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Bladder vs water bottle

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
When the time is right
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
I carry a 1.5L Platypus in my Osprey Stratos 36 backpack. I prefer it because it’s centered, easily accessible and reusable. On a few of the longer stretches or on hot days, I carry an extra water bottle. I prefer the platypus brand because the zip-lock type closure makes it easy to clean.
 

SenorJacques

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
Have been grappling with this very same decision - between a 2.5 L Osprey bladder or two (very) lightweight 1 L Vapor collapsible water bottles - for my Camino next year, so will be watching this thread closely. I remember reading some feedback (maybe on this forum somewhere?) that hydration bladders require the kind of regular cleaning and disinfecting that might be difficult to maintain over a six week period on the road, and that the relative easy of finding potable water sources along the way for refills makes a compartively heavy hydration bladder system unneccessary to begin with. But from previous hiking experience, I know I like the convenience of being able to take regular sips of water without having to constantly hold a water bottle or take it out and return it to my pack. Will be interested to hear what others have to say about it!
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
When the time is right
Have been grappling with this very same decision - between a 2.5 L Osprey bladder or two (very) lightweight 1 L Vapor collapsible water bottles - for my Camino next year, so will be watching this thread closely. I remember reading some feedback (maybe on this forum somewhere?) that hydration bladders require the kind of regular cleaning and disinfecting that might be difficult to maintain over a six week period on the road, and that the relative easy of finding potable water sources along the way for refills makes a compartively heavy hydration bladder system unneccessary to begin with. But from previous hiking experience, I know I like the convenience of being able to take regular sips of water without having to constantly hold a water bottle or take it out and return it to my pack. Will be interested to hear what others have to say about it!
Im wondering how often bladders need cleaning ?!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sep/Oct 2018)
Camino Portugues (May 2021)
I remember reading some feedback (maybe on this forum somewhere?) that hydration bladders require the kind of regular cleaning and disinfecting that might be difficult to maintain over a six week period on the road,
I used a water bladder for 35 days on the CF with no issues. Empty and rinse at the end of each day, then refill at night. It's easy to use while walking and doesn't take that long to refill in the rare cases you run low. I also carried a separate bottle, but didn't fill it until midway through the day (keep the weight down). If I had a full bottle with an hour or so to go, I wouldn't bother refilling the bladder. You will find people who think the weight of a bladder is too much, or it's a pain to re-fill. I found it made it easier to stay hydrated because you can constantly be drinking without having to stop, or fuss getting your bottle in and out of your pack. If you think you're going to be drinking a lot, I would go with the bladder.

Buen Camino!
 

SenorJacques

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
Im wondering how often bladders need cleaning ?!!
Funny, but right after I posted my above comment I noticed that more threads about this topic showed up on the bottom of the page - and lo, a comment by @davebugg addresses this very issue:

Personally, I prefer Platypus Big Zip hydration reservoirs.

This post is written to dispel myths which are commonly used to try and claim that reservoirs are either less sanitary to use, or are less easy to use than bottles.

I'm NOT writing this post to suggest that I and others who prefer reservoirs are making the best and most superior choice; I am doing this to preempt those who misstate facts to claim that using hydration reservoirs is the WRONG way to go.

1. Sanitation. Bottles have no advantage. Reservoirs stay as sanitary. They do not require cleaning every day, nor do they need to be dried.

As with plumbing, it is the change of water and water flow through use that keeps things fresh. With normal use, both bladders and bottles are constantly refilled and emptied That keeps them sanitary UNLESS contaminated water is introduced, or other fluids with sugars (juices, energy drinks, soda pop, etc) are put into either storage container.

While working for the local public health district, I did a review of the literature, which I again did in 2016. Comparisons of bacterial contamination levels between bottles and hydration bladders were indistinguishable -- both had equally low rates of bacterial contamination. And both were at about equal risk for developing significant levels of bacteria and mold if not cleaned and dried properly prior to storage. In the last few years, the hydration reservoirs have become more modular in nature and have wider openings to access the water compartments, making it much easier to clean and prepare for storage than previous generations of the product.

One study, from 2009:
https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(09)70419-3/fulltext

When it is time to store bottles or bladders away for the season, they can be sanitized if desired with a bit of bleach added to the final rinse water during cleaning. It is not necessary, but there is no harm in doing so. Then they can be rinsed out and be allowed to dry.

Molds and other nasty things occur if either container is stored with water over a period of time, or have contained other fluids which might have sugars and not properly washed out prior to long term storage..
So I guess whatever I had read elsewhere about resevoirs needing to be cleaned thoroughly/disinfected regularly might have been misinformed? Lots to think about here!

(For the record - I plan on using an Osprey Manta 34 for my Camino, which includes a 2.5 L hydration pack that is stored in its own external compartment, which to me seems an improvement over bladders that are stored in the same main compartment with the rest of one's gear. Less chance of things getting wet while refilling that way. But if I end up convinced that seperate water bottles are "better" somehow than the hydration bladder, I may just remove it entirely and use that compartment as extra storage space - seems perfect for storing a light jacket or coverup.)
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
I rinsed my water bladder everyday and washed it every 3-4 days when I could. Filled it and reinstalled it the night before so I could leave the albergue early and quietly. BTW, if you fill the 2.5L bladder, that’s an extra 5.5lbs or 2.5kilos. Enjoy the planning and Buen Camino.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - León, Camino Frances (2012 - 2019)
Having tried both, I would prefer a bladder every time - 2.5 litres is enough for the hottest of days with maybe one top-up at most. Easy to use, no need to unsling your rucksack, you can use it as you walk along. I've never felt the need to disinfect during a trip, but sterilising tablets as used for baby's bottles will do the job, just leave a solution in for an hour. If possible, I fill the bladder the night before and leave it in a fridge overnight.
These items are now so cheap that I usually buy a new one every year on eBay.
 
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Rick M

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
April ('16,'18, '19)
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
The key here is the time of year you are walking. Having done the Camino a few times in April/May, I discovered that most days, I did not need to carry any water at all. With a handful of exceptions, you are rarely more than an hour away from a water source, bearing in mind that the nearest one may be behind you! On the days where there is a long dry stretch, I just fill up my collapsible water bottle with whatever I will need for that stretch, which depends on the temperature that day. The collapsible water bottle comes in handy in some bars/albergues where the sinks are sooooo shallow that its hard to refill a PET bottle, although its really just a convenience.

The bottom line is that if you like to sip from a bladder, by all means take one. You do not need it though, and every ounce of extra weight increases your chances of foot issues. A PET bottle costs nothing and weighs nothing, especially when its empty.

Buen Camino
 

SenorJacques

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
You do not need it though, and every ounce of extra weight increases your chances of foot issues.
And that's my main concern about using a hydration bladder. Even when it's empty it weighs about 6 oz. - where the collapsible Vapur bottles I use weigh about 2 oz.

 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
No! No! No! (I am shouting at myself) - don't get involved .. this subject has come up before, don't get involved ... so I won't, not at all.
I shall not mention that with water bottles you can share with another pilgrim, nor that you can offer water to a thirsty cat or dog, nor that you can water dying plants .... nor that with a bottle you actually have to stop, shuck off the rucksack, enjoy the view as you drink, rather than banging along sucking at a tube and never stopping to, well, just be there .... nor that you can empty water out of a bottle over your head, or soak a neckerchief with it to wipe your skin, or soak your hat to keep you cool, or wash a wound, or even put out a small fire.. nor that a half filled clear bottle placed next to you in sunlight will keep flies away .... no, I will mention none of this ...

Nope!! - I will not mention any of these obvious virtues of a bottle over a bladder - nothing shall pass my lips, or be typed by me - this time I shall not get involved!!

So there!! ;)
 
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nickymd1

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdN + Fisterra 2017
Jakobsweg (Imperii + Regia) | BER-Leipzig-Naumburg 2018
Burgos-SdC 2019
On my CdN in summer 2017 I had a 1.5L bladder and on my CF this year I had a aluminium bottle with a 'straw head' such that I could sip as I went, as one does with a bladder. I'll never walk a Camino without the ability to sip as I walk, regardless of the time of year, plus unless your pack makes it easy to get the bottle in and out when you're walking alone, it's a massive pain.

I made the switch for Camino 2 because my pack makes getting a full bladder back into it difficult, so refilling during the day was tough. That being said, I missed the 'centred-ness' of a bladder, and will be going back to a bladder when next I hike/walk. I also carry a light, foldable 500ml bottle for grabbing extra water on hot or dry days, as well as to prevent the need to refill at coffee stops - I can just fill my bottle and drink what I need to keep hydrated. I drink 4+L a day when walking, more when it's particularly hot, but would still stick to a 1-1.5L bladder to keep weight down.

Edit: Also, if you're just using it for water, I see no reason why you would need to clean your bladder more often than you would a regular water bottle.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Like @David, I won't say that it's all been said before. I carry a 2 li bladder and a 500/600 ml plastic bottle. Both get filled in the morning, although for shorter days I might only 3/4 fill the bladder. When the bladder runs out, the bottle is decanted into the bladder. I then refill the bottle at the next opportunity. If the source is potable, the bladder can be refilled too, otherwise I treat the water in the bottle with a purification tablet.

I give the bladder a good clean before multi-day trips, and then rinse only every week or so. If needed, I will soak for a couple of hours using a denture cleaning solution.

If you run out of water in your 500ml bottle, you might want to run into David, not me. I might think your poor preparation is not my emergency! Genuine emergencies, on the other hand, will get sympathetic treatment and help.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April / May (2016) CF
I used 1 vapor collapsible bottle for my May Camino. I carried a 2nd one as a spare but never needed it. I clipped it to my chest strap so never had to remove my bag to get to my water.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Im wondering how often bladders need cleaning ?!!
It needs to be cleaned when you return home before you store it, provided you only use plain fresh water in it. Just like the pipes in your house don't require regular cleaning so long as fresh water is run through them, neither does your water bladder.
 

caminoagogo

http://camino-a-go-go.blogspot.com/
Camino(s) past & future
Francés from Leon(2014)
Frances & Sanabres from Ourense (2018)
Portugués (2020)
I've tried both and prefer a 1L Nalgene water bottle over the bladder. I can see how much is left, refill it quickly at any of the fountains, restaurants etc. and can share it easily with other pilgrims should the need arise. Plus it was super-easy to fill up from the wine fountain too :)
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(10,11,17), Vasco(12), Salvador(13), CP(13), CN(14), Madrid (16), Mozarabe (18), VdlP(19)
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍

I always use water bottles. I have a problem believing bladders remain clean during a month long walk. I do not want to get sick or have the issue of frequent maintenance on my bladder during my walk.

Joe
 
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jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF x 3
I use a 2-litre bladder and carry a collapsible water bottle for extra if needed. One benefit I’ve found is that the bladder tube on my shoulder strap reminds me to drink water all throughout the day and if I drink less than 2 litres a day I am reminded to give myself a stern talking to at the end of the day.

Besides that, my math suggests we shouldn’t be buying single-use bottled water (300,000 pilgrims x 10 days* x 2 1-litre bottles a day = 6,000,000 single-use bottles a year that need to be disposed of) when perfectly good water runs from most taps/fountains and as mentioned above, if one is worried a purification tablet should take care of that. Sorry, off the soap box now!

* absolutely pure guesswork as to the average number of days Pilgrims are on the trail but one has to start somewhere...
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
For those interested, I have reposted some information that I had written earlier.
————————————

This post is written to dispel myths which are commonly used to try and claim that reservoirs are either less sanitary to use, or are less easy to use than bottles.

I'm NOT writing this post to suggest that I and others who prefer reservoirs are making the best and most superior choice; I am doing this to preempt any misstated facts being used to claim that hydration reservoirs is the WRONG way to go.

1. Sanitation. Bottles have no advantage. Reservoirs stay as sanitary. They do not require cleaning every day, nor do they need to be dried.

As with plumbing, it is the change of water and water flow through use that keeps things fresh. With normal use, both bladders and bottles are constantly refilled and emptied That keeps them sanitary UNLESS contaminated water is introduced, or other fluids with sugars (juices, energy drinks, soda pop, etc) are put into either storage container.

While working for the local public health district, I did a review of the literature, which I again did in 2016. Comparisons of bacterial contamination levels between bottles and hydration bladders were indistinguishable -- both had equally low rates of bacterial contamination. And both were at about equal risk for developing significant levels of bacteria and mold if not cleaned and dried properly prior to storage. In the last few years, the hydration reservoirs have become more modular in nature and have wider openings to access the water compartments, making it much easier to clean and prepare for storage than previous generations of the product.

One study, from 2009:
https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(09)70419-3/fulltext

When it is time to store bottles or bladders away for the season, they can be sanitized if desired with a bit of bleach added to the final rinse water during cleaning. It is not necessary, but there is no harm in doing so. Then they can be rinsed out and be allowed to dry.

Molds and other nasty things occur if either container is stored with water over a period of time, or have contained other fluids which might have sugars and not properly washed out prior to long term storage..

2. Ease of Use. I find it personally easier to raise the mouth tube on my shoulder strap to drink from. I do not like to reach around to a side pocket, or even need to take off my pack to do so. I definitely do NOT like stuff hanging on my shoulder straps like bottles of water.

Again, this is personal preference, not an issue of something being 'better'. Access water bottles is not an issue of usability for bottle users.

3. Weight. Here is where two major claims are made, one is correct and the other is not.

A typical empty 2 liter reservoir weighs around 4 ounces. The equivalent in bottles around 1.5 to 3 ounces. Depending on bottle material used, though, bottles can weigh up to 8 ounces.

So while it is correct that bottles can weigh less, it is not a significant issue of consideration with overall backpack weight.

The other issue is capacity and weight.

No, one does not have to fill a reservoir to the tippy top. I will carry as much water as I need to carry from water source to water source. So regardless of container used, water weight is related to the individual's decision about how much to carry, and NOT on a container's capacity.

4. Refills. This is actually a subheading under 'ease of use', but it is frequently pointed to as why bottles are better than reservoirs.

I can refill my reservoir in 30 seconds without even removing my backpack. One does not need to pull a reservoir out of the pack. It is a matter of using a quick disconnect system which is a simple and cheap add on accessory.

For those interested in adding a quick disconnect adapter to your hydration reservoir/bladder, I've added a link below. With the quick disconnect added, I don't even need to remove my pack to do a quick and easy refill of the bladder.

The video shows the quick disconnect being used with a water filter as it might be used for wilderness backpacking. It is the way I have it set up when I am backpacking. However, on camino I leave off the filter altogether. Instead of the filter being added to the refill cap on the flexible water bottle, skip the filter and screw the refill adapter cap -- sans filter -- to the bottle after it is filled with water.

For refill bottles.... I use extremely lightweight collapsible bottles that can hold up to 2 liters. Empty, they roll down to a small bundle that are easily stashed in an outside pocket.

Many times, I will carry 1/2 liter in the bottle as a quick backup if the weather or the distance between water refills dictates. So if I decide to, say, carry 1.5 liters on a longer stretch between water resupply points, I will fill the reservoir with 1 liter, and then carry 1/2 liter in the bottle and keeping the bottle partially collapsed. That also assures me that I do not need to visualize the amount in the reservoir to be assured of adequate water. :)

The refill container in the video is just one option. The refill adapter can also fit on a variety of bottled water containers, if so desired.

So those are the major issues that always seem to come up. There are other myths, but those are the major ones. :)



L
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
All of the above suggestions and ideas are very good. Basically, ask 3 pilgrims, you will get 10 answers / opinions. Here are my three cents worth, for what it is worth...

In 2013, I started using a 2 liter Osprey bladder system. It weighed 11 oz empty.

After the first several days, I realized that it was FAR easier to rely on several .5 liter water bottles. Also, 11 ounces for the empty bladder system is HEAVY, relatively speaking. Empty .5 liter water bottles weigh maybe one ounce, with the cap on...

Not only do small water bottles come pre-filled with clean water, but the bottles can be reused until you can no longer deal with the accumulated grunge of perhaps several weeks reuse. Then you simply recycle the bottle responsibly and buy new .5 liter bottles, pre-filled with water.

In my case, I have a unique medical condition requiring that I premix protein powder nutritional supplements with water several times daily. Multiple .5 liter bottles made this easy, if a bit OCD.

There are also a myriad ways to carry these small bottles. There are stainless steel and / or plastic clips available to hang the bottles on your rucksack harness, lashing methods, described here in the forum, various belt holders and pouches, large cargo pants pockets, and the side pockets of your rucksack. Where there is a will, there are multiple ways... just sayin...

Fast forward, over six Caminos, to 2019. I rediscovered bladders. I now have a NEW style, WIDE mouth, Osprey 1.5 liter bladder system. It has design improvements which make it better than my original effort from six years before.

The wide mouth make it easy to fill, empty, and rinse. Cleaning is made SOOO much easier. The tubing also comes with quick disconnects, which makes refilling enroute easier, as only the bladder needs to be removed for filling, rinsing or cleaning.

Oh, the new bladder system weighs only 5 ounces when empty. This is a net improvement over the older system.

Bottom line, I have tested the new design, smaller bladder system on local walks here in Florida. I will plan to use it on my hoped for 2020 Camino. We shall see what happens.

Like others above have related, the bladder will be planned as my main, plain water supply. I will continue to use one or two small .5 bottles for either flavored drinks, my protein powder nutritional supplements, hydration mixes, or for an extra plain water supply if the circumstances and distances dictate.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Invierno (2019)
Camino Frances (2021)
No! No! No! (I am shouting at myself) - don't get involved .. this subject has come up before, don't get involved ... so I won't, not at all.
I shall not mention that with water bottles you can share with another pilgrim, nor that you can offer water to a thirsty cat or dog, nor that you can water dying plants .... nor that with a bottle you actually have to stop, shuck off the rucksack, enjoy the view as you drink, rather than banging along sucking at a tube and never stopping to, well, just be there .... nor that you can empty water out of a bottle over your head, or soak a neckerchief with it to wipe your skin, or soak your hat to keep you cool, or wash a wound, or even put out a small fire.. nor that a half filled clear bottle placed next to you in sunlight will keep flies away .... no, I will mention none of this ...

Nope!! - I will not mention any of these obvious virtues of a bottle over a bladder - nothing shall pass my lips, or be typed by me - this time I shall not get involved!!

So there!! ;)
You can do all that with a bladder 🥰🤞🥰
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I carry an 8 ounce bottle and fill it up in every village when needed.
I've never had any problems finding water on the Meseta?
I worry more about getting sick from a dirty bladder.
The bottle is easier to clean for my purposes.
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
I use water bottles. As I can't access a bottle from the rucksack pocket easily, I use a bottle holder which I hang from my rucksack belt to allow to drink frequently without taking my rucksack off.

I used bladders regularly whilst living in the Middle East, where I used to go out walking regularly, and my experience there left me loathing the things despite their practicalities. We would spend about an hour scrambling up a rocky wadi in heat of well over 30 degrees, spend a bit of time at our destination then scramble back down again. Keeping hydrated whilst staying safe would have been quite a problem without using a bladder, but how I loathed the thing! The water in the hose over my shoulder was always warm and tasted disgusting, whilst keeping the thing clean was so difficult (water purity issues?). It was generally agreed that the only way to keep the hose clean between weekly walks was to put it in the freezer after washing. So I never seriously considered taking one on the camino where I anticipated somewhat similar conditions at times!

Also, too many people I know have had serious leaks from a bladder incorrectly assembled and I did not want to run the risk of a wet backpack.
 

Kev

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept-Oct 2015
Camino Portuguese Sept-Oct 2018
Camino Portuguese Oct 2020
For my 2015 and 2018 Camino treks I used the Blue Desert SmarTube Hydration System (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000GM6LWS/?tag=casaivar02-20). It has the convenience using a hydration tube which just hooks right up to my regular water bottle. Anytime my water bottle started looking a little iffy, I would just get a new one at the nearest bar. Whenever I would stop I would either top off one water bottle from my other one or just switch the tube to the second bottle.
As a bonus I could take my bottle at the end of the day and put the regular sports cap on it, giving me a regular water bottle for the rest of the day and night.
 

c0484

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
It is largely a matter of personal preference. I wear an Osprey belly pack with 2 one liter bottles. I do that because I refill the bottles every time I come to a water fountain. It is a quick and easy process, whereas the bladder is a bit more complicated and time consuming.
 

VictorE

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis twice
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
I use water bottles but after recent portuguese Camino when my friend used bladder. I am thinking of switching
 

Simon B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles and Camino Frances. VDLP Spring 2019
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
I had the same debate a few years ago. I eventually decided I preferred a couple of .75 litre bottles. My issue with bladders is you do not know how much is left. With a bottle you can gauged how much you have with how far you have to go. There are plenty of fountains to fill up en route. I always drink at least half a litre before setting off in the morning and indulge at an fountain.
 

Maggie5859

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primitivo, Sevilla, Sanabres, Via Augusta, Finisterre, Muxia
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
 

Maggie5859

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primitivo, Sevilla, Sanabres, Via Augusta, Finisterre, Muxia
Hello. I bought Raidlight water bottle holders that fit on the straps of my Osprey pack. I find this perfect!easy to clean and to refill. Worked on Via de la Plata.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
We have used bottles on every Camino - the lightweight aluminium type - are from Moountain Warehouse. They might seem a little expensive but we have had them for 10 years now. Often on offer which makes them reasonable considering how long they last.
Easy to fill, fit in the side pockets of our packs and we can see how much is left easily. We are the 'stop and look at the view while having a drink' types, not 'sip on the go'.
We prefer to use the bladder pouch for paperwork, credenciales etc, the latter in a zip-lock bag with the top folded over to be outside the pocket which stops it sliding down and leaves it easy to access.
.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I have had a lot of hazzle with filling bladderes every day, as it requires having an almost empty rucksack before installing.
But as the last two years´ trips were on the VdlP where long stretches were without proper water, I have stuck to Osprey version, the one w the large cap. Which needs proper threading every time...
What I did was leaving the bladder in the fridge over night, so the bacterial climate was optimum during most of the day ....
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up.
@Dani7 (#1), like @Kev (#27) I also use Blue Desert.

Starting in 2012 I just used a bottle. Like others found the inconvenience of stopping and shucking the pack etc was inconvenient. Got a bladder (only one brand available here) which worked OK for day trips.

My Damascus moment was on day 3 of a 4 day trip in 2015. It was a hot day and I needed a refill after a few hours. A large fast-food outlet came into view: the manager was most accommodating (he was a tramper and had the same brand bladder). Experienced as he was it took him much fiddling and left a mess on the bench.

It was then I discovered the Blue Desert system. USD 20 for all three items and I supply the bottle. In late 2019 I am using the same bottle I used throughout all my trips in 2018, including to Europe.

On the Meseta (mid May 2017) I still had water left at the end of each day, bar one.

For me the advantages include:
1) peace of mind - no water inside my pack
2) weight - all up (bite, tube, screw top and bottle) weigh 120 grams (4 oz)
3) water level - easily noted when I do shuck the pack
4) no need to over fill, just in case
5) fruit drinks - I stuffed up once - replaced the tube at a building supplies - "boiled" the bite and top
6) simplicity at home - all items go in my freezer awaiting next time
7) simplicity en route - a quick rinse and refill is more than adequate

Total weight is important for me. For non Camino trips I also carry a tent system (1 kg) and some rations (north of 0.5 kg). With 1 litre of water, tent and food, my pack totals 7.5 kg, which I have become accustomed to (33 training day trips so far this year totaling 800 km, average of 24 km each) but would not like much more.

So, @Dani7 , kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
When the time is right
It is largely a matter of personal preference. I wear an Osprey belly pack with 2 one liter bottles. I do that because I refill the bottles every time I come to a water fountain. It is a quick and easy process, whereas the bladder is a bit more complicated and time consuming.
I checked out that system. Looks functional but how did you feel with that weight in the front?
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
When the time is right
Hello. I bought Raidlight water bottle holders that fit on the straps of my Osprey pack. I find this perfect!easy to clean and to refill. Worked on Via de la Plata.
I will check that out. Thank you 😊
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
meaning, ice cold for the most part of the day, and so ensuring bacteria would not proliferate.
The clothes in the backpack ensured insulation from the heat....
I found the inside clean even efter quite some days.
- As a comparison I have felt the inside when they were not "clean" from bacteria....
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
This question has no answer as such.........only lots of personal experiences and preferences. Like Poles or not, boots or runners......... So I'll throw in another opinion for what it's worth :cool: And Yes have tried both options............ Described here with pictures.

 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
strictly for wine ....
Unfortunately I could only afford to fill mine with water in the 80s. Used it for many years in various parts of the world, and still have it, the goat hair is a bit worn but, if it still works I'll take it next year on the frances, if not I'll buy a replacement. I might even be able to afford some wine this time.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Unfortunately I could only afford to fill mine with water in the 80s. Used it for many years in various parts of the world, and still have it, the goat hair is a bit worn but, if it still works I'll take it next year on the frances, if not I'll buy a replacement. I might even be able to afford some wine this time.
I bought a beauty for 26Euro in a hardware store, resin lining...
It is possible to restore lining by adding varm water to the Bota, and rinse.....
 

Sixwheeler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
I've always used a bladder and carry an extra bottle if I need it. Wash it out most days and give it a thorough wash every few days a d leave it nearly full overnight with half a Milton tablet in it, tastes foul next day if you don't wash it out well in the morning.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
meaning, ice cold for the most part of the day, and so ensuring bacteria would not proliferate.
The clothes in the backpack ensured insulation from the heat....
I found the inside clean even efter quite some days.
- As a comparison I have felt the inside when they were not "clean" from bacteria....
I'm sorry, but I don't think that your method would hold up to scientific testing.
 

William Krueger

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Porto (2018)
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
I use a bladder. However, I neglected cleaning while on the Portuguese. It became unusable due to an algae growth

Used it again on the Beara in Ireland. Payed attention to cleaning and was successful. Also with the bladder it is easy to add electrolytes.

Buen Camino
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
When the time is right
Hello. I bought Raidlight water bottle holders that fit on the straps of my Osprey pack. I find this perfect!easy to clean and to refill. Worked on Via de la Plata.
Looking to see where to source in Canada. Not available from Canadian amazon site. 🤨
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I'm sorry, but I don't think that your method would hold up to scientific testing.
my Gawd, I was so wrong to post, I see that now, this is is a discussion of attrition.
Scientific, my foot. I know a cold, even icy water bladder goes longer before I need to clean it...
 

Karenmc49

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
No pasts...want to plan the Camino for May 2018
Before my first Camino, I , like so many others, debated with myself and read every thread on this bladder/ bottle dilemma.
I hike quite a lot in the heat of Northern Australia so I’m quite aware of my hydration requirements and always have a hydration bladder but I kept reading about the abundance of water fountains etc, and finally made my decision.
I took a lightweight cup. Nothing else. I sat and had a lovely drink often, and watched people filling their bottles, and bladders etc, only to walk on and stop to drink from them a little further on..didn’t make a whole lot of sense to me!
I’ve just returned from my 3rd Camino now, and my faithful cup has accompanied me each time.
I think the only time I was “ looking” for a drink was a 35 km day in 38 degree Celsius heat.
As with so many of these issues, there’s no right or wrong..don’t overthink it.
 

Bilbo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
none in the past 1 september
2 of us were fine with 2 half litre bottles between us ,however we did the roman road right hand branch of the meseta ,very hot day and no other pilgrims on the route and ended up waterless by the end (just dumb planning on my part) Also one of the best days on the camino (although i ended up with a shin splint ,didnt even know what one was )
 

SeaHorse

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015 (SJPDP-Finisterre), planning Norte
I had 2 0,75 l plastic bottles bought filled with water in a grocery store. Soon they became one 0,75 as water bottle, one 0,75 as vino tinto bottle (you can buy the best wine in shops stored on low shelves with next to no labels for next to no price), and added one 0,3 l water bottle. Never run out of water. There are refill places everywhere.
My biggest objection to a bladder is that it does allow to sip water without stopping and that would mean I just go on till I drop. I need to stop, take off the backpack, sit on the sitting pad, drink enough water, enjoy the scenery and a mouthful of wine, chocolate, orange, hard cheese.
Filling up on the go is ok for some kinds of airplanes not for people. My biggest culture shock was to see people actually buy COFFEE on a street corner and drink it while walking :eek: Not in Spain, no.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
my Gawd, I was so wrong to post, I see that now, this is is a discussion of attrition.
Scientific, my foot. I know a cold, even icy water bladder goes longer before I need to clean it...
Sorry if I sounded harsh.
I walked around 42 days on my Camino this year and never washed my water bladder. So long as you keep adding new fresh water daily you shouldn't have any trouble with bacteria, regardless of the temperature.
 

Mike Blackard

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF -Sept.-Oct 2018 , CF Aug- Oct 2019
(CF or VdlP summer/fall 2020)
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
I just finished my 2nd Camino Frances. Last year from Sept. 5th to October 10, this year from August 28th to October 5th. Both times walked with Osprey 36 and both times with a 2.5 liter bladder. With my Osprey, it was next to impossible to get to a water bottle on either side in the mesh pockets. I had to take back pack off or have someone else get it out for me. The bladder was nice for several reasons - 1) Easy to drink from while walking. My hose has a magnetic button which sticks to pack's chest strap, making it easy to access and store when done. I would twist the valve to OFF when done with pack each day (to stop potential leaking on floor) and twist valve back to OPEN and leave open all day while walking.
2) Easy to refill. Sometimes I would pull bladder out of pack and refill in sink, and sometimes I would refill while still in backpack. With just a little care this can be done with no spillage. Usually I would unsnap the strap which holds the bladder in place and pull the bladder up a few inches so the "fill neck" was easily controlled.
3) Never bothered to clean or even rinse out. Just added more water every morning. 2.5 liters weighs 5 pounds! This year I would only fill with 1.5 ish liters at a time and top off in afternoon to the 1.5 level.
4) By staying hydrated, I never had leg cramps (a common occurance at home, early morning in bed) and I never felt really hungry (lost 15 lbs each camino) and I was never super tired. Last year was definitely warmer than this year. Drank more last year. Also, discovered the joy of drinking a Radler in mid day. (1/3 lemon soda, 2/3 beer - about 3% alcohol and 100% refreshing!)
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2018}
Hello Camino community 😀

I’m debating about buying a 2L bladder for my Osprey backpack or just bring a water bottle and fill up. Although most stages have easy access to potable water...a couple of stretches on the Meseta do not. I’m wondering about functional and practical features of both. Should I have both? For those who used the bladder did you find it easy to refill or a pain in the 🤬. I’m walking early spring ending mid may.

Your experience and feedback are invaluable in this planning stage of my Camino. Thanks to all 👍
Pain in the *** Only a couple of stretches where water not readily available. I carry one good water bottle then buy bottled water for long stretches to supplement. Bottled water can be refilled at fountains then disposed off (properly) after a couple of days. A couple of elastic cords attached to the shoulder strao pf rucksack keep the bottled water safe and handy to get at. Not sure how to clean out bladders but seems an effort more than its worth
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
When the time is right
I just finished my 2nd Camino Frances. Last year from Sept. 5th to October 10, this year from August 28th to October 5th. Both times walked with Osprey 36 and both times with a 2.5 liter bladder. With my Osprey, it was next to impossible to get to a water bottle on either side in the mesh pockets. I had to take back pack off or have someone else get it out for me. The bladder was nice for several reasons - 1) Easy to drink from while walking. My hose has a magnetic button which sticks to pack's chest strap, making it easy to access and store when done. I would twist the valve to OFF when done with pack each day (to stop potential leaking on floor) and twist valve back to OPEN and leave open all day while walking.
2) Easy to refill. Sometimes I would pull bladder out of pack and refill in sink, and sometimes I would refill while still in backpack. With just a little care this can be done with no spillage. Usually I would unsnap the strap which holds the bladder in place and pull the bladder up a few inches so the "fill neck" was easily controlled.
3) Never bothered to clean or even rinse out. Just added more water every morning. 2.5 liters weighs 5 pounds! This year I would only fill with 1.5 ish liters at a time and top off in afternoon to the 1.5 level.
4) By staying hydrated, I never had leg cramps (a common occurance at home, early morning in bed) and I never felt really hungry (lost 15 lbs each camino) and I was never super tired. Last year was definitely warmer than this year. Drank more last year. Also, discovered the joy of drinking a Radler in mid day. (1/3 lemon soda, 2/3 beer - about 3% alcohol and 100% refreshing!)
I tried my Osprey pack yesterday and hiked for two hours for the first time. Could never have reached the side pockets to grab the bottle. Had a foldable bottle hooked to my front shoulder strap. Not ideal. Appreciate your input.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
My peeve with the bladder was that I always seemed to get a pool of water on the floor when the hose got trodden on/kinked/who knows what. And that pool of water made my pack wet. I am sure it could have been avoided with more care on my part, but there you go. I am careless. Another issue was not being able to tell how much water I had left.
Now I use water bottles. I like to be able to drink without having to take off my pack so I use a front pack, or put 2 x 500ml water bottles inside the super large pockets of my hiking skirt.
 

Don Camillo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17,
Ruta de la Lana 09/18
2 lt bladder everytime. Water is stored close to back of the pack so weight is better distributed. Experience has shown me that cold water stored in the bladder stays cool well into the day - as opposed to in a bottle where it soon heats up. The drinking tube is convenient no messing around trying to get a water bottle back into the side pockets. The one that I use - sourced from ebay - has never leaked and has now been used for various trips over last two years or so.
I still carry a half litre water bottle ( supermarket) which also stays with me on camino but drink from this first.
Walking this September along the Mozarabe I found that I was drinking well in excess of 2lt's of water most days so apart from the other reasons I have mentioned on capacity grounds alone I would go with a water bladder everytime.
Don
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Sorry if I sounded harsh.
I walked around 42 days on my Camino this year and never washed my water bladder. So long as you keep adding new fresh water daily you shouldn't have any trouble with bacteria, regardless of the temperature.
what hits my box of incendiary flares is the queri for scientific backing, when in fact what we are doing here is dicussing best practise view points.
I too do not really care about the absolute stringest water quality of bladder water, when studies show that bottled water do contain some foreign matters, so I will gladly take the risk and do not feel the need to scrub the bladder every day...
 

timr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
Im wondering how often bladders need cleaning ?!!
I’m a physician, retired, with considerable practical experience in diarrhoeal and other waterborne diseases. I used a bladder for over 6 years, without ever cleaning it, and with no ill effects. I did keep meaning to clean it....;) But I don’t know how. Water is water is water. I never clean the pipes at home either.
I got a new one after that. I have never cleaned it in two years.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I understand that a reservoir makes it easy to stay hydrated; but, isn’t it an issue of personal discipline or decision making on how often one chooses to stop? 🙂
Some of us know our level of personal discipline and, where it is lower than we might like, use our decision making capacity to hack things to get us to do what we really want to do but may not have the discipline to do "in the moment" - like deciding to use water bottles to force us to pause. :)
 

HikeTall

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Haven't walked the Camino yet. But I've hiked all over this beautiful planet and hope to walk the Camino in the near future.
When i bike, i use a bladder, because i dont fill my back pack with gear when i bike. But when i hike, my pack is full of gear so it gets crowded to squeeze a bladder in, making it hard to get in & out. So when i hike, i use water bottles. But to be honest, i do prefer hydration bladders.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I regularly backpack in the Rockies, and it's bladder all the way there.

However, I find bottles preferable on the Camino given how easy it is to refill at a local bar, fuente, etc. I have little issue getting access to them in my pack side pockets, which is a top-three consideration from my perspective.

I also often add some morning juice and the remnants of the prior night's wine in with water in one of the bottles. It helps keep my morning energy up, especially before second breakfast. I'm good with rinsing it for hygiene, and after a few days will recycle it and replace it with a new bottle, switching to the other bottle for my juice/wine.

Twice I've found someone with low/no water on a long stretch (where I always carry extra) and I have shared with them. The bottle makes this easier and faster than a bite clip on a bladder.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Fast forward, over six Caminos, to 2019. I rediscovered bladders. I now have a NEW style, WIDE mouth, Osprey 1.5 liter bladder system. It has design improvements which make it better than my original effort from six years before.

The wide mouth make it easy to fill, empty, and rinse. Cleaning is made SOOO much easier. The tubing also comes with quick disconnects, which makes refilling enroute easier, as only the bladder needs to be removed for filling, rinsing or cleaning.

Oh, the new bladder system weighs only 5 ounces when empty. This is a net improvement over the older system.


Hope this helps.
I haven't been able to find this bladder that weighs 5 oz.
Do you have a link?
Thanks!
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
There might have been a rounding error. The 1.5 Osprey bladder (here) weighs 160 gm/5.6oz.
Great bladder, I’ve used an older model for years, the zip top, wide mouth makes it easy to clean. For most of the CF and CI it was the perfect size. On the longer legs, I pick up a bottle to carry/reuse.
 

eesaston

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
not yet
I usually carry a wide-mouth hydro flask stainless steel water bottle, which is not only easy to clean and easy to carry. Whether it is to maintain the temperature of hot drinks or cold drinks, it does a good job. I like to fill the bar under the mountain with cold beer and carry it with me until I want to drink it.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I like to fill the bar under the mountain with cold beer and carry it with me until I want to drink it.
I don't know what this means. Can someone please explain it?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I bet over the years I've seen a kabobazillion posts on this topic.
It boils down to preference, like shoes/boots.

On the Frances, I carry one 8 oz refillable bottle because there is good fountain water in literally every village.
On other routes, like the VDLP, I have carried a bladder that holds more - but still PREFER a bottle. The water stays cooler (to me) and fresher tasting. I hate the taste of the plastic in even the best bladders. On my first attempt at the VDLP, I found pieces of a bladder - first the bite valve - then the tubing - then the bladder itself - along the route, and then I used it! But my preference remains a bottle.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
This is a bit like a debate on poles or boots v trail runners! :oops:
There will be passionate arguments from all sides.

I will merely say. I loved bladders.
Ease of access, sip as you walk etc etc.
But I ran out of water a few times because I can't see what is left, and refilling was a bit of a pain.

So I tried bottles, mounted on the pack straps with a sipping tube.
All the benefits of a bladder.
Plus I can monitor my water levels and top up or swap bottles with ease.

 

DonCamino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 CF
2014 CN
2015 + 2016 VdlP
2017 CF + CN
2018 CP from Lisbon
2019 Salvador+Primitivo
Same discussion here: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/need-advice-hydration-bladder.61300/.

my evolution solution:


My point of view after 7 caminos is the (ultra)light one.

First i used a 2 liter Camel bladder: 180 grams. Hard to clean and dry. And heavy.

Then i used the mentioned tube system delivered with different adapters. Almost 90 grams. And daily „fresh“ 1.5 liter bottles (avg. 30 grams for the plastic bottle) = 120 grams, saved 60 grams. Everything ok with the tube system. Nothing wrong with it. Can really recommend it. (I always bring and use my own, permanently used plastic bottle and refill it daily, till it breaks before i change my (light) bottle).

Then i replaced the tube system by one 0.5 / 0.6 liter bottle clipped to the front solution = that means 30 grams for one big bottle / 60 grams for 2, 17 grams for the 0.5 bottle, 5 grams for the bottle clip = 52 to 82 grams for the whole „water solution“. Meanwhile my favourite one. Hygienic and ultralight. And unbeaten in weight till now for me.

To reach 5 grams i replaced the carabiner by a piece of line, knotted on the backpack strap.

96B66F98-AB83-4C93-BC4B-F7A848A9E8F1.jpeg

Perhaps a possibility for someone?!

Bon Caminos, Bom Caminhos for all of U

So long
DonCamino
 

howardd5

New Member
Have been grappling with this very same decision - between a 2.5 L Osprey bladder or two (very) lightweight 1 L Vapor collapsible water bottles - for my Camino next year, so will be watching this thread closely. I remember reading some feedback (maybe on this forum somewhere?) that hydration bladders require the kind of regular cleaning and disinfecting that might be difficult to maintain over a six week period on the road, and that the relative easy of finding potable water sources along the way for refills makes a compartively heavy hydration bladder system unneccessary to begin with. But from previous hiking experience, I know I like the convenience of being able to take regular sips of water without having to constantly hold a water bottle or take it out and return it to my pack. Will be interested to hear what others have to say about it!
I have parked my bladder for a pair of old gatorade bottles for long hikes .my bladder became "musky" on long treks due to un clorinated water and heat from my back and the sun . On my Camino treks i never was able to rinse with desinfectant or even an evening rinse .Also i could never tell when i was low , the gatorade bottle are light weight ,reusable and free.
 


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