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Camino Francés through Aragón

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Peregrino MJ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (August 2020)
I was supposed to have been on pilgrimage last fall and was planning on starting at SJPP . I did not know about this alternative. How would I find out more about this route? I love the quiet fields and general lack of crowds.
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
I was supposed to have been on pilgrimage last fall and was planning on starting at SJPP . I did not know about this alternative. How would I find out more about this route?

There is a subforum about the Aragones:


I walked from Somport to Puenta la Reina (where it connects with the Frances). Sadly I did not see the Santa Cristina hospital - so I have a good a reason to walk it again.....
 
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diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I was supposed to have been on pilgrimage last fall and was planning on starting at SJPP . I did not know about this alternative. How would I find out more about this route? I love the quiet fields and general lack of crowds.
I think you are going to love this alternative. In the link, you can have a quick overview (stages, the starting point, ...). Here you have my post about the first stage (Somport to Jaca) and one video in YouTube.

This is also the official info from the local agency.

Thank you!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Depending on how much time you have, I know that several forum members highly recommend starting at Oloron Ste. Marie, which is a two-day walk to the Somport Pass. That gives you the beauty of walking towards the mountains, as well as a little warm-up before ascending. You’ll find lots of information on it in the subforum @Marc S. linked you to.

The Aragonés does not get a lot of traffic. I cannot understand why — the infrastructure for pilgrims is great, the route is beautiful and goes through several pretty hill towns, and you can visit one of the wonders of the world, the Romanesque monastery at San Juan de la Peña.

Highly recommended!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
As well as San Juan de la Peña (west of Jaca), which is one of my 10-top-ever travel experiences, anyone passing through Jaca should have a look at the diocesan museum, a treasurehouse of early mediaeval art. Fans of S Francis Xavier can also look at a side-trip from Sangüesa to Javier to check out the castle where he grew up. I have never understood why the Aragonese was so lightly frequented aside from: a) there being no Martin Sheen film, and b) the absence of an easily accessible starting point.
 

Peregrino MJ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (August 2020)
Depending on how much time you have, I know that several forum members highly recommend starting at Oloron Ste. Marie, which is a two-day walk to the Somport Pass. That gives you the beauty of walking towards the mountains, as well as a little warm-up before ascending. You’ll find lots of information on it in the subforum @Marc S. linked you to.

The Aragonés does not get a lot of traffic. I cannot understand why — the infrastructure for pilgrims is great, the route is beautiful and goes through several pretty hill towns, and you can visit one of the wonders of the world, the Romanesque monastery at San Juan de la Peña.

Highly recommended!
As well as San Juan de la Peña (west of Jaca), which is one of my 10-top-ever travel experiences, anyone passing through Jaca should have a look at the diocesan museum, a treasurehouse of early mediaeval art. Fans of S Francis Xavier can also look at a side-trip from Sangüesa to Javier to check out the castle where he grew up. I have never understood why the Aragonese was so lightly frequented aside from: a) there being no Martin Sheen film, and b) the absence of an easily accessible starting point.
I truly appreciate your input! My only concern is I will be walking alone..
 
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Peregrino MJ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (August 2020)
Depending on how much time you have, I know that several forum members highly recommend starting at Oloron Ste. Marie, which is a two-day walk to the Somport Pass. That gives you the beauty of walking towards the mountains, as well as a little warm-up before ascending. You’ll find lots of information on it in the subforum @Marc S. linked you to.

The Aragonés does not get a lot of traffic. I cannot understand why — the infrastructure for pilgrims is great, the route is beautiful and goes through several pretty hill towns, and you can visit one of the wonders of the world, the Romanesque monastery at San Juan de la Peña.

Highly recommended!
Sounds perfect!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
First one in 1977 by train. Many since then by foot. Next one ASAP.
Depending on how much time you have, I know that several forum members highly recommend starting at Oloron Ste. Marie, which is a two-day walk to the Somport Pass.
Can't argue with that. The climb from Oloron up to the Somport is memorable. ... But! Let me suggest Lourdes as a starting point.... Lourdes is a strange but wonderful place. Worth experiencing..... And the several days' walk west from Lourdes to Oloron offers some of the most beautiful Shire-like scenery that I've ever enjoyed.

1610727931764.png
 
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diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
As well as San Juan de la Peña (west of Jaca), which is one of my 10-top-ever travel experiences, anyone passing through Jaca should have a look at the diocesan museum, a treasurehouse of early mediaeval art. Fans of S Francis Xavier can also look at a side-trip from Sangüesa to Javier to check out the castle where he grew up. I have never understood why the Aragonese was so lightly frequented aside from: a) there being no Martin Sheen film, and b) the absence of an easily accessible starting point.
Sshhh... keep the secret! :cool:
 
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chinacat

Veteran Member
I think you are going to love this alternative. In the link, you can have a quick overview (stages, the starting point, ...). Here you have my post about the first stage (Somport to Jaca) and one video in YouTube.

This is also the official info from the local agency.

Thank you!

I can’t get a connection to that last link ... just a blank page 🙂

Doesn’t the Aragonés have a connection to the Templars?
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
the absence of an easily accessible starting point.
Most of the pilgrims I met while walking the Aragones started at the Somport Pass, where there is a pilgrim hostel, and reached it by bus. I don't know where they began their bus trip, as I walked from Oloron Ste Marie after flying from Calgary to Toronto to Paris (Charles de Gaulle), bus to Orly, flight to Pau, bus into town, train to Oloron Ste Marie. This was a lengthy journey, with several delays, but I still started my walk from Oloron Ste Marie on the morning after my flight from Canada landed at Charles de Gaulle. I knew, from French tourist information, that the valley leading up to the Somport Pass was often very wet. But I had not expected the major storm which put out all the electricity in Oloron Ste Marie and up the valley, leaving me arriving in town in the pitch dark and the pouring rain with nothing open to get food. Fortunately, I had a reservation for the night, with breakfast included. My adventure was just beginning. I do not see any particular challenge in doing the walk alone. I was 68 at the time.
 

diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I can’t get a connection to that last link ... just a blank page 🙂

Doesn’t the Aragonés have a connection to the Templars?
My mistake: try this.
I’m not sure about the Templars but it could be: there are several castles and fortress in Aragon connected with San Anton Order and other Hospitality Knights. I’ll check it.
 

camino07

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances x5, Portuguese VdlP12, Sanabres, Aragones, Norte,Salvador,Primitivo, VdlP 17,Madrid18Norte
In 2013 we took a train from Barcelona to Zaragoza, went upstairs to the bus station and took the bus to Jaca .From there a bus to Somport arriving at 3 pm. After a coffee we walked back down to Canfranc Estacion and slept there. next day walked to Jaca and onwards. Loved the Aragones.
 
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Peregrino MJ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (August 2020)
In 2013 we took a train from Barcelona to Zaragoza, went upstairs to the bus station and took the bus to Jaca .From there a bus to Somport arriving at 3 pm. After a coffee we walked back down to Canfranc Estacion and slept there. next day walked to Jaca and onwards. Loved the Aragones.
Thank you for your account..
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
When I walked it, I flew to Toulouse, then trains and buses to the Somport pass.

As for walking it alone, there is a thread somewhere here with a ling discussion on that topic. I walked it alone (I am female) and thought it was fine.
 

Peregrino MJ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (August 2020)
When I walked it, I flew to Toulouse, then trains and buses to the Somport pass.

As for walking it alone, there is a thread somewhere here with a ling discussion on that topic. I walked it alone (I am female) and thought it was fine.
Thanks for the input!
 

Pilgrim9

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (2017)
SdC-Muxia-Fisterra-SdC (2017)
Lisboa-SdC (2018)
Ferrol-SdC (2018)
These threads about lesser-known pilgrimage route variants are really great, and this one in particular has piqued my interest. If luck is with me I might walk it. Thanks to all who have contributed to the thread.

Not living in Spain or France I cannot immediately visualize any of these lesser-known routes because, well, they are not well known. "Camino Aragonés" ... hmmm, probably something to do with Aragon. I have certainly heard that name ... think it's a province or region of Spain ... but where is it again? ... Must find a map and look it up. And find those towns, that I have not heard of before, but are mentioned in the thread. And draw a route line.

Brainstorming idea:

It would be great if there was a button or link at the top of these lesser-known-route threads that one could push to reveal an overview of the route on a map, or alternatively to all pilgrimage routes with the one in question highlighted or in bold or similar. Only enough information to give a very general idea of the region and the route would be needed.

It's just a thought.

Being entirely unfamiliar with the route I myself would not dare to post such a link to a map, as I might botch it and lead people astray.

Thanks again to all who have contributed, and to Ivar for enabling the forums.
 
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Flogwail

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
I walked the Aragones in early 2019 with a friend I met on a previous camino. I took the train from Zaragoza to Canfranc Estacion where I had the first night booked and walked straight up to the Somport Pass, got a beer and a sello in the bar and started back down again to meet my friend that evening and we started out together the next day. It was quiet enough and we met only a handful of pilgrims in the 8 days or so it took us to walk to Puente la Reina..
 

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Pilgrim9

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (2017)
SdC-Muxia-Fisterra-SdC (2017)
Lisboa-SdC (2018)
Ferrol-SdC (2018)

Flogwail

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
Canfranc Estacion has a fascinating history, worth booking the short tour if you have the time. Afterwards I went for a sneaky tour of my own...
 

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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
It would be great if there was a button or link at the top of these lesser-known-route threads that one could push to reveal an overview of the route on a map, or alternatively to all pilgrimage routes with the one in question highlighted or in bold or similar.


There are several good online sources for maps showing many of the routes.

Mundicamino has one.

Gronze has one: https://www.gronze.com/#todos

But hands down, the best source, IMO, is the map Ivar sells in his store. It identifies and depicts more than 40 caminos in Spain. It is produced by the Spanish Ministry of Fomento (development, roughly).



Wise Pilgrim also has a very comprehensive, more decorative map, but it isn’t a detailed map like the Spanish Ministry one.

 
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jsalt

Jill
Year of past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
I walked the Aragones in reverse, from Puente la Reina to Pau. (While walking Santiago to Rome.) LOVED it (and the challenge of finding the path backwards). It was winter (Mar 2019), so met very few others coming the other way. Spent 2 nights at Canfranc Estacion as it snowed overnight the first night, but could walk the next day on the road over the Somport Pass, which was one of the best days ever, in fresh snow but sunny blue skies. Very cold though, so was delighted that the café at the top of the pass (on the Spanish side) was open for hot chocolate. So glad I could do the tour at Canfranc Estacion as it was well worth it.
 
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Flogwail

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
So glad I could do the tour at Canfranc Estacion as it was well worth it.
Out of curiosity, was your tour in Spanish or English? I did enjoy it, even just being in the building there was an almost tangible sense of the history of the place, but I'm afraid I understood very little of it.
 
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jsalt

Jill
Year of past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
Out of curiosity, was your tour in Spanish or English?
The guide spoke in Spanish, but we were given headphones which we could adjust to an English narrative. They were a bit tricky to wear under the safety helmet, but worked well enough.

Canfranc.jpg
 

Flogwail

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
Yeah, I gave up on them trying to figure them out! The guide was very animated and passionate, that was why I was dying to understand her! It was in early May '19, snow around me on the pass but not on the path.
 
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diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
@Pilgrim9 -If you google Aragones camino route map, you’ll likely find one quickly.
Also, the Confraternity of St James (https://www.csj.org.uk/routes ) had route maps and route overviews that I used in the past for planning purposes.
@NorthernLight , @Pilgrim9, there are many resources for maps and routes of the Camino Aragonés. I leave you some (in Spanish) and I have also left in my web the main ideas along with a map of the two main alternatives. I also include a link to the extension that allows you to visit one of the main points in the history and creation of the Kingdom of Aragon at the time of the Reconquest: San Juan de la Peña.

IMG_4630.png
  1. description of stages and albergues > Gronze
  2. GPS Tracks > RayyRosa
It is a Camino that does not disappoint in any way. Perhaps lonely but that is solved in Puente La Reina de Navarra when it joins the French Way. If I have to highlight something, the hostel in the village of Arrés. It is one of those places, like the albergue in Grañón, where the pure spirit of the Camino is kept alive.

Buen Camino!

IMG_0614.png
 

diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
The guide spoke in Spanish, but we were given headphones which we could adjust to an English narrative. They were a bit tricky to wear under the safety helmet, but worked well enough.

View attachment 92499
Canfranc-Estación is just amazing. I can't wait for the entire station environment to be finished and ready to start up again. The first time I did the Camino Aragonés, I arrived late to Somport and stopped to sleep here. Lucky me!!

IMG_0633.png
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I came up to San Juan de la Peña from the ”back,” on the Camino Catalán, and then walked down to Santa Cruz de Serós and Santa Cilia de Jaca. We then got a ride up to Somport so we wouldn’t miss the beautiful walk down into Jaca.

The wikiloc tracks on your blog, https://www.diegoromero.es/ show (I think) that you went up to San Juan from Jaca without going all the way to the turnoff for Santa Cruz. is that right? Is that the trail through Atarés?

If so, can you tell us a bit about that path? There are threads here in which people have said it is totally abandoned and hard to navigate.

Check out this one.
 

diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I came up to San Juan de la Peña from the ”back,” on the Camino Catalán, and then walked down to Santa Cruz de Serós and Santa Cilia de Jaca. We then got a ride up to Somport so we wouldn’t miss the beautiful walk down into Jaca.

The wikiloc tracks on your blog, https://www.diegoromero.es/ show (I think) that you went up to San Juan from Jaca without going all the way to the turnoff for Santa Cruz. is that right? Is that the trail through Atarés?

If so, can you tell us a bit about that path? There are threads here in which people have said it is totally abandoned and hard to navigate.

Check out this one.
Yes, you're right: the track is from Jaca to San Juan de la Peña through Atarés and return to the Camino through Santa Cruz de la Serós. It's an extra stage in the Camino Aragonés and in common with Camino Catalán.

It's a route that people who spend time in Jaca usually do even in summer because it runs through the forest and hardly experience the high temperatures. I think it's no so hard but there are sections where the slope is interesting to say the least.

As you could see, it is worthwhile to enter the interpretation centers of both the Kingdom of Aragon and the monastery itself (the old and the new one).
 
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Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
As you could see, it is worthwhile to enter the interpretation centers of both the Kingdom of Aragon and the monastery itself (the old and the new one).
Is the interpretation center for the Kingdom of Aragon in that smaller, separate building close to the "new" monastery? I was there in November 2019 and things closed early so I hardly had time to explore the new monastery before going to the old one.
IMG_20191104_113924.jpg
 

diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Is the interpretation center for the Kingdom of Aragon in that separate building close to the "new" monastery? I was there in November 2019 and things closed early so I hardly had time to explore the new monastery before going to the old one.
Yes exactly... I think they close at 14:00 (info in Spanish). There are a lot information in the interpretation center of the monastery about the Kingdom of Aragon but if I had to choose, without a doubt, the old monastery. I shot some spherical photos and the truth is that the atmosphere and imagine yourself in those times gives you goose bumps.

IMG_4594.png
IMG_4620.png
 

diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I walked the Aragones in reverse, from Puente la Reina to Pau. (While walking Santiago to Rome.) LOVED it (and the challenge of finding the path backwards). It was winter (Mar 2019), so met very few others coming the other way. Spent 2 nights at Canfranc Estacion as it snowed overnight the first night, but could walk the next day on the road over the Somport Pass, which was one of the best days ever, in fresh snow but sunny blue skies. Very cold though, so was delighted that the café at the top of the pass (on the Spanish side) was open for hot chocolate. So glad I could do the tour at Canfranc Estacion as it was well worth it.
Completely agree @jsalt... but if the Aragonese Way is already solitary, the COVID has made everything much more complicated... look at the statistics: just 229 pilgrims.
 

koknesis

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances June/July 2014
Camino Aragones August 2015
Camino Sanabres (Ourense-SdC) August 2015
VdlP 2017
Indeed, Aragones is a beautiful Camino. And if you are not in rush, and love mountains you can take 5 days off in Somport and walk Senda de Camille, a circular track, including climbing Bisaurin
20150812_123751.jpg
 
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diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Indeed, Aragones is a beautiful Camino. And if you are not in rush, and love mountains you can take 5 days off in Somport and walk Senda de Camille, a circular track, including climbing Bisaurin
View attachment 92555
Absolutely! There are so many routes... very connected with the Camino, we have The Route of Holy Grail visiting several locations in the Jacetania county.
 
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Flogwail

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
I loved that the Pyrenees remained in view as they receded in the distance over the first few days.... 20210131_191810.jpg
 
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diegoromerosm

Lost and found in the Camino
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I never get tired of hiking any of the routes in the Pyrenees. Have you been to any of the ibones?

IMG_4632.png
 

Peregrino MJ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (August 2020)
Depending on how much time you have, I know that several forum members highly recommend starting at Oloron Ste. Marie, which is a two-day walk to the Somport Pass. That gives you the beauty of walking towards the mountains, as well as a little warm-up before ascending. You’ll find lots of information on it in the subforum @Marc S. linked you to.

The Aragonés does not get a lot of traffic. I cannot understand why — the infrastructure for pilgrims is great, the route is beautiful and goes through several pretty hill towns, and you can visit one of the wonders of the world, the Romanesque monastery at San Juan de la Peña.

Highly recommended!
Thank you!
 
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Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
I have done the Aragones in both directions and plan to keep walking it as long as my legs are moving! Very beautiful and peaceful, yet the pilgrim support is present.

While I second the opinions of starting in Lourdes or Marie St Oloron, here’s a third possibility: walk from Biarritz to SJPdP to MSO, then up over the Somport Pass. Stunning every step of the way and you’ll love leaving the pilgrim hordes behind in SJPdP as you walk the solitary path.

As for the alternative “historic” route from Jaca to SJdlP via Atares? Did it in the rain and snow and it was beyond challenging. Definitely one for the drier months and come equipped with good gps waypoints as the trail is not well-marked in places.
 

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