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Camino del Norte or camino Frances?

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#1
Hey everyone, I will be 19 years old next year and I'm planning on walking the Camino somewhere next year. Preferably in the spring.. I am a woman and will be walking the Camino on my own. I'd really like some advice, because I'm kind of at a lost.😅

I've been reading up on the different Camino's, and I am really drawn towards the Camino del Norte.

However, it will be my first Camino ever. And though I am very excited to walk the Camino, I'm also wondering if, for a first timer like me😛, the Camino Frances might be better..

I have read a lot of people saying the Camino Norte isn't such a good idea for the first time and it doesn't offer the "real" Camino experience, as it is far more quiet.

Though I am not such a fan of big crowds, I was wondering if this really lessens the experience?

Something to take into consideration as well is the fact that I am a vegan. From what I've read, this will be quite an obstacle to overcome. Most people's advice on this is to take your own food with you, which I'll probably be doing. But I was wondering if this should really affect my choice.

Thank you so much in advance, for your advice. I really want to make the right choice on this. In order to make my experience truly one I'll never forget.😊

Save travels and buen Camino!

Ps. I'm not a native English speaker so there might be some grammatical errors, but I tried my best..😋
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino del Norte y Primitivo (2018)
#2
I agree with what is the typical advice: walk the Frances for your first Camino. I did in 2016 and then walked the del Norte and Primitivo this year, both Caminos in the spring. You will definitely find company if you want on the del Norte, just not as many folks as on the Frances. On both, you can really decide how much you want to interact vs. be by yourself.

The Frances has a much more well-developed infrastructure. This includes access to markets where you can get supplies for a vegan. The del Norte towns, especially at the start, are more geared to tourists than to pilgrims and you are likely to be more challenged to find the food you want. Both have albergues where you can cook; you just have to research which ones have kitchens. Don't count on getting many vegan meals in bars and restaurants. Buen Camino, and happy planning!
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012-2018 Frances, Norte, Salvador, Aragones, Portuguese, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakibspaad.
#3
Hello.

If you feel really drawn to the Norte, my advice would be to........ walk the Norte. Life does not have to be too complicated. And you know best why you feel drawn to the Norte.

The Norte is indeed more quiet than the Frances, but when you are walking in spring you will surely meet many other people walking and you will definitely meet many people in the albergues at night. In other words, you will definitely not be alone on the Norte.

The Frances does have more 'pilgrim infrastructure' (like albergues), more historical sights related to the Camino, and probably more native English speakers who are walking. For some people these are important factors to choose it as their first camino. However, the Frances is also far more crowded - which is a positive for some, and a negative for others. And I know people who walked the Norte as their first camino (and met many while walking the Norte, also of your age) and they all loved it as their first camino.

Some people claim that the Frances offers "the real camino experience" and the Norte does not. I would suggest to ignore this opinion. :rolleyes:
There is no such thing as "the real camino experience". Because, whatever camino you are walking, it is always a real camino experience. What else could it be ?
And please realise you always miss out on something (when you are walking the Norte you miss out on the Frances, and vice versa) so there is no right or wrong decision.

Concerning vegan food. I don't know. I think it is equally challenging on both camino's, but others may have more insightful advice on this.

Whatever you do, Buen Camino !
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Madrid, Frances and Finisterre (2015)
Camino Norte-2017; Camino Ingles from A Coruna - 2017
#4
Hey everyone, I will be 19 years old next year and I'm planning on walking the Camino somewhere next year. Preferably in the spring.. I am a woman and will be walking the Camino on my own. I'd really like some advice, because I'm kind of at a lost.😅

I've been reading up on the different Camino's, and I am really drawn towards the Camino del Norte.

However, it will be my first Camino ever. And though I am very excited to walk the Camino, I'm also wondering if, for a first timer like me😛, the Camino Frances might be better..

I have read a lot of people saying the Camino Norte isn't such a good idea for the first time and it doesn't offer the "real" Camino experience, as it is far more quiet.

Though I am not such a fan of big crowds, I was wondering if this really lessens the experience?

Something to take into consideration as well is the fact that I am a vegan. From what I've read, this will be quite an obstacle to overcome. Most people's advice on this is to take your own food with you, which I'll probably be doing. But I was wondering if this should really affect my choice.

Thank you so much in advance, for your advice. I really want to make the right choice on this. In order to make my experience truly one I'll never forget.😊

Save travels and buen Camino!

Ps. I'm not a native English speaker so there might be some grammatical errors, but I tried my best..😋
If you had not told me that you were not a native English speaker, I would not have figured it out. Only in my dreams could I communicate in another language as well as you have.

As for which Camino - why are you walking a camino and are you seeking a certain experience?

I have walked both. You will likely experience a more social feel on the Frances. The scenery on the Norte can't be beat.

What is your native language? If you prefer to communicate in English then the Frances will be easier. On the Norte I felt like I mostly ran into pilgrims speaking Spanish, French and German.

Either way, buen camino.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#5
I agree with @Marc S. I would say 'walk the Camino that calls you'. There are plenty of little veg/fruit shops along the Norte and you can find meals too with care. Easier for vegetarian than full vegan but I don't think which Camino you walk will make that much difference to that.
If you use the gronze website you can find which albergues have kitchens. Be careful of those which provide communal meals as they are likely to be meat/fish rather than vegetarian or vegan unless clearly offering those options.
Buen camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Hice el camino francés hace 20 años (1999). Ahora quiero cruzar el del norte. (2019)
#6
Resa6, the choice of route really depends on what motivates you. The responders who say, "walk the camino that attracts you" offer good advice. Is it a long held goal, a spiritual impulse, a new adventure, a desire to 'socialize' with many people, or a theme for your first novel? You decide. For what it is worth, I say walk the Norte from San Sebastian to really travel a challenging and historic camino.
 

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#7
Thank you everyone for replying and your advice!
To those who asked me what my motivation is for this trip..
I don't think I'm quite sure yet. I have spent many years in school by now, and I would just like to experience new things. See and go places where nothing is already perfectly cut out for me.. I'd like to meet new people, but also try and get to know myself a bit better (if that makes any sense😅). I also want to find out if I'd actually be able to walk the Camino. Not just the physical aspects, but the mental ones as well.

So maybe it indeed would be better to just see what Camino 'calls' me the most..

I've still got some thinking to do, but I really do appreciate the advice!

Anyone who's got more advice, please do share! For I'm still quite the newbee on the whole subject😋

Also, thank you intrepidtraveler! That's really nice to hear!😊
 

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#8
I agree with @Marc S. I would say 'walk the Camino that calls you'. There are plenty of little veg/fruit shops along the Norte and you can find meals too with care. Easier for vegetarian than full vegan but I don't think which Camino you walk will make that much difference to that.
If you use the gronze website you can find which albergues have kitchens. Be careful of those which provide communal meals as they are likely to be meat/fish rather than vegetarian or vegan unless clearly offering those options.
Buen camino
Thank you for your reply!
I've taken a look at the website Gronze, which you suggested. And I think I'll be able to find some useful information there.
Right now I'm thinking it might indeed be the best choice to bring food with me, or buy at local shops/markets. And look for albergues with a communal kitchen. This might take up a bit more space in my backpack, but I think it'll be worth the trouble.
 

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#9
I agree with what is the typical advice: walk the Frances for your first Camino. I did in 2016 and then walked the del Norte and Primitivo this year, both Caminos in the spring. You will definitely find company if you want on the del Norte, just not as many folks as on the Frances. On both, you can really decide how much you want to interact vs. be by yourself.

The Frances has a much more well-developed infrastructure. This includes access to markets where you can get supplies for a vegan. The del Norte towns, especially at the start, are more geared to tourists than to pilgrims and you are likely to be more challenged to find the food you want. Both have albergues where you can cook; you just have to research which ones have kitchens. Don't count on getting many vegan meals in bars and restaurants. Buen Camino, and happy planning!
Thank you! This is quite useful!
I have some thinking to do before I decide which Camino I'll be walking. But from what I gather, I'll definitely have to do some more preparations if I were to decide to walk the Norte..😁
 

Barbara06

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Pamplona (2011-14)
VDLP (2015)
Portuguese (2015)
Francigena (2016)
Primitivo (2017)
#10
It is better to have a camino experience without the crowds. Especially if you are not too fond of crowds.
There are many shops on the Norte (it is a civilised place with many tourists during the season) so you should be able to find vegan food.
There is nothing so ridiculous as the term of "real" camino experience. Each ones experience is different, not one particular one is real.
I did my 1st camino (alone) in Spain, on the Via de la Plata, because it was that one that called me and it was really a wonderfull "camino experience" for me.
 

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#11
It is better to have a camino experience without the crowds. Especially if you are not too fond of crowds.
There are many shops on the Norte (it is a civilised place with many tourists during the season) so you should be able to find vegan food.
There is nothing so ridiculous as the term of "real" camino experience. Each ones experience is different, not one particular one is real.
I did my 1st camino (alone) in Spain, on the Via de la Plata, because it was that one that called me and it was really a wonderfull "camino experience" for me.
It's a relief to hear this! I was already a bit sceptical when reading all these people talking about the "real" Camino experience. I get that people like the feeling of solidarity and oneness on the Frances, because you walk with all these strangers towards one similar end goal. But I personally think this will probably be a feeling you will experience on every Camino, and it doesn't require starting each day with hundreds of people.

It is really nice to know there are enough places to get food along the Norte, seeing as this is quite a big concern of mine😊

Thank you!🙂
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
#12
It's a relief to hear this! I was already a bit sceptical when reading all these people talking about the "real" Camino experience.
@Resa6 , I think there are as many "real" Camino experiences as there are pilgrims.
My wife and I have just finished the Norte, walking from Hendaye/Irun. Having walked the Via Gebennensis and the Podiensis, we started on 3 September, and finished in Santiago on 30 October.
We had a fantastic Camino experience, meeting other pilgrims along the way, and we do believe we had a "real" Camino experience.
If you do walk the Norte, seek the coastal alternatives. They're explained in a number of posts here, and they will provide great scenery.
Buen Camino
Andrew
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#13
But I personally think this will probably be a feeling you will experience on every Camino, and it doesn't require starting each day with hundreds of people.
I agree with one quibble. I don't recall ever starting my day on the Frances with hundreds of people. Sure, there may be a hundred people on any given stretch of the Camino, but in general, on the days that I walked alone I often walked for several km before seeing another pilgrim.
 

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#14
@Resa6 , I think there are as many "real" Camino experiences as there are pilgrims.
My wife and I have just finished the Norte, walking from Hendaye/Irun. Having walked the Via Gebennensis and the Podiensis, we started on 3 September, and finished in Santiago on 30 October.
We had a fantastic Camino experience, meeting other pilgrims along the way, and we do believe we had a "real" Camino experience.
If you do walk the Norte, seek the coastal alternatives. They're explained in a number of posts here, and they will provide great scenery.
Buen Camino
Andrew
Hey Ajguillaume,
I should probably specify what I said in an earlier reply..😅
I didn't mean to say there is 'no such thing' as a real Camino experience! I just meant I believe everyone can get a sense of 'realness' on their way, and there is no 'one' specific or set way to get to this experience.
Every experience walking the Camino would probably be real in my opinion. As long as you get something useful out of it or learn something along the way. Even if this isn't what you would have expected when you started it out..
This is also something I'll aspire when walking the Camino.

I just got a bit sceptical because I've read enough people claiming other Camino's then the Frances won't give this to you, and should just be considered a 'pretty hike'.. That's a statement I don't think I can agree with.
But maybe I just don't have enough experience on the subject 😋. And that's exactly why I came to this forum, to hear different opinions from different people, and learn about the Camino's!😄
 

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#15
I agree with one quibble. I don't recall ever starting my day on the Frances with hundreds of people. Sure, there may be a hundred people on any given stretch of the Camino, but in general, on the days that I walked alone I often walked for several km before seeing another pilgrim.
Really? This is where my noobness, or inexperience shines through 😅
This makes me wonder though.. Could anyone tell me how many people starting walking, on an average day? Both on the Frances as the Norte..

Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#16
Really? This is where my noobness, or inexperience shines through 😅
This makes me wonder though.. Could anyone tell me how many people starting walking, on an average day? Both on the Frances as the Norte..

Thanks!
Definitely fewer on the Norte, but remember that everyone doesn't start at the same time each day! And there are lots of little towns along the way, so the pilgrims get spread out along the entire 800 km of the Camino.

I suppose that you could look on the Gronze website to see how many albergues and other accommodations, and the total number of beds in any given town to determine the maximum number of people who could be walking from that point.
 

MKalcolm M

Solvitur ambulando - It is solved by walking
Camino(s) past & future
north route spring 2013
#17
I walked the Norte as my first camino and really loved it. I had a fantastic time. I have since walked the Portugese, Frances and the Salvadore and plan to walk the Primitivo next Easter. I chose the Notre as I like the sea and dont like crowds. I read somewhere that thare are fewer pilgrims on the Norte, but the bonds formed between them are stronger. This was certainly the case when compared with the Frances, because there are less albergues, so you tend to meet the same people more often, and end up sharing/eating together more often. I have read so much hype about why the Frances is better, has "the real camino experience", has better infrastructure etc, and frankly it is all nonsense. I can say this clearly because I have walked both. If I had to chose which one to walk again, the Norte would win hands down.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Northern Way (2017)
#18
I’ve done one Camino : the Norte.

It was extraordinary and beautiful. I shouted , I sang, I cried. I was deeply and profoundly moved at times. And I was grumpy, frustrated and tired at times: just like most pilgrims.

Towards the end (just after Boimorto) I started to feel like I’d made the wrong choice. That I should have done the Frances.

When I examined my thoughts a little closer, I realized that I’d started finding myself accompanied by “experienced” pilgrims who were making constant, unflattering comparisons with the Frances. Sometimes really blatant, sometimes just milder complaints that come more from tired and aching bodies.

In essence I realized these people were acting like Joy Thieves, stealing my wonder and pleasure.

I came up with a good battle plan: I spent 1hour remembering as many specific, beautiful, wonderful things and writing them down in my journal:
The smell of mint in damp air
The ripples on the water from fish, swimming just below the surface.
The flashing of fish bellies
The transition from night to day, and how the world accumulated colour.
Sopa de Ajo and peeling garlic with a table of volunteers-all of whom spoke German(a language which was impenetrable to me)
Singing
Singing with friends
The friendly floofs
And so on.

No matter which you do, you will be at risk of regret-we all are. But I can attest to an incredible, moving and spiritual Camino. I even love my joy thieves. I’d just prefer not to walk with them ;)

Vegetarians can eat (usually) at many dinner included places. Vegans might be a bit harder.
 

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#19
I’ve done one Camino : the Norte.

It was extraordinary and beautiful. I shouted , I sang, I cried. I was deeply and profoundly moved at times. And I was grumpy, frustrated and tired at times: just like most pilgrims.

Towards the end (just after Boimorto) I started to feel like I’d made the wrong choice. That I should have done the Frances.

When I examined my thoughts a little closer, I realized that I’d started finding myself accompanied by “experienced” pilgrims who were making constant, unflattering comparisons with the Frances. Sometimes really blatant, sometimes just milder complaints that come more from tired and aching bodies.

In essence I realized these people were acting like Joy Thieves, stealing my wonder and pleasure.

I came up with a good battle plan: I spent 1hour remembering as many specific, beautiful, wonderful things and writing them down in my journal:
The smell of mint in damp air
The ripples on the water from fish, swimming just below the surface.
The flashing of fish bellies
The transition from night to day, and how the world accumulated colour.
Sopa de Ajo and peeling garlic with a table of volunteers-all of whom spoke German(a language which was impenetrable to me)
Singing
Singing with friends
The friendly floofs
And so on.

No matter which you do, you will be at risk of regret-we all are. But I can attest to an incredible, moving and spiritual Camino. I even love my joy thieves. I’d just prefer not to walk with them ;)

Vegetarians can eat (usually) at many dinner included places. Vegans might be a bit harder.
Wow.. First of all, I want to say; This is really beautiful written😯 Besides that, It's really nice to hear you had such a magical experience on the Norte. Of course no one's experience is the same to another's, but I have found that with the right mindset you can, in fact find beauty everywhere.

I'll be aspiring to walk with such a mindset when leaving for my Camino 😄

Thank you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011 April, 2014 March) San Salvador, Primitivo, Finisterre, Muxia (June 2015) Del Norte (Sept/Oct 2016)
#20
When I walked the Norte two years ago I had already walked the Frances twice, the San Salvador and the Primitivo.
I met a few pilgrims who were walking the Norte as their first camino. I also met a man who had walked the Norte 7 times - and was not interested in walking any other camino!
LIke others have said previously, walk the camino that is calling you. It's your camino.
buen camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Planning Italy to Finisterre and back (20xx)
#21
I'm in the same situation, I would definitely like the social part of the Frances, but I'm afraid that I would dislike it if becomes too much.
I can't help you with the decision as I haven't walk any of it yet, but I was considering, if walking the Frances, to have some "escape" routes to the Norte in case it gets too busy. Also, I would probably find an alternative route to avoid the last 100 Km either by South (most likely) or North.

Regarding the food: I'm vegan as well and my suggestions would be not to concern yourself too much.
There are many traditional dishes in Spanish cuisine which are vegan, but not "advertised" as such like, for example, gazpacho and paella con verduras.
Here a useful site to get you started: https://www.thenomadicvegan.com/the-ultimate-vegan-guide-to-spain/

If you are not strict about eating Spanish recipes you could try the ubiquitous Italian restaurants: minestrone, caponata, pasta al pomodoro, pizza marinara (not to be cofused with "ai frutti di mare" - with seafood) are all vegan and they have many more.

In Europe, or at least in Italy (not in big cities of course), food like Tofu, Seitan and the likes are still considered "exotic" so it would probably be hard to find them in small shops, but I don't think there would be any problem to find good local fresh veg if you want to cook for yourself.

When I eat out (regardless of the nation I'm in) I just check the menu outside and if there's something I like I get in, otherwise I move on. I don't say anymore that I'm vegan as I found some hostility in the past and as I grow older I can't be bothered to get into arguments anymore.
 

Resa6

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning for the Camino del Norte (2020)
#22
I'm in the same situation, I would definitely like the social part of the Frances, but I'm afraid that I would dislike it if becomes too much.
I can't help you with the decision as I haven't walk any of it yet, but I was considering, if walking the Frances, to have some "escape" routes to the Norte in case it gets too busy. Also, I would probably find an alternative route to avoid the last 100 Km either by South (most likely) or North.

Regarding the food: I'm vegan as well and my suggestions would be not to concern yourself too much.
There are many traditional dishes in Spanish cuisine which are vegan, but not "advertised" as such like, for example, gazpacho and paella con verduras.
Here a useful site to get you started: https://www.thenomadicvegan.com/the-ultimate-vegan-guide-to-spain/

If you are not strict about eating Spanish recipes you could try the ubiquitous Italian restaurants: minestrone, caponata, pasta al pomodoro, pizza marinara (not to be cofused with "ai frutti di mare" - with seafood) are all vegan and they have many more.

In Europe, or at least in Italy (not in big cities of course), food like Tofu, Seitan and the likes are still considered "exotic" so it would probably be hard to find them in small shops, but I don't think there would be any problem to find good local fresh veg if you want to cook for yourself.

When I eat out (regardless of the nation I'm in) I just check the menu outside and if there's something I like I get in, otherwise I move on. I don't say anymore that I'm vegan as I found some hostility in the past and as I grow older I can't be bothered to get into arguments anymore.
Haha, thank you for you reply!
These are some really helpful tips! Especially since I'm not that well known with the Spanish cuisine.

As for the escape route, I don't really know how you would do that..😅

I think it's really fun to read you kind of stay away form mentioning the word 'vegan'..
I have found myself this really does get quite some raised eyebrows 😂
Especially in Spain they often simply don't understand what you mean when trying to explain what a vegan can and can't eat😂

It's nice to hear despite it taking some more effort, you don't let being vegan hold you back in walking the Camino! 😄
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte Sept 2013
Camino del Norte Sept 2014
Camino del Norte 2015,16,17,18
#24
Just finished El Camino del Norte. I set off for the last part from Baamonde alone but quickly fell in with a group. We became 8 people who walked together. This felt very comfortable to have some time alone but also a feeling of support and there were others watching out for you. I really recommend El Norte. One of our group was a vegan. He made the compromise to eat eggs but apart from this carried lots of delicious nuts which he was happy to share . Hope this helps
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago Norte 2018
#25
It's a relief to hear this! I was already a bit sceptical when reading all these people talking about the "real" Camino experience. I get that people like the feeling of solidarity and oneness on the Frances, because you walk with all these strangers towards one similar end goal. But I personally think this will probably be a feeling you will experience on every Camino, and it doesn't require starting each day with hundreds of people.

It is really nice to know there are enough places to get food along the Norte, seeing as this is quite a big concern of mine😊

Thank you!🙂
Wherever there are people, there is food. I doubt you will even need to carry much ... you will just need to be "local".
I'm walking the Norte starting in May 2019. My first, and I'm counting on obtaining most of what I need locally. That is what I think will be the "best camino" for me.
 

KariC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho portugûes (2016)
#26
Hello.

If you feel really drawn to the Norte, my advice would be to........ walk the Norte. Life does not have to be too complicated. And you know best why you feel drawn to the Norte.

The Norte is indeed more quiet than the Frances, but when you are walking in spring you will surely meet many other people walking and you will definitely meet many people in the albergues at night. In other words, you will definitely not be alone on the Norte.

The Frances does have more 'pilgrim infrastructure' (like albergues), more historical sights related to the Camino, and probably more native English speakers who are walking. For some people these are important factors to choose it as their first camino. However, the Frances is also far more crowded - which is a positive for some, and a negative for others. And I know people who walked the Norte as their first camino (and met many while walking the Norte, also of your age) and they all loved it as their first camino.

Some people claim that the Frances offers "the real camino experience" and the Norte does not. I would suggest to ignore this opinion. :rolleyes:
There is no such thing as "the real camino experience". Because, whatever camino you are walking, it is always a real camino experience. What else could it be ?
And please realise you always miss out on something (when you are walking the Norte you miss out on the Frances, and vice versa) so there is no right or wrong decision.

Concerning vegan food. I don't know. I think it is equally challenging on both camino's, but others may have more insightful advice on this.

Whatever you do, Buen Camino !
I agree. The other caminos are the paths less trodden - 80% of the people who walk, walk the Francés. I loved the Português, and would not want the crowds and huge albergues of the Francés. Also, would never have caught you're not a native speaker - your English is superb!!
Buen camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte and Frances Sept 6 - Oct 11, 2016
#27
Hey everyone, I will be 19 years old next year and I'm planning on walking the Camino somewhere next year. Preferably in the spring.. I am a woman and will be walking the Camino on my own. I'd really like some advice, because I'm kind of at a lost.😅

I've been reading up on the different Camino's, and I am really drawn towards the Camino del Norte.

However, it will be my first Camino ever. And though I am very excited to walk the Camino, I'm also wondering if, for a first timer like me😛, the Camino Frances might be better..

I have read a lot of people saying the Camino Norte isn't such a good idea for the first time and it doesn't offer the "real" Camino experience, as it is far more quiet.

Though I am not such a fan of big crowds, I was wondering if this really lessens the experience?

Something to take into consideration as well is the fact that I am a vegan. From what I've read, this will be quite an obstacle to overcome. Most people's advice on this is to take your own food with you, which I'll probably be doing. But I was wondering if this should really affect my choice.

Thank you so much in advance, for your advice. I really want to make the right choice on this. In order to make my experience truly one I'll never forget.😊

Save travels and buen Camino!

Ps. I'm not a native English speaker so there might be some grammatical errors, but I tried my best..😋
The Norte was my first Camino and I am a woman who went alone. There are more people on the Frances and it is more commercial and no where near as beautiful as the Norte
 

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