A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Camino Forum Donation

Beyond SdC

Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
We are walking the CP from Porto this April. When we get to SdC we would like to walk some of the CI. Can we still stay in the alburges on the CP pasport or do we need another one from Santiago.
Also, is day one of the CP out of Porto really bad or just part of the Camino experience?
Thank you
 

Walli Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances '2009', Camino Portuguese from Porto '2015', Camino Ingles from Ferrol '2015', Finisterre and Muxia '2015'. Tentatively planning Camino from Granada '2017'.
When you leave Porto follow the river & up the coast to Matosinhos. A lovely way to start the Camino. Your credential will be fine. Buen Camino.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
As others have said, your credencial will be fine. In terms of the walk out of Porto, you haven't said which route you intend to walk. I'm assuming either the Central or the Coastal, as they tend to follow the northern route out of Porto that a lot of people have complained about. I can't speak to how bad that route out of Porto is, since I didn't walk it. If you choose to walk it you will find that it is part of your Camino experience. Some of those tough experiences we would never have chosen become memories that we cherish. Nevertheless, I chose the other route out of Porto, on the Senda Litoral. As Walli Walker said, you go down to the river from the Cathedral and then west along the river to the ocean and north along the seashore and boardwalk. It joins the Coastal route at Vila do Conde, if that is the route you are walking. If you are planning to walk the Central, from Vila do Conde you can turn right just after you cross the bridge and the entrance to the town and head east along a marked route to the Central, which it joins at Arcos, just before Rates.
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés (2014, 2018), Finisterre (2014, 2018) Primitivo (2015), Portuguese var routes (2017, 2018)
Yes! Walk along the river to Matosinhos. You will not regret it. For my photos of my lovely walk, without industry or lots of pilgrims, click here.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
Wow Elle,
Where did you get all this info and knowledge?! Seems you have a photographic memory or a voice recorder on constantly.
Thank you for ALL the info and emotional input.
 

Keyes

Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF May-June 2016
Francesco June-July 2017
Francigena July-August 2017
Portuguese July 2018
If you have time, start in Lisbon. The entire Camino Portuguese is a great walk, and there are several excellent stops between Lisbon and Porto. I agree with Walli and David. The Senda Litoral is a great way to begin the Coastal Route. I took that this year. Next time on the Portuguese I'll take the Central.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
That’s what I was thinking. I feel I should walk the CP from Porto and start on the central right out of Porto and not go costal for the first leg . I assume that is the route the original pilgrim took and I’m trying to stay as close to the spiritual aspect of this Camino as possible.
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés (2014, 2018), Finisterre (2014, 2018) Primitivo (2015), Portuguese var routes (2017, 2018)
Wow Elle,
Where did you get all this info and knowledge?! Seems you have a photographic memory or a voice recorder on constantly.
Thank you for ALL the info and emotional input.
Yes @Doug Delfeld I do lots of voice journaling! I pay attention, listen to others, and follow forums closely!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
Hi Elle, what kind of devices do you use for audio and video. It is so professional. Do you feel it altered your Camino experience? Good or bad overall.
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés (2014, 2018), Finisterre (2014, 2018) Primitivo (2015), Portuguese var routes (2017, 2018)
Thank you @Doug Delfeld I used only my galaxy note 8 for everything! Yes, it does distract from the experience, but for me it also helps me process.
 

Doogman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
My first time coming out of Porto I started at the cathedral and simply started following the yellow arrows through the city. I enjoy those urban walks. It gives you a small view of areas outside the tourist centre and a small glimpse of everyday life in the city. It’s all just part of the Camino.

As you get farther towards the north end of the city, you get into some more modern areas, which are not the most scenic IMHO. But as I said, I just take it as part of the journey.

I did it in 2013 so my memory is a little vague on the details, but I seem to recall that it was about 13-14 kms to get out of the urban areas and into the fields.

It may not be for everyone, but the excitement of being out on the trail again, plus the ability of seeing more of the city made it worthwhile for me. The route through the city was well marked with yellow arrows.

Have a great Camino, whichever route you choose!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
A big thx Elle.
That give me hope that even I who are technically challenged can do it. I’ve watched well over 500 videos and your even just the video not including all the text is far superior and helpful.
Blessing and Ultreia
 

peb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
when you say that you want to walk some of the Camino Ingles after arriving in Santiago, the Ingles stages nearest to Santiago are the most boring. The best stages are those at the start from Ferrol where you walk round the coast. You can take a bus from Santiago to Ferrol.

do not know who many days you have left over after finishing the Portuguese, but if you have not walked Santiago to Finisterre, I would look at that, over walking only part of the Ingles
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
Thanks Peb,
That’s good thinking. I’ve never walked SdC to Finistere. By the way, my Spanish is good but very little Portugués. Is that a problem?
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
By the way, my Spanish is good but very little Portugués. Is that a problem?
The languages are similar enough to allow you to read. In conversations, it works if people speak very slowly (however the Portuguese tend to eat a lot of the vowels). In Portugal most people speak a foreign language, so you will surely be able to get by with Spanish and English.

I took the train out of Porto during my CP, so can't help you with your first question. I had limited leave from work and opted for enjoying 2 lovely days walking around Porto and skipping the city exit walk.
 

Martyduc

Hunter Valley,Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 15,Portuguese 16,Finisterre Muxia 16,Ingles16,, Almeria to Muxia,Finesterre 18,,Camino 19 ??
That’s what I was thinking. I feel I should walk the CP from Porto and start on the central right out of Porto and not go costal for the first leg . I assume that is the route the original pilgrim took and I’m trying to stay as close to the spiritual aspect of this Camino as possible.
and it is no where near as bad as most seem to say ,,,, i found the central way perfectly ok ,,,
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Thanks Peb,
That’s good thinking. I’ve never walked SdC to Finistere. By the way, my Spanish is good but very little Portugués. Is that a problem?
You can cope with your Spanish although do not expect the Portuguese answer back in Spanish. .so you have to deal with a different language and also with a northern dialect with swallowed vowels. But the youngsters will speak english in common . the elderly people, if they do,will speak french .
Once crossed the border you will experience that there is another language the people speak, Gallego or Galician which is moreless similar to Portuguese, let say more to Portuguese than to Spanish (Castellano) .
For all my bookings for my next caminho in April I emailed in Portuguese but most of the time they answered me back in Gallego .

I walked the Caminho Português several times and I should advise you to leave Porto along the river Douro and Atlantic Ocean side untill Vila do Conde and then choose for the connection to the Central route by walking from there to São Pedro de Rates.
If you prefer to start directly on de Central route, I recommend you to take the metro in Porto to Póvoa de Varzim and step out at the station of Vilar do Pinheiro and walk from there. Soon you will arrive in a rural landscape on your way to São Pedro de Rates .

Passa bem e bom caminho
 
Last edited:

peb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
the walk from Santiago to Finisterre is all in spain, so if you speak spanish, you will be at a large advantage to many of the others who are walking the Finisterre camino.

There is a separate Finisterre type compostela which you can obtain. If you look at the Forum on this site named 'Santiago to Finisterre and Muxia', I am sure you will find where and how to obtain this and the separate pilgrims passport, as well as lots of other information on stages, where to stay, getting back to Santiago, etc.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
Thank you folks,
I appreciate the input. I’ve watched many videos on the central outof Porto and it looks a bit dangerous with the cars and no walking area. But I feel the central is more of the original Camino and I’m looking for as much authenticity as possible. I will miss the great seafood meals along the costal but I’m sure there will be plenty inland?🙏
Bom Caminho
 

Doogman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many more in the future (hopefully)
When I was walking out of Porto in 2013, I had the Brierley guide with me. The guide explained that there was a point where the route branched out, so there were two marked routes to continue north. The two routes met up on the edge of the city. The guide said that one route required the crossing of a busy road, so I gave that one a miss and took what was considered the "safer" route. I don't recall any concerns for safety on my way out of the city. I'll see if I can dig out the guidebook and provide more details.

The place where I do recall some concerns was on my second day. The route took me on a road with no shoulder, and high stone walls on either side. It was scary as cars came around the blind corners. It was not a long stretch, and I was glad to get through it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
Hey Doogman, thx for the input. I did see a video of the second day and those high walls and narrow roads with some tragic. Yes that could be a hazard!!
Blessings
 

OLDER threads on this topic


Book your lodging here

Booking.com


Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 37 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 133 15.6%
  • May

    Votes: 205 24.0%
  • June

    Votes: 60 7.0%
  • July

    Votes: 17 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 13 1.5%
  • September

    Votes: 254 29.8%
  • October

    Votes: 100 11.7%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.6%
Top