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LIVE from the Camino Camino Aragonés, September 2018

Isobeljc

Still walking
Camino(s) past & future
Frances “2017”
Aragones “2018”
Portuguese “2018”
We have made it YAY. From Australia we have had 2 plane flights, 3 train trips and 1 bus ride to get to Somport to start our walk. It really wasn’t that hard.
We flew into Paris (CDG). Waited a couple of hours and got the 4 hour TVG train to Bordeaux. The station is at the airport. Overnight in Bordeaux.
Next day to Pau by train. Another overnight to help get over the jet lag, it really is a beautiful city.
This morning we got the train to Bedous and then the bus to Somport, arriving at 11.30am. All done by the machine at the station, and in English.
Got our picture taken with the sign by nice Spanish Police, a caffe con leche, a sello, and we were off.
Now in Confrac Estacion after a couple of hours down the steep hill. The pack and poles feel like old friends. A good start to our second Camino.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
You're on your way! Loved the Aragonés. Hope you will keep us posted if you are inclined to report back while walking. So many great things about this Camino, but the numbers are way down, so your presence will be greatly appreciated by the hospitaleros! Buen camino, Laurie
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
When I walked the Aragones (2016) I flew into CDG, bus to Orly, flew to Pau, bus into town, train to Oloron Ste Marie, (all the same day) one overnight then walked from there. It was an easy three day walk up the Valee d'Aspe to Somport, if somewhat wet.
 

camino07

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances x5, Portuguese VdlP12, Sanabres, Aragones, Norte,Salvador,Primitivo, VdlP 17,Madrid18Norte
My way was: train from Barcelona to Zaragoza then bus to Jaca and bus to Somport.
 

Isobeljc

Still walking
Camino(s) past & future
Frances “2017”
Aragones “2018”
Portuguese “2018”
This is the story of our journey along the Aragones way.

We were very excited to get off the bus at Somport, a cafe con leche, a sello and we were off down the hill.

Steep in places but not too bad.
Magnificent mountain scenery, especially on a beautiful sunny day. Completely different to the French side of the Pyrenees.

Past the ski runs to the ruins of the Hospital Santa Christina. They cared for pilgrims from the Middle Ages and it’s even mentioned in the Codex Calixtinus.
First night at Canfrac Estacion. Lots of day trippers and hikers. Didn’t see a single pilgrim on the trail.
The abandoned International Railway Station is impressive.
The body the next morning was ok considering how little training we have done.

Stopped at Villanua for yummy tapas. Onward to Castellio de Jaca for the night.....oops.....no room at the inn.re
Another 8km on a warm day to get to Jaca for 2 nights. Thank goodness for bookings . com.

The San Juan de la Pena monastery clinging to the mountains under a rock is not to be missed. Also the newer one where there are excavations and the village below.

You can walk 11km mountain climbing to get there. We chose the easy way out and paid €50 for a taxi to take us up there and then wait for us. Worth every cent. The tourist office booked it for us. The bus doesn’t run this time of the year.

Checked out the 2nd oldest cathedral in Spain. Very beautiful but somber. The military citadel compete with deer and miniature military figures to finished off the day.

Hope you like some of our Pics
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes/Burgos/SdeC 77; Frances 12,15,17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes/Aragones18; Logrono-Leon 19.
Stopped at Villanua for yummy tapas.

How wonderful to hear that! I'm not a "foodie" and came late to the whole tapas thing, so my opinion may not be worth much.... But the tapas I ate at the Bar Asador Jose in Villanua Viejo were probably the tastiest I ever ran across. As good as anything I ever found in Logrono on the Calle Laurel!.... I complemented the servers behind the bar, but they waived their hands and said that "We do not make them here. The lady across the street makes them specially for us!"

(Nice pix, btw!)
 
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sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
We actually caught the bus to SAN Juan de la Pena yesterday. It leaves the bus station at 9.15am in Jaca. Goes straight to the new monastery at the top. We were able to leave our packs in the bus while we looked at the exhibition. Then he drove us down to the old monastery. The cost was an all inclusive price of 15€ for bus, 2 monasteries and the church of SAN Caprasio.
The bus is also used by the workers at the monasteries.
There are 2 options for returning to the route. Walk down from old monastery or return by bus to Jaca about 5.00. The hospitalero in Jaca said that we could stay 2 nights in the albergue if we wanted to return by bus. Instead some of us walked to Santa Cilia and some to Arres.
The hospitalera in Santa Cilia cooks a delicious dinner.
Also, a recommendation for Restaurant Biarritz in Jaca. An excellent meal for 15.50€.
 

Isobeljc

Still walking
Camino(s) past & future
Frances “2017”
Aragones “2018”
Portuguese “2018”
This Aragones Way is very different. Either you have short walking days (10-13km) or long ones (21-28km) per day. There is nothing in between.

Most of the villages are very small with just one albergue to stay in. Only one bar and no supermarkets.

Lots of huge vistas across the valleys with some forest in between. Mainly no shade as we walk through farm land. It is rather hot here at the moment.

Arres was a lovely place. There were more pilgrims than residents that night. 23 of us stayed there including 3 on the dining room floor. The donativo Albergue was brilliantly run. The hospitaliro gave a guided tour of the village, the church and the tower. All in very fast Spanish but luckily a fellow pilgrim translated for both the English and German speakers.

In Artieda an elderly man sits outside in the plaza with his big key to open the church and give a stamp to interested pilgrims. It was very special. I think that is his reason to get up in the morning. Our Catholic American walking friends were very touched.
Here we had one of the best pilgrims meals I’ve ever had. Of a choice of three I chose: Spinach and carrot soup, rabbit and local veges, with watermelon drizzled in chocolate to finish off. The wine was even uncorked in front of us.

A longs days walk from Artedia to Sanguesa through very pretty but tough terrain. Only Ruesta for a coffee con leche

Still very few pilgrims on the trail, no one passed us and we passed no one. We only saw the same friendly faces at night.

Sanguesa is a lovely town with all the services. A good place to stock up.

Enjoy the pics
 

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amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Thanks for your report, it is great to hear that people still love the Aragonés, Arrés is a special place, as is Ruesca, a unique, beautiful experience that fewer and fewer pilgrims seem to chose. The small church in Arres is just gorgeous!
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
Love that route - thanks for the report (I hope you post more)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
In Artieda an elderly man sits outside in the plaza with his big key to open the church and give a stamp to interested pilgrims. It was very special. I think that is his reason to get up in the morning. Our Catholic American walking friends were very touched.
Enjoy the pics
Love the photos! And I liked your snippet about the man in Artieda. I don’t want to overstate this, but I do think that the camino has brought some life and intereste into these tiny towns filled with old people and on their way to oblivion. I also remember a couple of years ago at the new albergue in Vilaserio. An elderly woman had opened an albergue in the family home after the death of her husband. Her daughter was at the albergue when i was there and she told me that in her opinion the albergue had given her mom back her reason to live. From depression, resignation, sadness, to getting up in the morning and having to get going. It’s nice that it’s one of the side effects, maybe for more people than these two.

And you are probably already beyond Sangüesa, but I wonder if you were moved to take the alternative through the Foz de Lumbier, a river canyon gorge type place, sorry for my inartful description. One of my few regrets when walking the Aragonés was that I was oblivious to its existence, and it looks like a beautful walk.
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
Hi Isobel. We are one day behind you. Albergue in Sanguesa is full tonight. There have been many pilgrims along the way. We stayed in Artieda last night and had a delicious dinner.
Planning to walk the Foz/ Lumbier gorge route tomorrow to Monreal.
Many of us have walked from France so we were very pleased to be together again in Sanguesa, which by the way looks much better after dark when the buildings and streets are lit.
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Foz de Lumbier. Enjoying this dramatic gorge first thing in the morning on your own, surrounded by the river and tens of vultures is a unique experience in all Caminos. A small tip: you have to cross old train tunnels where there is no light. You can do it the easy way, using a torch or your mobile, or you can be brave and do it the sensible way: just carry a stick/pole on your hand and point it at the wall on your side. Drag it along the way, and as long as you are dragging it agains the wall you can be sure you will not be breaking your nose in the dark. You start slowly, but when you realize it is perfectly safe, it is eery to walk at a good pace in complete darkness until you start seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.

Incidentally, that place was famous for some squirmish between ETA terrorists and Guardia Civil a few years ago, that is why the name was familiar to me. DO NOT MISS IT!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Foz de Lumbier. Enjoying this dramatic gorge first thing in the morning on your own, surrounded by the river and tens of vultures is a unique experience in all Caminos. A small tip: you have to cross old train tunnels where there is no light. You can do it the easy way, using a torch or your mobile, or you can be brave and do it the sensible way: just carry a stick/pole on your hand and point it at the wall on your side. Drag it along the way, and as long as you are dragging it agains the wall you can be sure you will not be breaking your nose in the dark. You start slowly, but when you realize it is perfectly safe, it is eery to walk at a good pace in complete darkness until you start seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.

Incidentally, that place was famous for some squirmish between ETA terrorists and Guardia Civil a few years ago, that is why the name was familiar to me. DO NOT MISS IT!
You’re killing me with these descriptions. How in the world did LT and I not know about this when we walked a few years ago??????
 

Isobeljc

Still walking
Camino(s) past & future
Frances “2017”
Aragones “2018”
Portuguese “2018”
Love the photos! And I liked your snippet about the man in Artieda. I don’t want to overstate this, but I do think that the camino has brought some life and intereste into these tiny towns filled with old people and on their way to oblivion. I also remember a couple of years ago at the new albergue in Vilaserio. An elderly woman had opened an albergue in the family home after the death of her husband. Her daughter was at the albergue when i was there and she told me that in her opinion the albergue had given her mom back her reason to live. From depression, resignation, sadness, to getting up in the morning and having to get going. It’s nice that it’s one of the side effects, maybe for more people than these two.

And you are probably already beyond Sangüesa, but I wonder if you were moved to take the alternative through the Foz de Lumbier, a river canyon gorge type place, sorry for my inartful description. One of my few regrets when walking the Aragonés was that I was oblivious to its existence, and it looks like a beautful walk.
Somehow we missed the sign to the gorge, I was looking forward to the tunnel
 

Isobeljc

Still walking
Camino(s) past & future
Frances “2017”
Aragones “2018”
Portuguese “2018”
Sorry about taking so long to post the rest of our journey, just didn’t get to it.

Heading of Sanguesa was a bit sad as our new American friends took a taxi to Puenta La Raina to get medical help (ps: she is now walking again and getting her pack transported), smart move.

A big day of 28km to Monreal with nothing open in between. Had to carry water and food for the day. The Albergue and bar in Izco was closed about half way. Don’t know if it’s permanent or not.
Walking was through a mixture of trails through the forest and rural roads. Some big hills to up and down.

Monreal was an ok albergue once every one figured out that you had to go to the bar to check in. Of course it was up a huge flight of steps to get there. Lots of locals around this time.

Next day again walking through farm land. Pamplona started to appear on our right. An strange feeling seeing it from a different direction. A short day to Tiebas. The near new municipal Albergue was well set up. We needed it as we were there on a Monday and the only bar in town was closed on Monday’s grrrrr. The Albergue had a well stocked cupboard of beans, pasta, tuna, wine etc to purchase and cook yourself. The castle in ruins on top of the hill is quiet spectacular, especially lit up at night.

Last day on the Aragones. Watching the traffic go by from above, along with the aqueduct was starting to bring us back to the real world.
Walking up to Eunate seeing this perfectly shaped church by itself was stunning.

After this it was a shock to the system joining all the pilgrims in Puenta La Reina after being basically on our own for the previous 160km. Where did all these people come from???

So......
Did I enjoy it?...yes
Was it tough?...yes
Was it social?....no
Was it well signposted?....no
Would I do it again?......no
Am I glad I did it?.......YES
 

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amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
You’re killing me with these descriptions. How in the world did LT and I not know about this when we walked a few years ago??????
Bueno, I only realized the day before, it was not so well signposted, I used the map on my mobile to cut across some fiels without realizing the GPS does not show fences or bad falls! I eventually made it. You will have to come back for this, Laurie! The old railway path is in carved in the cliff on the right hand side of this photo, I went down to the river to cool down a bit, and there was nobody else but me and a few dozens of different types of vultures
 

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mlhhome

Really new member
Camino(s) past & future
Various (‘12, ‘13, ‘15, ‘16, ‘18)
Wonderful wonderful reflections and photos. Thanks for taking the time and effort to share!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Bueno, I only realized the day before, it was not so well signposted, I used the map on my mobile to cut across some fiels without realizing the GPS does not show fences or bad falls! I eventually made it. You will have to come back for this, Laurie! The old railway path is in carved in the cliff on the right hand side of this photo, I went down to the river to cool down a bit, and there was nobody else but me and a few dozens of different types of vultures
That’s a really beautiful picture, just keep on doing this Amancio, ;)but I wonder if you could explain how you walk through the gorge with those water levels.
 

wayan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra (Oct-Nov 2013)
Camino Aragones, Frances, Portuguese (Sep-Nov 2015)
That’s a really beautiful picture, just keep on doing this Amancio, ;)but I wonder if you could explain how you walk through the gorge with those water levels.
The trail runs along the right side of the gorge. It was wide enough for a train to travel along.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
This was May 2018 - cold and a bit damp, the river in the gorge was raging and way to dangerous to approach. We also stumbled through the field trying to follow the old path as the new one took a very large detour around a road. A pBD683FAD-37C5-4D1E-BA96-0AB68A1FD94E.jpegost-gorge picnic lunch was our reward!



DC9F34C8-26E5-477F-A721-A0C5EE26DD23.jpeg840A83E9-17C7-49E7-B629-572F3CBB087F.jpeg
 

Simon Shum

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Oct 2013, Porto, San Salvador & Primitivo 2014. Norte 2016, VdLP & Via Francigena 2017
Vow, this is supremely beautiful.

Some quick questions - is the Aragones just as nice in mid October? Is this bus going up to SAN Juan de la Pena still operate in Mid October, and most albergues still open? And I assume I could get to Somport from Madrid city or airport? *(I know I should read past postings, but seeing all these beautiful pictures really get me excited)!!
Thanks!
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
I agree about coming in to the Frances at Puenta la Reina- pilgrim overload!
We loved the Aragonese and Arles routes. We found there were plenty of pilgrims once past Toulouse. As we don’t like big crowded albergues, this suited us fine. Most nights there were at least 5 pilgrims, sometimes the albergues were full. However, if there had been more pilgrims they would have been accommodated. There seemed to always be a mattress or stretcher that could be used.
We were lucky the day we walked through Izco as they opened the bar for 5 of us. Just long enough for us to buy a cold drink and use the toilets.
The route is a bit crazy at times. Taking you off the road, up a hill, down etc, when it would have been fine to stay on the very quiet road.
It was also quite tough leading up to Somport. But the views made up for it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
I took a train from Madrid to Zaragoza and the small regional train to Canfranc and taxi to Somport. Tourist office in Jaca will help you arrange a taxi to San Juan de la Pena, 50 euros well spent. I am in Sanguesa right now and have seen only 4 pieces of litter the entire way. The hospitalero in Arres says that this route is for intelligent people, very true.
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
Vow, this is supremely beautiful.

Some quick questions - is the Aragones just as nice in mid October? Is this bus going up to SAN Juan de la Pena still operate in Mid October, and most albergues still open? And I assume I could get to Somport from Madrid city or airport? *(I know I should read past postings, but seeing all these beautiful pictures really get me excited)!!
Thanks!
The bus takes workers up to SAN Juan Della Pena, so I presume that it keeps going while the monasteries are open. So I would say yes for mid October. Check on their website.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
Double check the tourist office who five days ago told me the bus was not running which is why I took a taxi.
 

Simon Shum

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Oct 2013, Porto, San Salvador & Primitivo 2014. Norte 2016, VdLP & Via Francigena 2017
I took a train from Madrid to Zaragoza and the small regional train to Canfranc and taxi to Somport. Tourist office in Jaca will help you arrange a taxi to San Juan de la Pena, 50 euros well spent. I am in Sanguesa right now and have seen only 4 pieces of litter the entire way. The hospitalero in Arres says that this route is for intelligent people, very true.
Thanks! I will consider this option, nice to visit Zaragosa too!
 

Simon Shum

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Oct 2013, Porto, San Salvador & Primitivo 2014. Norte 2016, VdLP & Via Francigena 2017
The bus takes workers up to SAN Juan Della Pena, so I presume that it keeps going while the monasteries are open. So I would say yes for mid October. Check on their website.
Thanks Sharon, I have been reading your postings with great interest! I will check its website, hopefully they are still working and running! I am also researching how to walk to the monastery and continue walking there! Much appreciated the information from all fellow pilgrims!
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
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caminka

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
The tourist office obviously had incorrect information as there were 8 pilgrims and 4 workers on the bus the day we took it.
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
The tourist office obviously had incorrect information as there were 8 pilgrims and 4 workers on the bus the day we took it.
It was Jose, the hospitalero from the municipal albergue, who told us about the bus.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
Hello, all and @sharon w, I do not think that the tourist office in Jaca would give incorrect information, but other information to fit our circumstances. If, for example, you arrived in Jaca later in the afternoon it makes sense to take the workers bus to San Juan de la Pena in the next morning. I arrived in Jaca during the morning and so going to the monestery by taxi in the afternoon worked well for me. Yes, 50 euros was no small amount of money but the driver and I had wonderful conversations in Spanish, he showed me his favorite lookouts and we also spent time at the churches in Santa Cruz de las Seros. So, any way that you get there, we all would agree that it is worth the time and effort.
 

Simon Shum

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Oct 2013, Porto, San Salvador & Primitivo 2014. Norte 2016, VdLP & Via Francigena 2017
My sincere thanks to all peregrina and peregrino above for sharing valuable info and experience! I want to do this camino real soon!

By the way, is Somport pass still open in early or mid November to start the camino there, or it is cutting into ski season? The Camino Aragones does not have many pilgrims, probably even less in November or March and April?
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
Hello, all and @sharon w, I do not think that the tourist office in Jaca would give incorrect information, but other information to fit our circumstances. If, for example, you arrived in Jaca later in the afternoon it makes sense to take the workers bus to San Juan de la Pena in the next morning. I arrived in Jaca during the morning and so going to the monestery by taxi in the afternoon worked well for me. Yes, 50 euros was no small amount of money but the driver and I had wonderful conversations in Spanish, he showed me his favorite lookouts and we also spent time at the churches in Santa Cruz de las Seros. So, any way that you get there, we all would agree that it is worth the time and effort.
Yes. You would be right. Also, if I was by myself, the taxi option would probably be better, as the walk down is stony and steep.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
The pass does not have a “closed season” like the Napoleon Route; whether you can cross is completely dependent upon the weather at that moment.

We walked the Aragones in April and it was virtually pilgrim-free! Over 8 days, we met 6 pilgrims.
 

Beeman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo,2017,Argonne and salvador,sept.2019
We have made it YAY. From Australia we have had 2 plane flights, 3 train trips and 1 bus ride to get to Somport to start our walk. It really wasn’t that hard.
We flew into Paris (CDG). Waited a couple of hours and got the 4 hour TVG train to Bordeaux. The station is at the airport. Overnight in Bordeaux.
Next day to Pau by train. Another overnight to help get over the jet lag, it really is a beautiful city.
This morning we got the train to Bedous and then the bus to Somport, arriving at 11.30am. All done by the machine at the station, and in English.
Got our picture taken with the sign by nice Spanish Police, a caffe con leche, a sello, and we were off.
Now in Confrac Estacion after a couple of hours down the steep hill. The pack and poles feel like old friends. A good start to our second Camino.
Why not just fly from Paris to Pau? Quicker and faster.
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
Yes, too late now of course but that 3-day walk from Oloron to Somport is very nice indeed. I hope you have a grand time.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
After all is "said and done" on this thread, AnnieSantiago's way sounds like the smoothest and easiest to me. If/when I ever walk the Aragones, this will be my choice, too, as I'd be coming from the west in the USA!
 
I flew to Madrid (spent a few days here), train to Zaragosa, train to Jaca (but a bus is probably faster) stayed 2 weeks taking Spanish lessons, Bus to Somport
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
Earlier this year @amancio suggested taking the regional train from Zaragoza to Canfranc which is what I did in September. It is nice to be able to move around a little more on a train and also to have toilet facilities.

The best part however was that train trip was a step back in time, a reminder of a lot of spanish history both good and not so good. Of course, many prefer to start the Aragones in France. It is amazing that there are so many different ways to reach the destination, just as there are in life and on the Camino, all good!
 

Thea Camino

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese (Sept 2017)
Camino Aragones (Sept 2019)
So excited We are hiking the CA and leaving Cape Town, South Africa 21 September 2019! We fly to Paris from where we would like the experience of travelling by train and will walk from Somport.

Any suggestions for reasonable accommodation in Paris?
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes, Aragonese May-June 2018 incomplete
So excited We are hiking the CA and leaving Cape Town, South Africa 21 September 2019! We fly to Paris from where we would like the experience of travelling by train and will walk from Somport.

Any suggestions for reasonable accommodation in Paris?
I walked from Lourdes, over Somport and got as far as Jaca, in May 2018.
For training I walked from the Waterfront to Camps Bay every Sunday for months, and always included steps from Clifton to High Level Road, making sure I had distance and hills.
Have a wonderful time. Best tapas in Spain in small town just past Somport.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes, Aragonese May-June 2018 incomplete
So excited We are hiking the CA and leaving Cape Town, South Africa 21 September 2019! We fly to Paris from where we would like the experience of travelling by train and will walk from Somport.

Any suggestions for reasonable accommodation in Paris?
If you want to talk to me, please send me a message. We can meet. I am also in Cape Town.
 

Isobeljc

Still walking
Camino(s) past & future
Frances “2017”
Aragones “2018”
Portuguese “2018”
HA! I even commented on these posts, so sorry, blame it on my fading memory. I will have to go through and re-read carefully because I have such wonderful memories of that route. Would you mind if I merged them all into one “live from the camino” thread so people who are looking for info now will out all about your camino in one place?

Way off topic, but what did you think of your Douro cruise? I love visiting the Douro and have taken a train way up to Pocinho to the end of the line and it’s gorgeous, but not sure how I would enjoy being in a boat.

Buen camino, Laurie
Hi @peregrina2000, feel free to wave your moderator magic to merge the threads.

Loved the cruise, very different to being a pilgrim.....big comfy bed, white fluffy towels, fantastic food.....the list goes on. The guide we had at Salamanca in Spain gave me a huge hug when she found out we were pilgrims. Got excited when we saw the scallop shell markers. Very interesting going to a known route even though we were not walking. Will PM you with the rest because it is off topic.
 

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