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Camino Littoral - water points, foodstores and camping

2020 Camino Guides

jonahi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal route (August 2014)
Hello!

We, a group of 3 young people from Finland and Portugal, are starting our very first camino in 1,5 weeks. Like usually, we are making plans on last moment! We are going to start from Coimbra, and from Porto onwards follow the Camino Littoral. We have limited amount of both time (21 days) and money, so we are on a tight budget (~10 e/day) and planning to spend most of the nights in a tent (albergue/official camping park every second or third night if we can find one) and cook a lot with a camping stove.

Since it is a bit hard to find information on this less walked route, I would like to ask about a couple of things. So,

1) How frequently can one find water points along the way? Is there a map/website that would list them? I am a bit worried about how much water we would have to carry to be sure it won't run out when spending the night in a tent.

2) How frequently are there villages with food stores, cafes and cash machines along the coast? Or houses at least, in case of some emergency? Are there long distances without any buildings? I guess on the beaches there are some restaurants, but they might be too expensive for us. I would like to have an idea if we need to stock up with food for several days or just one day at a time when we encounter a food store.

3) Is there a map/webpage that lists good free camping spots (why not also official camping parks, though they are usually pricey)?
And is there a ready made list of albergues along the Camino Littoral somewhere in the internet? I also read that the voluntary fire brigade (bombeiros) would let pilgrims stay in their stations for a couple of euros, is this true? And is there a list of these bombeiros stations who do this?

4) I guess it is possible to get the credencials from the cathedral here in Lisbon, even though starting the walk in Coimbra?

5) I read that all the cafes and bars along the route should give us stamps as well, in the case we are not visiting a church, an albergue or other more "official" place on a specific day? Is this true on the Littoral route as well? And, is it advisable to ask for 2 stamps a day when in Spain?

6) What color are the arrows on the Camino Littoral? I have read about green arrows and yellow footprints and it's quite confusing. We have maps though, and being a little lost probably will do no harm.

7) I guess the Coastal route has more villages, food stores and water points along the way than the Littoral route? Would you recommend taking that route instead when looking forward to camp a lot?


I am very grateful if someone has answers to any of my questions! :)
 

Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
Hello!

We, a group of 3 young people from Finland and Portugal, are starting our very first camino in 1,5 weeks. Like usually, we are making plans on last moment! We are going to start from Coimbra, and from Porto onwards follow the Camino Littoral. We have limited amount of both time (21 days) and money, so we are on a tight budget (~10 e/day) and planning to spend most of the nights in a tent (albergue/official camping park every second or third night if we can find one) and cook a lot with a camping stove.

Since it is a bit hard to find information on this less walked route, I would like to ask about a couple of things. So,

1) How frequently can one find water points along the way? Is there a map/website that would list them? I am a bit worried about how much water we would have to carry to be sure it won't run out when spending the night in a tent.

2) How frequently are there villages with food stores, cafes and cash machines along the coast? Or houses at least, in case of some emergency? Are there long distances without any buildings? I guess on the beaches there are some restaurants, but they might be too expensive for us. I would like to have an idea if we need to stock up with food for several days or just one day at a time when we encounter a food store.

3) Is there a map/webpage that lists good free camping spots (why not also official camping parks, though they are usually pricey)?
And is there a ready made list of albergues along the Camino Littoral somewhere in the internet? I also read that the voluntary fire brigade (bombeiros) would let pilgrims stay in their stations for a couple of euros, is this true? And is there a list of these bombeiros stations who do this?

4) I guess it is possible to get the credencials from the cathedral here in Lisbon, even though starting the walk in Coimbra?

5) I read that all the cafes and bars along the route should give us stamps as well, in the case we are not visiting a church, an albergue or other more "official" place on a specific day? Is this true on the Littoral route as well? And, is it advisable to ask for 2 stamps a day when in Spain?

6) What color are the arrows on the Camino Littoral? I have read about green arrows and yellow footprints and it's quite confusing. We have maps though, and being a little lost probably will do no harm.

7) I guess the Coastal route has more villages, food stores and water points along the way than the Littoral route? Would you recommend taking that route instead when looking forward to camp a lot?


I am very grateful if someone has answers to any of my questions! :)
1. In every cafe you will find water. It's not possible for you to know where there are water points, because every year, the quality of the water can change, and in one year fountains could be dry has well;
2. In almost every town you will find a cafe, and in some places, the cafe has a mini-market inside. Just pay attention for Saturdays and Sundays, because there are supermarkets and other shops that close in those days;
3. There are no free camping’s in Portugal, and wild camping it's forbidden has you can see in here: http://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/wild-camping-on-the-caminho-portugu%C3%AAs-allowed-or-forbidden.20903/ In Spain it's legal, but under some rules (not allowed to camp under 300m from a city or village, and you can't make fire, any kind). In Portugal we are under the Bravo Fase from the fire control, so no flames are allowed in the woods (camping stoves included, tickets go from 350 to 6000€);
4. Yes, you can get the Credentials at the Lisbon Cathedral;
5. Almost every café starting from Porto has a stamp for you to put on your Credential. On the last 100km, you must have 2 stamps for day, in order to get your Compostela;
6. Yellow arrows;
7 What do you mean with Coastal and Littoral route? Coastal and Littoral are the same. What you have it's the Caminho Central (Central Way) and Caminho da Costa (Coastal Route), has you can also see in here: http://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/tomar.27972/

If you have any other questions, and if you are still in Lisbon, maybe we can arrange a meeting so that I can talk with you. PM me if you need, or send me an email to metalmelitia666@gmail.com

Best Regards
Diogo
 
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jonahi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal route (August 2014)
Thank you Diogo for your advise!

It's good to know that there will be at least a cafe every couple of kilometers or so. But probably it is best to buy food for a day or two when passing by a store? We are all vegetarians so that is also why we just cannot have a dinner in a cafe but mostly have to do our own cooking and find food stores. Camping stoves are legal outside the woods right? We will of course use the camping stove only in fire safe places, we sure don't want to start a forest fire, but when on the coast I guess it is easy to find some sand, rocks or a lawn to cook on top.
About the camping, I don't like the idea of being a criminal and breaking the law, but camping is the thing that will make this journey possible in the first place. However we have noticed that it is best to ask local people where we could put the tent. In many cases those people are kind enough to offer a space on their property or even a bed in their house. :)

By Coastal and Littoral routes I meant the two routes that sometimes go apart and sometimes together, as you can see on this map marked with green and red: http://www.caminador.es/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/RELIEVE-PORTO-REDONDELA-IMPr.jpg . I guess the Littoral one is not "official" then, and I don't know how these should be called, but the Littoral route follows the coastline all the time while the Coastal route goes often more inland, not literally on the beach. Those maps are the most useful I have found so far. I guess there are no other guides to this route? But it's just for having some kind of a plan, since most probably after all we won't be strictly following only other one.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Hello!

We, a group of 3 young people from Finland and Portugal, are starting our very first camino in 1,5 weeks. Like usually, we are making plans on last moment! We are going to start from Coimbra, and from Porto onwards follow the Camino Littoral. We have limited amount of both time (21 days) and money, so we are on a tight budget (~10 e/day) and planning to spend most of the nights in a tent (albergue/official camping park every second or third night if we can find one) and cook a lot with a camping stove.

Since it is a bit hard to find information on this less walked route, I would like to ask about a couple of things. So,

1) How frequently can one find water points along the way? Is there a map/website that would list them? I am a bit worried about how much water we would have to carry to be sure it won't run out when spending the night in a tent.

2) How frequently are there villages with food stores, cafes and cash machines along the coast? Or houses at least, in case of some emergency? Are there long distances without any buildings? I guess on the beaches there are some restaurants, but they might be too expensive for us. I would like to have an idea if we need to stock up with food for several days or just one day at a time when we encounter a food store.

3) Is there a map/webpage that lists good free camping spots (why not also official camping parks, though they are usually pricey)?
And is there a ready made list of albergues along the Camino Littoral somewhere in the internet? I also read that the voluntary fire brigade (bombeiros) would let pilgrims stay in their stations for a couple of euros, is this true? And is there a list of these bombeiros stations who do this?

4) I guess it is possible to get the credencials from the cathedral here in Lisbon, even though starting the walk in Coimbra?

5) I read that all the cafes and bars along the route should give us stamps as well, in the case we are not visiting a church, an albergue or other more "official" place on a specific day? Is this true on the Littoral route as well? And, is it advisable to ask for 2 stamps a day when in Spain?

6) What color are the arrows on the Camino Littoral? I have read about green arrows and yellow footprints and it's quite confusing. We have maps though, and being a little lost probably will do no harm.

7) I guess the Coastal route has more villages, food stores and water points along the way than the Littoral route? Would you recommend taking that route instead when looking forward to camp a lot?


I am very grateful if someone has answers to any of my questions! :)
We did in addition to my good friend Diogo some research on a part of the caminho da Costa last May. We stayed in Viana do Castelo, Vila Praia d'Âncora, Caminha and A Guarda.
In some places are campings. In Vila Châ and Povoa da Varzim which both you can reach in one day walking from Porto. Viana do Castelo has one but in between on the route where I cannot find any camping site so between Vila do Conde/ Povoa da Varzim en Viana do Castelo is Esposende where is an albergue http://visitesposende.com/pt/14-onde-ficar/albergue-de-peregrinos/
From Viana the next camping is Vila Nova d'Âncora where we stayed for about a week.
From there you can reach Caminha in one day and if you are lucky ,you are in time to catch the ferry to A Guarda which is in that case 3 kms further after sailing over the river Minho. Unfortunately I cannot find any info about campings between A Guarda and Vigo After Vigo you reach Redondela where the connection is to the interior route to Santiago.
Last year we walked that part and as I remember we never have seen any campings on the route to Santiago from there but the tourist info of Galicia has a map with campings as they sent to us. Unfortunately this is now in our caravan which I have not standing nearby. http://www.turgalicia.es/portada?langId=en_US
Besides that most campings in Galicia are at the coast.

Water.. We walked the Caminho Portuges from Lisbon last year and the Camiño Ingles from Ferrol this year and everey day we did not take more water than 1 liter in the waterbladders a day. Everywhere where people are you can ask for "aqua potavel" people are very kind and helpfull towards pilgrims.
 
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Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
Thank you Diogo for your advise!

It's good to know that there will be at least a cafe every couple of kilometers or so. But probably it is best to buy food for a day or two when passing by a store? We are all vegetarians so that is also why we just cannot have a dinner in a cafe but mostly have to do our own cooking and find food stores. Camping stoves are legal outside the woods right? We will of course use the camping stove only in fire safe places, we sure don't want to start a forest fire, but when on the coast I guess it is easy to find some sand, rocks or a lawn to cook on top.
About the camping, I don't like the idea of being a criminal and breaking the law, but camping is the thing that will make this journey possible in the first place. However we have noticed that it is best to ask local people where we could put the tent. In many cases those people are kind enough to offer a space on their property or even a bed in their house. :)

By Coastal and Littoral routes I meant the two routes that sometimes go apart and sometimes together, as you can see on this map marked with green and red: http://www.caminador.es/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/RELIEVE-PORTO-REDONDELA-IMPr.jpg . I guess the Littoral one is not "official" then, and I don't know how these should be called, but the Littoral route follows the coastline all the time while the Coastal route goes often more inland, not literally on the beach. Those maps are the most useful I have found so far. I guess there are no other guides to this route? But it's just for having some kind of a plan, since most probably after all we won't be strictly following only other one.
The Green one it's not "oficial" for sure. The red one is.

Not even camping stoves! No flames can be made right now on the Portuguese forests, bushes or agricole fields. And on Spain, no fire at all also, but on the entire year. Inside a house you won't have any problem, outside it can become dangerous. Consider yourself warned.

Near the coast (like Caminha) you have some camping parks, where you can camp. If you tell me your stages, probably I can manage to find you something and help you out with that.

If you are going to buy and make your own food, make sure you share the weight between the 3 of you. And don't Forget that you don't have a cooler, so don't carry food that you know that will spoil very fast. And don't Forget, you need water for cooking in your camp ;)
 

Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
We did in addition to my good friend Diogo some research on a part of the caminho da Costa last May. We stayed in Viana do Castelo, Vila Praia d'Âncora, Caminha and A Guarda.
In some places are campings. In Vila Châ and Povoa da Varzim which both you can reach in one day walking from Porto. Viana do Castelo has one but in between on the route where I cannot find any camping site so between Vila do Conde/ Povoa da Varzim en Viana do Castelo is Esposende where is an albergue http://visitesposende.com/pt/14-onde-ficar/albergue-de-peregrinos/
From Viana the next camping is Vila Nova d'Âncora where we stayed for about a week.
From there you can reach Caminha in one day and if you are lucky ,you are in time to catch the ferry to A Guarda which is in that case 3 kms further after sailing over the river Minho. Unfortunately I cannot find any info about campings between A Guarda and Vigo After Vigo you reach Redondela where the connection is to the interior route to Santiago.
Last year we walked that part and as I remember we never have seen any campings on the route to Santiago from there but the tourist info of Galicia has a map with campings as they sent to us. Unfortunately this is now in our caravan which I have not standing nearby. http://www.turgalicia.es/portada?langId=en_US
Besides that most campings in Galicia are at the coast.
Isn't the ferry stoped right now my friend?

Well, in Spain they can do wild camping, so no camping areas required ;)
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Isn't the ferry stoped right now my friend?

Well, in Spain they can do wild camping, so no camping areas required ;)
I read the other day the ferry is sailing again with about a week from now but information can be obtained at the Xunta de Caminha.

Okay wild camping in Spain we did not do..we are luxery campers. Need electricity for heating up water and use my satelite ImageUploadedByCamino de Santiago Forum1406147865.019857.jpg disk so I could watch our Dutch football team winning from Spain 5-1 in my own seat.:). Picture taken in Tomar. We were down a very steep hill and even my 120 break horsepower Suzuki diesel could not tow up the caravan so the camping owner came with a big Nissan 4x4 to bring the caravan up.:)
 
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Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Hello!

We, a group of 3 young people from Finland and Portugal, are starting our very first camino in 1,5 weeks. Like usually, we are making plans on last moment! We are going to start from Coimbra, and from Porto onwards follow the Camino Littoral. We have limited amount of both time (21 days) and money, so we are on a tight budget (~10 e/day) and planning to spend most of the nights in a tent (albergue/official camping park every second or third night if we can find one) and cook a lot with a camping stove.

Since it is a bit hard to find information on this less walked route, I would like to ask about a couple of things. So,

1) How frequently can one find water points along the way? Is there a map/website that would list them? I am a bit worried about how much water we would have to carry to be sure it won't run out when spending the night in a tent.

2) How frequently are there villages with food stores, cafes and cash machines along the coast? Or houses at least, in case of some emergency? Are there long distances without any buildings? I guess on the beaches there are some restaurants, but they might be too expensive for us. I would like to have an idea if we need to stock up with food for several days or just one day at a time when we encounter a food store.

3) Is there a map/webpage that lists good free camping spots (why not also official camping parks, though they are usually pricey)?
And is there a ready made list of albergues along the Camino Littoral somewhere in the internet? I also read that the voluntary fire brigade (bombeiros) would let pilgrims stay in their stations for a couple of euros, is this true? And is there a list of these bombeiros stations who do this?

4) I guess it is possible to get the credencials from the cathedral here in Lisbon, even though starting the walk in Coimbra?

5) I read that all the cafes and bars along the route should give us stamps as well, in the case we are not visiting a church, an albergue or other more "official" place on a specific day? Is this true on the Littoral route as well? And, is it advisable to ask for 2 stamps a day when in Spain?

6) What color are the arrows on the Camino Littoral? I have read about green arrows and yellow footprints and it's quite confusing. We have maps though, and being a little lost probably will do no harm.

7) I guess the Coastal route has more villages, food stores and water points along the way than the Littoral route? Would you recommend taking that route instead when looking forward to camp a lot?


I am very grateful if someone has answers to any of my questions! :)
Isn't it better you walk the interior route ? This one is more facilitated for your needs.
The coast is more for vacation so the facilities are concentrated around the places I mentioned before. Buying food etc people do very often by car in big supermarkets outside the towns . The interior route leads to small villages with local bakeryshops, butcher shops and so on. The living in the villages is cheaper than at the coast. A breakfast at the interior costed us very often about 2€50 each in Portugal. In Spain the costs of living are higher we experienced this year walking the camiño Ingles.
 

Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
@Albertinho actually it depends from the point of view (I mean, about food of course).

On the supermarkets, in Spain, you will find food much more cheaper than in Portugal, specially if you divide the price for 3, 4, 5, or 8!

On the restaurants, complete menu from 8 to 13€. Where can you eat soup + main course + dessert + beverage + café for that price in Portugal? At least here in Lisbon it's very complicated. I remember eating in Rates, and I've paid 8,75€, and I only had one pizza, 1 Ice Tea, and a chocolate bar. And we paid that price each, because the owner made a discout of 10€!

But hey, they are cooking for themselves, I believe that they will be fine on supermarkets (at least I was, eating mac and shrimp and having wine for 3,80€ + the breakfast for the other day :D )

10258692_1404366643182872_2292206097397509004_o.jpg
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Last information that I have about the Ferry it's this one: http://www.cm-caminha.pt/ver.php?cod=1E0A
¡. Eso es! But ImageUploadedByCamino de Santiago Forum1406149217.584505.jpg. But I made this picture at the quai in Caminha.
By that time in May you had to make a detour of 25 kms via the bridge in Vilanova de Cedreira.we drove it by car to A Guarda but I saw some pilgrims puddled and muddled in heavy rain. The rain was the reason we stayed in Vila d'Âncora for a week because the weatherforcast for that week was rain rain rain.so from there we made some trips among others to Braga and to casa da Fernanda in Vitorino ((that is one good place our three young pilgrim friends could stay for a night camping in their garden for free if they choose for the interior route or sleep in real beds ,have lunch ,diner a great time and breakfast in the morning. DonativoImageUploadedByCamino de Santiago Forum1406149690.159701.jpgImageUploadedByCamino de Santiago Forum1406149721.095637.jpg. Jacinto even offered me to park my caravan in their garden :) if we liked we could stay for a month or so. Unfortunately the road to their house was to small for my "10 meters long "roadtrain " :)
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
@Albertinho actually it depends from the point of view (I mean, about food of course).

On the supermarkets, in Spain, you will find food much more cheaper than in Portugal, specially if you divide the price for 3, 4, 5, or 8!

On the restaurants, complete menu from 8 to 13€. Where can you eat soup + main course + dessert + beverage + café for that price in Portugal? At least here in Lisbon it's very complicated. I remember eating in Rates, and I've paid 8,75€, and I only had one pizza, 1 Ice Tea, and a chocolate bar. And we paid that price each, because the owner made a discout of 10€!

But hey, they are cooking for themselves, I believe that they will be fine on supermarkets (at least I was, eating mac and shrimp and having wine for 3,80€ + the breakfast for the other day :D )

View attachment 11762
Generalissimo Franco's law. Every labourer must be able to but a decent meal for......pesetas (I forgot the exchangerate but during the time I worked in Barcelona from 2006 to 2009 I could buy a menu del dia for 10€ everywhere, especially at the cafe bars restaurants at the polígonos industrials .we found menus do dia for about the same price or even less in Portugal among others in Vila Châ . Franceshina in Porto and in your restaurant in Rates ImageUploadedByCamino de Santiago Forum1406150416.514808.jpgImageUploadedByCamino de Santiago Forum1406150462.929111.jpg7€. The next 3 days you do not need to eat. So powerfull this dish is :)

Pimientos de Padrón. Cheap and nourative !
 
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Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
You are in good company ! which camiño you walked ? We have never seen so many peregrinos together neither on the caminho Portuges nor on the camiño Ingles :)
Português my friend. Always the Português :D
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Hello!

We, a group of 3 young people from Finland and Portugal, are starting our very first camino in 1,5 weeks. Like usually, we are making plans on last moment! We are going to start from Coimbra, and from Porto onwards follow the Camino Littoral. We have limited amount of both time (21 days) and money, so we are on a tight budget (~10 e/day) and planning to spend most of the nights in a tent (albergue/official camping park every second or third night if we can find one) and cook a lot with a camping stove.

Since it is a bit hard to find information on this less walked route, I would like to ask about a couple of things. So,

1) How frequently can one find water points along the way? Is there a map/website that would list them? I am a bit worried about how much water we would have to carry to be sure it won't run out when spending the night in a tent.

2) How frequently are there villages with food stores, cafes and cash machines along the coast? Or houses at least, in case of some emergency? Are there long distances without any buildings? I guess on the beaches there are some restaurants, but they might be too expensive for us. I would like to have an idea if we need to stock up with food for several days or just one day at a time when we encounter a food store.

3) Is there a map/webpage that lists good free camping spots (why not also official camping parks, though they are usually pricey)?
And is there a ready made list of albergues along the Camino Littoral somewhere in the internet? I also read that the voluntary fire brigade (bombeiros) would let pilgrims stay in their stations for a couple of euros, is this true? And is there a list of these bombeiros stations who do this?

4) I guess it is possible to get the credencials from the cathedral here in Lisbon, even though starting the walk in Coimbra?

5) I read that all the cafes and bars along the route should give us stamps as well, in the case we are not visiting a church, an albergue or other more "official" place on a specific day? Is this true on the Littoral route as well? And, is it advisable to ask for 2 stamps a day when in Spain?

6) What color are the arrows on the Camino Littoral? I have read about green arrows and yellow footprints and it's quite confusing. We have maps though, and being a little lost probably will do no harm.

7) I guess the Coastal route has more villages, food stores and water points along the way than the Littoral route? Would you recommend taking that route instead when looking forward to camp a lot?


I am very grateful if someone has answers to any of my questions! :)
By the way you can walk from Porto to Santiago in about 14 days so that rises your daily average of spending money.

ATM 's (money taps we call them here in Holland. Grifo de moneda:)
are in every town, bigger village, supermercado etc.


In Northern Portugal we did not see so many restaurants at the beach except for the bigger places.
In between places like Viana do Castelo and Caminha there is not much to do any other than often empty beaches with no facilities
Keep a mobile phone with you in case of emergency. Diogo knows the national alarmnumber for sure

The only places the Bombeiros Volontarios accept pilgrims to sleep as far as I know is at the Lisbon to Porto leg. We slept at the Bombeiros in Tomar . less Bombeiros accept pilgrims now due to their corps bussiness is not being a kind of hotel but other tasks.
On the Porto to Valença or Caminha leg i never heard the Bombeiros lodge pilgrims.
 
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Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
The only places the Bombeiros Volontarios accept pilgrims to sleep as far as I know is at the Lisbon to Porto leg. We slept at the Bombeiros in Tomar . less Bombeiros accept pilgrims now due to their corps bussiness is not being a kind of hotel but other tasks.
On the Porto to Valença or Caminha leg i never heard the Bombeiros lodge pilgrims.
Or because someone passing has a pilgrim, started to stole things from Fire Corporations, and all the Corporations were warned about this :(
 
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Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Or because someone passing has a pilgrim, strtaed to stole things from Fire Corporations, and all the Corporations were warned about this :(
A fire extinguisher ?! Bom caminho ! :)
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.

jonahi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal route (August 2014)
Wow, so many replies! Thank you guys, a lot of it is really helpful.

That is a good point that the interior way may be more camper-friendly and cheaper in what comes to all kinds of services. We will anyway start on the Central way, so when we reach Porto, we'll just see how we feel, if we want to continue similarly or go to the more deserted beaches. :) We were counting that it would be something like 11 days from Porto to Santiago. And about a week from Coimbra to Porto. Then we have an extra day or two for resting or something else.

Hopefully the ferry would be opened until we reach there, let's see.. We'll try to see the situation in the internet every now and then.

That Casa da Fernanda in Vitorino sounds a nice place to stay. If we'll choose the interior route we'll definitely spend a night there. Those green peppers also look delicious, probably the dish doesn't include any meat either! Have to try if we can find it somewhere.

But that camping caravan of yours is from a totally another world than our tiny tent, haha! :D

It is very sad that some jerks have made every pilgrim now lose the trust of the bombeiros! Very sad indeed. But it is good to know that from Coimbra to Porto it is still an option.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Wow, so many replies! Thank you guys, a lot of it is really helpful.

That is a good point that the interior way may be more camper-friendly and cheaper in what comes to all kinds of services. We will anyway start on the Central way, so when we reach Porto, we'll just see how we feel, if we want to continue similarly or go to the more deserted beaches. :) We were counting that it would be something like 11 days from Porto to Santiago. And about a week from Coimbra to Porto. Then we have an extra day or two for resting or something else.

Hopefully the ferry would be opened until we reach there, let's see.. We'll try to see the situation in the internet every now and then.

That Casa da Fernanda in Vitorino sounds a nice place to stay. If we'll choose the interior route we'll definitely spend a night there. Those green peppers also look delicious, probably the dish doesn't include any meat either! Have to try if we can find it somewhere.

But that camping caravan of yours is from a totally another world than our tiny tent, haha! :D

It is very sad that some jerks have made every pilgrim now lose the trust of the bombeiros! Very sad indeed. But it is good to know that from Coimbra to Porto it is still an option.
Some misunderstandings..
The central or interior way is from Porto to Barcelos and on to Valença do Minho /Tui to Santiago.
The Coastal is from Porto Matosinhos to Caminha and on either to Valença where you'll meet the interior way or on to Vigo and Redondela where you 'll meet the interior way.
Than we also are talking about a detour on the interior way out of Porto alingside the coast and after Vila do Conde it goes to the interior route in São Pedro de Rates avoiding walking alongside busy roads in the busy infrastructure north of Porto. See my started thread today "why pilgrims decide to walk to Vilarinho ? "


It reminds me that coming from Coimbra you can sleep and eat just outside Albergaria-a-Velha at casa Diocesana . It is an retraitehouse with nuns Beautfull situated on top of a steep hill. Bunkbeds showers, lunch diner and breakfast We paid 3€ each last year.

Just before Coimbra you can sleep at a schoolcampus for free during schooldays but maybe because of vacation it should be closed. It is a Jesuites school in Cernache.a restaurant is opposite the main entrance of the campus.

The green peppers are called pimientos the Padrón and well famous in Galicia. It is like Russian Roulette( do not like this term any more since an airplane was shot down with 293 innocent people who died innocently last week ) the taste of the peppers is moderate but there can be a very hot one in between so be prepared !

Bom caminho
 
Last edited:

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Yes. And that's why the firefighters started to look at pilgrims a little bit with disdain.
So this is understandable . What a bandits ! Can't imagine these are pilgrims !
 

Diogo92

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Português 2013, 2014
C. de Fátima 2014
C. do Salnés 2015
Got some news right now about the ferry:
The ferry it's stopped due to maintenance in the boat. What seemed a small repair, turned in a major problem for the company, since there are some parts missing and delayed. They don't have a date for the ferry work again, but untill September it won't work for sure.

Somebody advised me for you to search for a guy named Mario, in the Caminha harbor. He is the person to whom you have to talk in order to get to the other side. I don't know the price, but I think it stays between 5 na 12€ per person.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Got some news right now about the ferry:
The ferry it's stopped due to maintenance in the boat. What seemed a small repair, turned in a major problem for the company, since there are some parts missing and delayed. They don't have a date for the ferry work again, but untill September it won't work for sure.

Somebody advised me for you to search for a guy named Mario, in the Caminha harbor. He is the person to whom you have to talk in order to get to the other side. I don't know the price, but I think it stays between 5 na 12€ per person.
okay every time is a different story they tell. So bad luck for them who want to cross now. Walk to Vilanova de Cedreira and take a taxi as an alternative maybe
 

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