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2019 Camino Guides

Camino-themed Baby Names For English Speaker

Montater

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2014)
#1
Hello Pilgrims,

My wife and I did the Camino Frances in 2014 and both still think about the experience every day. It has shaped the way we live our life, and we are both actively seeking out our next opportunity to return to the Camino.

In the meantime, we are expecting our first child this summer! And because the Camino is still (and will always be) such an important part of our lives, I wanted to get some Camino/pilgrim-themed male/female/unisex baby name ideas.

Though I love the beautiful español/galego/português names we encountered, I'm looking for names that would also fit well in an English-speaking family, as my wife does not speak any of those languages and we live in the U.S.

Thank you in advance for your help and creativity!

Patrick
 

Stephen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Twice walked from St Jean to Estella and once from Sarria to Santiago. Maybe someday I'll find the time to do the entire walk.
I've found the time. Just completed SJPP to Santiago. 25 Aug to 1st Oct, 2016.
And now the Portuguese from Lisbon.
#2
One that leaps to mind is Peregrine, for a boy.
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#3
I myself was pleasantly surprised to learn that my own name, Perry, is derived from Peregrine. That comes from the Latin name Peregrinus, originally meaning "one from abroad", thus a foreigner, traveller, or pilgrim.
And as a result of all that etymology my first name on my compostella is filled in as Peregrino. My parents must have been clairvoyant...
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#4
What a cool question!
Ángel is nice, it's a boy's name in Spain, but I have met lady Angels too. Or just James for St James? / Jamie for a girl?
 
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notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#7
I think it's a shame we don't have a name that we all get, like Haji for people who have been to Mecca.
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
#9
The most obvious choice Spanish would be Santiago. In France it would be Jacques (with derivations in English as Jacob, but apparently, not Jack); pilgrims to Compostela are called "jacquets".
If Compostela sounds as too much, remember that one of the theories about its origin is "Campus Stella" (from Campus Stellae, "field of the star"). I would not go into the discussion of the merits of this etymology, but it would suffice to remember that the star (or Stella) is a traditional pilgrimage symbol and it appears in our beloved signposts. I like it.
There is a list of patron saints of pilgrims here (but no, I would not recommend "Niño de Atocha").
For some reason, Saint Roch (which is the origen of Rocco, Rocky) does not appear in the list. There are lots of churches dedicated to Saint Roch in south Germany and southwest France, and he is represented always as a pilgrim. But in present days everybody would rather remember a movie character....
Another choice are cities or villages names. Leon has been already mentioned. What about Sarria (for a girl) or Zubiri (for a boy)? Or Estella...
Anyway, remember that it is a very nice idea, but the boy/girl will carry the name for an entire life, with all the benefits and eventual problems that an usual or unusual name could have. I mention this because I have some first hand experience with the issue...o_O:rolleyes:
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
#16
Galician names are:

For Girls:
Lua (Moon), Estrela (Star), Uxía (Eugenia), Xoana ( Jane), Leda(happy)
For boys:
Iago (Sp Santiago), Brais (Sp Blas), Roi (Sp Rodrigo), Xan (John), Lois (Louis).
Galician X sounds like English SH
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#18
Rosalía for a girl, after the great Rosalia de Castro (1837 - 1885) " the unquestioned poet laureate of Galicia."
She published the first work written in the Galician language. The day her 'Cantares Gallegos' appeared later became an official holiday in Galicia, Día das letras Galegas.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
#21
The most obvious choice Spanish would be Santiago. In France it would be Jacques (with derivations in English as Jacob, but apparently, not Jack); pilgrims to Compostela are called "jacquets"...o_O:rolleyes:
Santiago actually translates into English as Saint James.
Iago in Hebrew translates to Jacob.
 

marciarsm

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (SJPDP-SdC) - 2004, 2013, & 2017
#30
For a girl it could be Rachelle (French for Rachel) and pronounced rah-shell, with Shelly as a nickname.
Or what about Jacqueline, anther French female name for James.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Arrive in Biarritz on June 25, 2017
#34
Hello Pilgrims,

My wife and I did the Camino Frances in 2014 and both still think about the experience every day. It has shaped the way we live our life, and we are both actively seeking out our next opportunity to return to the Camino.

In the meantime, we are expecting our first child this summer! And because the Camino is still (and will always be) such an important part of our lives, I wanted to get some Camino/pilgrim-themed male/female/unisex baby name ideas.

Though I love the beautiful español/galego/português names we encountered, I'm looking for names that would also fit well in an English-speaking family, as my wife does not speak any of those languages and we live in the U.S.

Thank you in advance for your help and creativity!

Patrick
Frances
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#35
I know. But from the linguistic point of view, it does not seem a logical evolution to me. But I am not an expert.
"James is the English language New Testament (Vulgar/Later Latin) form of the Hebrew name Yaʻaqov (known as Jacob in its earlier Latin form).[1] The name James came into the English language from the Old French variation James[2] of the late Latin name Iacomus. This was a Vulgar/Later Latin (proto-Romance) variant of the earlier Latin form Iacobus, from the New Testament Greek Ἰάκωβος (Iákōbos), from Hebrew יעקב (Yaʻaqov) (Jacob). The development Iacobus > Iacomus is likely a result of nasalization of the o and assimilation to the following b (i.e., intermediate *Iacombus) followed by simplification of the cluster mb through loss of the b. Diminutives include Jim, Jimmy, Jimmie, Jamie, Jimbo and others." Wikipedia.
 
Camino(s) past & future
There are many different Pilgrim Routes and Caminos in life.
#38
Tiago, Benedict, Roland or Muxia for a boy.
Faith, Maria or Sarria for a girl.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#40
Galician names are:

For Girls:
Lua (Moon), Estrela (Star), Uxía (Eugenia), Xoana ( Jane), Leda(happy)
For boys:
Iago (Sp Santiago), Brais (Sp Blas), Roi (Sp Rodrigo), Xan (John), Lois (Louis).
Galician X sounds like English SH
From a practical standpoint, Iago is a pretty rare name in the English-speaking world and I suspect most people that recognize it will associate it with the villain in Shakespeare's "Othello." If you have a boy and name him that, it may cause some distress later in life as most kids -- his peers while growing up -- will not associate the name with the saint of the Camino, especially once they get introduced to Shakespeare (do they teach that in schools any more?). FWIW, my name, James, as it appears on my Compostela, is Iacobum -- but I'm not suggesting that as a choice for your child.
Jim
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
#42
More ideas from the Camino.........Cizur, (Ceasar), Reina (Queen), Santo (Saint), Juan (John), Rei/Rey (King), Viana (Vivian), Jean (John), Cruciero/Cruz (Cross), Michel (Michael), Arleta (Arlette), Capilla (Chapel), Sebastian (Steven), Rio (River), Martin (Martin), Clara (Clara), Calzada, Gaudi, Isodoro (Isador), Palacio/Palacia (Palace), Pieros (Peter), Melide (Melinda?), Xulian (Julian), Anton (Anthony), Matias (Mathias), Faba (Fabian), Cebreiro, Sarela/o, ...
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#45
I think it's a shame we don't have a name that we all get, like Haji for people who have been to Mecca.
A Muslim barista in town, aware of my Camino-ing, does call me Haji.

As far as names go, a German academic of my acquaintance fell pregnant on her Camino a few years ago. After some thought, she decided that the child should be named after the town in which it was conceived, and came to the conclusion that Puente la Reina was the spot, her calculations suggesting that her first identification of Estella was wrong. This caused her some distress as she had no intention of calling her daughter Puente la Reina, when Estella was so excellent a choice. I suggested that she instead call the girl Estefania, who was one of the bridge-building queens. This went down well and little Steffi is about to head into her first year of school next year. I wondered why she had not consulted the father on this question but did not have the nerve to enquire.

In any case, it is as well that nothing untoward happened in Villalcazar de Sirga or Mansilla de las Mulas. Still, Atapuerca could be workable, although I would not recommend Belorado. Burgo is an occasional boy's name in England.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#47
A Muslim barista in town, aware of my Camino-ing, does call me Haji.

As far as names go, a German academic of my acquaintance fell pregnant on her Camino a few years ago. After some thought, she decided that the child should be named after the town in which it was conceived, and came to the conclusion that Puente la Reina was the spot, her calculations suggesting that her first identification of Estella was wrong. This caused her some distress as she had no intention of calling her daughter Puente la Reina, when Estella was so excellent a choice. I suggested that she instead call the girl Estefania, who was one of the bridge-building queens. This went down well and little Steffi is about to head into her first year of school next year. I wondered why she had not consulted the father on this question but did not have the nerve to enquire.

In any case, it is as well that nothing untoward happened in Villalcazar de Sirga or Mansilla de las Mulas. Still, Atapuerca could be workable, although I would not recommend Belorado. Burgo is an occasional boy's name in England.
Before naming any child Atapuerca, please look up the meaning of 'ata' (from 'atar') and 'puerca'.
The same goes for 'Muxía' or 'Mugía' as it used to be written in Spanish. 'Mugir' as a verb refers to the sounds that cows make, especially when they do not stop. That same verb can be used in case of a howling child, the kind of darling that never sleeps when it is supposed to.
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#48
'Elias', after Fr Elias Valina Sampedro, who did so much to stop the Camino dying out in the late 20th Century by painting the first yellow arrows etc.

He is also referred to with the Spanish honorific 'Don' (i.e. Don Elias), which would also work. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
#49
Before naming any child Atapuerca, please look up the meaning of 'ata' (from 'atar') and 'puerca'.
The same goes for 'Muxía' or 'Mugía' as it used to be written in Spanish. 'Mugir' as a verb refers to the sounds that cows make, especially when they do not stop. That same verb can be used in case of a howling child, the kind of darling that never sleeps when it is supposed to.
Muxia is Galician and Mugia was the Spanish official name in Franco's times . But don´t mean the same:
The name Muxia that I´m sure has another origin, in Galego means milked (past) from verb to milk, whereas Mugia in Spanish refers to the sounds that cows make.
There were some more cases of Galician toponomy that translated into Spanish changed completely their meanings, the most notorious was Niño da Aguia (Eagle Nest) that officially was Niño de la Guia (Child of the Guide).
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#50
Muxia is Galician and Mugia was the Spanish official name in Franco's times . But don´t mean the same:
The name Muxia that I´m sure has another origin, in Galego means milked (past) from verb to milk, whereas Mugia in Spanish refers to the sounds that cows make.
There were some more cases of Galician toponomy that translated into Spanish changed completely their meanings, the most notorious was Niño da Aguia (Eagle Nest) that officially was Niño de la Guia (Child of the Guide).
I do not recommend any name for a child that may be confused with a word with completely different meaning. Moreover, in my opinion, there is no grace in calling a boy "Milked" either. Nor a girl.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#51
...in the English-speaking world and I suspect most people that recognize it will associate it with the villain in Shakespeare's "Othello." If you have a boy and name him that, it may cause some distress later in life as most kids -- his peers while growing up -- will not associate the name with the saint of the Camino, especially once they get introduced to Shakespeare (do they teach that in schools any more?).
I don't have much faith in today's education system and would not worry about Shakespearian references. :(
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#52
Muxia is Galician and Mugia was the Spanish official name in Franco's times . But don´t mean the same:
The name Muxia that I´m sure has another origin, in Galego means milked (past) from verb to milk, whereas Mugia in Spanish refers to the sounds that cows make.
There were some more cases of Galician toponomy that translated into Spanish changed completely their meanings, the most notorious was Niño da Aguia (Eagle Nest) that officially was Niño de la Guia (Child of the Guide).
And Muxia is pronounced Moochee'a, unlike mugir.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#53
As far as names go, a German academic of my acquaintance fell pregnant on her Camino a few years ago.
...
I wondered why she had not consulted the father on this question but did not have the nerve to enquire
.
Who on earth has the energy for such things on the Camino? :eek: Let's just hope she was visiting pensiones claiming to do so because of other people's snoring. :eek:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#56
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#57
No, I don't think so ..... just stirring the pot here ...
The 'cheea' in Moocheea is pronounced, I would think, as in 'cheese.'
The 'sheea' in Moosheea is pronounced, again, I would think, as in 'she.'
Which is it? :)
Ch and sh are the same in French o_O. No t sound.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#59
Well, I think we can safely conclude that Muxía would make life difficult for a child of that name, even more so when living in an English-speaking environment.

However, with a slight alteration, it does become an extraordinary name for a cat, as Meoxía or Mouxia depending on character and talent.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
#60
No, I don't think so ..... just stirring the pot here ...
The 'cheea' in Moocheea is pronounced, I would think, as in 'cheese.'
The 'sheea' in Moosheea is pronounced, again, I would think, as in 'she.'
Which is it? :)
It is Moosheea. (Muxia)
Moocheea (Muchia) sounds different in Galego.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
#61
It is Moosheea. (Muxia)
Moocheea (Muchia) sounds different in Galego.
Think yourself lucky that your pronunciation is fairly regular and predictable. English is full of inconsistencies. Famously someone once demonstrated that in English the word "fish" could quite easily be spelled 'ghoti' :)
 

MKalcolm M

Solvitur ambulando - It is solved by walking
Camino(s) past & future
north route spring 2013
#64
My daughter's name is "Faith", so named because her mother was very nervous during the pregnancy. Whenever she worried, I would say "Just have faith". When a little girl was born, it seemed the natural name for her. Faith is now 12 years old and she I recently walked the Camino Portugese. Many people on the camino liked her name.

17883777_1404089906320481_1102615273893512306_n.jpg
 

Jacobus

Pilgrim since 2008
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2008 09 14
Del Norte 2011. Portuguese 2015, 2017Ingles 2015 Fisterre 2015.
#67
"James is the English language New Testament (Vulgar/Later Latin) form of the Hebrew name Yaʻaqov (known as Jacob in its earlier Latin form).[1] The name James came into the English language from the Old French variation James[2] of the late Latin name Iacomus. This was a Vulgar/Later Latin (proto-Romance) variant of the earlier Latin form Iacobus, from the New Testament Greek Ἰάκωβος (Iákōbos), from Hebrew יעקב (Yaʻaqov) (Jacob). The development Iacobus > Iacomus is likely a result of nasalization of the o and assimilation to the following b (i.e., intermediate *Iacombus) followed by simplification of the cluster mb through loss of the b. Diminutives include Jim, Jimmy, Jimmie, Jamie, Jimbo and others." Wikipedia.
Iago in Spain,Seamus in Ireland, Hamish in Scotland,
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#69
Hello Pilgrims,

My wife and I did the Camino Frances in 2014 and both still think about the experience every day. It has shaped the way we live our life, and we are both actively seeking out our next opportunity to return to the Camino.

In the meantime, we are expecting our first child this summer! And because the Camino is still (and will always be) such an important part of our lives, I wanted to get some Camino/pilgrim-themed male/female/unisex baby name ideas.

Though I love the beautiful español/galego/português names we encountered, I'm looking for names that would also fit well in an English-speaking family, as my wife does not speak any of those languages and we live in the U.S.

Thank you in advance for your help and creativity!

Patrick
Thank you everyone for the thoughtful replies, I appreciate your creativity! Burn camino
Is it there yet? ;-) Buen Camino, SY
 

FRL

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April-May 2017
#77
I stayed in a gite in SJPdP and the owner's name was Maristella. The meaning is slightly different depending where you look: star or sea star. When I stayed at Albergue A La Sombra Del Laurel the owner was Esperanza: hope. Both of these names seem perfect for a Camino girl!
 

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