• Missing the daily forum e-mail? Subscribe again.
  • All Wise Pilgrim Guides now come with a free Finisterre/Muxia Guide.
    Order online or pick one up at Casa Ivar in Santiago if that is easier.
A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Calm Down

Camino(s) past & future
St Jean to Burgos 2017
St Jean to Fisterra 2018
St Jean to Fisterra 2020 or Chemin Piemont
#1
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
 

Advertisment

Rick M

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
April ('16,'18)
#2
In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.
True, but you now have a shoe that works! Finding a shoe that does not give you blisters, and getting used to your pack are the only preparations that really matter.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#4
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
Well and truly stated; Nicely done!!! :)
 

Advertisment

Camino(s) past & future
First time pilgrim and walking solo. Leaving SJDP around April 5, 2018.
#6
Great advice! The camino really, truly provides. A note about the shoes: my boots were well-worn in and perfect for my feet... until the combination of daily Navarra floodwaters coupled with fireplaces/hotboxes/radiators but NO newspapers every night shrunk them and they ate up my feet once I hit a heat wave. I purchased two different sets of runners on the Camino (Burgos and Leon) and had to "break them in" on the actual walk. You know what? It wasn't that big of a deal. My feet were not totally happy campers by the time I reached Santiago, but that too passed. Even if you have to make a complete wardrobe change or replace all gear while on the Camino, you will be OK (if only I could have given myself this message in March before I started -- much hand wringing had occurred until I was about a week into it and realized it was all going to be ok). Really good post; thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
First time pilgrim and walking solo. Leaving SJDP around April 5, 2018.
#7
I should add that I also had to ditch my original backpack for a new one, replaced phone power cord, ditched heavy socks, repurchased heavy socks, ditched a heavy jacket for weight when it was super hot, repurchased a heavy jacket, and on and on and on. Everything works out so long as you keep your feet happy, your body happy (seek out those veggies!), and your mind happy. Buen camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF December 2017
#8
I laugh (now) at all the anxieties I had planning to go, and how much I over-thought everything. Now having done the CF it would literally take me 15 minutes to pack and I would just go with the flow. I would know there is an Albergues somewhere ahead, I wouldn’t starve, plenty of places to buy whatever was needed, and pilgrims around me ready to lend a hand. All good.
 
#9
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
YES!!!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#10
Good post and so true.
You need almost no special equipment or logistical planning to walk it. Some of the over planning I see mentioned on here sometimes is comical. A combination of inspector gadget, OCD and an arctic expedition.
 

Birdbass

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk September/ October 2018
#12
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
....Hey!!!....a fine dose of realism....huge thanks!!!!!
 

arleneo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago French Way
Portuguese Camino - Central Route
#13
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
This is the BEST ADVICE I have read. Having done the Frances, I am now planning the Portuguese Central with a jog onto the Coastal. I feel less enthusiastic, less fit (five years later), but honestly I think the four of us have over-planned. I have begun unloading extras from my pack. Shoes - most important, and less stuff. Thank you for this post.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago, St Jean to Santuago, 2015
Camino Portuguese, 2018
#15
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
Brilliant. Totally agree.
 
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2019) Complete Astorga to Santiago
#16
I laugh (now) at all the anxieties I had planning to go, and how much I over-thought everything. Now having done the CF it would literally take me 15 minutes to pack and I would just go with the flow. I would know there is an Albergues somewhere ahead, I wouldn’t starve, plenty of places to buy whatever was needed, and pilgrims around me ready to lend a hand. All good.
I totally overthought my first Camino. I did have to cut it short at Astorga (feet problems - bursitis, but nary a blister the whole way), but I intend to go back and finish from Astorga to Santiago, and already anticipating my second full Camino from St. Jean... only this time with much less worry. Anticipation of the unknown is what causes me to worry... now I know it was all for naught.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#17
True, but you now have a shoe that works! Finding a shoe that does not give you blisters, and getting used to your pack are the only preparations that really matter.

I respect your view but it could be misleading. It may be true for some but not for others. I have seen many pilgrims having significant difficulty because they did not put in sufficient training and they wound up with blisters, shin splints and infections. My Mantra is Prepare! Prepare physically and as best one can mentally. Read about others’ experiences on blogs such as this one. Have a reasonable idea of what to expect. I do not mean, however, that every detail has to be planned. Have options in case things go wrong?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
#18
I respect your view but it could be misleading. It may be true for some but not for others. I have seen many pilgrims having significant difficulty because they did not put in sufficient training and they wound up with blisters, shin splints and infections. My Mantra is Prepare! Prepare physically and as best one can mentally. Read about others’ experiences on blogs such as this one. Have a reasonable idea of what to expect. I do not mean, however, that every detail has to be planned. Have options in case things go wrong?
Couldn't agree with you more....................
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#19
I respect your view but it could be misleading. It may be true for some but not for others. I have seen many pilgrims having significant difficulty because they did not put in sufficient training and they wound up with blisters, shin splints and infections. My Mantra is Prepare! Prepare physically and as best one can mentally. Read about others’ experiences on blogs such as this one. Have a reasonable idea of what to expect. I do not mean, however, that every detail has to be planned. Have options in case things go wrong?
@Marbe2
I did a little training before my first camino. Within a few days, excessive and too fast walking gave me my first experience of shinsplints, so I abandoned it. Yes, I planned: first night at Orisson, second at Roncesvalles, first week short days and easy walking. I never had any problems walking- my first and my second and my third caminos. I just walked my usual pace for the terrain and my current physical shape. Of course, I do have forty-five years of mountain walking experience, and a lifetime of getting around without a car. I find all the efforts at teaching people to walk rather funny. You just put one foot in front of the other, carefully enough that you don't fall over. Wear footwear that is comfortable and suitable for the weather and terrain. Carry what you feel comfortable with. If you don't know how to (distance) walk, I suppose a little practice couldn't hurt. Oh, and "Calm down."
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#20
I have seen many pilgrims having significant difficulty because they did not put in sufficient training and they wound up with blisters, shin splints and infections.
I have sedentary work and never have time or a sitation where I can 'train.' But it's just walking, and we all know how to do that.
You just put one foot in front of the other, carefully enough that you don't fall over.
Exactly.

If I had to choose one thing to train before the Camino it'd be the mind.
For starters, don't pack your fears, and to find a way to manage anxiety.
As the OP said so beautifully. Just relax. Seriously. ;):cool:
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#21
@Albertagirl wrote: I never had any problems walking- my first and my second and my third caminos. I just walked my usual pace for the terrain and my current physical shape. Of course, I do have forty-five years of mountain walking experience, and a lifetime of getting around without a car. I find all the efforts at teaching people to walk rather funny. You just put one foot in front of the other, carefully enough that you don't fall over.

With 45 years of mountains walking you likely began your camino with experience of varied terrain and walking distances. Your experience provided/provides you with mental and physical memory and perhaps a level of fitness when starting a camino. There are people who have never done any distance walking let alone with a backpack who decide to do the Camino without or with little preparation
Starting from SPJD and walking No less than 1,258 meters of positive height gain and 485 meters of negative height difference on your first day without preparation can-end a Camino or, so can starting in Pamplona and attempting the down hill section on alto del Perdon! We obviously perceive the terrain differently if you think that these sections are simply just putting one foot in front of the other! I certainly encourage anyone who wants to do the Camino to do so! However, I believe we do potential pilgrims a disservice by not encouraging them to physically prepare.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#22
@Albertagirl wrote: I never had any problems walking- my first and my second and my third caminos. I just walked my usual pace for the terrain and my current physical shape. Of course, I do have forty-five years of mountain walking experience, and a lifetime of getting around without a car. I find all the efforts at teaching people to walk rather funny. You just put one foot in front of the other, carefully enough that you don't fall over.

With 45 years of mountains walking you likely began your camino with experience of varied terrain and walking distances. Your experience provided/provides you with mental and physical memory and perhaps a level of fitness when starting a camino. There are people who have never done any distance walking let alone with a backpack who decide to do the Camino without or with little preparation
Starting from SPJD and walking No less than 1,258 meters of positive height gain and 485 meters of negative height difference on your first day without preparation can-end a Camino or, so can starting in Pamplona and attempting the down hill section on alto del Perdon! We obviously perceive the terrain differently if you think that these sections are simply just putting one foot in front of the other! I certainly encourage anyone who wants to do the Camino to do so! However, I believe we do potential pilgrims a disservice by not encouraging them to physically prepare.
@Marbe2
I think that the "physical memory" is useful for me. And you will note that I started without training, but with planning: footwear, pack, first night booked at Orisson, first week easy. I am not convinced that specific physical training for walking a camino is necessary. I fear that it may intimidate those who see the requirements as too high for their regular commitments. If a prospective pilgrim is in good ordinary health, my advice would be to get good footwear, pack light, give yourself lots of time to walk your camino, and take it easy. You might take a few long walks with your pack if you have never done so, just to see how you feel. Calm down.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#23
@Albertagirl stated “am not convinced that specific physical training for walking a camino is necessary.”

I would agree that it may not be necessary for everyone depending on lifestyle, age, and health...But for others it is,I think, inappropriate to make such generalizations. There are people writing all the time about how they are trying to prepare and can not walk even 10kms, or even 5 Kms. Would you tell them to just go, calm down, walk to Orrison, overnight, and then on to Roncevalles? Really?
 

GloriaAnn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk in September 2018
#24
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
Thank you for that encouraging note!!!
 

Sharonn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015
Camino Portugues 2017
#25
Thanks for a most encouraging post M! Agree. Relax and enjoy. Take it slow and remember: It's not a race. Each one or couple or family should walk their own Camino respecting different circumstances and aspects such as age, level of fitness, finances etc. The infrastructure is excellent and caters for all needs. Of course shoes, socks and bags are extremely important but I think most pilgrims do their homework before embarking on their pilgrimage.
Walk your own camino!
Blessings!
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago de Compestela in May(2016)
#26
Walking the camino is a piece of cake but that's only if you know what your're doing.

In my job when assessing people for like cover one of the questions was "is your occupation hazardous?" When they answered, "Not if you know what you're doing!" you knew it was a risky job. Similarly, I'd agree that the camino ain't that hard, but you've got to know what to expect.

If your life has been sitting behind a desk or a steering wheel and the heaviest thing that you've lifted recently is a BigMac the ascent from SJPdP to Orisson with 10 kilos on your back will come as a bit of a shock to the system.

If your climate is wall to wall sunshine the constant rain going over some of the hills/moutains will be a little bit of a dampener (literally).

If you're used to showering in your en-suite and sleeping in a king size bed with laundered cotten sheets then the top of a rickety bunk with a plastic coated mattress in the municiple albergue with paint peeling off the ceiling in the shower will also be an eye-opener, in more ways than one when an oversized lady passes by in her towel!

In a nutshell, the Camino isn't difficult, but PPPPPP. For those that haven't heard it before........ Proper Planning Prevents P**s Poor Performance.
 

poogeyejr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, May 2011
Norte, Sept 2013
Started the Frances, 2017
#27
As we can see from the myriad replies there are as many Ways to complete the Camino as there are Pilgrims who do it!

What I loved about this is that he compares his 2 Caminos and learns from his own mis-steps.


So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

What have YOU learned between two of your Camino's?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF September (2018)
#28
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
This is exactly how i planned to do my first camino, and i too am an inveterate planner. So for this trip i decided not to plan beyond an hour two and already i feel better. Thank you for weighing in and making me(us?) feel better about letting go. Thanks, i needed that....and now that you have these experiences behind you, i would bet you are also doing less planning in your daily life, anddiscovering that just like your two camino walks, you have survived.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles - Santiago 2009; Norte & Primitivo Aug/Sept 2016 ??
#29
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
I couldn't agree with you more!! I walked my first and only camino in 2009, and have been dreaming of doing another one, any one as long as I could walk a camino in Spain, but just find all sorts of excuses all the time, but not being fit enough is I think my greatest fear, and now at 74 I can see the years just drifting away and me not doing another Camino, oh so sad..... maybe 2019 !!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#31
I couldn't agree with you more!! I walked my first and only camino in 2009, and have been dreaming of doing another one, any one as long as I could walk a camino in Spain, but just find all sorts of excuses all the time, but not being fit enough is I think my greatest fear, and now at 74 I can see the years just drifting away and me not doing another Camino, oh so sad..... maybe 2019 !!!
@formysons
I am 70 and have walked three longer camino routes in the last three years, in spite of not being in the best shape. If you want to go on camino again, my suggestions would be: 1. consult with your doctor as to your health. If you get the go-ahead, consider 2. How you are going to get fit enough to do it, as this is your concern. Get moving: walk, go the gym, sign up for an exercise program 3. Plan your camino: where, when, how, a shorter or a longer route. If you lack confidence, you can start with one of the shorter camino routes and plan short days. You can go again the next year, once you have more confidence 4. You might consider why you are looking for excuses not to go, as you may never run out of excuses. It is your choice to try or not to try, one step at a time. Buen camino.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#32
This is probably one of the best posts I've read in this forum.

After two caminos, I spend more time planning things that will stay behind (house sitting, pet sitting, bills to pay) than my actual camino stuff - backpack gets ready in a few minutes, hotel for the first night and TA-DAHHH!
 

tfw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP (2013), CP (2018)
#33
This is an excellent post with very sage advice. The old saying don't sweat the small stuff because it's all small stuff really applies to Caminos. The "anxiety" curve disappears after the first Camino. After the first one you can pack up and be on a plane to Madrid in but a few hours, worry free.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#34
The best plan is not to have a plan. Just go. Spain has all you need.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Frances, 2017 Frances, (2019 ???)
#35
I couldn't agree with you more!! I walked my first and only camino in 2009, and have been dreaming of doing another one, any one as long as I could walk a camino in Spain, but just find all sorts of excuses all the time, but not being fit enough is I think my greatest fear, and now at 74 I can see the years just drifting away and me not doing another Camino, oh so sad..... maybe 2019 !!!
Maybe you need to pack your bag.

Dos Caminos 72yrs.

Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk May 2017
#37
Well and truly stated; Nicely done!!! :)
Excellent post mate, literally just booked flight to Biarritz and that's it, I plan to arrive and walk, did Ponferada to Santiago and then on to Finisterre last June 2017, this time planning to get to Burgos..will one day walk the entirety in one hit, but that may have to wait till retirement..last year I arrived and walked, the experience was life changing, and I was totally out of my comfort zone, never been on my own before, never stayed in hostel before, as the old saying goes"life begins at the end of your comfort zone" and it truly does.
I met some amazing people walking, and remember them all... anyone thinking about walking the Camino, just do it , don't over plan or over think it, pack a bag, and unpack your mind before starting...buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#38
Excellent post mate, literally just booked flight to Biarritz and that's it, I plan to arrive and walk, did Ponferada to Santiago and then on to Finisterre last June 2017, this time planning to get to Burgos..will one day walk the entirety in one hit, but that may have to wait till retirement..last year I arrived and walked, the experience was life changing, and I was totally out of my comfort zone, never been on my own before, never stayed in hostel before, as the old saying goes"life begins at the end of your comfort zone" and it truly does.
I met some amazing people walking, and remember them all... anyone thinking about walking the Camino, just do it , don't over plan or over think it, pack a bag, and unpack your mind before starting...buen Camino.
My first Camino I was totally out of my comfort zone too. About halfway through my second Camino last year I realized that the Camino is my comfort zone.
 

Crumblies

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on Camino Francés
#40
I couldn't agree with you more!! I walked my first and only camino in 2009, and have been dreaming of doing another one, any one as long as I could walk a camino in Spain, but just find all sorts of excuses all the time, but not being fit enough is I think my greatest fear, and now at 74 I can see the years just drifting away and me not doing another Camino, oh so sad..... maybe 2019 !!!
Please don’t be afraid to do it again. My husband & I did our first Camino (CF) this year and had a wonderful time. We are both 71 and we met some people who were even older than us! Some days were tough, some were easier, but the people we met and the good times we shared made everything worthwhile. Do some physical preparation in an activity you enjoy, follow the excellent advice on Malachiuri’s “Calm down” post, watch “The Way” again and lots of YouTube Camino posts and you will soon be enthusiastic to do it again. Good luck! (By the way we are now planning our next year’s Camino)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
#41
Please don’t be afraid to do it again. My husband & I did our first Camino (CF) this year and had a wonderful time. We are both 71 and we met some people who were even older than us! Some days were tough, some were easier, but the people we met and the good times we shared made everything worthwhile. Do some physical preparation in an activity you enjoy, follow the excellent advice on Malachiuri’s “Calm down” post, watch “The Way” again and lots of YouTube Camino posts and you will soon be enthusiastic to do it again. Good luck! (By the way we are now planning our next year’s Camino)
I find it inspiring to hear that people, senior to I, are still "LIVING" while they are alive. Nice going Pilgrims!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles - Santiago 2009; Norte & Primitivo Aug/Sept 2016 ??
#42
I find it inspiring to hear that people, senior to I, are still "LIVING" while they are alive. Nice going Pilgrims!
All these positive replies give me so much hope that I will be able to do another camino, will catch up on my yoga to start with, why not be in Spain for my 75th birthday July 2019 !!!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
#43
All these positive replies give me so much hope that I will be able to do another camino, will catch up on my yoga to start with, why not be in Spain for my 75th birthday July 2019 !!!!!
Sounds good! Start with yoga and end it with a completion of a goal !
 

Traa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I want to walk Camino in Sept/Oct 2017
#44
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
Absolutely excellent post I 100% agree!
 
Camino(s) past & future
walked Camino Frances 23 April- 23 May (2018), Camino Portuguese 2018/19
#47
[QUOTE="Malachiuri, post:

Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything. You are gonna be just fine!
Please be realistic about your abilities.Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.
Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities. You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I droWalk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use.
It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience. /QUOTE]
I think you need to prepare, physically and mentally. But then I agree not to worry! The Camino often allows us to let go. Research enough to know to get comfortable footwear and really pack light but then relax, you can do it whatever way you need to. But do it!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Spring (2016)
Camino Frances Spring (2017)
Camino Frances Autumn (2018)
#48
So, after 2 trips on the Camino, 1 that was an abject failure and 1 that was an unqualified triumph I have a few thoughts for all you new pilgrims.

Calm down. No, seriously... Calm down. Take a breath, quit worrying and over planning and analyzing everything.

I am a compulsive planner and gadget enthusiast(geardo) who spent 2 years planning my first camino and it ended up being a really bad experience. Woke up every day with a head full of snakes and worry and bailed at Burgos. I was traveling with friends and regret that decision daily. This year I went back and completed St Jean to the ocean with a friend and it was a truly life changing experience, and yes I am heading back in 2020 to do it all again.

Let me take some worry off your shoulders if I can.

You aren’t walking the arctic tundra or across the Sahara. More or less you are hiking on decent trails from small village to small village with a few large cities thrown in to spice up the soup. Apart from some notable experiences you are rarely more than 10kms from the next village and a chance to use a bathroom, take on water and grab some food. My camino friend from this year called parts of the trip a “500km pub crawl” because of how many bars we stopped for coffee and snacks. You are gonna be just fine!

Please be realistic about your abilities. If you can do the trip in 30 days, that's great! If you need 60, take 60 dammit!(we took 54, with 7 flex days and it was brilliant) Make sure you have some flexible time on the way for extra rest days, medical days and just good old down time.

Don’t overpack! Take the bare necessities for the trip. You will have dozens of chances to add to your kit if you need to, and hundreds of chances to grab toiletries or daily essentials. I used a 40L daypack and could have probably gone a little smaller(Im a big dude too so my clothes take up a ton of room, but I always had extra space). You can do laundry every day so less is more. The best packing advise I have gotten was simple. “Pack all of your needs, 2 of your wants and none of your fears. Fears and what make backpacks heavy”.

Train properly. Lose weight if you need to. I dropped 48lbs between my failed and triumph camino trips and it made a world of difference. Walk at least 100 miles in your boots/shoes with the sock combo you expect to use. If you can do that without blisters or foot problems you are ready to rock! Change out what you need to make your feets happy campers... or hilkers.

In all honesty you could probably rock up to St Jean with nothing but a pocket full of Euros and do the entire Camino. There is an infrastructure to help you along. It is safe, fun and a tremendous experience.

Get to Spain. Start walking. Enjoy the views. Laugh at the pain. Make new friends. Change your world.
Thanks, I am heading off from SJPP 25th August on my third camino. My first sort of solo, I am walking with a young friend and am sure she will probably enjoy meeting and walking with folks her own age. Your last line I have written into the front of my journal as a reminder. Again thank you.
 

Shona

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2018)
#49
A million Thank Yous, Malachiuri. (Now that's what you call an interesting name.)
In 5 weeks time a friend and I will be travelling from northern Scotland to SJPP to begin our first Camino to Santiago and, a very big maybe, to Finnisterre.
Your post is so encouraging, am really grateful and for the responses from other pilgrims.
What a great bunch you all are. Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#50
I can think of at least two camino-related groups that would pillory you for this post. It is wonderful to see it here, but this forum is the kind of place where you can make these statements freely and not offend anyone who is obsessed with shopping, booking ahead, and knowing ahead of time exactly what they will see around the next corner.
Thank you for posting!
 
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean to Burgos 2017
St Jean to Fisterra 2018
St Jean to Fisterra 2020 or Chemin Piemont
#51
Huh... this thing just wont die.

I am truly heartened that anyone got a little support from my ideas. In a perfect world we all find what we need on Camino. Some love the experience, some love the prep and planning. Personally I LOVE gearing up for any new adventure. There is no human endeavor that cannot be improved by at least 3 useless gadgets purchased on a whim on Amazon at 4:12am...

My post was a personal reflection on what happens when the prep and planning become the focus and the generator of stress, as happened to me in 2017. I meant no disrespect toward those who micro plan everything. If that's your thing, roll on with it. Just don't let it induce undue anxiety. Know that the Camino provides for us all.

In some way I am slightly embarrassed by my original post. I am currently planning to do the Piemont route across southern France and I am in the middle of my own micro planning and research hurricane. Perhaps I need to read over what I wrote again. Perhaps get it tattooed on my forearm.

Cheers!

M
 
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy route (Fall 2018)
#52
@Marbe2
I think that the "physical memory" is useful for me. And you will note that I started without training, but with planning: footwear, pack, first night booked at Orisson, first week easy. I am not convinced that specific physical training for walking a camino is necessary. I fear that it may intimidate those who see the requirements as too high for their regular commitments. If a prospective pilgrim is in good ordinary health, my advice would be to get good footwear, pack light, give yourself lots of time to walk your camino, and take it easy. You might take a few long walks with your pack if you have never done so, just to see how you feel. Calm down.
Totally agree!
 

OLDER threads on this topic


Most read today

Live - Camino Portugues It begins
Replies
4
Views
89


Advertisement

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 8 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 32 4.6%
  • April

    Votes: 106 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 172 24.7%
  • June

    Votes: 51 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 14 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • September

    Votes: 200 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 85 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top