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Camino Mozárabe: 5 things you'll want to know

Anna&Michael

Not all those who wander are lost!
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
We've written a short article on walking the Camino Mozárabe. Word limits prevent us from publishing the entire article here but here's a summary of the five points. Have a look at the full article which has more detail, links to useful websites and guides, etc.
Camino-Mozarabe-5-things-feature.jpeg

Also, read our account of walking the Camino Mozárabe to gain an insight into the experience of walking the route and for photographs that will give you a sense of the trail. Our account is in three stages to make for easy reading and planning:
1. Almería to Granada
2. Granada to Córdoba
3. Córdoba to Mérida


The Camino Mozárabe: 5 things you'll want to know (a summary)

1. Why should I consider walking the Camino Mozárabe?
You might consider walking the Camino Mozárabe because when you walked the Camino Francés, you wished you’d walked it years ago when it was less crowded. Or, maybe the Camino has got under your skin and you’re ready for a more adventurous pilgrimage.

The Camino Mozárabe is well marked and you’ll be mainly walking on old tracks and quiet minor roads. You’ll visit the history-laden cities of Granada, Córdoba and Mérida, walk past Roman ruins and visit fortified hilltop villages.

2. Give me an overview of walking the Camino Mozárabe?
It’s a fascinating route historically, culturally and scenically (although some days you walk through rows and rows of olive trees). It’s undulating/hilly for much of the route which makes for constantly changing scenery, and while it’s physically more demanding than the Camino Francés, this shouldn’t be a problem if you’re reasonably fit.

The trail is well marked but with few pilgrims on the trail you can’t rely on following the pilgrim in front of you. There are a few longer stages than on the Camino Francés (30-35km) and fewer villages overall, not all of which have accommodation or even a shop. The Camino Mozárabe is 620 kms long and can be divided into three main sections:
Almería to Granada, 200 km
Granada to Córdoba, 170 km
Córdoba to Mérida, 250 km
From Mérida, where the Camino Mozárabe meets the Via de la Plata, it’s 750 km to Santiago.

We walked from Almería to Mérida in 25 days, including a couple of rest days and one day on a bus when Michael needed treatment for shin splints.

3. Do I need to be fluent in Spanish?
You don’t need to be fluent in Spanish but it would be helpful to have enough to be able to order food, book a bed and ask the way to Santiago (pointing, sign language and translation apps can help).

4. I’m interested in walking the Camino Mozárabe, help me find out more
The very helpful amigos at Almería have information on distances, accommodation, facilities and route profiles from Almería to Mérida. While some of this information is in Spanish, the really useful bits such as maps, accommodation and trail profiles don’t require translation.

Another detailed route guide (including the Málaga route) in English is the Pilgrims Guide: Mozarab Way of Santiago. It has stage descriptions, accommodation & services information, and maps.

5. How do I find out what walking the Camino Mozárabe is like?
If you haven’t already read our story of walking the Camino Mozárbe, then click here. Hopefully, you’ll be inspired to start planning your own Camino along this fascinating route before the crowds arrive.

Summary:
Traversing Aundulicia, the Camino Mozarabe is the perfect route for those looking for a quieter trail with layers of history from vanquished civilisations, beautiful white villages, and a range of landscapes. It's a less travelled, well supported and fascinating path. Find out more.
 
Last edited:
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TaraWalks

Peregrina without a skateboard
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2016 & 2018, planning for Le Puy 2019/2020ish and for some shorter Caminos stacked
Awesome, thankyou!
 

Sirage

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago (2005), Porto to Santiago (2007), Vezelay for 200 kms (2009), From Seville, May (2015), Le Puy to Sangüesa (2016), Norte-Primitivo (Sep-Oct 2016)
I have been looking for a route for next March. The red one is my draft, but I will now read your blog - thanks for the link.

1626314508032.png
 

Anna&Michael

Not all those who wander are lost!
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
I have been looking for a route for next March. The red one is my draft, but I will now read your blog - thanks for the link.

View attachment 104799
Your draft route has a nice line to it. the route from Malaga is slightly shorter than from Almeria, but over that distance it's probably immaterial. It'll be a fabulous adventure, enjoy!
 

Anna&Michael

Not all those who wander are lost!
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Your draft route has a nice line to it. the route from Malaga is slightly shorter than from Almeria, but over that distance it's probably immaterial. It'll be a fabulous adventure, enjoy!
Also, just noticed that you walked from Le Puy in 2005. We walked the Camino Frances in the same year and have recently posted an account of our first Camino (COVID-19 has some thin silver linings):
 
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Sirage

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago (2005), Porto to Santiago (2007), Vezelay for 200 kms (2009), From Seville, May (2015), Le Puy to Sangüesa (2016), Norte-Primitivo (Sep-Oct 2016)
Also, just noticed that you walked from Le Puy in 2005.
Yes - but the list under my name is a little out of date and I don't seem to be able to update that.
It appears you are also Australians - in which case you will understand my plans may not come to fruition next March because of our travel restrictions, even though I am fully vaccinated.
Planning is a good background activity during quiet moments on wet winter days - I have since added the Almeria route to my maps.
Voila!
1626326319747.png
 

Anna&Michael

Not all those who wander are lost!
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Yes, we're Australians and also taking some solace in planning various adventures and hoping some may come to fruition. Best wishes.
 

OZAJ

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Mozarabe/VdlP/Sanabres (2008) Norte (2009) Vezelay/Frances/Salvador/Primitivo (2010) etc.
My first in 2008. No other pilgrims before Merida. One English speaker: son of a hostal owner who was delighted that I helped his son practise English. Gave me a huge discount on my room.

Happy days indeed!
 
Also, just noticed that you walked from Le Puy in 2005. We walked the Camino Frances in the same year and have recently posted an account of our first Camino (COVID-19 has some thin silver linings):
Anna & Michael
Enjoyed reading about your first Camino Frances.Beautifully written and lovely photos.Thank you.I followed in your footsteps in 2006.
 

Ghislaine

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francès(2006)
Le Puy/Conques(2009)
Del Norte(2012)
Portuguese(2018)
We've written a short article on walking the Camino Mozárabe. Word limits prevent us from publishing the entire article here but here's a summary of the five points. Have a look at the full article which has more detail, links to useful websites and guides, etc.
View attachment 104797

Also, read our account of walking the Camino Mozárabe to gain an insight into the experience of walking the route and for photographs that will give you a sense of the trail. Our account is in three stages to make for easy reading and planning:
1. Almería to Granada
2. Granada to Córdoba
3. Córdoba to Mérida


The Camino Mozárabe: 5 things you'll want to know (a summary)

1. Why should I consider walking the Camino Mozárabe?
You might consider walking the Camino Mozárabe because when you walked the Camino Francés, you wished you’d walked it years ago when it was less crowded. Or, maybe the Camino has got under your skin and you’re ready for a more adventurous pilgrimage.

The Camino Mozárabe is well marked and you’ll be mainly walking on old tracks and quiet minor roads. You’ll visit the history-laden cities of Granada, Córdoba and Mérida, walk past Roman ruins and visit fortified hilltop villages.

2. Give me an overview of walking the Camino Mozárabe?
It’s a fascinating route historically, culturally and scenically (although some days you walk through rows and rows of olive trees). It’s undulating/hilly for much of the route which makes for constantly changing scenery, and while it’s physically more demanding than the Camino Francés, this shouldn’t be a problem if you’re reasonably fit.

The trail is well marked but with few pilgrims on the trail you can’t rely on following the pilgrim in front of you. There are a few longer stages than on the Camino Francés (30-35km) and fewer villages overall, not all of which have accommodation or even a shop. The Camino Mozárabe is 620 kms long and can be divided into three main sections:
Almería to Granada, 200 km
Granada to Córdoba, 170 km
Córdoba to Mérida, 250 km
From Mérida, where the Camino Mozárabe meets the Via de la Plata, it’s 750 km to Santiago.

We walked from Almería to Mérida in 25 days, including a couple of rest days and one day on a bus when Michael needed treatment for shin splints.

3. Do I need to be fluent in Spanish?
You don’t need to be fluent in Spanish but it would be helpful to have enough to be able to order food, book a bed and ask the way to Santiago (pointing, sign language and translation apps can help).

4. I’m interested in walking the Camino Mozárabe, help me find out more
The very helpful amigos at Almería have information on distances, accommodation, facilities and route profiles from Almería to Mérida. While some of this information is in Spanish, the really useful bits such as maps, accommodation and trail profiles don’t require translation.

Another detailed route guide (including the Málaga route) in English is the Pilgrims Guide: Mozarab Way of Santiago. It has stage descriptions, accommodation & services information, and maps.

5. How do I find out what walking the Camino Mozárabe is like?
If you haven’t already read our story of walking the Camino Mozárbe, then click here. Hopefully, you’ll be inspired to start planning your own Camino along this fascinating route before the crowds arrive.

Summary:
Traversing Aundulicia, the Camino Mozarabe is the perfect route for those looking for a quieter trail with layers of history from vanquished civilisations, beautiful white villages, and a range of landscapes. It's a less travelled, well supported and fascinating path. Find out more.
Thank you! I will have a good look at it. I’m leaving in September. I’m starting in Almeria and already contacted the association. They are really great in helping you with infirmations. Looking forward!🤗🙏
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Yes - but the list under my name is a little out of date and I don't seem to be able to update that.
It appears you are also Australians - in which case you will understand my plans may not come to fruition next March because of our travel restrictions, even though I am fully vaccinated.
Planning is a good background activity during quiet moments on wet winter days - I have since added the Almeria route to my maps.
Voila!
View attachment 104807
Good luck and I hope you can get out to do this camino. Looks like it would be wonderful. I am doing the VDLP this year. I was supposed to do it with two friends I met from Australia that I met on the CF when I walked in Nov/Dec 2019 but this damn Covid has them trapped like you in Australia.
 

Lynn C O'Hara

Mainelynn
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2016) Norte, Primitivo (2017), Portugues (2018), Finisterre/Muxia (2016)
We've written a short article on walking the Camino Mozárabe. Word limits prevent us from publishing the entire article here but here's a summary of the five points. Have a look at the full article which has more detail, links to useful websites and guides, etc.
View attachment 104797

Also, read our account of walking the Camino Mozárabe to gain an insight into the experience of walking the route and for photographs that will give you a sense of the trail. Our account is in three stages to make for easy reading and planning:
1. Almería to Granada
2. Granada to Córdoba
3. Córdoba to Mérida


The Camino Mozárabe: 5 things you'll want to know (a summary)

1. Why should I consider walking the Camino Mozárabe?
You might consider walking the Camino Mozárabe because when you walked the Camino Francés, you wished you’d walked it years ago when it was less crowded. Or, maybe the Camino has got under your skin and you’re ready for a more adventurous pilgrimage.

The Camino Mozárabe is well marked and you’ll be mainly walking on old tracks and quiet minor roads. You’ll visit the history-laden cities of Granada, Córdoba and Mérida, walk past Roman ruins and visit fortified hilltop villages.

2. Give me an overview of walking the Camino Mozárabe?
It’s a fascinating route historically, culturally and scenically (although some days you walk through rows and rows of olive trees). It’s undulating/hilly for much of the route which makes for constantly changing scenery, and while it’s physically more demanding than the Camino Francés, this shouldn’t be a problem if you’re reasonably fit.

The trail is well marked but with few pilgrims on the trail you can’t rely on following the pilgrim in front of you. There are a few longer stages than on the Camino Francés (30-35km) and fewer villages overall, not all of which have accommodation or even a shop. The Camino Mozárabe is 620 kms long and can be divided into three main sections:
Almería to Granada, 200 km
Granada to Córdoba, 170 km
Córdoba to Mérida, 250 km
From Mérida, where the Camino Mozárabe meets the Via de la Plata, it’s 750 km to Santiago.

We walked from Almería to Mérida in 25 days, including a couple of rest days and one day on a bus when Michael needed treatment for shin splints.

3. Do I need to be fluent in Spanish?
You don’t need to be fluent in Spanish but it would be helpful to have enough to be able to order food, book a bed and ask the way to Santiago (pointing, sign language and translation apps can help).

4. I’m interested in walking the Camino Mozárabe, help me find out more
The very helpful amigos at Almería have information on distances, accommodation, facilities and route profiles from Almería to Mérida. While some of this information is in Spanish, the really useful bits such as maps, accommodation and trail profiles don’t require translation.

Another detailed route guide (including the Málaga route) in English is the Pilgrims Guide: Mozarab Way of Santiago. It has stage descriptions, accommodation & services information, and maps.

5. How do I find out what walking the Camino Mozárabe is like?
If you haven’t already read our story of walking the Camino Mozárbe, then click here. Hopefully, you’ll be inspired to start planning your own Camino along this fascinating route before the crowds arrive.

Summary:
Traversing Aundulicia, the Camino Mozarabe is the perfect route for those looking for a quieter trail with layers of history from vanquished civilisations, beautiful white villages, and a range of landscapes. It's a less travelled, well supported and fascinating path. Find out more.
Thank you so much! I’m hoping I’ll finally make it to this camino in April, after having to cancel two years in a row due to Covid! This info is much appreciated!
 

Anna&Michael

Not all those who wander are lost!
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
My first in 2008. No other pilgrims before Merida. One English speaker: son of a hostal owner who was delighted that I helped his son practise English. Gave me a huge discount on my room.

Happy days indeed!
The delights of walking less-travelled routes (although more popular routes also have their attractions).
 

Anna&Michael

Not all those who wander are lost!
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Thank you! I will have a good look at it. I’m leaving in September. I’m starting in Almeria and already contacted the association. They are really great in helping you with infirmations. Looking forward!🤗🙏
We can't emphasise how helpful the association was. They are doing all they can to support pilgrims and promote the route so as to support the local economy and provide an income for locals.

Enjoy your journey
Buen camino!
 

Anna&Michael

Not all those who wander are lost!
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Good luck and I hope you can get out to do this camino. Looks like it would be wonderful. I am doing the VDLP this year. I was supposed to do it with two friends I met from Australia that I met on the CF when I walked in Nov/Dec 2019 but this damn Covid has them trapped like you in Australia.
The Via de la Plata is possibly our favourite Camino, possibly because it is where discovered the joy of long-distance walking. We also walked with two French pilgrims for a while on the route and have become very good friends. Enjoy the journey and we hope that your Aussie friends are able to follow in your footsteps before too long.
Buen camino
 
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Anna&Michael

Not all those who wander are lost!
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Thank you so much! I’m hoping I’ll finally make it to this camino in April, after having to cancel two years in a row due to Covid! This info is much appreciated!
Thank you for your kind feedback, we're pleased to have assisted and we hope that COVID will allow you (and many others) to start your Camino next year.
Buen camino
 

truenorthpilgrim

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Yes - but the list under my name is a little out of date and I don't seem to be able to update that.
Go to your profile (upper right hand corner of the page) and click "Signature". I believe listing one's previous caminos has now moved to the signature section. You can only list years underneath profile picture now, so I just put the current year.
 

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