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Camino Aragonés 2021 Questions

WanderingEsquire

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (SJPDP to Santiago - June/July 2018)
Hola a tod@s! I am planning/hoping to walk the Camino Aragonés, starting in Pau/Oloron Sainte-Marie, in early July. I've read that this is not a very highly trafficked Camino route, but I'm hoping to hear first-hand from those who have done this Camino in recent years whether you met other pilgrims while walking. I enjoyed having a lot of time alone while walking the Francés in 2018, but I also loved chatting with different people to break up the long days - and I especially loved the community feeling at the albergues. I'm not sure I'd love spending 8-9 days walking totally by myself. I'm also a bit concerned about the infrastructure, in terms of having places to stop to fill up water, grab a snack, etc. I watched (and loved) Nadine Walks' YouTube videos about this route, and it seemed like there were several times she went without seeing any place to stop for hours.

Also, is there any type of certificate of completion or special stamp to mark the completion of this route? Finally, has anyone walked backward from Puente La Reina to Pamplona at the end of this route? I was thinking this could be a super fun way to see the Alto del Perdon one more time - approaching from the other side! Thanks in advance. :)
 
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O Peracha

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Did it in June 2019 as part of a longer trek from Toulouse to Santiago. Very few pilgrims and compared to Frances is going to feel very lonely . . . when you are walking. However, there was never a night where there weren't people at the albergue - either pilgrims, hikers or bicylists. There is an opportunity to join/make a camino family and you could arrange to walk together I was part of three and we could have walked together but never did because we had very different styles of walking. One guy started at 5 am and didn't stop until he reached the albergue for the day. Another took long breaks including naps along the way. So, we all walked by ourselves and met at the albergue and had dinner together. None of this was arranged or discussed ahead of time, no exchanging of numbers. It just happened. July should have more people. There aren't many choices on where to stop but one place that I would highly recommend is the albergue in Arres. Also, you'll have to carry your lunch/snacks. There aren't many options along the way.

I'm not aware of a compostela specific to Aragones.


BTW, the Oloron albergue is very popular as it is on the crossroads of multiple paths. It was full. I made reservations in June and would strongly recommend it for July.

edit: I forgot to mention, I would not let the fewer pilgrims deter you. It is a beautiful camino and highly recommend it.
 

Flog

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I walked it in May 2019 and
It was fairly quiet. I walked with a camino friend and we met about 10 pilgrims in total. You do need to stock up on food and drinks for some stages but it's quite managable and there are enough places to find a bed and a meal... a nice week's walking..
 

dick bird

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
There was never a night when there weren't other pilgrims around, but we'd rarely meet them on the way. On the French section - the French way outdo the Spanish in their odd business (or non-business) hours. No one would take a lunch order after 1 pm, and in the evening, only formal restaurants were open. Everything is closed on Sundays (everything). The good news is that the gites (similar to private albergues) have the great system of the 'épicerie de coin', literally grocer's in the corner, a cabinet where they sell basic foods - cans, rice, pasta, and, of course, wine. But on the French section you will need to think ahead about tomorrow's lunch and having emergency food to cook. You will mainly navigate by the GR system - a red and a white horizontal line. It actually works better than the yellow arrows, so harder to get lost. The people were delightful, kind and helpful all the way - forget every snarky comment you have heard about the French. July will be hot, but the gites all have 3 ft thick walls so are very cool in the day.

Try to spend some time exploring the churches in Oloron, Jaca and Sangüesa. The side trips to Leyre and San Juan de la Peña are really worth doing if you have time, and yes, Arrés is not to be missed.

The Aragonés is a bit more like a typical Spanish camino. There may be sections with fewer facilities but it is more pilgrim oriented than the Chemin D'Arles.

Both sections are beautiful. Here are a couple of links to youtube videos I made to whet your appetite.

Feel free to PM if you have any specific questions, and buen camino.


 

Ksalud

Member
Did it in June 2019 as part of a longer trek from Toulouse to Santiago. Very few pilgrims and compared to Frances is going to feel very lonely . . . when you are walking. However, there was never a night where there weren't people at the albergue - either pilgrims, hikers or bicylists. There is an opportunity to join/make a camino family and you could arrange to walk together I was part of three and we could have walked together but never did because we had very different styles of walking. One guy started at 5 am and didn't stop until he reached the albergue for the day. Another took long breaks including naps along the way. So, we all walked by ourselves and met at the albergue and had dinner together. None of this was arranged or discussed ahead of time, no exchanging of numbers. It just happened. July should have more people. There aren't many choices on where to stop but one place that I would highly recommend is the albergue in Arres. Also, you'll have to carry your lunch/snacks. There aren't many options along the way.

I'm not aware of a compostela specific to Aragones.


BTW, the Oloron albergue is very popular as it is on the crossroads of multiple paths. It was full. I made reservations in June and would strongly recommend it for July.

edit: I forgot to mention, I would not let the fewer pilgrims deter you. It is a beautiful camino and highly recommend it.
Arres my favorite after 4 different Caminos
 
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JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
There is a decent chance of coming upon other pilgrims on the Aragonès, especially after you reach Jaca.

The Albergues I liked on the French side are the Monastery one at Sarrance, and the combination Pilgrim & Pyrenees crest trail hikers hostelry at Borce.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I walked the Caminos Catalan and Aragonese for three weeks in late October and early November 2019. These were described as having few pilgrims. That was especially true at that time of year. I met only one on the Catalan going my way and that was just for a night but several days later we met again on the Aragones and with another spent the nights at the same places. The log books showed walkers spaced apart by days. With sparse accomodations if you meet up with someone it will likely be for a couple days.

I did walk from Puente de Reina to Pamplona to finish my camino. It was fun seeing a good number of pilgrims again and coming toward me. The majority were Korean. Also fun was that it was snowing at the Alto de Perdon. Around Cizor Minor I had to walk besides the trail because it had become a deep and fast moving stream. There were a lot of floods in Spain at the time.

Definitely carry more water with you in the summer. Extra snacks is a good idea too.

I'm not aware of any "compostela" or stamp for the camino.

Do stop for the church at Eunate. Check for the hours that it is open. Also detour to see the old monastery of San Juan de la Peña. I walked two weeks to get there and it was worth it. The "new" monastery (1600) had its interests too.
 

John Saxon

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
@WanderingEsquire I haven't walked the Aragones but am planning on doing that in September (so thanks to all who have responded with such great info). About the only thing I can add is that my plan is to do it "backwards" starting in SJPdP (hoped to start in Bayonne but the Baztan is "closed") to Puente la Reina and then to Oloron and from there along the Chemin Piemont to Carcasonne or Narbonne.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
Walked it forward in Spring 2018 and then reverse in Spring 2019 and loved it each way. Fewer pilgrims than the CF, but enough to not feel lonely. Carry water (especially in the summer) and a lunch - while food is available, the timing never worked out for us. July will be very hot in the Valley, so definitely take a hat and sunscreen (I got sunburned in Jaca in late April, than snowed on over the Somport pass the very next day!)

Consider detours to the Lumbier Gorge, Castle Javier, and SJdlP since they do not add many miles but certainly are historically interesting enough for the effort.
 

dick bird

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Walked it forward in Spring 2018 and then reverse in Spring 2019 and loved it each way. Fewer pilgrims than the CF, but enough to not feel lonely. Carry water (especially in the summer) and a lunch - while food is available, the timing never worked out for us. July will be very hot in the Valley, so definitely take a hat and sunscreen (I got sunburned in Jaca in late April, than snowed on over the Somport pass the very next day!)

Consider detours to the Lumbier Gorge, Castle Javier, and SJdlP since they do not add many miles but certainly are historically interesting enough for the effort.
I endorse the recommendation for the Lumbier Gorge. It starts just after Sangüesa and you can rejoin the Aragonés shortly after. Spectacular scenery and birds.
 
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I endorse the recommendation for the Lumbier Gorge. It starts just after Sangüesa and you can rejoin the Aragonés shortly after. Spectacular scenery and birds.
It is a bit longer than the standard route. The woman who checked us into the Sangüesa albergue told us that there was an early morning bus that could be taken to make the two routes closer in length. I stuck with the standard route.

Here is what I missed:
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
Spain’s first electric train ran from Sangüesa to Pamplona through that gorge and there are still a few remnants of that infrastructure. One can continue walking that path all the way to Pamplona (which we did!), though there are no specific pilgrim accommodations nor is the path clearly marked.

From Lumbier, you can return to the official Aragon route though this detour does add a half-day of walking.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
I walked the Caminos Catalan and Aragonese for three weeks in late October and early November 2019. These were described as having few pilgrims. That was especially true at that time of year. I met only one on the Catalan going my way and that was just for a night but several days later we met again on the Aragones and with another spent the nights at the same places. The log books showed walkers spaced apart by days. With sparse accomodations if you meet up with someone it will likely be for a couple days.

I did walk from Puente de Reina to Pamplona to finish my camino. It was fun seeing a good number of pilgrims again and coming toward me. The majority were Korean. Also fun was that it was snowing at the Alto de Perdon. Around Cizor Minor I had to walk besides the trail because it had become a deep and fast moving stream. There were a lot of floods in Spain at the time.

Definitely carry more water with you in the summer. Extra snacks is a good idea too.

I'm not aware of any "compostela" or stamp for the camino.

Do stop for the church at Eunate. Check for the hours that it is open. Also detour to see the old monastery of San Juan de la Peña. I walked two weeks to get there and it was worth it. The "new" monastery (1600) had its interests too.
I agree with Joe. Eunate and San Juan de la Pena are both very special. Do visit them.

Here is one way to walk Backward to Eunate
 
Last edited:

GailGwyn

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
part Camino Frances (2013), Part Camino Norte (2014)Camino Frances (2019)Camino Portuguese (2020)
There was never a night when there weren't other pilgrims around, but we'd rarely meet them on the way. On the French section - the French way outdo the Spanish in their odd business (or non-business) hours. No one would take a lunch order after 1 pm, and in the evening, only formal restaurants were open. Everything is closed on Sundays (everything). The good news is that the gites (similar to private albergues) have the great system of the 'épicerie de coin', literally grocer's in the corner, a cabinet where they sell basic foods - cans, rice, pasta, and, of course, wine. But on the French section you will need to think ahead about tomorrow's lunch and having emergency food to cook. You will mainly navigate by the GR system - a red and a white horizontal line. It actually works better than the yellow arrows, so harder to get lost. The people were delightful, kind and helpful all the way - forget every snarky comment you have heard about the French. July will be hot, but the gites all have 3 ft thick walls so are very cool in the day.

Try to spend some time exploring the churches in Oloron, Jaca and Sangüesa. The side trips to Leyre and San Juan de la Peña are really worth doing if you have time, and yes, Arrés is not to be missed.

The Aragonés is a bit more like a typical Spanish camino. There may be sections with fewer facilities but it is more pilgrim oriented than the Chemin D'Arles.

Both sections are beautiful. Here are a couple of links to youtube videos I made to whet your appetite.

Feel free to PM if you have any specific questions, and buen camino.


Beautiful videos and music. Thank you.
 

Pia Valbak Schmidt

Pilgrim, DK, Caminos 2007,09,11,12,13,14.15,16,18
Past OR future Camino
2007,2009,2011,2012,2013,2014.2015,2016,2018. Hospitalera 2012,2013,2014,2016,2017
Hola a tod@s! I am planning/hoping to walk the Camino Aragonés, starting in Pau/Oloron Sainte-Marie, in early July. I've read that this is not a very highly trafficked Camino route, but I'm hoping to hear first-hand from those who have done this Camino in recent years whether you met other pilgrims while walking. I enjoyed having a lot of time alone while walking the Francés in 2018, but I also loved chatting with different people to break up the long days - and I especially loved the community feeling at the albergues. I'm not sure I'd love spending 8-9 days walking totally by myself. I'm also a bit concerned about the infrastructure, in terms of having places to stop to fill up water, grab a snack, etc. I watched (and loved) Nadine Walks' YouTube videos about this route, and it seemed like there were several times she went without seeing any place to stop for hours.

Also, is there any type of certificate of completion or special stamp to mark the completion of this route? Finally, has anyone walked backward from Puente La Reina to Pamplona at the end of this route? I was thinking this could be a super fun way to see the Alto del Perdon one more time - approaching from the other side! Thanks in advance. :)
I walked The Aragones i the end of may/ start june 2018. I did not meet very many pilgrims on the caminopath, but there were always many people at the albergues in the evening.
For me it was a bit though, because on many places the paths were in bad condition because of bad weather in the area, but it was a beautiful walk, and a great expierience. I might do it again.
Buen camino 🍀 🍀 🍀
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I agree with @O Peracha about the albergue at Arres. The spirit is like Granon, but with beds! I saw recently on this forum that it is open this summer.
 

High Endeavours

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 13
VdlP 14
LePuy 15
Invierno DosFaros CP 16
88 Templ Japan 17
Sicily Arles-Santiago 18
Norte 19
Prior to the covid interruption I walked Marseille to Santiago starting September 21. There were very few pilgrims along the Arles, but once I arrived in Spain in mid October just after the Col de Somport at Canfranc there were a few other walkers, often folks walking for a week or less. And yes, the Lumbier Gorge is a very nice variant. No reason not to walk back towards Pamplona as many others have done so over the years. Have fun!
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Past OR future Camino
yes...
Hola a tod@s! I am planning/hoping to walk the Camino Aragonés, starting in Pau/Oloron Sainte-Marie, in early July.

Hello! I'm planning on walking the Aragones from Oloron on the 11th July... we arrive on the 10th. Unlike a conventional camino we're walking short day stages and staying in a gite in Oloron for a week... and then moving on to a similar property somewhere after Jaca. We live in France so we'll drive down and walk the stages and return to our car each day. We did this last year on the Leboniego and it worked well... and we got to see the route in two directions... there and on the way back to our car too.

We have 2 weeks and hope to cover as much ground as possible... Perhaps we'll see you one day :cool:
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
I'm this close to setting out on the Aragones from the border of Spain/France on the 16th June. The thing I'm concerned about is availability of accommodation because of covid closures. I don't mind paying for a couple of hotel nights on the six days to Puente la Reina, but are there also albergues open on this route still? Gronze lists some but I don't know if I can trust that they're really open.

Can anyone lay my worries to rest? :D Thanks!!
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
The albergue system is pretty meager on this route even in the good times, so your worry is justified during this transitional period. I’d love to allay your fears, but with the landscape changing daily, I think you just need to call/email each of them to see what their unique situation is.

I know the new albergue in Canfranc won’t open until at least August, someone mentioned Arres as July 1, and the municipally run ones (Jaca, Santa Cilia, Sanguesa) are likely not to be open.

In short, research and be prepared to pay for private lodging when necessary (which could be every night on the Aragon). Also, you may have to elongate your stages at times because it Ruesta is closed, for instance, the next lodging of any kind is a long walk away.

it’s a fabulous route, but definitely made harder as things emerge from hibernation.
 
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John Saxon

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I'm planning on walking the Aragones from Maruzabel to Somport (and on to the Piedmont) in September.
It's my understanding from checking Gronze and another Spanish federation website that Sanguesa albergue is closed at least temporarily "pending new concession" and that the Arres albergue is closed but may open back later this summer or fall. The albergue in Artieda (based on email correspondence) is open but very limited due to COVID restrictions. I'm seeing albergues in Canfranc Estacion, Canfranc, Jaca, Santa Cilia de Jaca, Ruesta, Undues de Lerda, and Monreal open (but possible limited capacity).
Buena suerte y buen Camino!
Here's the Spanish federation website I've been checking (in addition to Gronze): https://albergueslot.appcamino.com/inicio
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2017-20: Francés, Norte, Francés, Portuguese Lisbon Coastal, Portuguese central
Thanks to you both for the really helpful answers. I'm quite okay with staying in cheap (ie. sub 40 euro) hotels for some of the nights if that's what it takes. I'm really just scared to be stranded with nothing one night, and no way to get away to the nearest large town, but not knowing the route well I don't know if that's a realistic concern or not!

Thanks John for the link to the albergue federation. That's extremely useful! Do I understand that these are live figures for how many beds available tonight or is it just in general?

I'm planning on walking the Aragones from Maruzabel to Somport (and on to the Piedmont) in September.
It's my understanding from checking Gronze and another Spanish federation website that Sanguesa albergue is closed at least temporarily "pending new concession" and that the Arres albergue is closed but may open back later this summer or fall. The albergue in Artieda (based on email correspondence) is open but very limited due to COVID restrictions. I'm seeing albergues in Canfranc Estacion, Canfranc, Jaca, Santa Cilia de Jaca, Ruesta, Undues de Lerda, and Monreal open (but possible limited capacity).
Buena suerte y buen Camino!
Here's the Spanish federation website I've been checking (in addition to Gronze): https://albergueslot.appcamino.com/inic
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
The Aragon feels like a million miles away from nowhere a lot of the time, but you really are not - at one point you can see Pamplona from a particularly lonely section of the trail! There’s no bus or train route, but catching a ride or having a bar call you a taxi is always possible.

In 2018, we arrived in Monreal to find the albergue locked up - “the hospitalero failed to arrive” we were told. Fortunately, a local inn-keeper was putting up pilgrims in his beautiful Casa Rural for the same pilgrim price!!! King size bed, bathtub, and a master suite almost the size of my real home!

As they say, “The Camino Provides (but it’s never a bad idea to have a backup plan” 😎
 

John Saxon

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Thanks to you both for the really helpful answers. I'm quite okay with staying in cheap (ie. sub 40 euro) hotels for some of the nights if that's what it takes. I'm really just scared to be stranded with nothing one night, and no way to get away to the nearest large town, but not knowing the route well I don't know if that's a realistic concern or not!

Thanks John for the link to the albergue federation. That's extremely useful! Do I understand that these are live figures for how many beds available tonight or is it just in general?
There are a couple of nights when I'm planning on staying in fairly inexpensive hotels for detours through Foz de Lumbier and San Juan de la Pena monasteries. But I'm fairly confident that as of September I'll be able to find some place to stay.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
We have stayed twice at Hotel Restaurant Iru Bide in Lumbier; they offered a pilgrim rate and their fixed price meal (no pilgrim discount) was outstanding! Both times we had a giant bathtub and a balcony overlooking the valley. Not too fancy, but a great deal for the price (and their morning selection of bocadillos was truly superb!)

The only place to stay at SJdlP was in the “new” monastery which is now essentially a large hotel. A bit pricey, but the morning breakfast was extensive and being at such an amazing site after the tourist buses have gone home was a delight.
 
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Frances 2016; Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre/Muxia 2017; Aragones 2018; Suso/Yuso, Meseta 2019
I can echo most of what has been written here! I took 11 days in early October 2019 to walk from Somport to Puente la Reina which allowed me time for a couple of extra stops. The Monastery Leyre has a nice hosteria with great views of Embalse Yesa from the terrace. The office gave me a key to the crypt and told me "to lock myself in"! Mass in the evening has lovely gregorian chant. One thing I did that very few pilgrims do, especially old lady pilgrims walking alone, was to stop at Santa Cilia aerodrome and go soaring over the foothills. Wonderful!
I had three days in a row when I saw no other pilgrins, not even in my chosen lodging. I speak reasonably good castellano.

I would be interested also in learning a route to go up to Alto de Perdon, either backwards on the Camino or from the eastern end of the mountain.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I would be interested also in learning a route to go up to Alto de Perdon, either backwards on the Camino or from the eastern end of the mountain.
Maps.me shows a pedestrian route from Tiebas to Alto de Perdon via the eastern end of that mountain.

I can’t imagine Obanos to Pamplona via the camino in reverse being that difficult, direction-wise.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
There is a route from Tiebas (on the Aragones) that requires a long climb up, but then you follow the ridge line past the wind turbines to the Perrigrino monument at Alto de Perdon! Beautiful views over 15km.
 

Daniel H

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I can echo most of what has been written here! I took 11 days in early October 2019 to walk from Somport to Puente la Reina which allowed me time for a couple of extra stops. The Monastery Leyre has a nice hosteria with great views of Embalse Yesa from the terrace. The office gave me a key to the crypt and told me "to lock myself in"! Mass in the evening has lovely gregorian chant. One thing I did that very few pilgrims do, especially old lady pilgrims walking alone, was to stop at Santa Cilia aerodrome and go soaring over the foothills. Wonderful!
I had three days in a row when I saw no other pilgrins, not even in my chosen lodging. I speak reasonably good castellano.

I would be interested also in learning a route to go up to Alto de Perdon, either backwards on the Camino or from the eastern end of the mountain.
These are some great ideas of ways to enjoy what the Camino Aragones can offer. The Monastery Leyre “sounds” wonderful. I might be following in your footsteps in a few weeks, so this was very helpful.
 

Daniel H

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Im
There is a route from Tiebas (on the Aragones) that requires a long climb up, but then you follow the ridge line past the wind turbines to the Perrigrino monument at Alto de Perdon! Beautiful views over 15km.
I’m interested in this option. I might be walking the Aragones in a few weeks and I haven’t decided about if I will go to Pamplona to not miss that city, or just join up with the Frances at Obanos. Does the route go through Subiza or Biurrun? (I can see the roads on the Google satellite map, and would ask the locals regardless.). Just as likely that I might decide that is not a hill that I need to climb, but planning from the couch I still have lots of energy! And that ridge walk would be amazing.
 
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Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
Subiza. But if you haven’t been to Pamplona, then definitely head that way! But I’d walk the entire Aragones to Puente la Reina - it’s magical to feel so alone and suddenly be swamped by pilgrims and residents! Perhaps finish the Aragon and then bus to Pamplona to restart walking there?
 

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