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Camino del Norte

janines1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
2016
Hello, we are planning a Camino for 2020 and would like to go on the Camino del Norte from Irun to Oviedo. I have been looking at the del Norte and it looks like it comes in at Arzua, we are planning on meeting our 3 children and their partners in Sarria to walk the last 100km together as a family.
I thought that Arzua is too far along to meet the kids and was looking at other options of getting to Sarria and felt that we could catch a train to Leon from Oviedo and continue along the Camino Frances to Sarria.
I have a couple of questions for the forum to help with planning our Camino
Do you know if you can peel off the del Norte anywhere straight into Sarria?
Can you walk Lugo to Sarria?
Can you walk Oviedo to Leon as that Camino seems to say it goes Leon to Oviedo- ? I feel like you could but need to check as I can see there is a train service.
Many thanks for any suggestions or guidance
Janine
 
Camino(s) past & future
.
Hi Janine
just thought I'd start this off on what I expect to be a long thread, as you have raised some new questions...
Firstly just to say - the traditional Norte path comes in at Arzua but there's a newer official route that joins the Frances later - it's even further away from Sarria so won't be any good for you.
I know of 8 ways into Santiago from the 100km point. Think of them as spokes to a wheel with Santiago as the hub - from the north and going clockwise:
Ferrol/A Coruna (Ingles), Baamonde (Norte), Lugo (Primitivo), Sarria (Frances), Montfort de Lemos (Invierno), Ourense (Via de la Plata), Tui/Valenca (Portugues), and Finisterre/Muxia.
But I'm not aware of any paths linking up the rim of this wheel. I've not heard of a waymarked path which goes from the Norte (in Galicia), across the Primitivo (and Lugo) and then to Sarria. I don't think this is a viable idea. But look forward to hearing from others who will enlighten us!
Yes you can walk the Salvador route in reverse from Oviedo to Leon. It's a proper hill walker's path, more challenging than the Frances, but well worth the challenge. As you would be going 'backwards' and you might have some mountain weather, I think it would be prudent to take some kind of GPS navigation device.
 

janines1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
2016
What's wrong with persuading your family to walk the last 100km from Lugo instead of Sarria - it's the same from Melide - and you can easily get the bus from Oviedo to Lugo
thank you that is a good option - the kids would be happy to walk from where ever, this would make good sense , thanks again, its good to open up the options
 

david marquez

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte ( Irun to Luarca), Camino Primitivo-Fisterra: April-May 2018
Via de la Plata 2019
The only thing I would say here is this: the Del Norte from Irun to Ribadeo is an endless string of beaches, most are spectacular and many are secluded and quiet. Why not let your family enjoy the beauty of Northern Spain rather than the circus complete with daily bed race that is the last 100 km or so into Santiago de Compostela
 

janines1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
2016
The only thing I would say here is this: the Del Norte from Irun to Ribadeo is an endless string of beaches, most are spectacular and many are secluded and quiet. Why not let your family enjoy the beauty of Northern Spain rather than the circus complete with daily bed race that is the last 100 km or so into Santiago de Compostela
Thank you, the more I think about it the more I am seeing this as a possibility, I really appreciate your suggestion , Janine
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte Sept 2013
Camino del Norte Sept 2014
Camino del Norte 2015,16,17,18
Hi Janine
If your family want to join you for the last 100 km , why don't they join you at Baamonde? I realise I'm not saying anything very original here but it is really lovely and I did this last year so feel inclined to pitch in to the conversation. Join the Frances later than Arzua following the new guidance. If they have time they could also join you around Santander. This is spectacular before and after it and as someone else said let them join you at the beginning. Buen Camino x
 

MKalcolm M

Solvitur ambulando - It is solved by walking
Camino(s) past & future
north route spring 2013
I walked the Norte from Irun, and loved it. The scenery is fantastic. I was not prepared for the change when it joined with the Frances, and suddenly we were in a sea of pilgrims, many in bus parties and literally hundreds of people on the move. We had never encountered a full albergue, but suddenly there were so many people that the first three albergues were full, and we were lucky to get a bed in the fourth. It was 2.00pm and we were told "You have left it very late to find a bed". Many days on the Norte we took our time on the walk, and didn't arrive at an albergue until 5.00pm. The exodus of people and how commercial the last part of the camino was came as a deep shock. Where previously adverts for albergues would say "Hot showers and communal kitchen" they now said "parking for coaches" this really sums it up. It was like going from Swaziland to Switzerland.
The advice to have them join you at the beginning of the Norte is good, but keep in mind it is tough going if they have not got into the way of walking first.
I have also walked Leon to Oviedo on the camino San Salvador. parts of which are spectacularly beautiful. Your suggestion of walking this route in reverse would be doable but not easy as all the signs would be in reverse.
I would suggest that you also consider meeting them in Lugo, having walked the Norte, then the Primitivo, and you can all walk the last part together.
 

janines1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
2016
I walked the Norte from Irun, and loved it. The scenery is fantastic. I was not prepared for the change when it joined with the Frances, and suddenly we were in a sea of pilgrims, many in bus parties and literally hundreds of people on the move. We had never encountered a full albergue, but suddenly there were so many people that the first three albergues were full, and we were lucky to get a bed in the fourth. It was 2.00pm and we were told "You have left it very late to find a bed". Many days on the Norte we took our time on the walk, and didn't arrive at an albergue until 5.00pm. The exodus of people and how commercial the last part of the camino was came as a deep shock. Where previously adverts for albergues would say "Hot showers and communal kitchen" they now said "parking for coaches" this really sums it up. It was like going from Swaziland to Switzerland.
The advice to have them join you at the beginning of the Norte is good, but keep in mind it is tough going if they have not got into the way of walking first.
I have also walked Leon to Oviedo on the camino San Salvador. parts of which are spectacularly beautiful. Your suggestion of walking this route in reverse would be doable but not easy as all the signs would be in reverse.
I would suggest that you also consider meeting them in Lugo, having walked the Norte, then the Primitivo, and you can all walk the last part together.
Thank you very much, it is great to read your suggestions, the del Norte sounds spectacular and quieter, Lugo sounds a great place for us to meet and start with the kids, all the best Janine
 

janines1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
2016
Hi Janine
If your family want to join you for the last 100 km , why don't they join you at Baamonde? I realise I'm not saying anything very original here but it is really lovely and I did this last year so feel inclined to pitch in to the conversation. Join the Frances later than Arzua following the new guidance. If they have time they could also join you around Santander. This is spectacular before and after it and as someone else said let them join you at the beginning. Buen Camino x
Thank you Maggie, this is very interesting to read, I have some great suggestions to look into. It’s very exciting hearing how beautiful it is, thank you best wishes Janine
 

Ozrob

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Nord
I walked the Norte from Irun, and loved it. The scenery is fantastic. I was not prepared for the change when it joined with the Frances, and suddenly we were in a sea of pilgrims, many in bus parties and literally hundreds of people on the move. We had never encountered a full albergue, but suddenly there were so many people that the first three albergues were full, and we were lucky to get a bed in the fourth. It was 2.00pm and we were told "You have left it very late to find a bed". Many days on the Norte we took our time on the walk, and didn't arrive at an albergue until 5.00pm. The exodus of people and how commercial the last part of the camino was came as a deep shock. Where previously adverts for albergues would say "Hot showers and communal kitchen" they now said "parking for coaches" this really sums it up. It was like going from Swaziland to Switzerland.
The advice to have them join you at the beginning of the Norte is good, but keep in mind it is tough going if they have not got into the way of walking first.
I have also walked Leon to Oviedo on the camino San Salvador. parts of which are spectacularly beautiful. Your suggestion of walking this route in reverse would be doable but not easy as all the signs would be in reverse.
I would suggest that you also consider meeting them in Lugo, having walked the Norte, then the Primitivo, and you can all walk the last part together.
Gosh that sounds so grim! What momth was that?
 

janines1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
2016
I walked the Norte from Irun, and loved it. The scenery is fantastic. I was not prepared for the change when it joined with the Frances, and suddenly we were in a sea of pilgrims, many in bus parties and literally hundreds of people on the move. We had never encountered a full albergue, but suddenly there were so many people that the first three albergues were full, and we were lucky to get a bed in the fourth. It was 2.00pm and we were told "You have left it very late to find a bed". Many days on the Norte we took our time on the walk, and didn't arrive at an albergue until 5.00pm. The exodus of people and how commercial the last part of the camino was came as a deep shock. Where previously adverts for albergues would say "Hot showers and communal kitchen" they now said "parking for coaches" this really sums it up. It was like going from Swaziland to Switzerland.
The advice to have them join you at the beginning of the Norte is good, but keep in mind it is tough going if they have not got into the way of walking first.
I have also walked Leon to Oviedo on the camino San Salvador. parts of which are spectacularly beautiful. Your suggestion of walking this route in reverse would be doable but not easy as all the signs would be in reverse.
I would suggest that you also consider meeting them in Lugo, having walked the Norte, then the Primitivo, and you can all walk the last part together.
thank you Malcom for your advice, I appreciate your time, sounds fabulous until closer to Santiago! I will look into meeting at Lugo, all the best Janine
 

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