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Camino thoughts from a man in a kilt

Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
Greetings one and all. I am about a month back from my walk on the Camino Frances. I took the time as there are a large number of thoughts rioting around inside my head. First of all, every man should walk the Camino in a kilt. Socially and physically. I met all sorts of people...there must one hundred photos of me that pilgrims have taken home with them. Pictures, shaking my hand, with an arm around me or attempting to peek up the kilt. Every few days, a brave women would say: "I understand that nothing is worn under the kilt?" My answer was always: " three Euros is the cost" Luckily everyone thought that was funny and never produced the Euros. Not sure what I would have done in the face of the money. Made a new friend, I guess.

Physically...it was a hiker's kilt of man made material...went into the washer and dryer and was very quick dry. Sewn in pleats in the back ensured that there was always a gentle sway to the kilt from the rear. It was light to wear, with a nice breeze up the inside of the legs, no binding across the thighs on the uphills. no belt but a strip of velcro inside the waist made it very adjustable. Out after a large meal and in after a long day of walking.

Even after all of the pre trip reading on here and a fairly extensive list of long distance walking, including the Appalachian Trail on the Eastern seaboard of the United States, I was a little nervous. I had just enough Spanish to embarrass myself but people were kind. The problem was if I started in Spanish, people responded in such a rapid fire that I was lost. I have a fond memory of leaning over an orchard fence with a farmer who spoke no English. We had a long conversation of broken Spanish and broken English with lots of body language as we ate figs from a bag he had just filled. I hope it was his orchard.

People made the difference. Friends of a few seconds duration, that I never saw again. People that I saw often in an intermittent fashion. I thought of us a ducklings bobbing on the surface of a lake. The current would shift and we would drift apart, only to be reunited on another part of the lake. People old and young in towns of different sizes who always acknowledged me and ensured that I had the right directions. The old lady that slapped my hand gently when I touched a tomato in a shop.

I also experienced moments which were known to me from past experiences. The slogging up a hill...sweat pouring out of your body, endorphins pounding around in the body, your thighs complaining, the thought at the back of your mind which said: "who the hell thought this was a good idea?" And then you reach the top of the climb and it appears that half the world is laid out in front of you...festooned with wild flowers, old buildings and grazing animals in the distance gently murmuring. The feeling is difficult to explain to those of my friends who have not experienced it. It is a sense of joy and euphoria that makes it all worthwhile.

I walked from Roncesvalles to Sahagun as that was the time I had at my disposal. I want to go back in the Spring and finish.
 
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MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Yep I think the kilt idea was a good one. Life of endless gifted miles ahead of us.
 

LakeMcD

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 15' Portuguese 16' GR10/Norte/Primitivo 17' Chemin LePuy 18' Salvador/Prim/Kerry Way 19'
I've thought more than once about a kilt on my next Camino, Norte next summer. Would like something made of a light technical fabric. Any ideas? Hey Keith how are you? We should have a visit soon. The portuguese was a blast.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
I've thought more than once about a kilt on my next Camino, Norte next summer. Would like something made of a light technical fabric. Any ideas? Hey Keith how are you? We should have a visit soon. The portuguese was a blast.
Good yes that's a great idea! Did you walk with a fellow from Croatia name of Vedran? Have a good turkey day!
 
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Mike Trebert

Guest
"Every few days, a brave women would say: "I understand that nothing is worn under the kilt?" My answer was always: " three Euros is the cost" Luckily everyone thought that was funny and never produced the Euros. Not sure what I would have done in the face of the money. Made a new friend, I guess."

If you'd said "ten Euros" you'd have had them queueing up! Next time, don't sell yourself short.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Year of past OR future Camino
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Aye the kilt; and nuttin iz worn unda the kilt, ladies, all is in fine working order !! is another reply....-.

Well done, few have the b...s to do it, must be the best attire...

Andrew, an old mate of mine from Dundee, used his grandfather´s winter kilt when hitchhiking from Calais to his family in southern France in the summer. But the 16 oz fabric of heavy duty wool was a hot burden, he confided, but the kilt always got him the best rides south and almost every time to the door.....
 
Last edited:
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
What would it have been like if you didn't have the kilt, and had to wear ordinary clothes like everyone else? Would it have been less of a camino?

All of the people would have been the same and just as engaging. I might not have met as many though as I am a little backward about coming forward in social situations and others might not have approached me.
I have learned that the physical aspect is enhanced by the freedom of the kilt.
 
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how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
"Every few days, a brave women would say: "I understand that nothing is worn under the kilt?" My answer was always: " three Euros is the cost" Luckily everyone thought that was funny and never produced the Euros. Not sure what I would have done in the face of the money. Made a new friend, I guess."

If you'd said "ten Euros" you'd have had them queueing up! Next time, don't sell yourself short.

"Short?" What a terrible thing to say to a fellow pilgrim on the road of life :D
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I've thought more than once about a kilt on my next Camino, Norte next summer. Would like something made of a light technical fabric. Any ideas? Hey Keith how are you? We should have a visit soon. The portuguese was a blast.
Purple Rain also makes a men's kilt from lightweight fabric.
 

AlexCiccio

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Saint Jean Pied de Port to Carion de Los Condes
Greetings one and all. I am about a month back from my walk on the Camino Frances. I took the time as there are a large number of thoughts rioting around inside my head. First of all, every man should walk the Camino in a kilt. Socially and physically. I met all sorts of people...there must one hundred photos of me that pilgrims have taken home with them. Pictures, shaking my hand, with an arm around me or attempting to peek up the kilt. Every few days, a brave women would say: "I understand that nothing is worn under the kilt?" My answer was always: " three Euros is the cost" Luckily everyone thought that was funny and never produced the Euros. Not sure what I would have done in the face of the money. Made a new friend, I guess.

Physically...it was a hiker's kilt of man made material...went into the washer and dryer and was very quick dry. Sewn in pleats in the back ensured that there was always a gentle sway to the kilt from the rear. It was light to wear, with a nice breeze up the inside of the legs, no binding across the thighs on the uphills. no belt but a strip of velcro inside the waist made it very adjustable. Out after a large meal and in after a long day of walking.

Even after all of the pre trip reading on here and a fairly extensive list of long distance walking, including the Appalachian Trail on the Eastern seaboard of the United States, I was a little nervous. I had just enough Spanish to embarrass myself but people were kind. The problem was if I started in Spanish, people responded in such a rapid fire that I was lost. I have a fond memory of leaning over an orchard fence with a farmer who spoke no English. We had a long conversation of broken Spanish and broken English with lots of body language as we ate figs from a bag he had just filled. I hope it was his orchard.

People made the difference. Friends of a few seconds duration, that I never saw again. People that I saw often in an intermittent fashion. I thought of us a ducklings bobbing on the surface of a lake. The current would shift and we would drift apart, only to be reunited on another part of the lake. People old and young in towns of different sizes who always acknowledged me and ensured that I had the right directions. The old lady that slapped my hand gently when I touched a tomato in a shop.

I also experienced moments which were known to me from past experiences. The slogging up a hill...sweat pouring out of your body, endorphins pounding around in the body, your thighs complaining, the thought at the back of your mind which said: "who the hell thought this was a good idea?" And then you reach the top of the climb and it appears that half the world is laid out in front of you...festooned with wild flowers, old buildings and grazing animals in the distance gently murmuring. The feeling is difficult to explain to those of my friends who have not experienced it. It is a sense of joy and euphoria that makes it all worthwhile.

I walked from Roncesvalles to Sahagun as that was the time I had at my disposal. I want to go back in the Spring and finish.


Hi, I live in Bergmo too and I just came back from the Camino Francese; thi wasn't my first time! I plan to do walk the Camino Primitivo next year, proabably in May , Saluti Alex
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Year of past OR future Camino
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Your kilt is a great idea Bumpa - so practical for the Camino.
I've had a discussion or two with a friend who has a kilt and a good answer to give, when any peregrinas ask what you wear under your kilt, is to reply "shoes and socks". ;)
Cheers - Jenny
 
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.
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300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).

malingerer

samarkand
Year of past OR future Camino
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
Your kilt is a great idea Bumpa - so practical for the Camino.
I've had a discussion or two with a friend who has a kilt and a good answer to give, when any peregrinas ask what you wear under your kilt, is to reply "shoes and socks". ;)
Cheers - Jenny
Good grief Jenny, "shoes and socks?". How uncouth! Surely for us peregrinos, it should be "Boots and sox"! and Heaven forfend, NOT the dreaded sox and sandals!:) How are u anyway, and whilst I'm at it, Merry Christmas!
Yours aye,
The Malingerer.

Vaya con Dios.

PS what about robes then? Friar Tuck style? :)
 

FrankieBallz

Wandering; Not lost.
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances & Camino Ingles -- Oct./Nov. 2016
Lots of courage with that kilt! Your attitude made it work. Cowboy Frank here from FL. I enjoyed walking & talking with you on a few different occasions. Go back and finish the rest when you have time. I miss it already!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
Your kilt is a great idea Bumpa - so practical for the Camino.
I've had a discussion or two with a friend who has a kilt and a good answer to give, when any peregrinas ask what you wear under your kilt, is to reply "shoes and socks". ;)
Cheers - Jenny

Very true Jenny but the point that interested me was that they weren't asking...they were stating a fact, they felt to be true. A lot of info out there about kilt etiquette I guess :rolleyes: One noted rule is "when wearing a kilt in a crowded space and you drop something...never bend down to pick it up until you have kicked it into a corner and have your back to a wall" :D
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
Lots of courage with that kilt! Your attitude made it work. Cowboy Frank here from FL. I enjoyed walking & talking with you on a few different occasions. Go back and finish the rest when you have time. I miss it already!

Frank.....how great to hear from you! I enjoyed our interactions on the Camino. You were one of the few people that I could say: "see you down the road" and assume that it would be true. :) You were always a positive influence on people and I looked forward to our meetings, on the Camino or by chance in a cafe or alberque. I trust that you finished well and I certainly will be getting back to finish.
 

wildrover

thewildrover
Year of past OR future Camino
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
Greetings one and all. I am about a month back from my walk on the Camino Frances. I took the time as there are a large number of thoughts rioting around inside my head. First of all, every man should walk the Camino in a kilt. Socially and physically. I met all sorts of people...there must one hundred photos of me that pilgrims have taken home with them. Pictures, shaking my hand, with an arm around me or attempting to peek up the kilt. Every few days, a brave women would say: "I understand that nothing is worn under the kilt?" My answer was always: " three Euros is the cost" Luckily everyone thought that was funny and never produced the Euros. Not sure what I would have done in the face of the money. Made a new friend, I guess.

Physically...it was a hiker's kilt of man made material...went into the washer and dryer and was very quick dry. Sewn in pleats in the back ensured that there was always a gentle sway to the kilt from the rear. It was light to wear, with a nice breeze up the inside of the legs, no binding across the thighs on the uphills. no belt but a strip of velcro inside the waist made it very adjustable. Out after a large meal and in after a long day of walking.

Even after all of the pre trip reading on here and a fairly extensive list of long distance walking, including the Appalachian Trail on the Eastern seaboard of the United States, I was a little nervous. I had just enough Spanish to embarrass myself but people were kind. The problem was if I started in Spanish, people responded in such a rapid fire that I was lost. I have a fond memory of leaning over an orchard fence with a farmer who spoke no English. We had a long conversation of broken Spanish and broken English with lots of body language as we ate figs from a bag he had just filled. I hope it was his orchard.

People made the difference. Friends of a few seconds duration, that I never saw again. People that I saw often in an intermittent fashion. I thought of us a ducklings bobbing on the surface of a lake. The current would shift and we would drift apart, only to be reunited on another part of the lake. People old and young in towns of different sizes who always acknowledged me and ensured that I had the right directions. The old lady that slapped my hand gently when I touched a tomato in a shop.

I also experienced moments which were known to me from past experiences. The slogging up a hill...sweat pouring out of your body, endorphins pounding around in the body, your thighs complaining, the thought at the back of your mind which said: "who the hell thought this was a good idea?" And then you reach the top of the climb and it appears that half the world is laid out in front of you...festooned with wild flowers, old buildings and grazing animals in the distance gently murmuring. The feeling is difficult to explain to those of my friends who have not experienced it. It is a sense of joy and euphoria that makes it all worthwhile.

I walked from Roncesvalles to Sahagun as that was the time I had at my disposal. I want to go back in the Spring and finish.
Greetings one and all. I am about a month back from my walk on the Camino Frances. I took the time as there are a large number of thoughts rioting around inside my head. First of all, every man should walk the Camino in a kilt. Socially and physically. I met all sorts of people...there must one hundred photos of me that pilgrims have taken home with them. Pictures, shaking my hand, with an arm around me or attempting to peek up the kilt. Every few days, a brave women would say: "I understand that nothing is worn under the kilt?" My answer was always: " three Euros is the cost" Luckily everyone thought that was funny and never produced the Euros. Not sure what I would have done in the face of the money. Made a new friend, I guess.

Physically...it was a hiker's kilt of man made material...went into the washer and dryer and was very quick dry. Sewn in pleats in the back ensured that there was always a gentle sway to the kilt from the rear. It was light to wear, with a nice breeze up the inside of the legs, no binding across the thighs on the uphills. no belt but a strip of velcro inside the waist made it very adjustable. Out after a large meal and in after a long day of walking.

Even after all of the pre trip reading on here and a fairly extensive list of long distance walking, including the Appalachian Trail on the Eastern seaboard of the United States, I was a little nervous. I had just enough Spanish to embarrass myself but people were kind. The problem was if I started in Spanish, people responded in such a rapid fire that I was lost. I have a fond memory of leaning over an orchard fence with a farmer who spoke no English. We had a long conversation of broken Spanish and broken English with lots of body language as we ate figs from a bag he had just filled. I hope it was his orchard.

People made the difference. Friends of a few seconds duration, that I never saw again. People that I saw often in an intermittent fashion. I thought of us a ducklings bobbing on the surface of a lake. The current would shift and we would drift apart, only to be reunited on another part of the lake. People old and young in towns of different sizes who always acknowledged me and ensured that I had the right directions. The old lady that slapped my hand gently when I touched a tomato in a shop.

I also experienced moments which were known to me from past experiences. The slogging up a hill...sweat pouring out of your body, endorphins pounding around in the body, your thighs complaining, the thought at the back of your mind which said: "who the hell thought this was a good idea?" And then you reach the top of the climb and it appears that half the world is laid out in front of you...festooned with wild flowers, old buildings and grazing animals in the distance gently murmuring. The feeling is difficult to explain to those of my friends who have not experienced it. It is a sense of joy and euphoria that makes it all worthwhile.

I walked from Roncesvalles to Sahagun as that was the time I had at my disposal. I want to go back in the Spring and finish.
I'm of the opinion, only Scottish men should walk in kilts. After all it's our national dress. Not fancy dress! I don't want to offend bumps, That's not my intention! I'm also glad you had a great Camino.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018

No offence taken. All of my family, from grandparents on back, were born in Scotland. What is the statute of limitations on family members wearing a kilt?
 

john07989

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Greetings one and all. I am about a month back from my walk on the Camino Frances. I took the time as there are a large number of thoughts rioting around inside my head. First of all, every man should walk the Camino in a kilt.

This a challenge to all forum readers then. Who's going to be the first one to post a picture of Bumpa in his kilt, (from any angle) :)
 

john07989

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
This a challenge to all forum readers then. Who's going to be the first one to post a picture of Bumpa in his kilt, (from any angle) :)
 

wildrover

thewildrover
Year of past OR future Camino
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
No offence taken. All of my family, from grandparents on back, were born in Scotland. What is the statute of limitations on family members wearing a kilt?
Hi Bumpa, no statute of limitations. Scottish men wear Scottish kilts. Irish men wear Irish kilts. The latter derived from the initial highland kilt. The highland kilt was a practical garment. Warm in the cold, cool, free moving and airy in the heat. Protective in battle, due to the thick material. At dusk it was a blanket etc,etc. Going commando was British army regs at that time. It can go on to be a more complex discussion, with regards to the other claims on the national dress of Scotland. My grandparents were souther Irish, another one Spanish. I'm proud of those connections, but I'm more proud that my parents and I are British/ Scottish. I'm glad your proud of your Scottish connection. You didn't say in your post why you wore the kilt on the Camino. I contemplated it myself ! Thought it would not really be practical for me. I know of other scots who have. On my last Camino, I was asked by an intelligent pilgrim, if we still wore the dress in Scotland.? It's not about braveheart. We're a proud people. Regards. Jackie.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
Hi Bumpa, no statute of limitations. Scottish men wear Scottish kilts. Irish men wear Irish kilts. The latter derived from the initial highland kilt. The highland kilt was a practical garment. Warm in the cold, cool, free moving and airy in the heat. Protective in battle, due to the thick material. At dusk it was a blanket etc,etc. Going commando was British army regs at that time. It can go on to be a more complex discussion, with regards to the other claims on the national dress of Scotland. My grandparents were souther Irish, another one Spanish. I'm proud of those connections, but I'm more proud that my parents and I are British/ Scottish. I'm glad your proud of your Scottish connection. You didn't say in your post why you wore the kilt on the Camino. I contemplated it myself ! Thought it would not really be practical for me. I know of other scots who have. On my last Camino, I was asked by an intelligent pilgrim, if we still wore the dress in Scotland.? It's not about braveheart. We're a proud people. Regards. Jackie.


Hi Jackie. My family name is Christy in Canada and Christie for the relatives around Dunfermline. Not sure how the spelling changed with immigration. My grandfather went to Northern Ireland first and then to Canada. I have always wondered about the number of Christy's as a first name in Ireland and if this is how the change came about. We have a designated Christie tartan and I have a full eight yards of good Scottish wool kilt that I wear, with a Prince Charlie jacket, instead of a regular suit for weddings, funerals and other festivals of varying emotions. As a sept of clan Farquharson, I am entitled to wear their tartan and I use the Farquharson kilt badge when I hike as there is none for Christie.

I believe "commando is the American term and "regimental" is the British equivalent.

I wear a kilt to salute my heritage and the difficult times my ancestors had. The full eight yards would be difficult to wear for a variety of reasons..not the least of which is weight. I have also found that the light weight hiking kilt enhances the walk for comfort but also always reminds me who I am and where I come from. The kilt was exceptionally well received by pilgrims I met from all over the world. I was immediately asked if I was Scottish. I proudly replied that I was Canadian but always added that I was proudly of Scottish heritage
 

wildrover

thewildrover
Year of past OR future Camino
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
Hi Jackie. My family name is Christy in Canada and Christie for the relatives around Dunfermline. Not sure how the spelling changed with immigration. My grandfather went to Northern Ireland first and then to Canada. I have always wondered about the number of Christy's as a first name in Ireland and if this is how the change came about. We have a designated Christie tartan and I have a full eight yards of good Scottish wool kilt that I wear, with a Prince Charlie jacket, instead of a regular suit for weddings, funerals and other festivals of varying emotions. As a sept of clan Farquharson, I am entitled to wear their tartan and I use the Farquharson kilt badge when I hike as there is none for Christie.

I believe "commando is the American term and "regimental" is the British equivalent.

I wear a kilt to salute my heritage and the difficult times my ancestors had. The full eight yards would be difficult to wear for a variety of reasons..not the least of which is weight. I have also found that the light weight hiking kilt enhances the walk for comfort but also always reminds me who I am and where I come from. The kilt was exceptionally well received by pilgrims I met from all over the world. I was immediately asked if I was Scottish. I proudly replied that I was Canadian but always added that I was proudly of Scottish heritage
Hi mate, you misunderstood my meaning, regarding the commando and regs statement. I should have been more clear in my text. Commando is a word used in connection with not wearing underwear at any time around the world. Regs is short for army regulations. The queens/kings regulations stated.... at the time of wearing the kilt during military service, underwear was not to be worn. Only Scottish men ever wore kilts during service. It's not an Irish or multinational saying. Hence only a true Scotsman wears no under wear!!! When you meet fellow pilgrims they ask, in jest, are you being traditional and not wearing underwear. You can't be traditional if your not a Scot!! The association can only be made with true scots in birth. I will not say any more on the subject. Any other Scottish men, I discussed this issue with, retort, ditto! Canada is a majestic country and yes a strong Scottish connection. It also has a indigenous people and I believe the traditional Canadian national dress is Structured around there previous form of clothing. If you ever get to Scotland, visit Calgary bay,on the island of mull. Amazing place. Take care and finish that Camino. Cheers. Jackie
 

jennie

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
from st jean - estella 2013 ponferrada-santiago 2012.hope/expect to do full camino with y
sister in sept 14. we completed our walk in 2014?puenta la reina to belarado june 2016,
All of the people would have been the same and just as engaging. I might not have met as many though as I am a little backward about coming forward in social situations and others might not have approached me.
I have learned that the physical aspect is enhanced by the freedom of the kilt.
love your post,its a great ice breaker to the start of a conversation and just fun,i bumped into two guys wearing kilts on one of my caminos,they loved the attention and photos etc i think anything that can put a smile on tired pilgrims face is wonderful
 

wildrover

thewildrover
Year of past OR future Camino
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
I've thought more than once about a kilt on my next Camino, Norte next summer. Would like something made of a light technical fabric. Any ideas? Hey Keith how are you? We should have a visit soon. The portuguese was a blast.
I've an idea, wear your own national/ traditional attire. Cheers. Wild
 

wildrover

thewildrover
Year of past OR future Camino
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
love your post,its a great ice breaker to the start of a conversation and just fun,i bumped into two guys wearing kilts on one of my caminos,they loved the attention and photos etc i think anything that can put a smile on tired pilgrims face is wonderful
his own traditions....would also have been an ice breaker!!!!
 
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