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2019 Camino Guides

Camino Belloc

rappahannock_rev

Anglican Catholic Priest
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes, Burgos & SdeC 77 (by train); Frances 12, 15 & 17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes, Aragones 18
#1
In 1901 young Hilaire Belloc, English Roman Catholic journalist and man-of-letters, made a solitary pilgrimage from Toul, in French Lorraine, over the Alps to Rome. He did it mostly on foot, and published a self-illustrated book about his pilgrimage titled The Path to Rome. It's a wonderful, wonderful book.

He did not tote a backpack. He did not wear REI trousers, or Merrell trailrunners. He found no albergues, and sometimes slept rough.... He did drink a lot of wine.... He tended towards being what we might consider today a walking purist, a man waaaaay ahead of his time.... And btw the Europe of 1901 was nothing like the Europe of today. Can you imagine walking across the heart of Europe and never seeing a car? Well, if Belloc saw one I can't recall any reference to it in his book! (Were there no cars in Europe in 1901?)

I've just now run across a 1990 book by Peter Francis Browne titled Rambling On the Road to Rome. It recounts Browne's attempt to follow in Belloc's footsteps! And although I'm overly devoted to the Frances (Camino Portugues? Bah! Humbug!) my curiosity has been roused.

Anyone on the Forum site familiar with Belloc's book? Anyone ever tried to do what Browne did almost thirty years ago, and walk the Camino Belloc? Anyone want to?
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#2
One favorite Belloc quote re walking from The Idea of a Pilgrimage

"..but the best way of all is on foot, where one is a man like any other man, with the sky above one, and the road beneath, and the world on every side, and time to see all....."

See or read Belloc's full text here.
http://m.fullonlinebook.com/essays/the-idea-of-a-pilgrimage/muab.html
 
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Paladina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cycled caminos francés, Finisterre, primitivo & del norte (2017); VdlP/Sanabres, ingles et al (2018)
#4
Yes, I’ve read Belloc’s book, but no, I hadn’t considered following in his footsteps - at least, not until now. Your suggestion, however, is very appealing.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Hice el camino francés hace 20 años (1999). Ahora quiero cruzar el del norte. (2019)
#5
In 1901 young Hilaire Belloc, English Roman Catholic journalist and man-of-letters, made a solitary pilgrimage from Toul, in French Lorraine, over the Alps to Rome. He did it mostly on foot, and published a self-illustrated book about his pilgrimage titled The Path to Rome. It's a wonderful, wonderful book.

He did not tote a backpack. He did not wear REI trousers, or Merrell trailrunners. He found no albergues, and sometimes slept rough.... He did drink a lot of wine.... He tended towards being what we might consider today a walking purist, a man waaaaay ahead of his time.... And btw the Europe of 1901 was nothing like the Europe of today. Can you imagine walking across the heart of Europe and never seeing a car? Well, if Belloc saw one I can't recall any reference to it in his book! (Were there no cars in Europe in 1901?)

I've just now run across a 1990 book by Peter Francis Browne titled Rambling On the Road to Rome. It recounts Browne's attempt to follow in Belloc's footsteps! And although I'm overly devoted to the Frances (Camino Portugues? Bah! Humbug!) my curiosity has been roused.

Anyone on the Forum site familiar with Belloc's book? Anyone ever tried to do what Browne did almost thirty years ago, and walk the Camino Belloc? Anyone want to?
I read Belloc´s book while in high school in 1960. As I recall, he used a style device of of ¨Lector¨ and "Auctor" in order to deliver his senses and reflections on what he experienced. The Path to Rome opened my eyes to travel and my desire to feel and understand a place as closely as possible, without the benefit of being a native of such place. Thanks for that reminder. Ultreia!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
#6
In 1901 young Hilaire Belloc, English Roman Catholic journalist and man-of-letters, made a solitary pilgrimage from Toul, in French Lorraine, over the Alps to Rome. He did it mostly on foot, and published a self-illustrated book about his pilgrimage titled The Path to Rome. It's a wonderful, wonderful book.

He did not tote a backpack. He did not wear REI trousers, or Merrell trailrunners. He found no albergues, and sometimes slept rough.... He did drink a lot of wine.... He tended towards being what we might consider today a walking purist, a man waaaaay ahead of his time.... And btw the Europe of 1901 was nothing like the Europe of today. Can you imagine walking across the heart of Europe and never seeing a car? Well, if Belloc saw one I can't recall any reference to it in his book! (Were there no cars in Europe in 1901?)

I've just now run across a 1990 book by Peter Francis Browne titled Rambling On the Road to Rome. It recounts Browne's attempt to follow in Belloc's footsteps! And although I'm overly devoted to the Frances (Camino Portugues? Bah! Humbug!) my curiosity has been roused.

Anyone on the Forum site familiar with Belloc's book? Anyone ever tried to do what Browne did almost thirty years ago, and walk the Camino Belloc? Anyone want to?
That's very interesting, I think you may have laid the seeds of my 2011 pilgrimage, when I fear Spain may be suffering from a Holy Year spike.

Belloc was my mother's godfather, and always gave her her favourite Chocolate Bath Oliver biscuits. He regularly stayed with her parents, both in England and when they were based abroad - indeed he celebrated one of my grandfather's postings with a little verse:

Sir Eric Phipps himself, I hear
Is nominated to Vienna.
So, early in the coming year
Sir Eric Phipps himself, I hear
Will take the train to Belvedere,
And carry on across the Brenner.
 

bkrey

New Member
#8
I agree this is a wonderful book, written with someone with a deep love of old Europe. In addition to the pilgrim-specific challenges you mentioned that Belloc faced, there was also the question of money. I recall he carried enough with him for the journey from starting point over the alps and had to make it on monetary fumes into a post office in northern Italy where his next 'cache' was waiting.
I also recall a hilarious episode in Switzerland (I think?) where a local left Belloc holding a mule or or horse while he caroused in a tavern, that story alone makes this worth reading. After the last page was done I found myself wishing I could have walked with this man as a companion.
 

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