A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Camino with a disability

Camino Badges

Alinka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
plan to walk in 2021
Hello, I am starting to plan my camino. However, it is a bit of a challenge, as I suffer from spastic cerebral palsy, which affects both of my legs and my left hand. I do not use any walker or crutches or wheelchair, but I get tired easily, falls are as easy as getting tired and can walk approx 5 - 6 km a day. They say that for CP people the walking is cca 3 - 5 times more energy demanding than for folks without spasticity, so if you multiply the numbers, you can see that my 6 km are easily the same amount as 20 - 30 km of somebody else. :) I can manage stairs, if there is something to hold on to, but upper bunk beds are a no go.

So, walking the camino is a big deal, even if I only take the last 100 kilometres. I would love to do the Portugese way, but haven't decided yet. Is there anyone who tried to walk the Camino in this extra slow way? Any tips that you can share?
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Wow! I love your strong heart. You know your own capabilities and help, should you need it, should never be more than a few steps away. I don't know how it actually works, walking as you are, but were you able to make yourself into a triped with a pole, instead of a biped, it may be more secure, especially on the many descents.

You know you and must choose the route that you want but you may find the CF more supportive. Villages and refugios tend to be closer and more frequent, and there are many more pilgrims out there to meet and chat with.

Of one thing you may rest assured, you will only be met with kindness.

Buen Camino!!
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
Hi Alinka, welcome to the forum!
Walking only short distances is a topic that comes up regularly and you may find useful info here (and there is more):

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/camino-for-someone-who-is-unable-to-walk-a-lot-is-it-possible.63444/#post-767266

You can walk what you can walk, it is as simple as that. A lot is possible when you organize your camino around your needs.

Will you walk alone or with a companion? Will you carry a backpack or have it transported? Will you use poles for support? Take taxis? Make reservations for lower beds? All this will make your walk easier.

Buen camino wherever you go.
 

Alinka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
plan to walk in 2021
Hello, and thank you for your answers. I do plan to have my luggage forwarded. As for companions, if I find someone willing to take it this slowly with me, then I will be happy, but when I just asked at my Facebook profile about whether there would be someone willing to do it this way, what I got was... oh yes, I plan to walk this way when I retire and then the people started to exchange ideas about what it will be like when they retire. I cannot wait till I retire, as I might be physically unable to travel at all by that time. And it is a true pilgrimage for me, even though I am a Protestant, so I don't want to do it as a sport achievement. I want to walk slowly, pray in silence, give thanks and walk some more. What I think might work is ask several friends to join me, say for a week each. That way I would not bother anyone for a month with a speed that does not work for that person. So I am starting to plan from scratch, really, trying to work out the possibilities. :)In a way, this planning is already a way to the Way, if you understand what I mean. I would like to get a Compostella to have a physical proof I did something so "impossible" :)
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Alinka - A common fear for first timers is that they will be alone and often make the mistake of taking a someone with them, which completely skews their Camino - a solitary Camino is a wonderful thing.

So, are you able to walk alone or is it that you need someone at your side at all times whilst walking? If it is the former then on the CF you will find countless friendly pilgrims who all walk at different speeds and daily distances so being alone won't be a problem as the Camino isn't like that - well, the busy CF isn't like that.

If it is the latter then, true, your planning has to start with the home base of pals. Let us know.
 

Alinka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
plan to walk in 2021
No - I can walk alone. I do not need anyone to help me, unless it is a very difficult terrain, in which case I need a hand from someone, or I just hold onto something (ground, trees etc.) But in my normal life I work as an English teacher and I walk to all of my clients without any help. I work fulltime as a language and voice teacher, although this is done freelance so as to give me some flexibility for organizing physical therapy etc. :)
 

Denise McKay

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
16th September 2017
Hello, I am starting to plan my camino. However, it is a bit of a challenge, as I suffer from spastic cerebral palsy, which affects both of my legs and my left hand. I do not use any walker or crutches or wheelchair, but I get tired easily, falls are as easy as getting tired and can walk approx 5 - 6 km a day. They say that for CP people the walking is cca 3 - 5 times more energy demanding than for folks without spasticity, so if you multiply the numbers, you can see that my 6 km are easily the same amount as 20 - 30 km of somebody else. :) I can manage stairs, if there is something to hold on to, but upper bunk beds are a no go.

So, walking the camino is a big deal, even if I only take the last 100 kilometres. I would love to do the Portugese way, but haven't decided yet. Is there anyone who tried to walk the Camino in this extra slow way? Any tips that you can share?
I think walking from Sarria might suit you. There might be more opportunities for accommodation and rest stops. I am sure you will find your way and meet wonderful people no matter what you choose to do. I wish you the best for your Camino.
 

Alinka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
plan to walk in 2021
I hope to be able to do it. You know, i was thinking about the Portuguese way, because I really enjoyed when I went to Portugal two years ago with my father and we had some great father - adult daughter time. :)
Also, I have almost no idea of what it will be like.... I just know I do not want it to be just a walking holiday.
On a more practical note, would public alberges take reservations from somebody with a legitimate :) disability? It is going to take me a long time to complete the pilgrimage (no 6 days), I am thinking of something like a month or maybe more, if I go wild. :) And I need to be able to afford my accommodation and sleeping in a tent or outside would mean having to carry that, which would probably make it really hard, even though I am open even for that. :)
 

Denise McKay

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
16th September 2017
I hope to be able to do it. You know, i was thinking about the Portuguese way, because I really enjoyed when I went to Portugal two years ago with my father and we had some great father - adult daughter time. :)
Also, I have almost no idea of what it will be like.... I just know I do not want it to be just a walking holiday.
On a more practical note, would public alberges take reservations from somebody with a legitimate :) disability? It is going to take me a long time to complete the pilgrimage (no 6 days), I am thinking of something like a month or maybe more, if I go wild. :) And I need to be able to afford my accommodation and sleeping in a tent or outside would mean having to carry that, which would probably make it really hard, even though I am open even for that. :)
It is hard for me to answer that. I just have faith that you would find your way and I don’t think you will need to carry a tent but that choice is up to you. The Camino has a way or working things out. You should be able to book ahead though. It probably means you will have to plan a bit more as you go but you can do that. Have faith in yourself and have a go.
 

K Turner

One step at a time
Camino(s) past & future
14 August 2019 (SJPdP 16 August)
I haven't walked my Camino yet (2 1/2 more weeks but who's counting?). Ehlers-Danlos causes me mobility issues. On local hikes I use a trekking pole. I can't do it without. It helps tremendously with stability, especially when I dislocate something. I spent years in a wheelchair from all the brain and spine surgeries, and still have a dropfoot tendency when I'm tired. I also try to pay close attention to hydration because being dehydrated makes everything go out the window!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Burgos-SdC (May-June 2016); CF, SJPDP-SdC (April-June 2018); Norte (June-July 2019)
Alinka, if you decide to walk alone, I believe you will find help when you need help. That is what happens on the Camino. And what a gift you give to others, when they have the opportunity to help you.

I wish you a wonderful Camino!
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Hello, I am starting to plan my camino. However, it is a bit of a challenge, as I suffer from spastic cerebral palsy, which affects both of my legs and my left hand. I do not use any walker or crutches or wheelchair, but I get tired easily, falls are as easy as getting tired and can walk approx 5 - 6 km a day. They say that for CP people the walking is cca 3 - 5 times more energy demanding than for folks without spasticity, so if you multiply the numbers, you can see that my 6 km are easily the same amount as 20 - 30 km of somebody else. :) I can manage stairs, if there is something to hold on to, but upper bunk beds are a no go.

So, walking the camino is a big deal, even if I only take the last 100 kilometres. I would love to do the Portugese way, but haven't decided yet. Is there anyone who tried to walk the Camino in this extra slow way? Any tips that you can share?
We have always said that it is best to walk the Camino that calls...
However if you are concerned about daily distances then maybe the Frances will offer more opportunity for short days, or rest breaks. In A Brea we met lovely 80+year old who had walked from Sarria - her shortest day had been 2kms and her longest 8km and she had booked her bed ahead for each night. She expected to take a further week to reach Santiago while we expected to take 2 days. There was also a 90 year old in the same private albergue also walking short days. The younger lady was having her pack forwarded and walking with just the necessities for the day (water etc) .
Be encouraged, everything is possible, and I hope you have a wonderful Camino
 

Mark McCarthy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2014 2015
Lourdes 2 SdC 2016
Sarria 2 SdC April&Oct 2016 & (April 2018)
Camino Baztan June 2017
If you are interested, I put together an 18 day walking plan for Sarria to Santiago. Even if you do the last 100km of the CP (which are in Spain rather than Portugal), you might still might find the plan interesting. I suspect on the last 100km of the CP you may it difficult to create such short stages as it is not as well facilitised (in terms of locations such as bars where you can call taxis) as the last 100km of the CF. Buen Camino!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Is there anyone who tried to walk the Camino in this extra slow way?
Not first-hand, but I met a man who had had polio as a kid and he could only walk 5k a day. After a few days he got over feeling guilty about taking a taxi if he needed to, but walked as much as he could. I have to say he was the most inspiring and courageous pilgrim I've met. As you will be to others. You have a lot of strength, and obviously heart, too. You'll need flexibility, as well, but you probably have that in spades already.

Others have said the Frances would be better, but that last 100kms is so crowded that it would leave you little quiet time to pray and contemplate. If you feel called to the Portugues, I'd say plan it and then go for it. There is luggage transport, plenty of pilgrims, and enough infrastructure to be comfortable. And a bit more quiet than the Frances.

Buen camino, Alika! You're on your way already.
 

Alinka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
plan to walk in 2021
We'll see how it goes. At the moment, I am exploring both possibilities and see what it will end with. I have also started walking a little bit more to get more ready very, very slowly. I don't know if I can become fitter or not, as adults with my disability are not really the centre of physio attention, so nobody really knows anything about how we react to normal training, but if I try, I will find out. :)
 

Ivan_Prada

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés-(septiembre 2018)
Portugués-(en planes 2021)
We'll see how it goes. At the moment, I am exploring both possibilities and see what it will end with. I have also started walking a little bit more to get more ready very, very slowly. I don't know if I can become fitter or not, as adults with my disability are not really the centre of physio attention, so nobody really knows anything about how we react to normal training, but if I try, I will find out. :)
Hi Alinka:

Go for it!

I have Parkinson’s and walked tha last 100km on September of 2018. My recommendation is to practice on hilly terrain and use the poles for support and balance.

Btw, I did it on six days, first timer mistake. Take your.time and plan for days of rest, which I didn’t and should have.

Buen Camino
 

Alinka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
plan to walk in 2021
Hi Alinka:

Go for it!

I have Parkinson’s and walked tha last 100km on September of 2018. My recommendation is to practice on hilly terrain and use the poles for support and balance.

Btw, I did it on six days, first timer mistake. Take your.time and plan for days of rest, which I didn’t and should have.

Buen Camino
Well, if I do something like 100 km, it will take me at least three weeks, but maybe there will be a surprise as I start training and we'll see the walking distance can actually improve in a person like me. Cerebral palsy is crazy. Walking costs approx 3 - 5 times more energy than in people with no disability and they say there no way to improve the condition in an adult. Whether that is true needs to be explored, though... :) I love your recommendation of hilly terrain and poles. That is very practical and helpful. :)
 

Nick B

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - May/June 2018
Portugese - (2019)
Norte - (2020)
All the best Alinka, you'll make it and there will be plenty offers of assistance along the way. If planned you will make the last 100km of the Portuguese.
 

Nick B

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - May/June 2018
Portugese - (2019)
Norte - (2020)
You'll be fine, something to look forward to.
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I can't speak to the camino Portugese, but the Frances should be manageable on short stages. I think there are a couple places where it is 7 - 10 km between albergues:
Portomarín to Gonzar 7.7km
Casanova to Melide 9.3 km (there is a Casa Rural at the 2.8 km mark so you might be able to jiggle things) ...
and for those you may want to consider a taxi if needed.

Two comments on taxis: given the speed you are going, you may not get questioned by the pilgrim office if you walked it all and if they do ask, well, the reply is with you and god. Personally, I'd consider you'd have done so. Secondly, you can take a taxi back to where you got it and finish the section the next day, thereby satisfying yourself that you did walk it all.

You could do the same taxi shuttle on the Portugese.

You would not be able to do these shorter stages after Oct 30 or before Easter, as many of the albergues will be closed.

I think you will be successful whichever route you take, but recommend you leave your friends at home, they will likely be a burden and slow you down.

Happy planning.
 

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 6 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 43 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 162 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 261 24.5%
  • June

    Votes: 81 7.6%
  • July

    Votes: 21 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 22 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 306 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 129 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 13 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.6%
Top