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Camino Primitivo


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Camino(s) past & future
CF, June 2012
CF, July 2012
CF, September 2016
Camino Primitivo, May 2017, followed by Camino Frances, late May, 2017
#3
Loved your blog post. Good luck walking and looking forward to seeing you next week. Shoot me an update on weather and conditions when you can.

Steve
 

tominrm

Hiking to Celebrate the End of Working Life.
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2014)
del Norte ( 2015)
Portuguese ( 2016)
Primitivo ( 2017)
VdlP (2018)
#4
I would like to add my two cents on CP as I am just about complete mine. I am in Melide now.
My compliments to the Xunta de Galicia. I can't speak for other routes, but they are really upgrading markers and roads for CP. Brand new markers complete with distance added everywhere (sometimes 30 meters apart) and updating "wrong" pointers temporarily painted with yellow arrow or red X.
The (previously) muddy paths are newly covered with gravel. I passed once the workers are working on a marker. You will notice as soon as you crossed the peak from Asturias, if you can make it to that point.

Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Camino Frances, Camino FInesterre, Camino Muxia
2014 Via de la Plata
2016 Norte
2017 plan to walk Portuguese, san Salvador & Primitivo
#5
Thanks for the blog, I am looking forward to your posts as I am doing the Primitivo in Mid June after completing Portuguese and then San Salvador.
 

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tominrm

Hiking to Celebrate the End of Working Life.
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2014)
del Norte ( 2015)
Portuguese ( 2016)
Primitivo ( 2017)
VdlP (2018)
#6
I forgot to add something. One day out of Lugo there is private Albergue Ponte Ferreira. It is temporarily closed until June 1 or so. But there is an alternate albergue A Nave about 800 m BEFORE Ponte Ferreira.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#7
Day 1 was yesterday but no internet in Escamplero or cell connection. I'll be posting a day behind below is the link to stage 1 Oviedo to Escamplero. Today we stopped in La Doriga at Ca Pacita. More to come.
Temperatures are far too hot for us and we are going to start walking at 5:30 starting tomorrow. By midday it's hitting low 70F (23 Celsius). It has slowed our walking down a lot. Took us almost 10 hrs today to get here because of the frequent stops to get shade. Going through 3 liters of water easily. Thank God for random old days in villages offering us more water. Very few places to refill in the first 2 days at least.
http://www.musingsfromthelastfrontier.com/camino-primitivo-day-1-oviedo-to-escamplero/
 
H

HighlandsHiker

Guest
#11
Alaskans:0))). You saved me from forgetting to pack sunscreen earlier. Hope you've found someplace pleasant to cool off and rest. Enjoying your blog on the train, Irene!
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#12
Alaskans:0))). You saved me from forgetting to pack sunscreen earlier. Hope you've found someplace pleasant to cool off and rest. Enjoying your blog on the train, Irene!
Many stretches in the first 3 days with zero shade. When you come across any woods, that's the best place to pee :) Everywhere else is towns and farmland that is exposed.
Just putting that out there. Bars are very far apart and so are the water fountains. We easily gone through 3 liters within 20 km. But we are not used to this heat and humidity.
 
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alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#13
I forgot to add something. One day out of Lugo there is private Albergue Ponte Ferreira. It is temporarily closed until June 1 or so. But there is an alternate albergue A Nave about 800 m BEFORE Ponte Ferreira.
Yes, that's Juanma's albergues. We have a private room reserved with him.
 
H

HighlandsHiker

Guest
#15
Many stretches in the first 3 days with zero shade. When you come across any woods, that's the best place to pee :) Everywhere else is towns farmland that is exposed.
Just putting that out there. Bars are very far apart and so are the water fountains. We easily gone through 3 liters within 20 km. But we are not used to this heat and humidity.
Thanks for the heads up about not passing up woods:0)). 3L water is heavy to carry, but better than the alternative. Will catch you on the other side of the pond.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#19
I've had next to no wifi since I last posted. I will update my blog but for now just a few notes.
I'm in Granda de Salime now. Horrible case of plantar fasciitis that I didn't know I had prior to this trip. Excruciating pain as soon as hit 20km and then really bad when I take my shoes off in the evening.
Went over the Hospitales yesterday. Drizzling, winding, overcast and cold enough for this Alaskan to put on that lightweight synthetic puffy under my rain jacket.
We were enjoying the pouring rain from a couple days ago by today the temps skyrocketed again. 70's and no rain. Tough day. Ran out of water right as we got to the restaurant at the Dam. 3 liters is our requirement and I stress again the lack of fountains and services along this route. Especially on Sunday and Mondays. If you are not used to hiking in heat, you must carry 3 liters or you will dehydrate fast.
This Camino is not a walk. It's hiking. A lot of hard surfaces and steep ascents and descents.
The worst advice I got was to wear hiking shoes instead of light weight boots. I should have known better given my experience, so I have nobody to blame except myself.
All the Spaniard and Germans are wearing boots. As is my husband and he has zero issues. I have no blisters but the plantar fasciitis may cause me to skip ahead to Lugo and take a rest day.
 
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N

NoQ

Guest
#20
Once you get on the Frances it will be much easier and it is said to be easier after Lugo, so your take on that section will be useful.

This is excellent advice. I was wondering what shoes / boots to take and was thinking of Treksta trekking shoes as I have previously used two pairs on two Camino Frances pilgrimages, but it sounds like boots would be better on the Primitivo.

Hope your feet recover after Lugo so you can enjoy the rest of your Camino in less pain.
 
H

HighlandsHiker

Guest
#21
I've had next to wifi since I last posted. I will update my blog but for now just a few notes.
I'm in Granda de Salime now. Horrible case of plantar fasciitis that I didn't know I had prior to this trip. Excruciating pain as soon as hit 20km and then really bad when I take my shoes off in the evening.
Went over the Hospitales yesterday. Drizzling, winding, overcast and cold enough for this Alaskan to put on that lightweight synthetic puffy under my rain jacket.
We were enjoying the pouring rain from a couple days ago by today the temps skyrocketed again. 70's and no rain. Tough day. Ran out of water right as we got to the restaurant at the Dam. 3 liters is our requirement and I stress again the lack of fountains and services along this route. Especially on Sunday and Mondays. If you are not used to hiking in heat, you must carry 3 liters or you will dehydrate fast.
This Camino is not a walk. It's hiking. A lot of hard surfaces and steep ascents and descents.
The worst advice I got was to wear hiking shoes instead of light weight boots. I should have known better given my experience, so I have nobody to blame except myself.
All the Spaniard and Germans are wearing boots. As is my husband and he has zero issues. I gave no blisters but the plantar fasciitis may cause me to skip ahead to Lugo and take a rest day.
Ouch. You've done so much of it under such difficult circumstances that I hope you can rest now, Irene. Thank you for posting about the boots instead of hiking shoes. You've likely got your hands full and still have limited WiFi here and there, and it sounds obvious that trail runners would be an even worse idea. I might have to revise plans. Mine have Vibram soles with good lugs, but it sounds like that might not be enough. Will hope you're doing OK out there and that the plantar fasciitis abates enough to manage alright ongoing. You probably know what to do for it, having hiked so much.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#22
Ouch. You've done so much of it under such difficult circumstances that I hope you can rest now, Irene. Thank you for posting about the boots instead of hiking shoes. You've likely got your hands full and still have limited WiFi here and there, and it sounds obvious that trail runners would be an even worse idea. I might have to revise plans. Mine have Vibram soles with good lugs, but it sounds like that might not be enough. Will hope you're doing OK out there and that the plantar fasciitis abates enough to manage alright ongoing. You probably know what to do for it, having hiked so much.
I've never had plantar fascitis! But I do know how to treat it. No blisters and I credit my darn tough socks. Hubby is wearing the Merrell Phaserbound mid waterproof boots and they are perfect for him. No blisters and no pain. Take into account that he's a 53 year old over weight male. If I'd listened to him and taken my mid weight hikers I probably wouldn't have this problem. There is a lot of road walking and a lot of gravel and rocky roads. The easiest terrain was the Hospitales because it was natural mountain terrain.
I would definitely consider a light weight hiking boot instead of hiking shoes if you suffer from any history of Achilles' tendon problems (I had my left on injured a few years back and it's acting up) or even mild heal pain or plantar fasciitis. Good orthotics for your personal issues and Darn Tough socks. Wide width shoes and for sure size up. I got that part right.
The problem on the Primitivo is the hard surfaces you are walking through. It's tough on feet. Unlike what I'm used to in Alaska which is all wilderness and no real trails. Hard ball surfaces cause plantar fasciitis. I'm very glad I had waterproof shoes though. With my short nylon gators my feet stayed completely dry in downpours and deep mud. No waterproof shoes would have had me in soaking wet feet for hours. Probably caused a blister.

I don't recommend my Merrill MOABs for this trail. Too light weight. I should have worn my Vasque St Elias (wide size even though I have normal width feet. They swell like I broke something when hiking in heat). The Merrill's are very comfy but definitely a long day hike with no load kind of shoe.

Another thing to consider. Despite saying that I was packing my Teva Olowahu flips, at the last minute I packed the Teva terra lite sandals. Normally a good camp shoe but anything with a heel strap is a bad idea when you have Achilles problems. The mildest cinching causes pain. Alternative? I'd bring a super light weight cushiony shoe like those cheaply made sketchers. Give up weight elsewhere. Feet are the most important thing.

I'm skipping 2 stages. We took the bus to Lugo (along with 5 other pilgrims with same foot issues) this morning and I am resting in the hotel (Mendez Nuñez) with my feet elevated, iced, and prescription strength dosages of ketoprophen. Which is sold over the counter here so I was able to easily obtain a few boxes. It's a Cox2 NSAID but seems to work better for me than Naproxen (Aleve). We are waiting for our friend Steve (Stfina) to arrive tomorrow. We start walking again on Wednesday.
I'm also lightening my pack by about a 1 1/2 pounds. Sending Ivar my puffy jacket (only needed it over the Hospitales route and that night before in Campiello); my phone backup charger (finding the new iPhone 7 Plus doesn't run out of battery life especially without a data connection); my long sleeve hiking shirt; my silk long johns that were never used; and ditching the blister packs of allergy meds we ended up not needing. Just never know since hubby has bad seasonal allergies. Also ditching 1 pair of my exofficio bra since I only need one pair to walk. And one pair of socks. I only intended to bring 3 pr and 1 extra made its way in there. Don't need more than 3. Will probably throw away one of our pieces of Dr Bronners since we only have 4 days left and these suckers last forever.
Still carrying 3 liters of water at least until we reach Melide since there are still not enough water sources between here and there. Temps later this week will be hitting mid 80's so I'll need all that water. After that I'll decrease it to 1.5.

I think that should help my feet. I may also ditch my rain skirt. I walked in pouring rain with just my purple rain skirt and t-shirt in high 50's and was extremely comfortable. Obviously not ditching the large quantities of pain killers :) luckily I also brought a few muscle relaxants that have helped tremendously at night. Thanks to my 80 year old doctor who gave me Valium (original use was as a muscle relaxant) because she KNEW I'd have spasm in my legs during this kind of hike (other patients had told her stories so she made sure I was prepared). I have just enough for each night left.

I hope this is helpful information. Some things to think about any way.

Oh! Every albergue in the Primitivo has thick good blankets for those of you who get cold. No shortages.

I may even ditch my sleeping bag at this point. Pensiones all have linen. I probably won't, though.

Edited to say that I reserved the next 4 days at private albergues so I will keep my sleeping bag just have something comfortable to lay on. The albergues are NOT cold right now. In Campiello the heat comes on around 8pm and it's very comfortable. I would have been fine with just a sleep sack or super light weight quilt. My REI Helio is rated at 50F and I used as a quilt. Didn't need the warmth.
 
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H

HighlandsHiker

Guest
#23
I've never had plantar fascitis! But I do know how to treat it. No blisters and I credit my darn tough socks. Hubby is wearing the Merrell Phaserbound mid waterproof boots and they are perfect for him. No blisters and no pain. Take into account that he's a 53 year old over weight male. If I'd listened to him and taken my mid weight hikers I probably wouldn't have this problem. There is a lot of road walking and a lot of gravel and rocky roads. The easiest terrain was the Hospitales because it was natural mountain terrain.
I would definitely consider a light weight hiking boot instead of hiking shoes if you suffer from any history of Achilles' tendon problems (I had my left on injured a few years back and it's acting up) or even mild heal pain or plantar fasciitis. Good orthotics for your personal issues and Darn Tough socks. Wide width shoes and for sure size up. I got that part right.
The problem on the Primitivo is the hard surfaces you are walking through. It's tough on feet. Unlike what I'm used to in Alaska which is all wilderness and no real trails. Hard ball surfaces cause plantar fasciitis. I'm very glad I had waterproof shoes though. With my short nylon gators my feet stayed completely dry in downpours and deep mud. No waterproof shoes would have had me in soaking wet feet for hours. Probably caused a blister.

I don't recommend my Merrill MOABs for this trail. Too light weight. I should have worn my Vasque St Elias (wide size even though I have normal width feet. They swell like I broke something when hiking in heat). The Merrill's are very comfy but definitely a long day hike with no load kind of shoe.

Another thing to consider. Despite saying that I was packing my Teva Olowahu flips, at the last minute I packed the Teva terra lite sandals. Normally a good camp shoe but anything with a heel strap is a bad idea when you have Achilles problems. The mildest cinching causes pain. Alternative? I'd bring a super light weigh cushiony shoe like this cheaply made sketchers. Give up weight elsewhere. Feet are the most important thing.

I'm skipping 2 stages. We took the bus to Lugo (along with 5 other pilgrims with same foot issues) this morning and I am resting in the hotel (Mendez Nuñez) with my feet elevated, iced, and prescription strength dosages of ketoprophen. Which is sold over the counter here so I was able to easily obtain a few boxes. It's a Cox2 NSAID but seems to work better for me than Naproxen (Aleve). We are waiting for friend Steve (Stfina) to arrive tomorrow. We start walking again on Wednesday.
I'm also lightening my pack by about a 1 1/2 pounds. Sending Ivan my puffy jacket (only needed it over the Hospitales route and that night before in Campiello); my phone backup charger (finding the new iPhone 7 Plus doesn't run out of battery life especially without a data connection); my long sleeve hiking shirt; my silk long johns that were never used; and ditching the blister packs of allergy meds we ended up not needing. Also ditching 1 pair of my exofficio bra since I only need one pair to walk. And one pair of socks. I only intended to bring 3 pr and I extra made its way in there. Don't need more than 3. Will probably throw away one of our pieces of Dr Bronners since we only have 4 days left and this'd suckers last forever.
Still carrying 3 liters of water at least until we reach Melide since there are still not enough waster sources between here and there. Temps later this week will be hitting mid 80's so I'll need all that water. After that I'll decrease it to 1.5.

I think that should help my feet. I may also ditch my rain skirt. I walked in pouring rain with just my purple rain skirt and t-shirt in high 50's and was extremely comfortable. Obviously not ditching the large quantities of pain killers :) luckily I also brought a few muscle relaxants that have helped tremendously at night. Thanks to my 80 year old doctor who gave me Valium (original use was as a muscle relaxant) because she KNEW I'd have spasm in my legs during this kind of hike (other patients had told her stories so she made sure I was prepared). I have just enough for each night left.

I hope this is helpful information. Some things to think about any way.

Oh! Every albergue in the Primitivo has thick good blankets for those of you who get cold. No shortages.

I may even ditch my sleeping bag at this point. Pensiones all have linen. I probably won't, though.
That's all fantastic information to have, Irene!! I have the orthotics and the wide version of Merrell Siren Sport 2's, and have found good ways of caring for foot problems if they're at a manageable level at all. Have Thorlo socks and Injinjis, and have some long gaiters maybe I can take, since am taking only a Frogg Toggs poncho this time. We sometimes used Ketolorac/Toradol post-op in ortho/neurosurgery (nursing), and people didn't seem to have too many GI problems related to it, but be careful with alcohol when taking either one of those two meds (Ketolorac or Valium). Your doctor is an angel for giving you a little of the latter for muscle relaxing and hopefully you'll get good rest with it.

So maybe I'll ditch the fleece jacket and take more peelable layers and run down to the Outfitter and see what hiking boots they have on hand that could be broken in quickly. Am so glad you have a rest day or two and hope your foot feels better soon with the rest and care. I can't thank you enough for sharing your experience doing the Primitivo, Irene - I feel better prepared for it, and wish you all the best for your last 4 days there. Beth
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#24
That's all fantastic information to have, Irene!! I have the orthotics and the wide version of Merrell Siren Sport 2's, and have found good ways of caring for foot problems if they're at a manageable level at all. Have Thorlo socks and Injinjis, and have some long gaiters maybe I can take, since am taking only a Frogg Toggs poncho this time. We sometimes used Ketolorac/Toradol post-op in ortho/neurosurgery (nursing), and people didn't seem to have too many GI problems related to it, but be careful with alcohol when taking either one of those two meds (Ketolorac or Valium). Your doctor is an angel for giving you a little of the latter for muscle relaxing and hopefully you'll get good rest with it.

So maybe I'll ditch the fleece jacket and take more peelable layers and run down to the Outfitter and see what hiking boots they have on hand that could be broken in quickly. Am so glad you have a rest day or two and hope your foot feels better soon with the rest and care. I can't thank you enough for sharing your experience doing the Primitivo, Irene - I feel better prepared for it, and wish you all the best for your last 4 days there. Beth
Fleece is too heavy. I bought lightweight synthetic puffy that is much lighter weight but just as warm. Really needed it over the Hospitales that day. But otherwise just sits in the pack.
The Primitivo is really active right now. No problem with beds but the turigrinos are taking up beds on the weekends. I reserved ahead once so far and now I just reserved for the next 4 stages past Lugo since I got word that the Frances is moving along kinda crowded. With my feet hurting and the temps skyrocketing to 80's my pace will Slow to 2km per hr on hills after 11:00. So it gives me peace of mind.
Bring some blister packs of electrolyte tablets. You just take them with a glass of water and get some magnesium into your muscles fast.
Glad my info is of help. I'll keep posting with any new trail info.
Ohhhhh. When you get to the fork in the road at Fonsagrada the arrow points left up a steep hill. Don't go that way. Go right under the highway toward Burron. It takes you into Fonsagrada without the absurd and unnecessary steep climb. If the old lady at the farm is outside she will warn you to go right. Everyone who follows the arrow up the hill arrives later and totally wasted. The locals are pissed that they routed the Camino up that hill. They hate seeing the half dead pilgrims stumble into town.
 
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alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#25
Once you get on the Frances it will be much easier and it is said to be easier after Lugo, so your take on that section will be useful.

This is excellent advice. I was wondering what shoes / boots to take and was thinking of Treksta trekking shoes as I have previously used two pairs on two Camino Frances pilgrimages, but it sounds like boots would be better on the Primitivo.

Hope your feet recover after Lugo so you can enjoy the rest of your Camino in less pain.
For what it's worth, all the Spaniards have boots. They aren't complaining of foot problems.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#26
Oh, bring a few water treatment tablets. There are places where the river is close enough to get water from but it must be treated with iodine tablets. We didn't need them but we were glad to have a few. Don't be embarrassed to knock on a door or ask a local for some agua. They were offering it to us on long stretches. Those old timers know there's no water out there. They all want to help the suffering pilgrims :) it helped that I'm fluent in Spanish and since my family is from these parts, I look like them. But they have figured out ways to communicate with foreigners as long as they speak a little English.
 
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H

HighlandsHiker

Guest
#27
This is priceless information, Irene. What good luck to have someone with trail experience (and used to reporting on it) going before. I can get some water treatment tablets tomorrow and will track down some electrolyte tablets, since it sounds warmer than I was expecting it would be. I'm very grateful and will use every bit of this information.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2014), Camino Inca (2015), Primitivo (2017), Portugues (2018)
#28
So much useful information - thank you! I knew that I was taking my hiking boots, as I have had ankle issues in the past. I have some water treatment tablets - hadn't thought about using them but I will now. And I just went out to get some electrolyte tablets. The heads-up about the lack of water, and the heat, are invaluable. Thanks, keep posting !
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#29
Lugo to ponte Ferreira-all road walking except for maybe 30 minutes. No fountains but there is a bar with a stamp and breakfast about 7km out but nothing until San Román. Nice bar with stamp and cold drinks. Places to duck into the woods to pee are a challenge!
I went through 3 liters of water. Not counting the 2 waters at each bar.

A Nave private albergue in Ferreira is awesome and spacious. The municipal albergue is a little more than a tiny house. Looked dismal. A Nave offers a communal meal of paella. Has its own well stocked bar, too.
 
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alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#30
High temp today was over 85F/31c
Seems that this is hot year. No snow in this winter and very high heat for months now, according to all the locals that I've spoken to.
 
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alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#31
Ponte Ferreira to Boente. Another very long day in 90F heat. We finally came upon a well about 13Km into the walk. I was down to my last 1/2 liter of water. The actual walking isn't hard. Relatively flat compared to previous week but some ascents and descents. Very rocky improved surface. We stopped at the only bar along this stage which was 7km outside of Melide. Everyone was there! Overheated and tired. I wish I had planned this trip for 18 walking days instead of 14. The stages are just too long for me. My feet are in pain from the plantar fasciitis but at least I'm able to ice them every night.
I got my FIRST blister on today's walk. Of course it would happen to be on the ball of my foot. Painful to walk but I caught the hot spot right away and put Compeed on it.
Staying at albergue Boente. Much nicer than sos Boente. I went and looked at it and was not as nice. Here we have 2 rooms. The one we're in has 10 beds with real linens. Not those paper things. We have lockers big enough to fit the backpack an each bed has a little cubby hole with your own electrical outline, night light and space for stuff. I put my phone there to charge, my bra, my instant ice pack , and still had room for small items. You could could fit a water bottle. 12 Euros. They take credit cards. Serve dinner off of a pilgrim menu and a la carte, full bar. Washers and dryers and a patio to gang and hand wash as well. The shower in our room has two separate heads so a couple could actually shower at the same time and save time. Very spacious. There are 2 bunk rooms. The 10 Euro one has disposable linen and no personal cubbies. We have thick blankets for those who get cold . One per bunk.
The church across the street is St James' and has a stamp.

Weather forecast is promising us a significant drop in temperature and some rain for tomorrow. Keeping my fingers crossed that it's accurate. We're headed to Santa Irene. My namesake :)
 
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alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#32
Arrived in Santa Irene after a long day in pouring rain and thunderstorms. It was perfect walking weather for us. Not hot at all, a bit humid. That was easy walking and just a light rain jacket was enough. Glad I was not wearing a portable sauna (poncho) :)
Staying at albergue Rural Astral in Santa Irene. About .5 km off the main road and away from the noisy Main Street. We had A large 4 bunk room reserved for 3 of us. Owners did our laundry and drove us to the restaurant for free. Highly recommend this place.
We arrive in Santiago tomorrow! Short 22.5 km day and easy terrain compared to the last 2 weeks.
I will update my blog over the course of the following days after we settle into our vacation apt on the coast for the next week.
I'm exhausted! No blisters but bad plantar fasciitis :-(
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#33
We arrived in Santiago on Saturday. Very painful walk on hard surfaces but I made it. Had lunch the following day with Johnny Walker Santiago and SYates plus the Irish pilgrims that came by boat last year. Yesterday we helped them get their boat on a trailer and sent them off to A Coruña.
We are now in a fantastic apt in isla de Arousa on the coast of Galicia resting and planning a kayak trip around the island. I WIll update my blog. Just been too tired the last few days.
The walk from Santa Irene was easy terrain but a lot of turigrinos that was a shock to my system after 2 weeks with hard core walkers :)

Buen Camino to those heading out soon. Weather is very hot in Asturias and Galicia. I was glad that I forwarded my light puffy jacket, long sleeved hiking shirt, and rain skirt after going over the Hospitales. I should have sent my sleeping bag too. Didn't need it. The private albergues and pensiones we stayed in had real linen and blankets. Plus it was just hot. We slept with windows open all night in every albergue. It's hotter than usual is what I keep getting told.
 
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#34
We arrived in Santiago on Saturday. Very painful walk on hard surfaces but I made it. Had lunch the following day with Johnny Walker Santiago and SYates plus the Irish pilgrims that came by boat last year. Yesterday we helped them get their boat on a trailer and sent them off to A Coruña.
We are now in a fantastic apt in isla de Arousa on the coast of Galicia resting and planning a kayak trip around the island. I WIll update my blog. Just been too tired the last few days.
The walk from Santa Irene was easy terrain but a lot of turigrinos that was a shock to my system after 2 weeks with hard core walkers :)

Buen Camino to those heading out soon. Weather is very hot in Asturias and Galicia. I was glad that I forwarded my light puffy jacket, long sleeved hiking shirt, and rain skirt after going over the Hospitales. I should have sent my sleeping bag too. Didn't need it. The private albergues and pensiones we stayed in had real linen and blankets. Plus it was just hot. We slept with windows open all night in every albergue. It's hotter than usual is what I keep getting told.
Congrats and a well deserved rest now!:)
Aha the famous lunch with the lovely people.;)
 
H

HighlandsHiker

Guest
#38
Wow, you had lunch with several Camino royalty then, Irene:0)! Where was lunch? I'd watched a video about those Irish pilgrims and seem to remember that Glen Hansard was among them one year. Your foot probably still hurts, but it could probably be worse - you could be rowing back to Ireland!

Glad you're someplace comfortable and have fun kayaking. Enjoying all of your posts!
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#39
Wow, you had lunch with several Camino royalty then, Irene:0)! Where was lunch? I'd watched a video about those Irish pilgrims and seem to remember that Glen Hansard was among them one year. Your foot probably still hurts, but it could probably be worse - you could be rowing back to Ireland!

Glad you're someplace comfortable and have fun kayaking. Enjoying all of your posts!
Many Camino royalty at that lunch . San Clemente restaurant. The guys aren't going back to Ireland. They are rowing south to Morrocco. Wonderful people.
 
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H

HighlandsHiker

Guest
#43
I had the great pleasure to be invited here twice. Not only a stunning menu but the best staff I have ever encountered.
Santiago is such a welcoming place, I can't imagine even better staff, but that's a lovely endorsement, Sabine. Is it possible to have lunch in informal clothes such as a plain skirt and hiking shirt?
 
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#44
Santiago is such a welcoming place, I can't imagine even better staff, but that's a lovely endorsement, Sabine. Is it possible to have lunch in informal clothes such as a plain skirt and hiking shirt?
Abolutely. I had my walking pants, my most classy Merino shirt :D and a colourful scarf. No seriously, they do not seem to mind.
Sorry @alaskadiver : I'm hijacking your thread...tend to get carried away when it comes to food and restaurants.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#45
IMG_1467.JPG IMG_1467.JPG
Abolutely. I had my walking pants, my most classy Merino shirt :D and a colourful scarf. No seriously, they do not seem to mind.
Sorry @alaskadiver : I'm hijacking your thread...tend to get carried away when it comes to food and restaurants.
No problem. The restaurant isn't fancy. It's just really good. We still hadn't picked up our travel clothes from Ivar so we were in hiking pants, tshirt and sandals. They don't care.
I'm the short one in the blue shirt behind Sister Catherine and 2 over from Father Allen. Johnny Walker Santiago is to the right of the picture.
 

MichaelSG

Retired member
Camino(s) past & future
Not enough
#46
High temp today was over 85F/31c
Seems that this is hot year. No snow in this winter and very high heat for months now, according to all the locals that I've spoken to.
What a difference a week makes! We were about seven days in front of you and everyone was apologising for the unseasonably cold weather from Irun through Oviedo to Lugo. We had a couple of hot and sunny days but enjoyed walking in the more numerous, cloudy, chilly days. Most mornings never got above 10C (50F) and the afternoons were mostly never above 15C (60F). When we transited back through Bilbao on the way home a month later, we were shocked by the difference. One pharmacy sign said 35.5C and it was 13C in the "heat" of the afternoon five weeks earlier when we first arrived in Spain.
 
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alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#47
What a difference a week makes! We were about seven days in front of you and everyone was apologising for the unseasonably cold weather from Irun through Oviedo to Lugo. We had a couple of hot days in the sunny days but enjoyed walking in the more numerous, cloudy, chilly days. Most mornings never got above 10C (50F). When we transited back through Bilbao on the way home, we were shocked by the difference. One pharmacy sign said 35.5C and it was 13C in the "heat" of the afternoon five weeks earlier when we first arrived in Spain.
The temps were horrible. Especially with the lack of water sources. If I ever do another Camino it will be in March or April. Winters in Spain are mild for me. This heat is just too much.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#49
Last year on the Primitivo (photo taken in Lugo 19 July):
View attachment 34228
But the municipal pools are open in July, which makes all the difference.
Not while you're walking it doesn't :)
My hotel in Lugo had AC. I wouldn't have bothered with a pool personally. I would never hike in the summer in Spain. I'll leave that to you crazy hot weather people.
 
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alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#50
Hello everyone. I've updated my blog with Days 4-6. I just got home late last night and had off today so I started to catch up. I really thought that I was going to be able to publish every night but the lack of wifi made it impossible for me to log onto my blog account and post pictures. It became too much of a hassle and I didn't want to post crap. So I took notes and I'm now writing the posts. I also thought that I'd write while I was spending 5 days on the beach in Galicia after our hike. HA! Silly me. Anyway, if you want to catch up here is the link. I have to work tomorrow and Thursday but I'm off on Fridays so I'll be posting the rest of the days over the course of this weekend. Thanks for following. It was great fun.
musingsfromthelastfrontier.com
 
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#51
Not while you're walking it doesn't :)
My hotel in Lugo had AC. I wouldn't have bothered with a pool personally. I would never hike in the summer in Spain. I'll leave that to you crazy hot weather people.
I'm hoping that the unusually hot Spring leads to an unusually cool summer. :)
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
2019- Invierno
#53
And finally! My blog is now completely updated. My entire Camino Primitivo through the days in Santiago when we had lunch with SYates, JohnnyWalker Santiago, and Irish Boat pilgrims. I'm adding a separate post about their tragic accident. I wanted my last Camino post to reflect the joy we all had the day they left.
If you haven't read any of the posts you can click on category: Camino de Santiago and just the posts from the Primitivo will show on the results page.

http://www.musingsfromthelastfrontier.com/
 


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