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Can you help translate ...

Bert45

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo,
"arco de estriba" into English, please? I know a literal translation is "stirrup arch", but that is not a term I've ever heard. It is a description applied to the remaining arch of the old Roman/medieval bridge at Portomarín here: http://portomarincidre.blogspot.com/2013/04/
Also, from the same blog, can you explain in "En la foto se aprecia la típica forma lombada de época medieval ..."what exactly is meant by "forma lombada"? Is it a typo for "lombarda"? And, if it is, what is the Lombard style of arch?
Also can you offer a translation for "caneiro" from the same blog? Many thanks.
The article is very interesting (if you like that sort of thing). It reveals the the bridge next to the new bridge was opened on 10 September 1930. You may already know that the new bridge was "opened" by Franco on 10 September 1963. That can't be a coincidence. Actually, I haven't been able to confirm that. All I have is: "Francisco Franco inauguró la nueva Portomarín el 10 de septiembre de 1963" which I assume includes the new bridge. Any and all information gratefully accepted.
 
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SabineP

Veteran Member
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some and then more. see my signature.
"arco de estriba" into English, please? I know a literal translation is "stirrup arch", but that is not a term I've ever heard. It is a description applied to the remaining arch of the old Roman/medieval bridge at Portomarín here: http://portomarincidre.blogspot.com/2013/04/
Also, from the same blog, can you explain in "En la foto se aprecia la típica forma lombada de época medieval ..."what exactly is meant by "forma lombada"? Is it a typo for "lombarda"? And, if it is, what is the Lombard style of arch?
Also can you offer a translation for "caneiro" from the same blog? Many thanks.
The article is very interesting (if you like that sort of thing). It reveals the the bridge next to the new bridge was opened on 10 September 1930. You may already know that the new bridge was "opened" by Franco on 10 September 1963. That can't be a coincidence. Actually, I haven't been able to confirm that. All I have is: "Francisco Franco inauguró la nueva Portomarín el 10 de septiembre de 1963" which I assume includes the new bridge. Any and all information gratefully accepted.

Some googlesearch confirmed what I already thought ( and read a while ago in a book on Romanseque styles ) about the origin of the Lombard style.


 
Last edited:

Robi Diaz De Vivar

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2016), Norte (2017), Portuges (2018), Mozarabe (2019), Primitivo (2019), Via de La Plata (2
"arco de estriba" into English, please? I know a literal translation is "stirrup arch", but that is not a term I've ever heard. It is a description applied to the remaining arch of the old Roman/medieval bridge at Portomarín here: http://portomarincidre.blogspot.com/2013/04/
Also, from the same blog, can you explain in "En la foto se aprecia la típica forma lombada de época medieval ..."what exactly is meant by "forma lombada"? Is it a typo for "lombarda"? And, if it is, what is the Lombard style of arch?
Also can you offer a translation for "caneiro" from the same blog? Many thanks.
The article is very interesting (if you like that sort of thing). It reveals the the bridge next to the new bridge was opened on 10 September 1930. You may already know that the new bridge was "opened" by Franco on 10 September 1963. That can't be a coincidence. Actually, I haven't been able to confirm that. All I have is: "Francisco Franco inauguró la nueva Portomarín el 10 de septiembre de 1963" which I assume includes the new bridge. Any and all information gratefully accepted.
Okay - I'm not 100% on this but here are 2 wikipedia links respectfully in Spanish and Portugues sorry.

In the first there is a link to "estribo" in blue which shows a picture of a stirrup arch.

Caneiro (Portugues or Gallician) seems to be a type of mill race - a water management system - there are photos on the wikipedia page. Hope it helps.


 

MariaSP

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
"arco de estriba" into English, please? I know a literal translation is "stirrup arch", but that is not a term I've ever heard. It is a description applied to the remaining arch of the old Roman/medieval bridge at Portomarín here: http://portomarincidre.blogspot.com/2013/04/
Also, from the same blog, can you explain in "En la foto se aprecia la típica forma lombada de época medieval ..."what exactly is meant by "forma lombada"? Is it a typo for "lombarda"? And, if it is, what is the Lombard style of arch?
Also can you offer a translation for "caneiro" from the same blog? Many thanks.
The article is very interesting (if you like that sort of thing). It reveals the the bridge next to the new bridge was opened on 10 September 1930. You may already know that the new bridge was "opened" by Franco on 10 September 1963. That can't be a coincidence. Actually, I haven't been able to confirm that. All I have is: "Francisco Franco inauguró la nueva Portomarín el 10 de septiembre de 1963" which I assume includes the new bridge. Any and all information gratefully accepted.
'Caneiro' is a Galician word. It can be a couple of different things (here's a link to the Galician dictionary: https://academia.gal/dicionario/-/termo/busca/caneiro).
In this case, it's a small construction to lead the fish to a certain area where it could be easily caught. It can also be called 'pesqueiro'.
 
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To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
Caneiro (Portugues or Gallician) seems to be a type of mill race - a water management system - there are photos on the wikipedia page. Hope it helps. https://gl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caneiro_(muíño)
Actually, when you click on the link caneiros de pesca in the Wikipedia article that you quoted you get to another Wikipedia entry which exist not only in Galician but also in English where it is Fishing weir. Which I think is what @MariaSP explained in her comment above this one?
 
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Also, from the same blog, can you explain in "En la foto se aprecia la típica forma lombada de época medieval ..."what exactly is meant by "forma lombada"? Is it a typo for "lombarda"? And, if it is, what is the Lombard style of arch?
One meaning of lombada in Portuguese is ramp. That makes sense because you can see a ramp shape to the bridge.

Now the question becomes "Why is there a Portuguese word used?".
 

Robi Diaz De Vivar

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2016), Norte (2017), Portuges (2018), Mozarabe (2019), Primitivo (2019), Via de La Plata (2
One meaning of lombada in Portuguese is ramp. That makes sense because you can see a ramp shape to the bridge.

Now the question becomes "Why is there a Portuguese word used?".
Well we are in Galicia and Portuguese is just a modern dialect of Galician.
 

Bert45

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo,
Wow! Thanks, everybody! That Spanish article on The Arch, translated by Google seems to help 'stirrup' make some sense. I (naturally) thought that 'stirrup' referred to the shape of the arch, like a stirrup in shape. But no! It refers to the supporting abutments of an arch or series of arches. On either side of a series of arches, or of a single arch, there has to be an abutment sufficiently strong to resist the lateral forces developed by the arch. Why call it a stirrup then? Aha! The danger of relying on Google Translate! I eventually turned to my Spanish-English dictionary and see that 'estribar' means to rest (on) , be supported (by), and 'estribo' means 'stirrup; step (of coach); bracket; support; foundation, basis; buttress'. The 'arco de estribo' is the last arch of a series of arches, the buttressed arch.
I emailed the writer of the blog, and he (or she) came back to me almost immediately. He (or she) used the words 'lombarda' and 'lombada' in the reply. "Fue construido en la época medieval y tenía una forma típica lombarda de la época. Lombado significa que estaba más alto en el arco central." I had asked if 'lombada' was a typo, but that question was not answered. However, it seemed unlikely that the same mistake had been made again. 'Ramp' or 'sloping' makes perfect sense! The writer has obviously slipped into galego without realising the confusion that would be caused to people like me.
 
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danielgzepeda

Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2016
Okay - I'm not 100% on this but here are 2 wikipedia links respectfully in Spanish and Portugues sorry.

In the first there is a link to "estribo" in blue which shows a picture of a stirrup arch.

Caneiro (Portugues or Gallician) seems to be a type of mill race - a water management system - there are photos on the wikipedia page. Hope it helps.


Could it be that "caneiro" is relative to both English and Spanish "canal" which is also used in agricultural areas to transport water for irrigation of crops?
 

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