Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement

Camino de la Corona - Where am I?

wisepilgrim

Guidebook Author
Camino(s) past & future
Many
Here's another 'where is it?' set of photos for the camino veterans. The first shows the camino, with some well aged signage and a distinct pine covered stretch which is arrow straight... something which makes it unique-ish on the Camino Francés. It coincides with another route, the Camino de la Corona, which is not well traveled enough to appear on a very brief google search.

Any guesses?



Camino.jpg

Corona.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
I'm going back 6 years on this stretch, but given that the most pines I recall are after the cruz de farro, but road-side (so this path seems wrong) , and between Puenta de la Reina and Burgos (where that massively wide, very muddy path is). I am going to guess that it's on the day that we walk into Najerra or into Estrella??
 

simply B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
somewhere between "not enough" and "way too many"
Okay, my best guess is....<drum roll>....

The only place that I remember comes even close is a few km out from the Irache wine fountain on the way to Luquin. (ie. on the "high" road)

The "lower" road takes one to Villamayor de Monjardin in a rough parallel to the A-12 and the N-111, correct?

(Are there "bonus points" for senior citizens who remember these types of things?;) Yep, that's what I thought....:rolleyes: It's okay, never mind!)

B
 

Isca-camigo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
The GR symbol on one of the trees could be a indicator, is it one of the entries or exits to Roncesvalles before they started putting concrete slabs down to ' help' the pilgrims, which is before my time?
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Instead of leaving Estella via the camino which leads to the Monastery at Irache
leave Estella via the Calle Mercatondoa and
Calle Camino Montejurra.
You can then make a right turn directly onto Camino de la Corona


Furthermore if you walk along the CdC towards Bodegas Pago de Larrainzar soon on your right is a path, the Camino de Santiago !!, which curves north across vineyards upto the Plaza de Irache and the main entrance of the Monastery.

 
Last edited:

wisepilgrim

Guidebook Author
Camino(s) past & future
Many
Instead of leaving Estella via the camino which leads to the Monastery at Irache
leave Estella via the Calle Mercatondoa and
Calle Camino Montejurra.
You can then make a right turn directly onto Camino de la Corona


Furthermore if you walk along the CdC towards Bodegas Pago de Larrainzar soon on your right is a path, the Camino de Santiago !!, which curves north across vineyards upto the Plaza de Irache and the main entrance of the Monastery.

You are in the right neighborhood, that is for sure. The Camino de la Corona is not to be confused with the street of the same name.
Okay, my best guess is....<drum roll>....

The only place that I remember comes even close is a few km out from the Irache wine fountain on the way to Luquin. (ie. on the "high" road)

The "lower" road takes one to Villamayor de Monjardin in a rough parallel to the A-12 and the N-111, correct?

(Are there "bonus points" for senior citizens who remember these types of things?;) Yep, that's what I thought....:rolleyes: It's okay, never mind!)

B
Ding ding ding! The senior wins the prize!

This part of the camino isn't very well traveled, in part because for many years the A-12 construction made it appear a bit less desirable from the onset.

But for pilgrims looking for a bit of beautiful scenery, and who are not planning to stay in Villamayor de Monjardin or Azqueta, the alternate route via Luquín (now with albergue) is an option I cannot recommend enough.

The option to follow it comes up a hundred meters after you leave the Monastery and Wine fountain. It is sign posted, but basically you need to take the left option to pass under the motorway and pick up the trail. Once you have done so, keep an eye open for arrows taking you off the service road and into the forest... it is almost immediately after the underpass. From there it is clear, and gosh darn lovely. It follows the curvature of the Montejurra Mountain on your left.
 

elleley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (16); Leon-Sarria, Ourense-SdC (17), Burgos-Leon (17), Porto-SdC (18), SalvadorPrimitivo(19)
Thank you so much for posting these photos. I took that Way when I walked the CF in 2016 and was alone on the trail the whole time. I experienced an "out of body" dream as I walked it and instead of the pack on my back, was carrying a small child (my pack was way too heavy...). I was leading a group through the forest and felt a strong sense of courage and fearlessness. It was way cool and, although I haven't shared this story with many, your photo brought it back to me- clear as a bell. Didn't realize I was walking the Camino de Corona. Love that detail. Ultreia!
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Okay, my best guess is....<drum roll>....

The only place that I remember comes even close is a few km out from the Irache wine fountain on the way to Luquin. (ie. on the "high" road)

The "lower" road takes one to Villamayor de Monjardin in a rough parallel to the A-12 and the N-111, correct?

(Are there "bonus points" for senior citizens who remember these types of things?;) Yep, that's what I thought....:rolleyes: It's okay, never mind!)

B

Exactly! This section is precisely what came to my mind when I thought of pine trees. The second time I walked from SJPdP to Santiago in 2018 I, my accident, took the "high" road rather than going through Villamayor de Monjardin. It was absolutely delightful and I saw no one along the way. I would suggest it to all, unless of course you are planning to sleepin in Villamayor.
 

simply B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
somewhere between "not enough" and "way too many"
Instead of leaving Estella via the camino which leads to the Monastery at Irache
leave Estella via the Calle Mercatondoa and
Calle Camino Montejurra.
You can then make a right turn directly onto Camino de la Corona


Furthermore if you walk along the CdC towards Bodegas Pago de Larrainzar soon on your right is a path, the Camino de Santiago !!, which curves north across vineyards upto the Plaza de Irache and the main entrance of the Monastery.

@mspath -

You are a scholar on these things. Do you have any insight or further information as to which "crown" is referenced in this "Camino de Corona" - - and perhaps why?

Thank you in advance for any help!

B
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
@mspath -

You are a scholar on these things. Do you have any insight or further information as to which "crown" is referenced in this "Camino de Corona" - - and perhaps why?

Thank you in advance for any help!

B
Unfortunately neither do I know which "crown" is referenced. However the answer might be found in "The PIlgrimage Road to Santiago" by Linda Davidson and David Gitlitz which offers comprehensive information on interesting places and monuments of artistic or historical importance along the Camino Frances.

Today as much of the world is in confinement during the current Coronavirus Covid 19 pandemic the title Camino de la Corona has a horrific contemporary significance.
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I walked that way last year, and it was lovely. Of course Camino de la Corona didn't have the same significance as it has this year, so if I saw that sign it didn't make much of an impression on me. 😄
 
Last edited:

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Okay, my best guess is....<drum roll>....

The only place that I remember comes even close is a few km out from the Irache wine fountain on the way to Luquin. (ie. on the "high" road)

The "lower" road takes one to Villamayor de Monjardin in a rough parallel to the A-12 and the N-111, correct?

(Are there "bonus points" for senior citizens who remember these types of things?;) Yep, that's what I thought....:rolleyes: It's okay, never mind!)

B
I have no guess, but in 2017 I was headed toward the albergue run by the Dutch in Monjardin because I enjoyed staying there two years earlier. When I arrived with three family members the whole village was "completo". We had to trudge a few more kilometers up to Luquin after a long hot day, but we had a new private albergue all to ourselves...it was heavenly.
 
Last edited:

simply B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
somewhere between "not enough" and "way too many"
Unfortunately neither do I know which "crown" is referenced. However the answer might be found in "The PIlgrimage Road to Santiago" by Linda Davidson and David Gitlitz which offers comprehensive information on interesting places and monuments of artistic or historical importance along the Camino Frances.

Today as much of the world is in confinement during the current Coronavirus Covid 19 pandemic the title Camino de la Corona has a horrific contemporary significance.
Thank you, @mspath !

I will be pulling that volume off my library shelf in the next few days to see what I missed the first couple of times through.

It IS a wonderful volume but so densely packed with information there will be no surprise on my part if I missed a reference.

My appreciation for the gift of your response,

B
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
This a beautiful alternate route. We did it twice, but each time staying in Villatuerta and then going across country from there. On this route, just a few kms after Villafuerte, you pass in front of the ruins of an ancient Pilgrim Hospital, which you can explore.
 

wisepilgrim

Guidebook Author
Camino(s) past & future
Many
"La Corona" is a field name. It's the name of a small area of the territory of Ayegui. Next to "El Soto" and "Cerrado de Iratxe".

View attachment 86700
Impressive. Only now I want to know why it is called that. Next time I am in the area I will knock on some doors. Out of curiosity, what is your map source?

I don't see a mention of it on older paper maps, which makes me suspect that it is a more modern invention.
 
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
Impressive. Only now I want to know why it is called that. Next time I am in the area I will knock on some doors. Out of curiosity, what is your map source?
The source was a massive pdf file that turned up in a Google search. But there is a better source: an interactive Visor Geográfico de Toponimia Oficial de Navarra. You can click on the name La Corona (or El Soto or Cerrado de Iratxe) for some information but the sources given for the names are all "oral". I think this is not unusual for field names in rural Europe: they have been only orally transmitted for centuries and their origin and original meaning are hidden in the mist of times.

PS: The map file has 8 MB and this is the link. It's somewhere on www.navarra.es
 
Last edited:

Advertisement

Booking.com

Similar threads

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 57 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 202 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 330 24.8%
  • June

    Votes: 96 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 25 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.0%
  • September

    Votes: 386 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 160 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top