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Camino Primitivo - feasability and advice

gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
Hola a todos

Any comments, suggestions and thoughts are welcomed, particularly current views on the albuerges and places to stay as well as any recommendations for where to eat well but economically!

Having had such a good time walking on the Camino Ingles last July, the intention is that we set out on the Camino Primitivo in late July 2014. The "we" is myself and a 9 year old, who is a determined, proven and strong walker.

The following are the plans, though these plans are subject to feed-back received

Oviedo - Cornella
Cornella - Bodenaya
Bodenaya - Campiello
Campiello - Berducedo
Bedrducedo - Castro
Castro - Fonsagrada
Fonsagarda - O Cadavo
O Cadavo - Lugo
rest day in Lugo
Lugo - Puente Romano
Puente Romano - Ribadiso da Baixo
Ribadiso da Baixo - Pedrouzo
Pedrouzo - Monte de Gozo
Monte de Gozo - Santiago de Compestela

Many thanks for any responses.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, gollygolly,
I have walked the Primitivo twice, my stages here for purposes of comparison if you're interested:

http://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-stages-on-the-camino-primitivo.4841/
http://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/back-from-the-primitivo-june-2012.14728/

I would suggest one little tweak -- instead of staying in the monastery in Cornellana, which then would give you a long day 1 and a short day 2, you might want to consider shortening day 1 and walk to San Juan de Villapanada. There is a lovely albergue there, great views, clean and comfortable, with a hospitalero "character" who loves the Camino, orchestrates dinner, and enjoys keeping the albergue in good shape. Buen camino, you will love the primitivo. Laurie

Hospitalero.jpg San Juan albergue.jpg SanJuan2.jpg
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
First reaction is that these stages are too long for an adult. There are some very demanding hills on the stages between Campiello and Fonsagrada. I think a child could do it, but certainly some, such as Berducedo to Castro would be better shorter. There are various ways to make better stages. Aiming at 20-25kms max per day would be better over the terrain.:)
http://www.gronze.com/camino-de-santiago/caminos/guia-del-camino-primitivo

(Edit) Castro is a private hostal which could be fully booked with youth groups. Phoning to check would be essential IMO in July and stopping in Grandas at the new albergue there might be necessary.
 
Last edited:

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
In the Camino Primitivo you will find the cathedral of pulpo (if you like it) in Fonsagrada. There are two places O Candal and Caldeira. Both of them are good. I ate a Menu del Peregrino in Caldeira:

I had:
Caldo Gallego
Pimientos de Padrón
Pulpo á Galega (with potatoes). ( A quantity that in Madrid would cost 15E only this dish)
Tarta de Santiago (dessert).
Jar of wine and little orujo.
Galician bread t
All 12 euros.

This day was great. After doing the beautiful but hard stage Grandas- Fonsagrada I had my reward.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks, Tia, for the caveat. I had meant to refer golly to some of your posts on shorter stages but forgot. I always try to leave it to the OP to figure out what's best for him/her and walking partners, because we all have such different walking abilities. I did the stages golly posted, more or less, on two separate occasions, most recently at age 62. I enjoyed them and was not at the breaking point. Others will have more or less stamina. I do think that it's important for anyone trying to figure out how far to walk to factor in elevation gain in addition to distance, because the 8 kms from St. Jean to Orisson are certainly a lot different than 8 kms between Carrion and Calzadilla, for instance.
 
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Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
The caveat was Terry's thought rather than mine. He walked more like the Gronze length stages, but with some different stops. A further consideration will be availability of provisions - eg. Berducedo has bar/shop etc but La Mesa has none (although a tiny temporary facility was open in 2013 in the high season apparently).
Gollygolly you can see Terry's stages here at Terry's Walk to Compostella May which gives his stages and distances. A few were short because he wanted to see places and the longest was Cádabo to Lugo, which we broke at Castroverde when together. Terry suggests too that Puente Romana (Ferreira) to Melide would be far enough at 26km - it is another 11km to Ribadiso - again because of the terrain.
Happy planning.
 
Past OR future Camino
2012
Hi Gollygolly,
I'm planning to make my way along the Salvador and Primitivo this spring, hoping to start in May so i'll be ahead of you. I promise i'll post any surprises i find along the routes. I am so grateful to Laurie for her wonderful posts on these routes and to Tia and all the others who have posted supplementary info across this forum. Personally I think some of your stages are ambitious, they certainly would be for me, but you will know your own capabilities and those of your companion. I found, on the Frances, that it was not the individual days mileage but the aggregate that was the challenge. I can, and do occasionally, walk marathon distances in a day but walking long distances, with a pack, on consecutive days puts additional strain on the good body. Perhaps either moderate some of your stages or factor in some rest days. i'm sure your companion will would appreciate them.

Buen camino
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Just a heads up for those planning on the Salvador in addition to the primitivo. The forum is chock full of recent reports (Susanna, fortview, StuartM, thomas, and some I am probably forgetting) on that glorious walk -- in the Salvador section of the forum.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

Harington

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
The Primitivo is one of the more strenuous caminos - very up and down. The nine-year-old might find it tough. depends how much you intend to carry.
 
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amancio

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Oviedo-Cornellana is too much for the first day; consider stopping in Grado (San Juan de Villapañada, actually), or else taking a half day walk from Oviedo to Escamplero, then Escamplero-Cornellana, they are all the same stages as I did.

The Campiello-Berducedo can be a bit long.

Otherwise, it is a GORGEOUS camino indeed!
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
Hi, gollygolly,
I have walked the Primitivo twice, my stages here for purposes of comparison if you're interested:

http://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-stages-on-the-camino-primitivo.4841/
http://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/back-from-the-primitivo-june-2012.14728/

I would suggest one little tweak -- instead of staying in the monastery in Cornellana, which then would give you a long day 1 and a short day 2, you might want to consider shortening day 1 and walk to San Juan de Villapanada. There is a lovely albergue there, great views, clean and comfortable, with a hospitalero "character" who loves the Camino, orchestrates dinner, and enjoys keeping the albergue in good shape. Buen camino, you will love the primitivo. Laurie

View attachment 7775 View attachment 7776 View attachment 7777
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
Many thanks for the suggestion - the stage planning has been modified, so that Day 1 should be a shorter day. Thanks also for the images which make everything seem more three-dimensional. Cannot wait to get going. Roll on the end of July!
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
Hi Gollygolly,
I'm planning to make my way along the Salvador and Primitivo this spring, hoping to start in May so i'll be ahead of you. I promise i'll post any surprises i find along the routes. I am so grateful to Laurie for her wonderful posts on these routes and to Tia and all the others who have posted supplementary info across this forum. Personally I think some of your stages are ambitious, they certainly would be for me, but you will know your own capabilities and those of your companion. I found, on the Frances, that it was not the individual days mileage but the aggregate that was the challenge. I can, and do occasionally, walk marathon distances in a day but walking long distances, with a pack, on consecutive days puts additional strain on the good body. Perhaps either moderate some of your stages or factor in some rest days. i'm sure your companion will would appreciate them.

Buen camino
Looking forward to reading your own account of how your Camino and experience unfolds. I can read that my own tentative plans are more than ambitious, and so a little bit of extra time is now being built into the planned stages so that it will be slightly longer in terms of days on the Camino, but the distance covered on some of days will not be so extreme. Buen Camino for your own May experience!!!
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
The caveat was Terry's thought rather than mine. He walked more like the Gronze length stages, but with some different stops. A further consideration will be availability of provisions - eg. Berducedo has bar/shop etc but La Mesa has none (although a tiny temporary facility was open in 2013 in the high season apparently).
Gollygolly you can see Terry's stages here at Terry's Walk to Compostella May which gives his stages and distances. A few were short because he wanted to see places and the longest was Cádabo to Lugo, which we broke at Castroverde when together. Terry suggests too that Puente Romana (Ferreira) to Melide would be far enough at 26km - it is another 11km to Ribadiso - again because of the terrain.
Happy planning.
Hi there Ta Valeria

Thanks for your post, and especially for the link to Terry's walk, which I just read and which has been a very real help for me. Much appreciated and all best wishes.
 
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raydercha

Member
Hola a todos

Any comments, suggestions and thoughts are welcomed, particularly current views on the albuerges and places to stay as well as any recommendations for where to eat well but economically!

Having had such a good time walking on the Camino Ingles last July, the intention is that we set out on the Camino Primitivo in late July 2014. The "we" is myself and a 9 year old, who is a determined, proven and strong walker.

The following are the plans, though these plans are subject to feed-back received

Oviedo - Cornella
Cornella - Bodenaya
Bodenaya - Campiello
Campiello - Berducedo
Bedrducedo - Castro
Castro - Fonsagrada
Fonsagarda - O Cadavo
O Cadavo - Lugo
rest day in Lugo
Lugo - Puente Romano
Puente Romano - Ribadiso da Baixo
Ribadiso da Baixo - Pedrouzo
Pedrouzo - Monte de Gozo
Monte de Gozo - Santiago de Compestela

Many thanks for any responses.
I am flying into Madrid on July seventh and am drawn to irun to santander then believe I might bus to Oviedo or somewhere close with maybe a bit of beach time inbetween but the long and short is I will be with a nine year old and look forward to Basque country a bit of the north coast then the topography of the primitivo. It would be fantastic for the young ones to know they aren't the only ones.
 

econodan

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Caminos Catalan, Aragones, part of Frances, Ruta del Salavador, Primitivo, and Finisterre (2012);
Cammino San Pellegrino, Italy (2013);
Lebaniego, Vadiniense, and Invierno (July 2014)
The Primitivo is truly beautiful. As others have noted, there is a lot of up and down, so plan stages accordingly. Also, be ready for some seriously muddy walking, especially near Tineo. We found plenty of places to stay (mix of albergues and small pensions) in 2012. For a day by day description of the stages we walked and a few photos, take a look at our blog here.
Buen Camino.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
The Primitivo is truly beautiful. As others have noted, there is a lot of up and down, so plan stages accordingly. Also, be ready for some seriously muddy walking, especially near Tineo. We found plenty of places to stay (mix of albergues and small pensions) in 2012. For a day by day description of the stages we walked and a few photos, take a look at our blog here.
Buen Camino.

Hmmm, I'm not certain, but having taken a quick look at your blog, I think I may have met you and your wife in a shoe store in Leon. My toes were bleeding and your shoes had worn out. I was planning to walk the Salvador/Primitivo and I know we talked about that route. Do you remember meeting a gabby grey haired woman in the shoe store? Anyway, it looks like you enjoyed the rest of the way to Santiago, if nothing else I can say with confidence that we were not more than a day or so apart during most of the last part of the Camino. Welcome to the forum! Buen camino, Laurie
 

econodan

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Caminos Catalan, Aragones, part of Frances, Ruta del Salavador, Primitivo, and Finisterre (2012);
Cammino San Pellegrino, Italy (2013);
Lebaniego, Vadiniense, and Invierno (July 2014)
Hi Laurie,
You are both observant and possessed of an excellent memory! Once we returned home and started reading the Forum again, I remembered you from the shoe store in Leon. Hope your new togs worked out well.
The Camino was a transformative experience for both of us, and we'll be back this summer. We haven't decided on a route yet, but are thinking of walking the Vadiniense and the Invierno.
Maybe we'll run into you again. Buen camino, Dan
 
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Juanma

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Primitivo (2015 and 2016)
... Terry suggests too that Puente Romana (Ferreira) to Melide would be far enough at 26km - it is another 11km to Ribadiso - again because of the terrain.
Happy planning.
Hi there! Just a little correction here: Ferreira to Melide will rather be 20 or 22 km than 26km. You have about 25km from Ferreira to Boente, which is 5km passed Melide.
Buen Camino!
 

sulu

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
a few since 2010
Beatrice, what dates?? We're looking at fall also..probably late September into October!!
Hi ksam,
I'm also looking to do this route in the autumn. I'm thinking El Salvador and then Primitivo, I don't have any dates in mind yet, as long as I go before there is any danger of snow.
Sue
 
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gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
The Primitivo is truly beautiful. As others have noted, there is a lot of up and down, so plan stages accordingly. Also, be ready for some seriously muddy walking, especially near Tineo. We found plenty of places to stay (mix of albergues and small pensions) in 2012. For a day by day description of the stages we walked and a few photos, take a look at our blog here.
Buen Camino.

Just catching up on the posts, and have read your blog, and feeling really excited as our experience with the Camino Primitivo is approaching. Thanks for the sharing, and the the great photographs. Buen Camino !! Andrew
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
Hi Gollygolly,
I'm planning to make my way along the Salvador and Primitivo this spring, hoping to start in May so i'll be ahead of you. I promise i'll post any surprises i find along the routes. I am so grateful to Laurie for her wonderful posts on these routes and to Tia and all the others who have posted supplementary info across this forum. Personally I think some of your stages are ambitious, they certainly would be for me, but you will know your own capabilities and those of your companion. I found, on the Frances, that it was not the individual days mileage but the aggregate that was the challenge. I can, and do occasionally, walk marathon distances in a day but walking long distances, with a pack, on consecutive days puts additional strain on the good body. Perhaps either moderate some of your stages or factor in some rest days. i'm sure your companion will would appreciate them.

Buen camino

Hope that your Camino is unfolding with many positive experiences and that the weather and your feet are being kind to you. Buen Camino !! Andrew
 
Past OR future Camino
2012
Hi Andrew, I'm running a bit behind hopes, but this Camino is indeed unfolding as they do. I fly out to Madrid 28 May, thence to Leon, a quick visit to Moratinos and a prayer at the tree planted in memory of Methodist Pilgrim. And then...

The sense of joyful anticipation is profound.

Buen Camino
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
I had intended this to be a brief summary, but enthusiasm took over, so please forgive is this is slightly tedious. The main information to impart from this is that walking with a young child (in this instance a girl) of 9 years 4 months is feasible, providing that the child is enthusiastic and determined. The walk that we did of the Camino Ingles was an ideal initiation into what walking on the Camino entails.

This was not the easiest of walks, for as most of those reading this will know, there are a few strong ascents and correspondingly challenging descents. Having written this warning, we were fortunate to have the blessing of weather which was, given that we were walking in the first half of August, quite cool, and certainly not as blistering as might have been expected . We were also fortunate to find, with only a couple of exceptions, space to sleep at most of those albuerges that we had arrived at.
There was difficulty in knowing the exact distance that we had covered, and it seems that different guide books are stating different distances. The Distance Certificate that we obtained at Santiago de Compestela states that Oviedo to Santiago is 343 kms, so take the distances that are given below as being only approximate. Our walking pace was on the whole 'normal', with quite slow descents where there was loose stones and a clear need for care.


Day 1: arrival in Oviedo. Stayed at the Hotel Vetusta, ideally located near the Cathedral in the historic centre.

Day 2
: Oviedo - Cornellana
started walking at 7:36am arrival 6:07pm
about 39.5kms.
A monster of a first day, with probably the highest of the temperatures that we were to experience during this Camino. The long walk is compensated by the stay at the magnificent albuerge at Cornellana, set within the beautiful, though decaying, Monasterio de San Salvador de Cornellana. I hope that the enthusiasm and funds to restore the set of buildings that make up the Monastery can be found.

Day 3: Cornellana - Bodenaya
started walking at 7:32am arrival 1:30pm
about 18.2kms.
This was another stage that was made with the destination of a specific albuerge as a priority. Having read a bit about this private albuerge, upon arrival it did not disappoint. A very friendly owner, who clearly has a love for the Camino, we ate both supper and breakfast communally, which is always a pleasure as well as an opportunity to connect with other peregrinos. The day's walking involves passing through Salas, where we had a brief break. A very pleasant small town, which in addition to having a very helpful tourist office, has a magnificant small hotel, Castillo de Valdés, which seemed a great place to stay if passing through Salas again.

Day 4
: Bodenaya - Borres
started walking at 7:48am arrival 4:38pm
about 28.4kms.
A slightly later departure then intended - a young peregrino had got locked inside the lavatory at the albuerge, and I assisted in releasing her, which took some time. Felt like being St George to the rescue. The arrival at Borres was disappointing ; a quite unpleasant albuerge located off the Camino, it was dirty and plagued with flies and mosquitoes. It was also full, and we had to sleep on mattresses placed on the floor in a very crowded and hot room. Strongly suggest that the private albuerge located in Campiello, about 3.5kms prior to Borres, is the far better option. Another negative of the destination is that the only bar in Borres is serving poor food and is overpriced. Note: if on the following day you are going to walk the 'Hospitales' route, there are no shops at all after Campiello. Stock up with provisions at Campiello!

Day 5: Borres - Montefurado
started walking at 7:38am arrival 4:04pm
not sure at all, but was told that it was 21.4kms
The walk 'over the top', taking what is known as the 'Hospitales' route, seemed the sensible option. In addition to being very well marked, this was a most uplifting day in terms of feeling the elements as well as feeling that we were really walking in the steps of many, many previous peregrinos. This was a great experience, even if slightly wet and windy, and will always be remembered. The challenge came towards the end of the Hospitales route, when walking down from Puerta de Palo, which was for me a challenging descent. The walk via Hospitales also involves passing over the highest point, at 1130 meters, on the Camino Primitivo (this point is, I am told, where the stone remains of the former Hospital at Fonfaraón are located).

Day 6
: Montefurado - La Mesa
started walking at 7:45am arrival at Berducedo 1:05pm / arrival at La Mesa 4:30pm
again, not sure at all, but was told that it was 20.5kms + 4.3kms to La Mesa
The time of arrival is the time that we arrived at Berducedo, where we were totally challenged in getting accommodation. The municipal albuerge was full, and while there is a private albuerge, the Camin Antiguo, I regarded the 15euros per person asked as abusively expensive. We wasted time looking, without success, for another private albuerge that allegedly exists, before finally abandoning Berducedo and going the additional 4.3kms to La Mesa. While not the most attractive of albuerges, this albuerge is in a beautiful location, and we shared a memorable evening with the other peregrinos as well as sharing their/our food.

Day 7
: La Mesa - Grandas de Salime
started walking at 6:45am arrival 2:15pm
not sure, but believe it is about 16.5kms.
Not a long walk, though there is quite a descent towards the reservoir at Grandas de Salime. Slightly surreal, and mostly abandoned buildings associated with the dam, including the viewing platform that is passed before crossing the dam, and which is worth looking out for. Also worth the stop is the bar located once the dam has been crossed, for a good breakfast with great coffee and the most enormous rolls that you will encounter on this Camino. Our stay in Grandas coincided with their Fiesta Major, so there was little sleep, while the music pumped away till 6.15am. To compensate, we had fortunately had a tremendous late lunch in a restaurant called A Reigada, which served stunningly tasty fare, that would justify a mention in the Michelin guide. Hunt out this restaurant if stopping in Grandas de Salime.

Day 8
: Grandas de Salime - Padrón
started walking at 7:00am arrival 3:30pm
again, not sure of the accurate distance, but believe it is about 26.5kms.
The day we left Asturias and entered Galicia.
I/we were not taken by the town of Fonsagrada, with the sprawl of ugly, recently built blocks of flats and decided to walk a bit further, to stay at the very friendly albuerge at Padrón. The additional 1/1.5kms was worth it for the tranquility of the location, the friendliness of the place - and a washing machine! Once we settled in, we walked back to Fonsagrada for a late lunch, which was easily the worst meal of the Camino, and stocked up on provisions at the local super-market. This included buying some food for our late supper, before our walk back to the albuerge.

Day 9
: Padrón - Castroverde
started walking at 7:12am arrival 3:30pm
again, not sure of the accurate distance, but believe it is about 34.5kms.
This was a very pleasant walk that became more challenging as the day unwound and the heat picked up. This was the only day that I saw my young daughter wilt. We finally made it to the rather surreal, modern albuerge of Castroverde. Could not an old and neglected building in the town have been conserved, restored and made into the albuerge for peregrinos? Despite being almost brand new, with a total absence of utensils, crockery and cutlery, the rather shiny kitchen is likely to remain little used by peregrinos. We were, however, able to conjure up a rather good salad for 9 of us, using little more than a Swiss army knife and disposable plastic plates, knives and forks, all washed down with some half descent wine drunk from disposable plastic cup, all obtained at the local Dia supermarket.

Day 10: Castroverde - Lugo
started walking at 7:05am arrival 12:14pm
again, not sure of the accurate distance, but believe it is about 19.0kms.
The first part of the day was not challenging, but by the time Lugo was being approached it was a dreary walk, over autopistas and the usual drab and depressing development that rings most towns and cities. Fortunately, the albuerge in Lugo lies within the walled part of Lugo. What a contrast between the historic old town within the walls and the Lugo that lies outside those walls. I was quite taken by the abundant charms of the old walled town, and walking the streets with their many abandoned houses, the majority of which are little architectural jewels.

Day 11
: Lugo (rest day and look around Lugo, which was well worth the time)
Stayed in a hotel a couple of streets along from the albuerge, just off the main plaza. Today my wife joined us, and was also able to see something of Lugo, as well as getting the first, and very beautiful stamp, in her credencial de peregrino, obtained at the Cathedral.
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
Day 12: Lugo - As Saixas
started walking at 6:26am arrival 15:14pm
again, not sure of the accurate distance, but believe it is about 37.4kms.
Poor start to the day, as we followed the original stone way markers out of, I believe, the gateway known as Porta Miña. After following the camino and descending the hill we came to a section that is now a quagmire, and impassable. We retraced our steps back to the walls of the old town, and found a sign indicating a deviation, which we now followed in order to exit Lugo, crossing the old Roman bridge, subject to a recent serious over-restoration, leaving it looking spanking new. As we ascended out of Lugo we passed the way marker indicating that just over 100 kms were left to walk to get to Santiago. The intended destination was full, and we forged ahead to the albuerge at As Seixas, a delightful place, just a few hundred metres removed from the camino. This is what albuerge's should be : a conversion of an old building, retaining all the charm and character of the original while adding the comforts of the current century. A very friendly woman (Mari Fé?) is responsible, and the overall ambient and setting makes this, I am sure, one of the better albuerge's that will be found on any of the caminos leading to Santiago. There are no shops at As Saixos, but we ate at the nearby small (private) albuerge, Casa Goriños, which has a limited menu, but while it may be limited, the portions were generous, tasty and good value. Eating also helped revive my wife, a bit. I think.

Day 13: As Seixas - Ribadixo da Baixo
started walking at 7:00am arrival 13:10pm
again, not sure of the accurate distance, but believe it is about 22.9kms.
Another ooops moment, as we walked out of the albuerge and, in error, turned left. It was an silly error, as we should have returned to start from the point where we had left the camino the day before. Like the day before, we had to once again retrace our steps. The next unfortunate is that this is the day that the Camino Primitivo joins, at Melide, the Camino Frances. Why unfortunate ? Until now, the number of peregrinos has been (relativly) few, even allowing for those that started, like my wife, at Lugo. The Camino Frances is a different matter, and in the middle of August, it is simply a column of ants marching in one direction, interrupted by the occasional bicycle or group of bicycles, smashing their way along the camino. Perhaps I am a kill-joy, but I personally am against the cyclists being on the same route, and believe that they should be taking the asphalt roads to Santiago. I find that having to step to one side to allow the cyclists to thunder by with the cry of "Buen Camino" flying in the wind quite unsettling, and when the path becomes muddy, as it did, the bicycles tend to churn the path up. Anyway, back to the day : this was another 'destination' albuerge, as I had stayed here all those years ago when I walked the Camino Frances some 12 years ago. So pleased that we - or at least my daughter and myself - were able to get here in time so as to have an overnight in this albuerge, which is an original albuerge sitting in a valley beside a small river. It is totally idyllic, and my daughter spent several hours playing in the river. The walk to this albuerge, at least from Melide, was at a very brisk pace, as my daughter marched me Left-Right/Left-Right almost the entire 10/11 kms, leaving my wife well behind. The sole intention was to ensure that we could stay at Ribadixo da Baixo albuerge, and in order to do that, my daughter and myself must have passed something like 60 to 70 other peregrinos, all who were coming along the Camino Frances. What these other peregrinos made of a young girl walking along and barking "Left-Right/Left-Right" and "come on Papa, come on Papa" I have no idea, but we made it in record time, my wife following on some time later. We ate well in the bar/restaurant next door, 'Meson Ribadiso', though the croissants we bought there before heading off the next morning looked great but disappointed.


Day 14: Ribadixo da Baixo - Albuerge Santa Irene
started walking at 7:20am arrival 12:20pm
I believe it is about 19.4kms.
While en route, we passed through San Paio, having a good coffee at Casa Porta de Santiago, and watched the steady stream of peregrinos pass by. Come mid-morning it was clear that my wife was not having the easiest of times, so we stopped at the Albuerge Santa Irene and waited for it to open, while also feeling the effects of Galicia's finest and very faint rain, which I am told is called "chirimiri". We waited for the albuerge to open at 1:00pm, and were the first peregrinos to check in, though it quickly began to fill, as the rain became heavier and encouraged more peregrinos to seek shelter and call it a day on the walking. We were able to eat at a nearby bar, Arca O Pino (?) where we once again were very agreeably served large, tasty portions at absurdly low prices.

Day 15
: Albuerge Santa Irene - Lavacolla
started walking at 7:36am arrival 12:10pm
I believe it is about 12.6kms + 1 km to the hotel
Another hick-up to the start of the day, as we walked the 200 odd metres back to the bar where we had ate the previous day, in the hope of starting the day with coffee etc. The assured opening time of 7:15 to 7:30 passed without any sign of life within the bar, and so without having had the hoped for coffee, we turned on our heels and headed back in the direction of Santiago. A few moments of light rain/heavy mist were sporadically passing, and though these were not constant, the path was quite muddy from the rainfall of the day before.
Still, this was a short day for walking, with our destination being the Paxo Xan Xordo, situated just outside Labacolla. There were four reasons for this destination. The first is that from what I had seen of the Paxo Xan Xordo on the web, that this was a delightful place. Second, to make it a short day with an overnight away from the noise and disturbance of the albuerges, while third was to be close enough to Santiago in order that the following day we would arrive very early, while finally Lavacolla is apparently the location of a stream that in former times peregrinos would wash themselves in before their arrival at Santiago. So it felt appropriate to being at the Paxo Xan Xordo, relaxing in a bath and making ourselves as clean as possible before the final day of walking that was to follow and which would see our arrival at Santiago de Compestella.

Day 16: Lavacolla - Santiago de Compostela
started walking at 7:01am arrival 09:00pm
I believe it is about 10.3kms
We made good pace to be at Santiago as early as possible. The first few kilometres wind through the ubiquitous eucalyptus plantations that are so abundant in Galicia, before the final few kilometres of the entry to Santiago, which has little to recommend it, until the old town is reached, and the full beauty, charm and attraction of Santiago overwhelm the senses. We made the final steps through the gate that leads onto Plaza Obradoiro, and with beautiful synchronicity the bells of the Cathedral were chiming 9 o'clock.

The distances I have recorded add up to a little over 331kms, so shy of the 343kms that are recorded on the Distance Certificate.
 
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TerryB

Veteran Member
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Strongly suggest that the private albuerge located in Campiello, about 3.5kms prior to Borres, is the far better option. Another negative of the destination is that the only bar in Borres is serving poor food and is overpriced. Note: if on the following day you are going to walk the 'Hospitales' route, there are no shops at all after Campiello. Stock up with provisions at Campiello!

Day 5: Borres - Montefurado
started walking at 7:38am arrival 4:04pm
not sure at all, but was told that it was 21.4kms

Well done gollygolly, glad you enjoyed our favourite Camino! Campiello is an option on that stretch, but it is not the cheapest accommodation around. What did you do at Montefurado, use a tent or bivvey? Did you find tap water or use the spring up at Puerto de Palo?

Blessings
Tio Tel
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Gollygolly -- THANKS for the detailed account of your trip! I am collecting info for the guide I am maintaining and all your detail was very helpful. Congratulations to your daughter expecially -- walking 39 k days is really impressive -- I sure try to avoid doing so!

I have a questionfor you. Where did you stay in Montefurado? Is there an albergue? or a Casa Rural? Thanks again for all the info.
 

Juanma

Active Member
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Primitivo (2015 and 2016)
Day 12: Lugo - As Saixas
started walking at 6:26am arrival 15:14pm
again, not sure of the accurate distance, but believe it is about 37.4kms.
Poor start to the day, as we followed the original stone way markers out of, I believe, the gateway known as Porta Miña. After following the camino and descending the hill we came to a section that is now a quagmire, and impassable. We retraced our steps back to the walls of the old town, and found a sign indicating a deviation, which we now followed in order to exit Lugo, crossing the old Roman bridge, subject to a recent serious over-restoration, leaving it looking spanking new. As we ascended out of Lugo we passed the way marker indicating that just over 100 kms were left to walk to get to Santiago. The intended destination was full, and we forged ahead to the albuerge at As Seixas, a delightful place...
Hi gollygolly!, really sorry that we were fully booked the day you passed in front of us and you had to keep on to As Seixas, especially because it must have been a long first day of walk for your wife; would have been nice to meet another forum member! However, as you said, the albergue in As Seixas, and also Marifé, the hospitalera, are wonderful, so no sorrow! :)
Buen Camino!,
 

Pelegrin

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2019
"[/we were not taken by the town of Fonsagrada, with the sprawl of ugly, recently built blocks of flats and decided to walk a bit further, to stay at the very friendly albuerge at Padrón. The additional 1/1.5kms was worth it for the tranquility of the location, the friendliness of the place - and a washing machine! Once we settled in, we walked back to Fonsagrada for a late lunch, which was easily the worst meal of the Camino, and stocked up on provisions at the local super-market. This included buying some food for our late supper, before our walk back to the albuerge"


I'm sorry for your bad meal. Where did you eat?
In my case I had by far my best lunch in my Camino.
A Fonsagrada is a mythic place for pulpo in North East Galicia and Western Asturias and there are organized trips from these areas just to have pulpo in Candal and O Caldeira restaurants.
Also caldo galego, pimentos de Padrón, and other Galego dishes are usually good.








.
 

Tia Valeria

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We liked Fonsagrada, good place to stay and food. The Tarta de Fonsagrada was wonderful. I am still looking for a recipe that doesn't serve an entire restaurant :)
 
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Tia Valeria

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Thank you Beatrice. Page saved - I will have to try it out.
 

gollygolly

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Gollygolly -- THANKS for the detailed account of your trip! I am collecting info for the guide I am maintaining and all your detail was very helpful. Congratulations to your daughter expecially -- walking 39 k days is really impressive -- I sure try to avoid doing so!

I have a questionfor you. Where did you stay in Montefurado? Is there an albergue? or a Casa Rural? Thanks again for all the info.


Help !!

I am feeling that a senior moment has come on, and cannot now recall ; my hand written summary state Montefurado, and yet when I look at our credencial, I see the stamp on the 1st August is showing BORRES and the next dated albuerge is the next day, 2nd August showing Albuerge de Peregrinos LA MESA. I recall our abandoning/departing from Berducedo and heading to La Mesa, but cannot recall Montefurado. Did we pass through Montefurado if we came via Hospitales ??? I actually cannot recall Montefurado, and must go and scratch my memory a lot harder and see where my notes are adrift.
 

gollygolly

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2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
We liked Fonsagrada, good place to stay and food. The Tarta de Fonsagrada was wonderful. I am still looking for a recipe that doesn't serve an entire restaurant :)


We had recommendations for eating in Fonsagrada : Caldeira and O Candal. Perhaps it was because it was Monday, or we were late, but these were closed when we were searching for somewhere to eat.

The lunch we had was in Restaurante pulpería A Parrilla, which is located just at the beginning as one enters Fonsagrada ; the poor meal may have also been because of the lateness of our eating, and the possibility that the cook had left.
 
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gollygolly

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We liked Fonsagrada, good place to stay and food. The Tarta de Fonsagrada was wonderful. I am still looking for a recipe that doesn't serve an entire restaurant :)

The charm of Fonsagrada escaped us - probably not helped by the poor lunch that we had (see my other posting on the restaurant) - but we really loved the albuerge at Padrón, and the very warm welcome there, as well as the tranquility of the setting. We also had only 4 peregrinos sleeping in the room, as is the case (I believe) for most of the sleeping arrangements at Padrón. Might also add that we were fortunate to have access to the church in Padrón - the keys are available from the house nearby.
 

gollygolly

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"[/we were not taken by the town of Fonsagrada, with the sprawl of ugly, recently built blocks of flats and decided to walk a bit further, to stay at the very friendly albuerge at Padrón. The additional 1/1.5kms was worth it for the tranquility of the location, the friendliness of the place - and a washing machine! Once we settled in, we walked back to Fonsagrada for a late lunch, which was easily the worst meal of the Camino, and stocked up on provisions at the local super-market. This included buying some food for our late supper, before our walk back to the albuerge"


I'm sorry for your bad meal. Where did you eat?
In my case I had by far my best lunch in my Camino.
A Fonsagrada is a mythic place for pulpo in North East Galicia and Western Asturias and there are organized trips from these areas just to have pulpo in Candal and O Caldeira restaurants.
Also caldo galego, pimentos de Padrón, and other Galego dishes are usually good.



I have already posted a response to Tia Valeria on the lunch, which was a follows : the lunch we had was in Restaurante pulpería A Parrilla, which is located just at the beginning as one enters Fonsagrada ; the poor meal may have also been because of the lateness of our eating, and the possibility that the cook had left.

We had been given recommendations for eating in Fonsagrada : the Caldeira and the O Candal - but no success at finding these open when we were looking for our late lunch (it was also Monday).




.
 

gollygolly

Active Member
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2000/13/14/15/16/17/18/19/2021
Hi gollygolly!, really sorry that we were fully booked the day you passed in front of us and you had to keep on to As Seixas, especially because it must have been a long first day of walk for your wife; would have been nice to meet another forum member! However, as you said, the albergue in As Seixas, and also Marifé, the hospitalera, are wonderful, so no sorrow! :)
Buen Camino!,

It was a tough first day for Ana - who has now sworn that she will never walk another Camino! The albuerge at As Seixas was, however, very special, and a great nights sleep as a bonus. I fell in love with the very sympathetic conversion of the building, and despite being slightly removed from the actual camino, and further then planned for that day, have no hesitation in saying that for me, this was a positively memorable destination.
 

Tia Valeria

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Help !!

I am feeling that a senior moment has come on, and cannot now recall ; my hand written summary state Montefurado, and yet when I look at our credencial, I see the stamp on the 1st August is showing BORRES and the next dated albuerge is the next day, 2nd August showing Albuerge de Peregrinos LA MESA. I recall our abandoning/departing from Berducedo and heading to La Mesa, but cannot recall Montefurado. Did we pass through Montefurado if we came via Hospitales ??? I actually cannot recall Montefurado, and must go and scratch my memory a lot harder and see where my notes are adrift.
The Camino passes through Montefurado which ever route you take from Campiello as it is after Puerto de Palo. There is a chapel and a few empty buildings.
 

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gollygolly

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Thanks for the photo - it sort of rings a bell, though it still has not produced the "oh yes" recollection. I suspect that I was still running on personal reserves after the descent from Pola de Allande, which was my personal near-annihilation of the Camino.

I am now sitting with the credencial in front of me, and these are the over-night 'destinations' recorded :

29 July Hotel Vetusta, Oviedo

30 July Albuerge at Cornellana

31 July Albuerge at Bodenaya

1 August Albuerge at Borres

2 August Albuerge at La Mesa

3 August Albuerge at Grandas de Salime

4 August Albuerge at Padrón (though the stamp says Ayuntamiento Fonsagrada - this albuerge was outside Fonsagrada)

(there is also another stamp from that day with O Acebo / A Fonsagrada, though I am sure that was a good bar with coffee and great rolls that we stopped at in the morning)

5 August Albuerge de Castroverde

6 August Albuerge in Lugo

7 August Lugo - Hotel Méndez Núñez

8 August Albuerge at As Seixas

9 August Albuerge at De Ribadiso (Ribadiso de Baixo)

10 August Albuerge Santa Irene

11 August Pazo Xan Xorxo

12 August arrival at Santiago


Should have looked at this and it front of me while drafting my account.

Still, hope that this helps explain the over night stops, which certainly did not include Montefurado!
 
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Pelegrin

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"(there is also another stamp from that day with O Acebo / A Fonsagrada, though I am sure that was a good bar with coffee and great rolls that we stopped at in the morning)".

Yes O Acebo is a solitary bar, that is the first house after passing the Asturias/Galicia border. I think it is the perfect place to celebrate the arrival in Galicia with a Ribeiro and a tapa.
 

fraluchi

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Yes O Acebo is a solitary bar, that is the first house after passing the Asturias/Galicia border. I think it is the perfect place to celebrate the arrival in Galicia with a Ribeiro and a tapa.
Except that we found it closed when passing there one early morning in September last year.:rolleyes:
 

Pelegrin

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2019
Yes I know that sometimes the bar is closed. So, If you find it open, you are lucky and double reason for celebration!. ;)
 

BeatriceKarjalainen

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It was closed when I passed as well in the middle of the day. I had planned to eat something there.
 

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