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Blister advice please

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Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Hello guys
We are walking to Mansilla de las Mulas today and then in to León tomorrow.

My wife has a couple of blisters on her feet. They are controlled with Compeed, gauze and pressure pads but still hurt.

Can anyone recommend somewhere in either location to get them looked at?

Thanks

Mansilla is a small place but does have a Centro de Salud. (Health Clinic)
Better to check them sooner than later I'd say.

 

SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
Another option is Hospital Regla in Leon, very close to the cathedral . Convenient because you do not have to find a bus or taxi to a clinic out of town.

Take good care.
 
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
And to add to the good advice: Laura, the hospitalera at the MdlM, is very skilled at blister first aid. She's of course not a medical professional, but knows from vast experience who needs referral to one, or advice to bus ahead - and what to do for the less dire cases.
 
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SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
And to add to the good advice: Laura, the hospitalera at the MdlM, is very skilled at blister first aid. She's of course not a medical professional, but knows from vast experience who needs referral to one, or advice to bus ahead - and what to do for the less dire cases.


I thought immediately of her too but unfortunately ( if Gronze is up to date as they are most of the time ) the albergue is still closed.

 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Guys
Brilliant advice, just what I needed.

As our hotel tomorrow is close to the Cathedral I have now emailed the hospital asking for an appointment.

Also, as above, we noticed that Brierley tells us not to sweat taking the bus into León.

I think we qualify for the bus this time. I just need to convince my wife that it's ok to do.

Again, thank you all very much.
 

FLEUR

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
If we had not taken the bus to Leon we would not have met a pilgrim who told me about the Spanish senior rail card. As we were taking a train home from Leon nex5 day that advice was so well timed.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I just had my reply, €300 to be seen, I think not!!
I was treated at another HM hospital in A Coruña, and they had a liason person who spoke English, which made everything easier. I needed an X-ray and stitches. I submitted the bill to my US health insurance, who paid reimbursed the majority, and then to my travel insurance who picked up the rest.

I liked that I was able to pay with my credit card at the hospital at time of service.

Another time I was seen at the public hospital in Santiago when I was suffering from really bad shin splints and wanted to rule out a stress fracture. After a very cursory exam (does it hurt when you do this? How about this?) I was sent off with the recommendation to take Tylenol. There was no facility to pay the bill at the time, and a few months later I received a bill that was for almost as much as the X-ray and stitches at the other hospital!

Adding to the expense was that they would only accept payment via wire transfer from my bank, which cost me more time and money to accomplish.

So, the point of my story is, if you have good health and/or travel insurance that will reimburse you don't be scared off, as my experience at an HM hospital was very positive.
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
While you're in Leon, I suggest your wife consider getting a new pair of shoes to walk in. It's highly likely that her shoes do not fit well (too small). -- On my first camino, I got blisters, and I thought my feet would toughen up and callous after healing or that my shoes would stretch a bit. I arrived limping in Santiago with infected blisters, and damaged nail beds. (My big toe nails fell off a few months after the camino.) I had considered buying a new and larger pair of shoes in Leon, but didn't.
 
Last edited:

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
An update. We have just visited the health centre and got tuned away as we were not an emergency, and to turn up in the morning and maybe get an appointment.

So, we have reappraised the blisters and although a bit sore, none have any angry edges or colour. To be fair, they look like 'ordinary' blisters.

So, we visited the pharmacy and bought gauze pads to go over the Compeed, held in place by surgical tape. My wife has told me it has already taken the pressure off the blisters and that she now feels more confident walking.

Having said that, we will be taking the bus to León in the morning. We have two rest days there so I shall just lock her in the Hotel to minimise the walking. (As if that would work!)

As an aside, the boots are the correct size as her feet were professionally measured and they saw use before we came to Spain.

We also have several pairs of socks and we know about blister control, and we walk the stage distances at home so it does not normally bother us.

What caused the problem is that my wife also gets cramp in her feet and she confessed that she had not tied up her laces correctly to avoid cramp, which if course led to her feet slipping in her boots.
 

FLEUR

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
Further advice from an old pilgrim, buy some sturdy walking sandals. These proved to be a lifesaver for me on an early Camino. I still carry them and swap from my good walking shoes to sandals most days to give my feet a change.
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
An update. We have just visited the health centre and got tuned away as we were not an emergency, and to turn up in the morning and maybe get an appointment.

So, we have reappraised the blisters and although a bit sore, none have any angry edges or colour. To be fair, they look like 'ordinary' blisters.

So, we visited the pharmacy and bought gauze pads to go over the Compeed, held in place by surgical tape. My wife has told me it has already taken the pressure off the blisters and that she now feels more confident walking.

Having said that, we will be taking the bus to León in the morning. We have two rest days there so I shall just lock her in the Hotel to minimise the walking. (As if that would work!)

As an aside, the boots are the correct size as her feet were professionally measured and they saw use before we came to Spain.

We also have several pairs of socks and we know about blister control, and we walk the stage distances at home so it does not normally bother us.

What caused the problem is that my wife also gets cramp in her feet and she confessed that she had not tied up her laces correctly to avoid cramp, which if course led to her feet slipping in her boots.
I saw the price that you were quoted. That is why I always get insurance. In 2019 I got 2 months worth of insurance for about the same price. I live in Mexico. I am an American and got it with Alliantz. I developed broncial spasms which necessitated one hospital visit and two clinic visits. There is no way i could have continued my camino without these visits. There was an 800 number in Spain and the staff at all three places knew exactly what to do. I paid nothing and had no paperwork to fill out either. They only thing I did was contact my agent in Mexico in Whatsapp to let her know that I was using the insurance. Twice I did it after the fact as I went in the morning while she was still sleeping.
Never walk without insurance. I think it is a necessity.
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I saw the price that you were quoted. That is why I always get insurance. In 2019 I got 2 months worth of insurance for about the same price. I live in Mexico. I am an American and got it with Alliantz. I developed broncial spasms which necessitated one hospital visit and two clinic visits. There is no way i could have continued my camino without these visits. There was an 800 number in Spain and the staff at all three places knew exactly what to do. I paid nothing and had no paperwork to fill out either. They only thing I did was contact my agent in Mexico in Whatsapp to let her know that I was using the insurance. Twice I did it after the fact as I went in the morning while she was still sleeping.
Never walk without insurance. I think it is a necessity.
I agree with having insurance.

I have insurance and if I feel I have to use it I will.

We just wanted a second opinion on the blisters to confirm our own feelings that they were not infected, just sore.
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Further advice from an old pilgrim, buy some sturdy walking sandals. These proved to be a lifesaver for me on an early Camino. I still carry them and swap from my good walking shoes to sandals most days to give my feet a change.
Absolutely - I forgot to mention that we also have good quality walking sandles that she changed into, and that in itself made a big difference. Very good point
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
If you are uk residents and still have an EU health card thats in date could you claim it back?
Definitely, I still have a valid EHIC card and my wife has the newer GHIC card.

They don't work in the private practices that I'm aware of, that's where the insurance kicks in. They do work in the Spanish public health service though. Very good point
 

Zordmot

First timer Spring 2019
Past OR future Camino
April-May 2019
Guys
Brilliant advice, just what I needed.

As our hotel tomorrow is close to the Cathedral I have now emailed the hospital asking for an appointment.

Also, as above, we noticed that Brierley tells us not to sweat taking the bus into León.

I think we qualify for the bus this time. I just need to convince my wife that it's ok to do.

Again, thank you all very much.
I walked into Leon. I second the motion to take the bus. The last 10-15 km into Leon was boring and tedious. Imagine the last 10 km into Burgos. Also, the cause of the blisters may be because of her shoes/socks. Even if the shoes are broken in and she’s accustomed to her routine of socks, the heat and sweaty moisture might be the culprit. I ended up tossing my broken in beloved shoes and socks in Pamplona and went with a lightweight hiking sandal and a thin pr of merino wool sox-with my pre-Pamplona blisters taped and went the rest of the way with happy feet.
 
Last edited:
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
As an aside, the boots are the correct size as her feet were professionally measured and they saw use before we came to Spain.
I found that I had the correct size for walking several days/week at home and as much as a week on the Camino, when blisters belatedly appeared - on the outside of the baby toe. Since I moved to a larger/wider shoe, I haven't had the problem.

Have the blisters been drained? They tend to be most painful when they are filled with fluid.

Having the walking sandals as an alternative is great. I hope the feet heal soon!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Buy some Omnifix or Hypafix tape at the pharmacy. It can be used now to cover Compeed and gauze, and after the blisters heal put it on the blister prone spots every morning before walking. The friction which causes blisters will occur on the tape instead of the skin. When you do this, don't put gauze under the tape. You want complete contact between tape and skin.
 
Past OR future Camino
2022
I just had my reply, €300 to be seen, I think not!!

That’s quite high. As a point of reference, almost exactly two years ago, I went to the fancy private hospital in Burgos for a consultation and two X-rays. The X-rays were expensive, like €60-70 each, but the total bill was not more than about €200.

However, I remember something the receptionist did for us when arrived. She said we could make an appointment (I thought we had an appointment, but we didn’t) and come back the next afternoon (or maybe two days later, I don’t remember exactly, but longer than we wanted to wait) or we could see someone right away as urgent care. I said this isn’t urgent, and she said but it will also be cheaper. So that’s what we did.
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Buy some Omnifix or Hypafix tape at the pharmacy. It can be used now to cover Compeed and gauze, and after the blisters heal put it on the blister prone spots every morning before walking. The friction which causes blisters will occur on the tape instead of the skin. When you do this, don't put gauze under the tape. You want complete contact between tape and skin.
Thank you @trecile we will do just that, as we were wondering what to do to protect the area
after the blisters had gone.
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I agree with having insurance.

I have insurance and if I feel I have to use it I will.

We just wanted a second opinion on the blisters to confirm our own feelings that they were not infected, just sore.
It seems like when I first walked the CF in 2013 there were quite a few albergues that had people who came in to treat pilgrim's blisters. I didn't see one when I walked in 2019 but it was in November and December. I guess now in Covid times there isn't that luxury anymore or am I wrong about that?
 

Givesome

Cape Hiker
Past OR future Camino
CF 27 March 2017
Hello guys
We are walking to Mansilla de las Mulas today and then in to León tomorrow.

My wife has a couple of blisters on her feet. They are controlled with Compeed, gauze and pressure pads but still hurt.

Can anyone recommend somewhere in either location to get them looked at?

Thanks
Hi David. The best treatment for blisters is to avoid it in the first place but I know your situation. My wife is prone to blisters no matter the shoes or socks. We tried everything and she got blisters no matter what. Your wife needs to keep your feed dry at all times and it might be helpful to change her socks twice a day.

You get different types of blisters: Friction (shoes which are to small - always buy one number bigger than your usual size), pressure blisters (normally on the sides or on the soles - these blisters are normally deeper and require more time to heal. If you often wear open shoes, parts of your soles becomes hard and it can cause deep blisters (put Vaseline on your feet every morning on the camino to soften the hard areas).

The problem with blister is that they get infected and it becomes worsts than the blisters itself. You can try compede plasters and try to slog on but it might be worth your while to take a rest day or two.

I was in the military in my younger days and the best treatment for blisters was to drain the blister and inject it with methylated spirits, Mercurochrome, betadine or any antiseptic. We now carry syringes, needles and some antiseptic with us and it works well. It is a painfull procedure but it prevents infection and it heals quite quickly. Once you drain a blister you always have the risk of infection which you should avoid at all cost.

A friction blister will heal in a day or two but the deeper blisters are problematic and you need to take a rest day or two.

Good luck.
 

JMac TO

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2017)
Hello guys
We are walking to Mansilla de las Mulas today and then in to León tomorrow.

My wife has a couple of blisters on her feet. They are controlled with Compeed, gauze and pressure pads but still hurt.

Can anyone recommend somewhere in either location to get them looked at?

Thanks
I can tell you to prevent future blisters use Vicks on hot spots. Works amazing.
 
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This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Just my experience:

Avoid Compeed at all costs: It encloses moist. Blisters, like all other wounds, need air to heal. JMHO. A Terra Cortril cream, air, and bandages is better.

This is not a medical opinion: Just my experience.

Good decisions come from experience. Experience comes from bad decisions.
 

ranthr

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
Kaliumjodid, brownyellow liquid, Last time I walked through Carrion de los Condes, I had a blister on a toe that was difficult for me to treat. I was told at the hostel that there was an opening hour for pilgrims at the local health office in the evening. I went there and a doctor treated my blister with the jod which ended my pain. I bought a yellow bottle with the stuff i the farmácia for further treatment.
I can remember from my ancient childhood 70 years ago that Jod was used to clean the wounds when we scrubbed our knees and so. Did not know that it still was in use, but after that incident in Carrion I found that I could still buy it in my local farmacy.
 
Last edited:

FLEUR

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
I've just remembered i had painful blisters beneath my toe nails on the way to Viana. I was fortunate to get an evening appointment with a local podiatrist. She treated my feet, with the help of Google translate she told me to buy various lotions at the pharmacy and it was she who told me to buy and walk in walking sandals. Very good advice.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Kaliumjodid, brownyellow liquid, Last time I walked through Carrion de los Condes, I had a blister on a toe that was difficult for me to treat. I was told at the hostel that there was an opening hour for pilgrims at the local health office in the evening. I went there and a doctor treated my blister with the jod which ended my pain. I bought a yellow bottle with the stuff i the farmácia for further treatment
I think this is what you are referring to
b3644cb65b19d1b6595ee32abc7ac3fa.jpg
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Preparing the wound for dressing

1. Cleaning the wound by flushing away any debris away with clean water or a mild dilution of hydrogen peroxide. Pouring or squirting the wound is fine, but any dirt particles sticking to the wound MUST be cleared away.

2. A topical antibiotic ointment, not cream, is gently applied after the blister wound is dry. The ointment serves two purposes: it reduces any risk of infection and it prevents any dressing material from inadvertently sticking to the wound.

Blister Dressing

A primary issue is getting whatever method of dressing that is to be used -- be it taping, Moleskin, hydrogel pads, bandaids, etc. --- to stick and remain in place, which can sometimes be a huge challenge.

Here are a few strategies to help.

1. Use hand sanitizer or alcohol to clean the skin area, not the wound, to which the tape or dressing will be stuck to. Get as much dirt and body oils removed as is possible.

2. To the cleansed skin, apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin then allow to dry. Do not put any directly on the wound. This will multiply the holding power of the adhesive that is used. If you aren’t familiar with it, think of it as rubber cement for the skin.

I carry a few crushable ampules of the stuff. You can get them on Amazon or at a pharmacy

3. When the adhesive is finally applied, rub the area of the tape or moleskin or Compeed or etc... The idea is to create heat from the friction to allow the adhesive to warm and adhere better.

For a roofed or closed blister I like to place a hydrogel dressing, like Spenco, to the top of the blister and them use Leukotape P or Omnifix or etc... to affix the dressing in place. The hydrogel provides basic cushioning and additional protection, helping the tape to reduce additional damage to the wound. If a hydrogel dressing is not readily available at a pharmacy, than a Compeed-style hydrocolloid patch could substitute.

For a de-roofed or open blister, the addition of the ointment to the open wound is applied prior to the hydrogel being put into place. The hydrogels are package and designed to be sterile. Bandaging is done as previously described.

Dealing with local discomfort while walking

If the blistered area, whether roofed or de-roofed, is so tender it is uncomfortable to walk on as treated above, then remove the dressing and then redress the blister the same way as before, but with the addition of using the 'doughnut' padding as the NOLS video demonstrates.

Unless additional attention is needed, it is best to leave the dressing in place until the end of the day. Then, remove the dressing, re-cleanse the wound, shower, cleanse, apply ointment, and redress for evening activities. At bedtime, remove the dressing, re-cleanse and apply antibiotic ointment and wear a clean sock.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Preparing the wound for dressing

1. Cleaning the wound by flushing away any debris away with clean water or a mild dilution of hydrogen peroxide. Pouring or squirting the wound is fine, but any dirt particles sticking to the wound MUST be cleared away.

2. A topical antibiotic ointment, not cream, is gently applied after the blister wound is dry. The ointment serves two purposes: it reduces any risk of infection and it prevents any dressing material from inadvertently sticking to the wound.

Blister Dressing

A primary issue is getting whatever method of dressing that is to be used -- be it taping, Moleskin, hydrogel pads, bandaids, etc. --- to stick and remain in place, which can sometimes be a huge challenge.

Here are a few strategies to help.

1. Use hand sanitizer or alcohol to clean the skin area, not the wound, to which the tape or dressing will be stuck to. Get as much dirt and body oils removed as is possible.

2. To the cleansed skin, apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin then allow to dry. Do not put any directly on the wound. This will multiply the holding power of the adhesive that is used. If you aren’t familiar with it, think of it as rubber cement for the skin.

I carry a few crushable ampules of the stuff. You can get them on Amazon or at a pharmacy

3. When the adhesive is finally applied, rub the area of the tape or moleskin or Compeed or etc... The idea is to create heat from the friction to allow the adhesive to warm and adhere better.

For a roofed or closed blister I like to place a hydrogel dressing, like Spenco, to the top of the blister and them use Leukotape P or Omnifix or etc... to affix the dressing in place. The hydrogel provides basic cushioning and additional protection, helping the tape to reduce additional damage to the wound. If a hydrogel dressing is not readily available at a pharmacy, than a Compeed-style hydrocolloid patch could substitute.

For a de-roofed or open blister, the addition of the ointment to the open wound is applied prior to the hydrogel being put into place. The hydrogels are package and designed to be sterile. Bandaging is done as previously described.

Dealing with local discomfort while walking

If the blistered area, whether roofed or de-roofed, is so tender it is uncomfortable to walk on as treated above, then remove the dressing and then redress the blister the same way as before, but with the addition of using the 'doughnut' padding as the NOLS video demonstrates.

Unless additional attention is needed, it is best to leave the dressing in place until the end of the day. Then, remove the dressing, re-cleanse the wound, shower, cleanse, apply ointment, and redress for evening activities. At bedtime, remove the dressing, re-cleanse and apply antibiotic ointment and wear a clean sock.
Indeed. Letting air in, together with cleansing & proper dressing is imperative. And remember, the pharmacies along the Camino(s) are skilled at this. Follow their advice.
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hi David. The best treatment for blisters is to avoid it in the first place but I know your situation. My wife is prone to blisters no matter the shoes or socks. We tried everything and she got blisters no matter what. Your wife needs to keep your feed dry at all times and it might be helpful to change her socks twice a day.

You get different types of blisters: Friction (shoes which are to small - always buy one number bigger than your usual size), pressure blisters (normally on the sides or on the soles - these blisters are normally deeper and require more time to heal. If you often wear open shoes, parts of your soles becomes hard and it can cause deep blisters (put Vaseline on your feet every morning on the camino to soften the hard areas).

The problem with blister is that they get infected and it becomes worsts than the blisters itself. You can try compede plasters and try to slog on but it might be worth your while to take a rest day or two.

I was in the military in my younger days and the best treatment for blisters was to drain the blister and inject it with methylated spirits, Mercurochrome, betadine or any antiseptic. We now carry syringes, needles and some antiseptic with us and it works well. It is a painfull procedure but it prevents infection and it heals quite quickly. Once you drain a blister you always have the risk of infection which you should avoid at all cost.

A friction blister will heal in a day or two but the deeper blisters are problematic and you need to take a rest day or two.

Good luck.
Thank you for the points above @Givesome . We have those points covered, and we did take the bus into León today. This gives us two full days of rest and I have cut our remaining schedule down to 20kms blocks as those distances seem to work without aggravating the blisters (yes, friction blisters).
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Preparing the wound for dressing

1. Cleaning the wound by flushing away any debris away with clean water or a mild dilution of hydrogen peroxide. Pouring or squirting the wound is fine, but any dirt particles sticking to the wound MUST be cleared away.

2. A topical antibiotic ointment, not cream, is gently applied after the blister wound is dry. The ointment serves two purposes: it reduces any risk of infection and it prevents any dressing material from inadvertently sticking to the wound.

Blister Dressing

A primary issue is getting whatever method of dressing that is to be used -- be it taping, Moleskin, hydrogel pads, bandaids, etc. --- to stick and remain in place, which can sometimes be a huge challenge.

Here are a few strategies to help.

1. Use hand sanitizer or alcohol to clean the skin area, not the wound, to which the tape or dressing will be stuck to. Get as much dirt and body oils removed as is possible.

2. To the cleansed skin, apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin then allow to dry. Do not put any directly on the wound. This will multiply the holding power of the adhesive that is used. If you aren’t familiar with it, think of it as rubber cement for the skin.

I carry a few crushable ampules of the stuff. You can get them on Amazon or at a pharmacy

3. When the adhesive is finally applied, rub the area of the tape or moleskin or Compeed or etc... The idea is to create heat from the friction to allow the adhesive to warm and adhere better.

For a roofed or closed blister I like to place a hydrogel dressing, like Spenco, to the top of the blister and them use Leukotape P or Omnifix or etc... to affix the dressing in place. The hydrogel provides basic cushioning and additional protection, helping the tape to reduce additional damage to the wound. If a hydrogel dressing is not readily available at a pharmacy, than a Compeed-style hydrocolloid patch could substitute.

For a de-roofed or open blister, the addition of the ointment to the open wound is applied prior to the hydrogel being put into place. The hydrogels are package and designed to be sterile. Bandaging is done as previously described.

Dealing with local discomfort while walking

If the blistered area, whether roofed or de-roofed, is so tender it is uncomfortable to walk on as treated above, then remove the dressing and then redress the blister the same way as before, but with the addition of using the 'doughnut' padding as the NOLS video demonstrates.

Unless additional attention is needed, it is best to leave the dressing in place until the end of the day. Then, remove the dressing, re-cleanse the wound, shower, cleanse, apply ointment, and redress for evening activities. At bedtime, remove the dressing, re-cleanse and apply antibiotic ointment and wear a clean sock.
Thanks @davebugg . Doing the above, but missed the point about the antibiotic cream (which we have) but will start doing so. We have the pads, we just need to buy the tape that @trecile recommended, we will try to get it tomorrow on our second rest day in León
 
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biarritzdon

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There are a lot of pros and cons about Compeeds, needles and threads, etc. I suggest looking at the many threads on this Forum to see how your wife's situation compares. If they are "that" bad I would suggest considering the serious damage and illness they might cause versus 300 euros.
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
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2021
There are a lot of pros and cons about Compeeds, needles and threads, etc. I suggest looking at the many threads on this Forum to see how your wife's situation compares. If they are "that" bad I would suggest considering the serious damage and illness they might cause versus 300 euros.
Thanks @biarritzdon.
The €300 euros are neither here or there as our insurance would cover it. The payment is not really the issue as we just wanted a second opinion on the blisters.

Having taken advice from pharmacists, along with some great advice on the forum, we are convinced that the blisters have stabilised and two days of rest in León will start to see improvements.

I can assure everyone that if we thought the blisters were really bad or poisonous I would not hesitate to pay the €300 euros👍
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
We now have the omnifix tape as recommended above, in fact, I've bought a small pharmacy of 'stuff' over the last few days. Pity the pharmacy does not award points 🤭

As an aside, in the last three days one blister has almost gone, another has started to subside and the third has stopped growing.

We are now in a happier position than we were three days ago
 

Aidan21

Active Member
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I love compeed on hot spots, so never had a blister...I probably would have disliked using it on a blister as I've read a few horror stories about it on the forum.
I have used compeed on hot spots many times and I have used compeed as a prophylactic on a number of occasions also. Always worked a treat. Otherwise I believe they should only be used on blisters that have lost their roof skin. But I guess the most important thing with blisters is to keep them clean and avoid infection at all costs.
 

Camino Chrissy

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I have used compeed
I just happen to be going to a wedding this evening and the shoes I've chosen to wear rub a bit on a certain spot of my foot. I think I'll dig out my Compeed and that should help prevent a blister as its sticking/staying power is amazing; much better than a bandaid.😊
(This is only a slightly off topic, being about high heels instead of trail runners.)🤣
 
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FLEUR

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I just happen to be going to a wedding this evening and the shoes I've chosen to wear rub a bit on a certain spot of my foot. I think I'll dig out my Compeed and that should help prevent a blister as its sticking/staying power is amazing; much better than a bandaid.😊
(This is only a slightly off topic, being about high heels instead of trail runners.)🤣
For tight shoes, especially new shoes take a hairdryer and blow plenty of hot air inside the shoes to soften them.
 

FLEUR

Veteran Member
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David with new kit. Well done with the blister rescue, just another Camino episide and you can hopefully now continue on your way.

Bon courage and buen Camino
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
An update. We have just visited the health centre and got tuned away as we were not an emergency, and to turn up in the morning and maybe get an appointment.

So, we have reappraised the blisters and although a bit sore, none have any angry edges or colour. To be fair, they look like 'ordinary' blisters.

So, we visited the pharmacy and bought gauze pads to go over the Compeed, held in place by surgical tape. My wife has told me it has already taken the pressure off the blisters and that she now feels more confident walking.

Having said that, we will be taking the bus to León in the morning. We have two rest days there so I shall just lock her in the Hotel to minimise the walking. (As if that would work!)

As an aside, the boots are the correct size as her feet were professionally measured and they saw use before we came to Spain.

We also have several pairs of socks and we know about blister control, and we walk the stage distances at home so it does not normally bother us.

What caused the problem is that my wife also gets cramp in her feet and she confessed that she had not tied up her laces correctly to avoid cramp, which if course led to her feet slipping in her boots.

Just another belated thought... My feet grew 2 sizes (american) when I walked the camino the first time. By Leon, my shoes (that had fit at home) were too small. -- My sports doctor (whom I had seen before I had left), had advised me that my foot muscles seemed atrophied and that was causing my foot pain. I seems that all I had to do after years of foot pain, was walk for days on end. No atrophy any more! -- But realize that foot shape and size does change on the Camino. -- I hope the blisters are all healed and you and your wife are doing well. Ultreia.
 

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Thanks @kelleymac

The blisters are still there, but no longer causing issues thanks to the advice I received from others above.

The omnifix tape is superb and keeps the padding in place to protect the blisters, which are improving.

The tape is also used as an anti-friction surface between feet and socks (not over blisters) and helps prevent hot spots. Marvellous stuff.

My wife is wearing sandles (please let it not rain) and is managing very well thank you very much (guess who is carrying her boots!!)

I noticed that my feet were getting tight in my own boots (which I have had over a year) and wondered what was going on. Then I realised my socks were twice as thick as they should be, thanks to the lavanderias out here.

New socks bought, old socks binned, problem solved
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
My wife is wearing sandles (please let it not rain) and is managing very well thank you very much (guess who is carrying her boots!!)
My last several Caminos I've exclusively worn sandals, and they worked perfectly in the rain. I do wear socks with them, and on my first "sandal Camino" rather than change out of wet socks if it was still raining I just wrung them out and put them back on.
I have since bought SealSkinz waterproof socks which work very well.

I'm glad that you've found the Omnifix to be useful - it's great stuff!
 
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