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Biking the Camino from Pamplona in Oct. 2016- Advice/Itinerary

DHeitch

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to bike Camino Oct. 2016
Hi,

I'm planning to fly to Pamplona in October and complete the journey to Santiago de Compostela in 12 days. A couple questions I would like to pose to others who've done a similar trip:
  • Rent bike or buy? I'm leaning towards renting because it sounds like the quality of rental bike is superior to the ones I'll be able to afford. I'd like to have the ability to lockout the suspension on a mountain bike and I don't think the cheaper mountain bikes I've read about people buying in Pamplona offer that. Has anyone rented in the last 12 months from Pamplona?
  • Itinerary? Does anyone have an itinerary for a 12-14 day trip between Pamplona and SDC they wouldn't mind sharing?
  • Backpack? I'd like to travel as light as possible with rain gear, a long pair of pants, shorts and three tshirts and toiletries. I'd like a bag that has a waterproof cover. Any recommendations?
Thanks in advance for your advice!
Daniel
 

AdaR

Wannabe Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
2015 biked CF; 2017 Portuguese by foot, bus, train (injury).
Daniel,
I am excited to think about your Camino, along with you.
I rented a hybrid bike from Bike Iberia last September. They delivered the bike to a hotel in Pamplona, and it was ready to go. That particular bike did NOT have lock out suspension, but it was a hybrid. They may have mountain bikes with the features you desire, and they were most helpful via email to help me with my rental options.
As for your itinerary, I cannot help you plan for only 12-14 days, as we had a full 3 weeks for our Camino, 19 riding days, with two zero days, one in Leon and one in Burgos. 14 days would have been a bit too aggressive for my riding ability.
Regarding a backpack, I'm not sure why you would want that on a bike. My rental came with full size waterproof panniers that were sufficient for way more gear than I brought along. The joy of biking the Camino rather than walking was not having to carry anything on my back. The bike was my sherpa! My pack list included: 1 water resistant cycling jacket, 2 pairs of bike shorts, 2 pairs of very lightweight, packable pants, 4 shirts, 1 pair of sandals, as well as biking shoes, undergarments, and toiletries. Oh, and a sleep sack for the albergues. All that fit into a small day pack for my travel to Pamplona. I stashed the pack in the bottom of the panniers and didn't use it again until I traveled back home.
Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
Hi,

I'm planning to fly to Pamplona in October and complete the journey to Santiago de Compostela in 12 days. A couple questions I would like to pose to others who've done a similar trip:
  • Rent bike or buy? I'm leaning towards renting because it sounds like the quality of rental bike is superior to the ones I'll be able to afford. I'd like to have the ability to lockout the suspension on a mountain bike and I don't think the cheaper mountain bikes I've read about people buying in Pamplona offer that. Has anyone rented in the last 12 months from Pamplona?
  • Itinerary? Does anyone have an itinerary for a 12-14 day trip between Pamplona and SDC they wouldn't mind sharing?
  • Backpack? I'd like to travel as light as possible with rain gear, a long pair of pants, shorts and three tshirts and toiletries. I'd like a bag that has a waterproof cover. Any recommendations?Thanks in advance for your advice! Daniel
Hola Daniel - I did this Camino Ride in Sept 2015. Yes I took longer - 21 days but if you are a competent rider then it can be done in 15 days. You might need to be a bit careful about route selection - either following the walkers camino or taking the road.
As to rent/buy/bring your own - over this period rent/hire comes out way in front - do some price comparison across the rental companies and see which one comes out better. If you need a bike with a pack-rack or hire panniers then include these costs in your hire price. Sorry I (personally) have not rented in Pamplona - I brought my own, however there is one bike shop in Pamplona that does rent - but you then need to factor in the cost of returning the bike to Pamplona. If you hire from (say) Bikeiberia then they will deliver to (your hotel) in Pamplona and will pick-up from either you accommodation in Santiago or from a recommended bike shop (say velocipedo or Motos Carballerio - do a google search for more info on these. I can recommend Velocidedo - they arranged the shipping of my bike back to Madrid). If you want more info on my ride do a search across my name or for a better report see posts from Newfydog. Once you have checked out our reports I will be happy to answer your specific questions.
You could use a backpack but I think panniers are a better option. As it can rain on the Camino from Sept/Oct onwards (especially west of Astorga) be sure to pack both a good rain coat and rain pants and a fleece (it can get cold at the Cruz de Fero at 1500 metres/4700 feet)..
Cheers
 

obinjatoo@yahoo.com

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Dieppe, FR Bici CF.
2014 Ruta Vasco/CF/Primativo
Why do you want to cycle the Camino? If it's a time constraint then go for it. I'm only asking because I both pedaled and walked on 2 different occasions. Cycling the Camino was a very different experience from walking it. I found walking gave me much more of the experience of pilgrimage.
Buen Camino
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
You'll find many opinions here. To me, the Camino is one of the finest bike trips in the world, but a very mediocre walk. With regard to "the experience of a pilgrimage", that is a personal thing, with both bikers and hikers showing a wide range of historical appreciation, religious beliefs etc..

You will be much happier on a bike with bike panniers instead of a backpack.
 

Aptrail

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Aug/Sept, 2016
Hospilatero May, 2018
Primativo May, 2018
Planning Hospitalero, 2019
I used to do a good bit of bike touring, with paniers, etc. Lately I have become convinced that, for me, bikepacking is more convenient. If you are taking minimal gear and clothes, a bikepacking rig with large behind the seat back and front sling is sufficient, easy and does not effect bike balance and handling. For example, check out the gear by revelate designs. Have a great trip.
 

PeterD1951

Member
Camino(s) past & future
First Camino May 2016
Could you please promise everyone that you will not ride your bike on footpaths marked SOLO PIETONAL.It was the most frustrating thing about my Camino. I could never understand why cyclists insisted on using the gravel footpaths parallel to an empty road either.

I should point out that when not walking I too am a cyclist, but I hope a more considerate one than many that we (almost literally) ran into!
 

Juanajoanna

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to bike spring 2017
Hi,

I'm planning to fly to Pamplona in October and complete the journey to Santiago de Compostela in 12 days. A couple questions I would like to pose to others who've done a similar
Daniel
Hi Daniel, I will be biking from Sevilla next Spring and joining the France's in Astorga. I would love to hear how your trip goes. Please update here once in a while.
Thanks
Joanne
 

Older Guy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis -May 2016 by bike---Loved it
I rented from"Cycling Rentals" In my opinion 12 days is too short. I started in Pamplona, had really horrible rain, cut my trip 450 mile by 100 miles by taking the train part of the way, and still took about 14 days. I could have done it in less, but I wanted to balance tourism, pilgrimage and church services, and talking to other pilgrims. 12 days will be an endurance event in my opinion.

I have done 205 miles (on a USA road trip) in 2 days, so you can do the 450 mile Camino in 12 days. but that would seem to some like an endurance event. If you are really in shape, want to totally avoid the trail, and are willing to put in a few really long days, you can do it in 12 days.

Remember to avoid "over use injuries" you need rest days. You will also need a few flex days for bad weather, unless you are extremely lucky. You might also want to spend a day or to in Pamplonea, Burgos, Leon, Santiago. A pilgrimage is not racing from point a to point b, it is a journey that you savor, reflect on and learn from.

A final thought that I see many avoiding is that for lots of folks, when you arrive in Europe you are jet lagged. I left myself 3 nights over and above my scheduled days to get over jet lag. The idea of being jet lagged and hopping on a bike for a two week marathon endurance event sounds like a sure way to get sick or have an accident.

A backpack is a really bad idea. Carry the weight on a bike rack over the rear wheel or on painners on either side of the rear wheel.....or send your pack ahead by taxi or courier is much better, especially if you really want to move fast over steep hills.

Good luck.
 
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Ajrk

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
Hi,

I'm planning to fly to Pamplona in October and complete the journey to Santiago de Compostela in 12 days. A couple questions I would like to pose to others who've done a similar trip:
  • Rent bike or buy? I'm leaning towards renting because it sounds like the quality of rental bike is superior to the ones I'll be able to afford. I'd like to have the ability to lockout the suspension on a mountain bike and I don't think the cheaper mountain bikes I've read about people buying in Pamplona offer that. Has anyone rented in the last 12 months from Pamplona?
  • Itinerary? Does anyone have an itinerary for a 12-14 day trip between Pamplona and SDC they wouldn't mind sharing?
  • Backpack? I'd like to travel as light as possible with rain gear, a long pair of pants, shorts and three tshirts and toiletries. I'd like a bag that has a waterproof cover. Any recommendations?
Thanks in advance for your advice!
Daniel
Hi Daniel
I recently completed my Camino on bicycle using Bicigrino as my rental option .They supplied an excellent Mountain bike with adjustable suspension and 29 inch wheels ( really makes A difference off road ) comes with panniers they delivered by Currier to Roncesvalles and they have a drop off zone in Santiago as for an itinerary you are on your own there as I took 28 days to complete mine with several 2 day stops along the way and I found it very challenging on most of the climbs over the Mountain area's where I had to push my bike rather than cycle but that said it was the best experience ever Good Luck
Alan
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
Why do you want to cycle the Camino? If it's a time constraint then go for it. I'm only asking because I both pedaled and walked on 2 different occasions. Cycling the Camino was a very different experience from walking it. I found walking gave me much more of the experience of pilgrimage. Buen Camino
I will agree the cycling pilgrim has a totally different outlook to the walking pilgrim, especially if you are cycling alone. You do not form those camino families that the walkers tend to do.

You'll find many opinions here. To me, the Camino is one of the finest bike trips in the world, but a very mediocre walk. With regard to "the experience of a pilgrimage", that is a personal thing, with both bikers and hikers showing a wide range of historical appreciation, religious beliefs etc..
You will be much happier on a bike with bike panniers instead of a backpack.
Its a bit hackneyed but each pilgrims camino is different - even when walking in a loose group, or cycling with partner or best friend. But seeing that friendly face from two days ago maybe all you need to make this day a success.
The one advantage that cyclists do have is the option of total rest days, or taking diversions - you know "spur of the moment decisions" - like going down to the museum at Atapuerca - it was about a 3 km round trip - not something that would attract a lot of walkers. Cheers
 

Lucky Sprite

Member
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean to Pamplona October (2014)
Pamplona to Logrono April (2015)
Logrono to ? JULY (2016)
Hi lucky you I came home from Cycling Logrono to Sarria over 5 days just 3 days ago and I'm longing to go back already. I cycled Pamplona to Logrono with my then 12 year old son last spring. We rented bikes in Pamplona Mundo rainte was the name of the shop. We picked our bikes and waterproof panier from the shop in Pamplona. Bikes were good quality and we just left them at our albergue in Logrono to be picked up. The service was good overall. We used John Brierleys guide and did a couple of stages a day on the trail. It was April so lovely and quiet. I travelled really light 2 pairs of cycling shorts with legwarmers a couple of base layers and rain coat and light pj's.
The trail from Pamplona is tough on the way up but rewarding at the top.
Going down is quite harrowing but we enjoyed it. The rest of the way to Logrono is very pleasant lots of undulating countryside.
From Logrono though this time round I lost my way a few times but I left at 1pm so no one else was on that section.
Just pay attention to the arrows!
This time I did 4/5 stages a day due to time constraints. I also opted for the road as it ran alongside the camino a lot of the time. There are a couple of days of steep climbing before
O Cebreiro but it is stunning - then downhill for ages :) Despite my expectations early July was quiet no shortage of accomodation and little conflict between walkers and cyclists mutual respect mostly. I hiked the first bit ST Jean to Pamplona and yes cycling is different but has many advantages and good if you are in a hurry.
Good luck
 

jaws101

Member
We biked from Roncesvalles 5 years ago. 60 year old male and 56 year old female. We started at the end of April and had some short days due to bad weather. We could probably have done the ride in two days less. These were our overnight stop.

Roncesvalles, Cizur Menor, Los Arcos, Azofra, Villafranca de los Montes de Oca, Burgos, Boadilla del Camino, Bercianos del Real Camino, San Martin del Camino, El Acebo, Las Herrerias, Triacastela, Palas de Rei, Santiago.

On most of the days we arrived in time for lunch.
 

DHeitch

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to bike Camino Oct. 2016
Thanks everyone for your replies and advice! I didn't expect such a flood of responses! This is all great info. I'll likely be booking my flight in the coming days. Can't wait to hit the camino!
 

Wiley Buckhorn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2016)
Hi,

I'm planning to fly to Pamplona in October and complete the journey to Santiago de Compostela in 12 days. A couple questions I would like to pose to others who've done a similar trip:
  • Rent bike or buy? I'm leaning towards renting because it sounds like the quality of rental bike is superior to the ones I'll be able to afford. I'd like to have the ability to lockout the suspension on a mountain bike and I don't think the cheaper mountain bikes I've read about people buying in Pamplona offer that. Has anyone rented in the last 12 months from Pamplona?
  • Itinerary? Does anyone have an itinerary for a 12-14 day trip between Pamplona and SDC they wouldn't mind sharing?
  • Backpack? I'd like to travel as light as possible with rain gear, a long pair of pants, shorts and three tshirts and toiletries. I'd like a bag that has a waterproof cover. Any recommendations?
Thanks in advance for your advice!
Daniel
I just finished biking from Pamplona to Leon a week or so ago. Rented from Bikeiberia and received a quality used mtn bike waiting for me at my hotel (Hotel Eslava) in good condition with Ortlieb panniers. I had a cheap 40 liter backpack which was a pain to stuff in the panniers. My companion brought a waterproof bag such as are used on river trips with shoulder straps and it rolled up nicely to fit in his panniers. We went too far each day and missed a lot on the trip. Next time I will ride less and enjoy more. We tried to stay on the path as much as possible, but I would suggest avoiding places like Alto de Perdon where the path is steep and covered with round rocks. Also, on steep descents, with a rocky gravel path there is a good chance of a fall or injury to a hiker. We pushed the bikes downhill, but not all did so. I found the hikers to be considerate and we did our best not to intrude on their hike, dismounting where appropriate and calling out in Spanish or English (con permiso - coming up on your left, etc.) when coming up behind them. I stayed mostly in hostels because I have a CPAP, but enjoyed the alberques more. The view is stunning, and the people are very kind.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
We biked from Roncesvalles 5 years ago. 60 year old male and 56 year old female. We started at the end of April and had some short days due to bad weather. We could probably have done the ride in two days less. These were our overnight stop. Roncesvalles, Cizur Menor, Los Arcos, Azofra, Villafranca de los Montes de Oca, Burgos, Boadilla del Camino, Bercianos del Real Camino, San Martin del Camino, El Acebo, Las Herrerias, Triacastela, Palas de Rei, Santiago. On most of the days we arrived in time for lunch.
WOW - One small question - where you on a Camino Pilgrimage or on a cycling tour? You appear to have missed (or omitted reference) to any rest days, but hey it was your holiday decision. Cheers
 

jaws101

Member
We didn't have/need any rest days and stopped to take many photos and look around places. Even tried the red wine fountain! We mostly rode only in the mornings so had all afternoon to rest up.

A couple of the days, ie from Las Herrerias over O Cebreiro was a very short day due to the horrendous weather. We arrived in Triacastela as people were peeking out of the door wondering whether they could leave or not!
 

Cambridge Pilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part walked / part cycled September 2014 SJPdP to SdC
Walked SJPdP to SdC summer 2017
We did Pamplona to Santiago in 12 stages as follows (showing end points for the day):

1: Cirauqui
2: Torres del Rio
3: Azofra
4: Ages
5: Castrojeriz
6: Real de Bercianos Camino
7: Astorga
8: Ponferrada
9: O'Cebreiro
10: Portomarin
11: Arzua
12: SdC

The first day was relatively short as it's a fairly tough climb up to Alto de Pardon. We took the road route down rather than the rocky descent. There are a couple of long-ish days around the meseta where it's flat and lots of road cycling alongside/close to the path. Our goal was to make Ponferrada with 4 days to go (approx 200km left) as we were confident of making it in our time constraints from there.

Regarding backpack vs panniers vs central rack carrier, I think it's a personal choice. If you're not used to riding with panniers then the Camino may not be the best place to start.

We hired bikes from Bikeiberia, asked them to leave the panniers off then just used a 15litre dry bag bungeed onto the rack over the rear wheel, keeping everything nice and central. If you are planning on travelling as light as you say then that should be more than enough. The bikes also come with a decent sized handlebar bag. We did also have a virtually empty rucksack but only because we walked the first three days from SJPDP. You won't need that if cycling only.
 
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newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
I would suggest avoiding places like Alto de Perdon where the path is steep and covered with round rocks. Also, on steep descents, with a rocky gravel path there is a good chance of a fall or injury .... We pushed the bikes downhill,
Regarding backpack vs panniers vs central rack carrier, I think it's a personal choice. If you're not used to riding with panniers then the Camino may not be the best place to start.
There is some good advice in here. I have seen far too many people end their bike trip early due to injury. Practice on a loaded bike is essential.

That said, I've seen a 60 year old woman ride a loaded bike both up and down the trail over Alto de Perdon without putting a foot down. I'm married to her.
 

DHeitch

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to bike Camino Oct. 2016
Thanks again everyone! I booked my flight to Pamplona today for Oct. 6! So excited!
 

Denee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2016
i am also planning my trip around that time! Great advice!! Maybe I ll see you on the Journey! Denee from Hawaii!
 

MikeC

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cycled SJPP to SDC September 2016
Starting Camino Ingles June 2018
I'm starting from SJPP on September 16th and hope to take about 16 to 18 days, using roads rather than the walkers trail and staying in a mix of alberbues and private rooms.
This will be my first Camino and also my first cycle tour so I am expecting the unexpected and will just see what happens.
Hope to see some of you along the way.
Burn
 

DHeitch

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to bike Camino Oct. 2016
So, I've set up my itinerary (you can view my custom Google Map here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=16-c3J5NQ5mBrg7dTocIqkQX3qlQ&usp=sharing). These are each of my stops (I start in Pamplona), with one rest day in Burgos:

1. Estella
2. Navarrete
3. Belorado
4. Burgos
5. Castrojeriz
6. Sahagun
7. Leon
8. Astorga
9. Ponferrada
10. O Cebreiro
11. Sarria
12. Palas de Rei
13. SDC

Anyone have advice on any of these stops? Should I avoid any of these places?

Also, while I'm in good physical shape, I'm not an experienced mountain biker. I'd like to avoid some of the tougher trails, by sticking to the road. Any advice for stretches to stick to the road? (someone posted above, that I should stick to the road for part of the bike to Estella from Pamplona... I'll def do that).

I've got my gear ready to go and I'll be travelling very light, with a 28L backpack (waterproof cover for it, and drybags inside for clothes, valuables) and will have paniers on the rental bike for additional storage (prob food) should I need it.
 

Seano

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances & Jacobeo. 2014 Vezelay
Hi,

I'm planning to fly to Pamplona in October and complete the journey to Santiago de Compostela in 12 days. A couple questions I would like to pose to others who've done a similar trip:
  • Rent bike or buy? I'm leaning towards renting because it sounds like the quality of rental bike is superior to the ones I'll be able to afford. I'd like to have the ability to lockout the suspension on a mountain bike and I don't think the cheaper mountain bikes I've read about people buying in Pamplona offer that. Has anyone rented in the last 12 months from Pamplona?
  • Itinerary? Does anyone have an itinerary for a 12-14 day trip between Pamplona and SDC they wouldn't mind sharing?
  • Backpack? I'd like to travel as light as possible with rain gear, a long pair of pants, shorts and three tshirts and toiletries. I'd like a bag that has a waterproof cover. Any recommendations?
Thanks in advance for your advice!
Daniel
Hi Daniel You probaly have all arrangments made by now, I just read your thread to day. If it's any help my web site www.seanoreilly.4t.com has all my Caminos. including a good description of Camino Frances and Fisterra. Its by road however. I skipped Pamplona as the alternative route from Ronchevelles is much nicer and I had visited Panplona previously. Best wishes and Buen Camino.
Sean
 

poogeyejr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, May 2011
Norte, Sept 2013
Started the Frances, 2017
Daniel,

How did the Camino go? Was it all you expected? How would you do it differently - now that you have had the experience?

Thank you,

Kathy
 

ShaLaw

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, fall of 2015
If the bike you eventually settle on doesn't have panniers or whatever they are called, you can always send your pack ahead using Jacotrans or another reputable pack carrier. If you do this, you must commit to where you sent your pack, however! We walked the camino in 2015 and decided to rent bikes to cross the meseta (167kms) which cut a 6.5 day walk down to a 2.5 day bike ride. Aside from sore bums, we loved that we chose to rent the bikes! You may also want to stick to the road for some of it. We did venture on the walking trails for some of it but that was kind of treacherous at times, due to the narrow paths and walking pilgrims.

Buen Camino!
 

wally

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
completed the camino frances in sept 2016 via bicycle (bicycletta)
ola migo
there have been so many good posts already. hope this brings you some new info

as to panniers, I purchased ortliebs and they worked just great. I bought mine through Amazon warehouse sale. You can also find these on e-bay.

as to how you are getting to SJPDP, you need to check the bus routes as I seem to recall that their schedules change about this time of year. In the unlikely event, you can't get a bus over to SJPDP, you can cab it over (est 70 euros - perhaps you can split the fare).

The climb out of SJPDP over to Pamplona is one of the more arduous for cyclists and don't be surprised if this section of the camino takes longer than anticipated.

as to your choice of clothing - packing raingear (jacket & pants) is a good idea. along with this, I'd pack a set of full-finger gloves as it is likely there will be one or two days that are cool in the mornings. Bring several large zip-type bags that you can keep in your panniers. In this way, you keep your dry stuff dry and your wet stuff separate from the dry stuff until you can get to a place where you can wash & dry the wet stuff.

If you are planning on making your journey in October, I'd also examine how you're set up for flashing lights - especially important on the rear of the bikes. You want to be visible if it's overcast or raining.

buen camino
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
I rented from"Cycling Rentals" In my opinion 12 days is too short. I started in Pamplona, had really horrible rain, cut my trip 450 mile by 100 miles by taking the train part of the way, and still took about 14 days. I could have done it in less, but I wanted to balance tourism, pilgrimage and church services, and talking to other pilgrims. 12 days will be an endurance event in my opinion.

I have done 205 miles (on a USA road trip) in 2 days, so you can do the 450 mile Camino in 12 days. but that would seem to some like an endurance event. If you are really in shape, want to totally avoid the trail, and are willing to put in a few really long days, you can do it in 12 days.

Remember to avoid "over use injuries" you need rest days. You will also need a few flex days for bad weather, unless you are extremely lucky. You might also want to spend a day or to in Pamplonea, Burgos, Leon, Santiago. A pilgrimage is not racing from point a to point b, it is a journey that you savor, reflect on and learn from.

A final thought that I see many avoiding is that for lots of folks, when you arrive in Europe you are jet lagged. I left myself 3 nights over and above my scheduled days to get over jet lag. The idea of being jet lagged and hopping on a bike for a two week marathon endurance event sounds like a sure way to get sick or have an accident.

A backpack is a really bad idea. Carry the weight on a bike rack over the rear wheel or on painners on either side of the rear wheel.....or send your pack ahead by taxi or courier is much better, especially if you really want to move fast over steep hills.

Good luck.
thanks mate i plan to start at saint jean and go to santiago in 3 weeks with rest days and taking my time steadily on a e bike but using no battery for last 200 kilometres and when i can use my legs to get used to pedaling so i be ready for the last 200. Then 6 days to go to fisterre and muxia and back to santiago 4 weeks with minimum 4 rest days :) what do you think mate? Buen Camino
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
thanks mate i plan to start at saint jean and go to santiago in 3 weeks with rest days and taking my time steadily on a e bike but using no battery for last 200 kilometres and when i can use my legs to get used to pedaling so i be ready for the last 200. Then 6 days to go to fisterre and muxia and back to santiago 4 weeks with minimum 4 rest days :) what do you think mate? Buen Camino
by the way what did you think of the company cycling rentals?
 

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