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Camino Portugese from Lisbon July 21st

MacMac

The Ghost Who Walks
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021… hopefully 2022
My daughter and I plan to walk the Camino Portugese starting from Lisbon on July 21st. Both of us have walked the Camino Frances from SJPdP and on to Finisterre previously, I twice, so have some experience :)

We do have some questions, and would be grateful for any help.

- pilgrim passport: is this the same type of credential as for the Frances, or specific for the Portugese?
- is the Albergue system similar as in Spain, or different (like for example in France)
- we tend to walk slower than most, and cover similar daily etappes by walking longer (till between 5 and 6 pm usually). Are there enough albergues to get a bed in July/August? Or should we plan shorter etappes, carry camping mats for outside etc?
- is there a good bus system, in case we have to skip an etappe or two? We have only 21 days and might not make it to Santiago in time for the return flight otherwise
- is it easy to get from Lisbon airport to wherever the Camino starts? Is the way out of Lisbon worth walking, or is it industrial areas?
- anything else very different to the Frances requiring different preparation or equipment?

Thanks for any tips!

Ittoop and Sangita :)
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
10/22 Aragones/Frances
There are less services and Albergues from Lisbon. If you only have three weeks you would probably need to average about 30 K a day without any rest days to complete the whole camino. My suggestion would be to start somewhere around Tomar. The Camino is much nicer the closer you get to Porto and beyond. Long days on the Camino can be tough on your knees because of all the road walking. I walked September and October it wasn’t that busy and rarely have problems getting a bed in an Albergue. I’m sure it will be busier for your Camino. Walking 30 K a day means you’ll arrive later and maybe have more problems getting a bed. You could also check out walking the coastal route from Porto. I heard that was a really pretty Camino. It may be more expensive due to the fact that it is on the coast and have a lot more people in the summer. In terms of a lpassporyand how the rules are in Albergues it’s the same as the Camino Frances. You don’t need a special passport If you start in Lisbon you can get a pilgrim passport at the Cathedral where the Camino begins. The people in Portugal or some of the nicest warmest and friendliest people will ever meet
Buen Camino
 
Time of past OR future Camino
2018
I'm going to Portugal May 31. I love Lisbon and there is a lot to see along the waterfront before getting to the Se Cathedral, but since I have been there, I intend to take the train up out of the city, probably to Santarem, and begin in less familiar territory. Brierley has a guide to the Portuguese that is helpful. I've also checked Booking.com for ideas. I agree that the Portuguese are remarkably kind and friendly; am looking forward to being there again. Bom Caminho!
 

MacMac

The Ghost Who Walks
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021… hopefully 2022
Thank you / Danke schön / Gracias to both of you for your help!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, MacMac,
There are lots of posts with information on the Caminho from Lisbon, and you will see there is a lot of debate. I walked it in 2008, so my info is way out of date, but even at that time, when there was more asphalt, no pilgrims, and no albergues, I enjoyed it very much. The forum resources section has a short guide to Lisbon to Porto, maybe now getting out of date and unnecessary because of all the improvements, but it may help you a bit.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/camino-portugués-lisbon-porto-2017.517/
One of the most notable changes in the route from Lisbon is that there is now an albergue in Alpriate, which is about 20 km from the Lisbon cathedral, where the arrows start. I think it has really made a difference in the experience. It's a small town with a great little café that serves reasonably priced meals, and the albergue brings together all those people you will be seeing over and over on the caminho. It's a good way to start off.
As far as walking out of Lisbon, I say go for it. The route from the cathedral to the Parque Nacoes takes you through the Alfama (old moorish quarter), the old port with some gorgeous buildings, past the tile museum (really worth a visit), and finally to the Parque Nacoes on the Tejo River. It was the site of a world expo and is also a fun place to visit (great aquarium, for example), but even if you are just walking through it's a nice river walk. There are some not so pleasant kms along a canal of the river for a few kms, but Alpriate is there waiting at the end!

There is probably as much asphalt on the Portugues as there is on the Norte, so shoes with more cushioning are probably a good idea rather than harder boots. And for an up to date list of albergues and other accommodation, check the list on the Via Lusitana website:
http://www.vialusitana.org/caminho-portugues/albergues/

There was a forum resource with a good compilation, but I can't find it, so if anyone else has the link, that would be helpful.

There is also a now outdated, but maybe still helpful, bit of suggestions of how to make the early stages shorter: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/short-stages-from-lisbon-to-porto.133/

Bom caminho to you and your daughter, Laurie
 
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MacMac

The Ghost Who Walks
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021… hopefully 2022
Hi, MacMac,
There are lots of posts with information on the Caminho from Lisbon, and you will see there is a lot of debate. I walked it in 2008, so my info is way out of date, but even at that time, when there was more asphalt, no pilgrims, and no albergues, I enjoyed it very much. The forum resources section has a short guide to Lisbon to Porto, maybe now getting out of date and unnecessary because of all the improvements, but it may help you a bit.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/camino-portugués-lisbon-porto-2017.517/
One of the most notable changes in the route from Lisbon is that there is now an albergue in Alpriate, which is about 20 km from the Lisbon cathedral, where the arrows start. I think it has really made a difference in the experience. It's a small town with a great little café that serves reasonably priced meals, and the albergue brings together all those people you will be seeing over and over on the caminho. It's a good way to start off.
As far as walking out of Lisbon, I say go for it. The route from the cathedral to the Parque Nacoes takes you through the Alfama (old moorish quarter), the old port with some gorgeous buildings, past the tile museum (really worth a visit), and finally to the Parque Nacoes on the Tejo River. It was the site of a world expo and is also a fun place to visit (great aquarium, for example), but even if you are just walking through it's a nice river walk. There are some not so pleasant kms along a canal of the river for a few kms, but Alpriate is there waiting at the end!

There is probably as much asphalt on the Portugues as there is on the Norte, so shoes with more cushioning are probably a good idea rather than harder boots. And for an up to date list of albergues and other accommodation, check the list on the Via Lusitana website:
http://www.vialusitana.org/caminho-portugues/albergues/

There was a forum resource with a good compilation, but I can't find it, so if anyone else has the link, that would be helpful.

There is also a now outdated, but maybe still helpful, bit of suggestions of how to make the early stages shorter: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/short-stages-from-lisbon-to-porto.133/

Bom caminho to you and your daughter, Laurie
Thank you, Laurie! This is really helpful :) We will definitely plan Alpriate for the first stop. I loved the “family” from the first evening in Orisson on the Camino Frances.
 

Gazelle2

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
19th May 2014
My daughter and I plan to walk the Camino Portugese starting from Lisbon on July 21st. Both of us have walked the Camino Frances from SJPdP and on to Finisterre previously, I twice, so have some experience :)

We do have some questions, and would be grateful for any help.

- pilgrim passport: is this the same type of credential as for the Frances, or specific for the Portugese?
- is the Albergue system similar as in Spain, or different (like for example in France)
- we tend to walk slower than most, and cover similar daily etappes by walking longer (till between 5 and 6 pm usually). Are there enough albergues to get a bed in July/August? Or should we plan shorter etappes, carry camping mats for outside etc?
- is there a good bus system, in case we have to skip an etappe or two? We have only 21 days and might not make it to Santiago in time for the return flight otherwise
- is it easy to get from Lisbon airport to wherever the Camino starts? Is the way out of Lisbon worth walking, or is it industrial areas?
- anything else very different to the Frances requiring different preparation or equipment?

Thanks for any tips!

Ittoop and Sangita :)
The walk starts next to the Cathedral , be aware a lot of the walk is on cobbled roads, which is very punishing on your knees.
It can be extremely hot so make sure you have enough water.
The best bit of the walk is from Porto to Santiago.
Credential from Cathedral.
You will not do it in 21 days more like 28 to 30.
I cannot comment on the buses as I never used one.
Not my favourite Camino I am glad I did it as the locals were delightful and the food and wine was lovely especially the Portuguese tarts.
 

MacMac

The Ghost Who Walks
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021… hopefully 2022
I decided to retire and now have unlimited time :)
 
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