Search 59,165 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery

Camino Mozarabe from Granada to Cordoba

bjorgts

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
In Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003
In April my husband and I walked Camino Mozarabe from Granada to Cordoba. Here comes some experiences: Malaga, Granada, Cordoba and Sevilla are all very interesting cities in this region. We used a day or two in each of them, and then we just had eight days left to walk, but the cities were worth it.

How to get a credential in Granada? We brought them with us. Our German guide says that you can get credentiales in Granada "Asiciación de Amigos del Camino de Santiago de Granada" every Wednesday 20:00-22:00 in "Calle Lavadoro de las Tablas 1". In other words: Not many posibilities!

You can get your firs stamp where the Camino start: "Real Monasterio de las Madres Comendadores de Santiago" where "Calle Santiago" cross "Calle Comendadores de Santiago". They too have some opening hours. I do not remember them.

The first day we walked from Granada to Pinos Puente. Walking all the way to Moclin is possible, but since the last part is a quite steep climbing up, that was a too hard starting day for us. In Pinos Puente we stayed at hotel Montserrat. OK. There is also some sort of Monasterio just before entering the town, but we did not know that then. I think it is the same organisation who has the albergue in Alcuescar.

There are some problems with the marking the first days. On our way from Pinos Punte to Olivares we were "out on our own among the olives" a couple of times, but we found our way. Some others walkers had the same problems, but you see Olivares and know where to end up.

Moclin is a nice place. Here and in the next two cities, wisit the castles! We stayed in Casa Rural La Brisa. OK. There are other posibilities. We saw a place when we came into the town and two other walkers were brought by car to a place near by.

From Granada to Cordoba you walk among millions of olive-trees and there are not much asphalt-walking. From Moclin to Alcalá la Real there was a very nice walk! The great problem on this part is the marking. Everybody we met on our walk (not many - 5-6 persons!) had been "lost among the olives" that day. When you reach N432, you walk some 200m along this road, and then you go up left by a destroyed house. Then the problems start, but none of us could say exactly where. So if you will be sure to reach Eremita Nueva, may be you should follow N432 for some kilometers.

In Alcalá la Real we stayed at Hostal Rio de Oro. OK. Notice that the castles has opening hours! We came there too late. (I think they close at 18:00, and dont let people in later than 17:30) But since this castle was one of the places I realy wanted to see, we waited untill they opened next day. It was worth it!

From Alcalá la Real to Alcaudete are there olives, olives olives. Nice! There are a small place in the middle (Ventas de Carrizal), and I have read somewhere that there are no open bars there. There is! Just walk a bit further up in the street with the closed one, and there are two - one with english-speaking owner. In Alcaudete we stayed at Hostal Hidalgo. OK. This casle is also worth a visit.

More olives from Alcaudete to Baena. Laguna del Salobral on the way was beautiful. Baena is centre for olive-oil-production. They have å olive-oil-museeum. Really worth a visit. There were many signs that told us that there had been much raining in this part of Spain this winter/spring. The yellow arrows along the Laguna went out into the water. Some places the road were just gone, and other places it was damaged. A couple of times we had to wade, but no serious problems.

Be sure to carry enough water on Camino Mozarabe. Some of the days there were no pueblos and no water. From Beana to Castro del Rio there are nothing - except olives! This day you walk quite a long stretch on asphalt, but it is a very quiet road. In Castro del Rio there may be some problems finding the hostales, but we found people very helpful. The are two hostales at the other outskirt, but the Camino goes there. Casa Antonio and hostal La Sole is there. We stayed at La Sole and it was OK. There also is a casa rural in the center (Casa Rural La Villa).

For some of us, almost 40 km to Cordoba is too much. Then you can do this: Walk from Castro del Rio to Santa Cruz off the Camino. There is a sign telling you were to leave. Next day you take another road back to the Camino. Santa Cruz has two hostales (different prices). They told us that they had walkers staying there almost every day in April.

Then Cordoba... no more walking this time.
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Fine art photography from the Camino Ways.

CaroleH

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
Hi Bjorgts,

Thanks for your wonderful post on the Granada route, very helpful. Sounds like lots of olive groves and not great signage. We are trying to decide about next year's camino. Planning on doing the VdlP, starting from either Granada or Huelva . . . can't decide.. . . no albergues from Granada to Merida is a factor, a money factor, and now it sounds like Hostals charge per person and not per room on many routes. Maybe this is a common happening in Spain now?? :?

Would love to hear more about this route from anyone. Hope you are enjoying your memories, Bjorgts.
Buen camino
Carole
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
In Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003
The problems with the signs were only on the second end third day. After that it was well marked. On the hostales we payed per room. Do not remember so many of the prices, but mostly between 35 and 45€. We have also walked Via de la Plata from Sevilla. If I had to choose, I would propably have choosen to walk from Sevilla, especially in spring with the flowering. But if you like solitude, the route from Granada is the best.
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
Thanks Bjorgts, for answering my questions. Now we have more to think about. Love it. :p

Best wishes, Carole
 
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean
Fine art photography from the Camino Ways.

gyro

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Caminos: Frances, Ingles, Portugues, de Norte
Via(s): de la Plata, Mozarabe
bjorgts said:
From Granada to Cordoba you walk among millions of olive-trees and there are not much asphalt-walking. From Moclin to Alcalá la Real there was a very nice walk! The great problem on this part is the marking. Everybody we met on our walk (not many - 5-6 persons!) had been "lost among the olives" that day. When you reach N432, you walk some 200m along this road, and then you go up left by a destroyed house. Then the problems start, but none of us could say exactly where. So if you will be sure to reach Eremita Nueva, may be you should follow N432 for some kilometers.

Many thanks for posting all of this Bjorgts,
I walked the same route in April and wuold echo your comments.

Now with this particular point, let me try and offer some advice....

This section between N432 and Eremite Nueva is frustrating, as the arrows abruptly end and you are wandering around an olive grove.
Here is the trick....when you turn off the N432, past the ruined house, there is a hill in front of you and another hill rising on your right. There is a dirt road, about halfway up the "right-hand hill", which rises towards some farm buildingswhich you can see on the top of the "in front of you" hill. You will pick up the yellow arrows at the shoulder where the two hills meet. there is a better track down the opposite side of these hills, and better marking.


If this makes absolutely no sense,then keep heading right and uphill as soon as you realise that you have run out of arrows. you will get to the shoulder, sooner or later.

Gyro
 
Hi,
I planned to walk this route last year but owing to a bit of bad health I had to postpone. I am though going to start this year on October 23rd.

In revisiting all the advice on this blog I notice that no one has spoken about the terrain other than to say it is steep in stages and undulating in others.

I have been going over the maps that I can find (eg Google, IGN Spain [sourced at at http://pilgrim.peterrobbins.co.uk]). However I am not well versed in interpreting contour lines and hence can get only an overall impression of the terrain.

I was wondering if there are any sections which could be consider as potentially dangerous, ie where one would be at risk of slipping off ridge lines if such exist. Sorry to sound so melodramatic but I am walking on my own and would be grateful for reassurance that stumbling and twisting an ankle is the height of the danger (no pun intended) that I am likely to experience (other than getting lost which appears to be de rigueur for the Mozarabe experience).

regards,
Arthur Loughran
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
In Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003
Hello!
No potentially dangerous places as far as I can remember. Since we had nice weather, things seemed good. What it would be like if the rain were pouring down, I dont know. Bjorg
 
Past OR future Camino
2019
Hi Arthur,

I have just completed the Mozarabe 3 days ago, and am currently in Merida having a rest before starting off again in the morning on the VDLP. The terrain is very tough in places , but there is no danger of falling off a ridge. The really difficult days are in the beginning when it is very easy to become lost in the olive groves.The walk to Moclin is a test of endurance. Others have written about that. I did not meet anyone until after Cordova, on day 13 ---after 3 days the 2 Dutch ladies got a train to Merida, as they only had a few days for walking.

I wish you all the best for your walk.
sandra
 
Hi Sandra and Bjorgts,
Thanks for your reassurance, much appreciated. That settles my wee febrile imagination.

And if it rains I will cry but at least I will feel at home. In Glasgow we do lots of rain.

Good luck with the rest of the walk Sandra. If you are running a blog and you do not mind vicarious travellers please let me know the address.

regards,
Arthur
 
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean
John Brierley 2022 Camino Guide
The most selling Camino Guide is shipping November 1st. Get your today and start planning.

hailows

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2013
The problems with the signs were only on the second end third day. After that it was well marked. On the hostales we payed per room. Do not remember so many of the prices, but mostly between 35 and 45€. We have also walked Via de la Plata from Sevilla. If I had to choose, I would propably have choosen to walk from Sevilla, especially in spring with the flowering. But if you like solitude, the route from Granada is the best.
bjorgts,
I am going to spain next March. I walked the CF in 2013 and VdlP in March 2015. I noticed your comment that you walked both and would have chosen to walk the VdlP. I would like to know why as I am in the process of trying to determine my starting point... Sevilla, malaga or granada.
I worry a bit about the Mozarabe route (I read it was very difficult). I was not camino fit when I started the last one but get "fit" fairly quickly.
I would love you comments as they might help me determine where I am going to start.
Stephen ... aka Slow Walking Stevie Wonder
ps... I have 49 days
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
@hailows
I'm not the OP but walked from Granada-Mérida last September. I'm on my phone so it's cumbersome to look up my thread but if you search you'll find my comments.
I walked the ENTIRE way alone - not one pilgrim seen during a Camino of 16 days (it would be longer if you don't do a few 40 km days). I enjoy walking alone but missed company at night (slept in albergues or polideportivos).
In my opinion the Plata might be a better choice - I have done it in the summer, fall and winter and there were always at least a few of us walking. The spring seems to be the busiest time.
I hope to walk the Mozárabe another time (from Málaga, Almería or Granada again) but not alone.
Let me know if I can be of any more help.
Cheers,
LT
Ps not difficult terrain except for hike up to Moclín but I did get lost at least once a day till before Córdoba. Signage after that good.
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 102 ratings
Downloads
15,347
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
8,008
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,778
Updated

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top