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Camino on Gran Canaria

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Hola

If you live in a cold country and you want to walk off the winter blues in the sun or if you are looking for an unusual route following your arrival in Santiago think about this Camino. 3/4 days long a Jacobean route with yellow arrows and waymarks has been devised on Gran Canaria which links the churches of Santiago.

There is more information here:

http://www.grancanaria.com/patronato_tu ... 413.0.html

And an account of my recent adventure on this route here:

http://johnniewalker-santiago.blogspot. ... llent.html

Buen camino

John
 

efdoucette

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011 Camino Frances
2012 Porto
2013 Le Puy
2014 Francigena
2015 - 2018 More ...
Well that's a coincidence John, my son leaves to walk that next Friday. I will send him the links, thank you.
Eric
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2013/2014)
Via Podiensis, Camino Francés (2015)
Camino del Norte (2017)
Wonderful! This one goes on my wish list, thanks!
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Camino de Santiago on Gran Canaria 28-31 March

I have recently walked my shortest ever Camino - and one which I think will be amongst the most memorable of them. A little over three days spent walking a little over 73km from Maspalomas to Galdar on the island of Gran Canaria. Part of Spain but in the Atlantic Ocean only 100 miles or so from the Sahara desert. A great diversity of landscape: arid rocky plains, rough and steep mountains, and shady pine forests. A climb from sea level to over 1700m in just over 24 hours: followed almost immediately by a long long descent to the coast again!

The Camino de Santiago on Gran Canaria is perhaps as distinctive for what it lacks as for what it offers: no albergues, no credencial, no Compostela, little accommodation, few bars or restaurants, comparatively limited signposting and virtually no pilgrims. The route is a fairly recent creation and makes use of an existing network of paths to connect the modern resort town of Maspalomas on the south coast with the historic church of Santiago in Tunte in the centre of the island. Along the way it passes through cactus-studded desert ravines and scrub, passes by a pre-Christian necropolis of rough stone burial mounds, then follows a dry river bed up into the mountains. From Tunte the route continues up and over the mountainous heart of the island, passing pre-Christian caves and a famous stone crucifix at Cruz de Tejeda before descending through forest and small villages to the original capital of the island at Galdar where the Church of Santiago shares the same papal privileges to grant indulgences to pilgrims as its rather more famous and visited Galician namesake. At least that was the plan. The signposting of the Camino is patchy and some of the published route information contradictory. That is my excuse anyway. On my third and supposedly final day of walking I missed the point where the Camino route parts company with another and better signposted path to Agaete - a smaller coastal town about 8km west of Galdar. By the time I realised my mistake it made sense to continue on the S90 path to Agaete and simply walk the last few km to Galdar by minor road on my final morning.

After a spectacular and frankly worrying steep descent into Agaete on my third evening I had the good fortune to find a very welcoming hostel in the town for a much needed shower and night's rest. I mentioned that there are no albergues for pilgrims along the route. Compared with the Spanish caminos low cost accommodation on the island is in very short supply. This is very much tourist Spain. There are more expensive options with luxury hotels in both Tunte and the Cruz de Tejeda but these did not suit either my pockets or my old-fashioned ideas of pilgrimage. Instead I decided to take advantage of the warm and mostly dry climate and spent two nights sleeping outdoors with a sleeping mat and a bivvy bag: enjoying marvellously clear skies, bright stars, and probably the most remarkable sunset over mountain and sea I have ever seen. A great privilege. I also carried more water and food than I would have done in mainland Spain since opportunities to buy food or refill water are very scarce. Although the Camino is only 73km - or a little more if navigationally-challenged like me! - the mountainous terrain, heat and lack of infrastructure makes it a serious undertaking. One for the more experienced and independent walker in my opinion. It lacks the historic character of routes like the Frances and the Primitivo where many centuries of pilgrim feet have prepared the way for the modern traveller. It is new and rough and raw. A challenge and a joy to walk.

http://www.grancanaria.com/patronato_turismo/EN.34317.0.html
http://www.grancanaria.com/…/t…/ext/naw_securedl/secure.php…
IMG_20170329_205302.jpg
 

Seabeggar

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Mozarabe
We are just back from a reverse walk along much of this beautiful Camino. The reason for the reverse routing was our lack of knowledge about accomodation etc. We had a splendid 4 days continuous journey, it was tough, but spectacular, we camped and used hotels. The weather at the end of October/early November was pleasant 25C. On our second day we were blessed to meet "Wandering Pier" fluent in Spanish, Italian and English, a resident of Gran Canaria with a passion for wandering this island who works as a guide. He has been walking the Camino every 2 months observing its seasonal changes. He is knowlegable about the history & environment along the Camino and had some ideas about more affordable accomodation. He has led small groups along the Camino and more widely around the Island. I am not here to promote his guiding business, but he was happy to be contacted for information about the Camino, his website http://www.wanderingpier.es/
 

Rhomer

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017)
Portugues (2017)
Podiensis (2018)
Norte (2018)
Camino de Santiago on Gran Canaria 28-31 March

I have recently walked my shortest ever Camino - and one which I think will be amongst the most memorable of them. A little over three days spent walking a little over 73km from Maspalomas to Galdar on the island of Gran Canaria. Part of Spain but in the Atlantic Ocean only 100 miles or so from the Sahara desert. A great diversity of landscape: arid rocky plains, rough and steep mountains, and shady pine forests. A climb from sea level to over 1700m in just over 24 hours: followed almost immediately by a long long descent to the coast again!

The Camino de Santiago on Gran Canaria is perhaps as distinctive for what it lacks as for what it offers: no albergues, no credencial, no Compostela, little accommodation, few bars or restaurants, comparatively limited signposting and virtually no pilgrims. The route is a fairly recent creation and makes use of an existing network of paths to connect the modern resort town of Maspalomas on the south coast with the historic church of Santiago in Tunte in the centre of the island. Along the way it passes through cactus-studded desert ravines and scrub, passes by a pre-Christian necropolis of rough stone burial mounds, then follows a dry river bed up into the mountains. From Tunte the route continues up and over the mountainous heart of the island, passing pre-Christian caves and a famous stone crucifix at Cruz de Tejeda before descending through forest and small villages to the original capital of the island at Galdar where the Church of Santiago shares the same papal privileges to grant indulgences to pilgrims as its rather more famous and visited Galician namesake. At least that was the plan. The signposting of the Camino is patchy and some of the published route information contradictory. That is my excuse anyway. On my third and supposedly final day of walking I missed the point where the Camino route parts company with another and better signposted path to Agaete - a smaller coastal town about 8km west of Galdar. By the time I realised my mistake it made sense to continue on the S90 path to Agaete and simply walk the last few km to Galdar by minor road on my final morning.

After a spectacular and frankly worrying steep descent into Agaete on my third evening I had the good fortune to find a very welcoming hostel in the town for a much needed shower and night's rest. I mentioned that there are no albergues for pilgrims along the route. Compared with the Spanish caminos low cost accommodation on the island is in very short supply. This is very much tourist Spain. There are more expensive options with luxury hotels in both Tunte and the Cruz de Tejeda but these did not suit either my pockets or my old-fashioned ideas of pilgrimage. Instead I decided to take advantage of the warm and mostly dry climate and spent two nights sleeping outdoors with a sleeping mat and a bivvy bag: enjoying marvellously clear skies, bright stars, and probably the most remarkable sunset over mountain and sea I have ever seen. A great privilege. I also carried more water and food than I would have done in mainland Spain since opportunities to buy food or refill water are very scarce. Although the Camino is only 73km - or a little more if navigationally-challenged like me! - the mountainous terrain, heat and lack of infrastructure makes it a serious undertaking. One for the more experienced and independent walker in my opinion. It lacks the historic character of routes like the Frances and the Primitivo where many centuries of pilgrim feet have prepared the way for the modern traveller. It is new and rough and raw. A challenge and a joy to walk.

http://www.grancanaria.com/patronato_turismo/EN.34317.0.html
http://www.grancanaria.com/…/t…/ext/naw_securedl/secure.php…
View attachment 33092
Camino de Santiago on Gran Canaria 28-31 March

I have recently walked my shortest ever Camino - and one which I think will be amongst the most memorable of them. A little over three days spent walking a little over 73km from Maspalomas to Galdar on the island of Gran Canaria. Part of Spain but in the Atlantic Ocean only 100 miles or so from the Sahara desert. A great diversity of landscape: arid rocky plains, rough and steep mountains, and shady pine forests. A climb from sea level to over 1700m in just over 24 hours: followed almost immediately by a long long descent to the coast again!

The Camino de Santiago on Gran Canaria is perhaps as distinctive for what it lacks as for what it offers: no albergues, no credencial, no Compostela, little accommodation, few bars or restaurants, comparatively limited signposting and virtually no pilgrims. The route is a fairly recent creation and makes use of an existing network of paths to connect the modern resort town of Maspalomas on the south coast with the historic church of Santiago in Tunte in the centre of the island. Along the way it passes through cactus-studded desert ravines and scrub, passes by a pre-Christian necropolis of rough stone burial mounds, then follows a dry river bed up into the mountains. From Tunte the route continues up and over the mountainous heart of the island, passing pre-Christian caves and a famous stone crucifix at Cruz de Tejeda before descending through forest and small villages to the original capital of the island at Galdar where the Church of Santiago shares the same papal privileges to grant indulgences to pilgrims as its rather more famous and visited Galician namesake. At least that was the plan. The signposting of the Camino is patchy and some of the published route information contradictory. That is my excuse anyway. On my third and supposedly final day of walking I missed the point where the Camino route parts company with another and better signposted path to Agaete - a smaller coastal town about 8km west of Galdar. By the time I realised my mistake it made sense to continue on the S90 path to Agaete and simply walk the last few km to Galdar by minor road on my final morning.

After a spectacular and frankly worrying steep descent into Agaete on my third evening I had the good fortune to find a very welcoming hostel in the town for a much needed shower and night's rest. I mentioned that there are no albergues for pilgrims along the route. Compared with the Spanish caminos low cost accommodation on the island is in very short supply. This is very much tourist Spain. There are more expensive options with luxury hotels in both Tunte and the Cruz de Tejeda but these did not suit either my pockets or my old-fashioned ideas of pilgrimage. Instead I decided to take advantage of the warm and mostly dry climate and spent two nights sleeping outdoors with a sleeping mat and a bivvy bag: enjoying marvellously clear skies, bright stars, and probably the most remarkable sunset over mountain and sea I have ever seen. A great privilege. I also carried more water and food than I would have done in mainland Spain since opportunities to buy food or refill water are very scarce. Although the Camino is only 73km - or a little more if navigationally-challenged like me! - the mountainous terrain, heat and lack of infrastructure makes it a serious undertaking. One for the more experienced and independent walker in my opinion. It lacks the historic character of routes like the Frances and the Primitivo where many centuries of pilgrim feet have prepared the way for the modern traveller. It is new and rough and raw. A challenge and a joy to walk.

http://www.grancanaria.com/patronato_turismo/EN.34317.0.html
http://www.grancanaria.com/…/t…/ext/naw_securedl/secure.php…
View attachment 33092
 

Rhomer

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017)
Portugues (2017)
Podiensis (2018)
Norte (2018)
I completed this camino a couple of weeks ago and just wanted to mention there is a reasonably-priced and gorgeous hostel, Mountain Hostel Finca La Isa, right near Cruz de Tejeda at the halfway point between Tunte and Galdar (photo below of view from their terrace). Amazing setting and friendly staff - proper camino-ey feel :) I live on the island and am happy to advise on logistics.
 

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