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Camino Inglés route

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May 2014 - May 2017; Finisterre & Muxia May 2016; Ingles Sept 2018
#1
I’m walking the Camino Inglés this September, Ferrol to SdC, but is it right that you can now get a Compostela after starting from A Coruña, as I’ve just read on gronze.com? Or do you need to have walked 25 km in from your home to start with? Second question: does anyone use the Ferrol bridge?
My travel companions are camino first-timers - and we’re not so young... I think they might like the choice! Many thanks for any advice.
 

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Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#3
If you walk from A Coruña rather than Ferrol then you have to show evidence that you have walked at least 25km in your own country if you want to receive a Compostela.

The footbridge section of the railway bridge from Ferrol to Neda is closed at the moment for repairs. There is no date available for its reopening. So if you want to bypass the estuary inlet you would need to walk the road bridge to Fene instead.
 

peb

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
#4
some people do use the N-651 bridge from Ferrol to Fene as a short cut to walking all round the estuary if they are walking as a first stage to Pontedeume. This is because the first stage from Ferrol to Pontedeume round the estuary is long. The N-651 is a dual carriageway road, but there is a fenced in footpath, separate from the traffic. If you do use the bridge, you have still walked 100km from Ferrol, and should still qualify for a compostela, provided you have your two stamps per day.

An alternative is to break the long first stage from Ferrol to Pontedeume up into two and stop overnight at either Xubia or Neda. That is what I would do if I walked the Ingles again. The first stage was too long at 29km or so, and I suffered for it next day.
 

Old Crow

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014 Pamplona - SDC - Finisterre - Muxcia.
2015 SJPDP - SDC - Finisterre -Muxcia - Santiago.
2017 SJPDP - SDC. Ingles, SDC - Finisterre - Muxcia - SDC.
#5
If you decide to walk around the estuary, a stop on Neda will make the stages short. The walk around the Ria Ferrol is lovely, and the albergue in Neda is right on the water.
 

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taga_cebu

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues Nov 2015, Camino Portugues Costal Sendo Litoral Sept 2017, Camino Ingles (June2018)
#6
some people do use the N-651 bridge from Ferrol to Fene as a short cut to walking all round the estuary if they are walking as a first stage to Pontedeume. This is because the first stage from Ferrol to Pontedeume round the estuary is long. The N-651 is a dual carriageway road, but there is a fenced in footpath, separate from the traffic. If you do use the bridge, you have still walked 100km from Ferrol, and should still qualify for a compostela, provided you have your two stamps per day.

An alternative is to break the long first stage from Ferrol to Pontedeume up into two and stop overnight at either Xubia or Neda. That is what I would do if I walked the Ingles again. The first stage was too long at 29km or so, and I suffered for it next day.
Having only 5 days to walk to SdC from Ferrol starting a day after arriving from Southeast Asia (Cebu->Hongkong->Madrid-> A Coruña-> bus to town then bus to Ferrol...i dread you, jetlag!) I am now strongly considering crossing directly to Fene via the N-6551. I hope I am not missing much by bypassing Neda. Im torn between fulfilling the full Camino Ingles experience vs. Straining myself too early in the walk. Stupid question: does the view and general experience crossing the N-6551 across the larger expanse of the estuary to Fene have any semblance to crossing to Neda?
Also, difficulty-wise, how does it compare to the Camino Portugues Costal ?
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#7
I am now strongly considering crossing directly to Fene via the N-6551. I hope I am not missing much by bypassing Neda.
You won't miss much. The walk is through suburbs and along roads most of the way, and markings are a bit confusing. You cross the highway a couple of times on steel pedestrian bridges. The albergue for Neda is actually up in Naron, and not near any restaurants. Neda itself is a nice little town, more banks than it is restaurants. I think you will do fine going across the bridge.:) I have done the route three times staying in the Hotel Kensington on the last one (it is a very nice place right in the town of Naron).
 

peb

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
#8
If you are able to take the train from La Coruna to Ferrol instead of the bus (depends, of course, on whether the train times are efficient for your arrival), the train will go right round the estuary where the Camino Ingles goes. You will then see what you will miss if you walk across the N-651 bridge from Ferrol to Fene and then on to Pontedeume from then. You will also see what the N-651 bridge cuts out. Taking the train may help you make up your mind.

Also, you need to remember that the N-651 bridge comes up a good hour into the first stage, so you can decide how you feel at that point, what the time is, weather, etc., depending on how you are going.

One other 'trick'. If you have time on your arrival into Ferrol and can walk the 2 km from the start of the Ingles at the harbour until the Ingles leaves the old town, this knocks 2km or 30 minutes off the walk the next day, as you have done it the night before. All you need on the first day is a stamp from Ferrol, and hopefully, you should be able to obtain this from the hotel you stay in.

If you only have 5 days, if you don't take the short cut over the N-651 bridge, you either need to walk the 29km all the way round the estuary from Ferrol on day 1, or stay at either Neda or Xubia on day 1, and then on day 5, walking 40km on the last day from somewhere around Bruma to Santiago. Taking the N-651 bridge knocks about 8km off the first stage, but at, still, over 20km, is still a long walk for some on the first day.

In terms of difficulty on the Ingles, now that the big climb up to Hospital de Bruma has been replaced by an easier, gradual climb, the only difficulty on the Ingles on a 5 day walk is the long stages (20 - 25km plus each, and every, day). There are two 20 - 30 minute climbs out of Pontedeume and Betanzos, on tarmacked roads, but these are at the very start of a day, when hopefully you will be fresher. Another thing to note is that facilities (bars, shops, restaurants, water fountains) don't appear every 3 km or so, and you may well find that these are some 10km apart in some parts. This can catch some people out who are unprepared. The final thing to note is that about half the Ingles is on asphalt, but in the main, you are walking on country roads.

Don't let any of this put you off the Ingles. It is a great walk, especially on the first two days when you walk round the coast, and for those who only have a week, far better, in my opinion, than jumping on the Frances at Sarria. It is a different feeling when you arrive in Santiago having walked a whole Camino. The Ingles is also much quieter, and gives you a genuine pilgrims experience.
 

peb

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Ingles March 2018
#10
something to add to @taga_cenb's question on whether walking across the N-651 bridge will mean that you lose the full Camino experience?

Answer is, absolutely not.

The N-651 bridge is an 8km shortcut, nothing else. You can still obtain a compostela if you go along that route. Yes, I completely agree with @Old_Crow that the full walk round the estuary is lovely, but if the shortcut saves your legs for the future stages, by the time you have reached Pontedeume at the end of the first day, and sat in the square with a beer or glass of wine, or looked over the river at the bridge from Potendeume quayside, you will have completely forgotten about it, or any guilt. You still walk 100km from Ferrol to Santiago.

In addition, there are plenty of other wonderful parts of the Camino Ingles to savour after Fene; walking along the white sand beach at Cabanas, Pontedeume and its bridge, the walk over the railway bridge at Mino, walking along the estuary to Betanzos, the old capital of Betanzos itself, the Eucalyptus forests, Hospital de Bruma, and then to Santiago.

If, when you get there, if your body says, take the N-651 bridge shortcut, do so. But, as @falcon269 rightly says, walk on the left hand side; i.e. the Northern footpath, which means walk under the N-651 at the roundabout and then up the sliproad that side. There are then less junctions on the Fene side to deal with. If you are in luck, the oyster fishermen may be out on their boats just below the bridge when you walk over.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May 2014 - May 2017; Finisterre & Muxia May 2016; Ingles Sept 2018
#11
This is all exactly what I needed to know, thank you all so much. I’m really looking forward to it.
 

taga_cebu

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues Nov 2015, Camino Portugues Costal Sendo Litoral Sept 2017, Camino Ingles (June2018)
#12
Thank you very much , Peb and Falcon269. Appreciate your vivid descriptions. Will keep all of it in mind.
 

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