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Carrying medication

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Hi - just wondering how people carry a months worth of medication- I currently use blister packs but they will take up far too much room. Thanks 😊
Are you talking about tablet organisers where each 'cell' has a number of different medications in it for different days and times of the day? Or are you thinking of the blister pack that many individual medications are delivered in, with a single tablet in each 'cell'?

I don't use the former method of arranging my medications, but if you are talking about the OEM blister pack, I would not recommend removing the medication from these until you are ready to take the dose you need.

While travelling to Europe, I keep all prescription medications in their original packaging, with the prescription label on any box, etc. I carry a copy of the script as well. Once I arrive, I remove as much of the packaging as I can, and place the blister pack sleeves of individual medications in their own zip-loc bag, cut the prescription label from any external packaging, and place that in the bag with the medication.

Normally I carry a small quantity of non-prescription medicines that I know I can get over-the-counter. You do need to be aware that what might be considered OTC in NZ might not be so in Europe.

Any complementary medications I will put in a labelled zip-loc bag, with a small sachet of silica gel. While these are easy enough to get in Spain and Portugal, the amount I need isn't that large, and I am happy to carry enough to avoid having to search them out along the way.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I got offered a "travel medication organizer" at my local pharmacy. Heavy and bulky.

But as I need the medication only for 14 days (5 pills in the morning, 2 on the evening after a heart attack), doing the Portuguese from Porto, I will be organising my meds in small ziploc-bags, stapling them to two weekly batches. The big boxes staying at home (beeing a supply for 3 months each).

In my opinion some the med boxes could be half the size, if the producers would be forced by law to reduce or optimize the packaging.
 
Hi - just wondering how people carry a months worth of medication- I currently use blister packs but they will take up far too much room. Thanks 😊
I also use small baggies for each day’s vitamins. I also carry the prescription and stick it to the larger baggie that holds all the smaller ones. This year because we were going for more than a month, I organized them by the week and always carried one week’s worth in my backpack (separated from my larger bag that was being transported, in case it got lost for a day or so…and I would then have some of my vitamins with me always). Finally I carried one extra week of everything in case one of us got COVID and had to quarantine for a few days…neither of us got sick!). Have a great Camino!!
 
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No tips here but it's a story. Peg was a volunteer in a large multi-year study of supplements. The pills came in blister packs, two pills together for each day and on a cardboard card holding a month's supply. She took three cards with her as they were sent. Partially because the study had a monthly newsletter and they published pictures of study participants on trips holding up their cards in front of landmarks.

The study tested fish oil and vitamin D. The study's results showed that they had no effect on the many things they studied (multiple medical examinations were done). However taking vitamin D resulted in lower mortality but not in any way studied. Also at the study's end we found out Peg had a placebo and a real pill. Other results of the study include Peg hauling placibos across a country for 12 weeks and pictures of Peg holding up cardboard at various landmarks in Spain.
 
I walked for 5 weeks and put each different type of pill in a separate little zip-lock bag. After a while walking I found it very helpful to put a single day's supply in a tiny plastic zip-lock bag. (I keep any I come across at home!) When I started having my pack transported I always carried my meds with me in a small daysack. Because my meds are important I kept them all in a small drybag too!

You know you're near Santiago when you can see how few pills are left 😅
 
Are you talking about tablet organisers where each 'cell' has a number of different medications in it for different days and times of the day? Or are you thinking of the blister pack that many individual medications are delivered in, with a single tablet in each 'cell'?

I don't use the former method of arranging my medications, but if you are talking about the OEM blister pack, I would not recommend removing the medication from these until you are ready to take the dose you need.

While travelling to Europe, I keep all prescription medications in their original packaging, with the prescription label on any box, etc. I carry a copy of the script as well. Once I arrive, I remove as much of the packaging as I can, and place the blister pack sleeves of individual medications in their own zip-loc bag, cut the prescription label from any external packaging, and place that in the bag with the medication.

Normally I carry a small quantity of non-prescription medicines that I know I can get over-the-counter. You do need to be aware that what might be considered OTC in NZ might not be so in Europe.

Any complementary medications I will put in a labelled zip-loc bag, with a small sachet of silica gel. While these are easy enough to get in Spain and Portugal, the amount I need isn't that large, and I am happy to carry enough to avoid having to search them out along the way.
Excellent message, thanks. I would like to underline an aspect of prescription medications within Europe ( aka as the European Union). While there is a general rule for pharmacies to accept non national prescriptions, be aware that each country has its own rules concerning certain medications. Should you have a prescription that is refused, head to a clinic or hospital to obtain a local prescription.
I remember having had a German prescription that could not be honored in Madrid but that was back in 2002.
 
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Hi - just wondering how people carry a months worth of medication- I currently use blister packs but they will take up far too much room. Thanks 😊
If space is an issue. Split your medication into a weeks supply in their blister packs, then send the rest post restante via Coreos to a significant town's post office on your Camino route. Collect from Post office take another weeks supply and repeat the process. Coreos have a specific Pilgrims service for this.
 
If space is an issue. Split your medication into a weeks supply in their blister packs, then send the rest post restante via Coreos to a significant town's post office on your Camino route. Collect from Post office take another weeks supply and repeat the process. Coreos have a specific Pilgrims service for this.
Something I learned today about the Spanish Correos. Thanks.
 
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Hi - just wondering how people carry a months worth of medication- I currently use blister packs but they will take up far too much room. Thanks 😊
I just stuff all my medications in a dry-bag in their original packaging with labels intact. I'd rather not have a lengthy discussion with Border Control or Customs & Excise or its equivalent at any airport or border crossing. I'm particularly sensitive to the sensitivities of some middle-eastern transit airports.

If your medications are really very bulky I'd suggest getting a larger rucksack ;). My 8 different flavours don't weigh much but they probably take up a couple of litres of pack space at the start of a trip
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
Carry the scripts (prescriptions) with you to avoid problems with TSA or at boarders, or if you need to renew while traveling.

Ziplock bags for each med. and supplement are convenient, but the closures don't last forever and sometimes (thinner) bags split - thicker bags with plastic "zippers" seem to last longer.

Pill organizers are helpful for those who forget whether they've taken their meds (I am one). Use organizers with a positive latch or wrap them with painters masking tape to keep them closed.
 
Spain does not permit the mailing of prescription medications. While it's quite possible nobody will check, you might run into problems.
I used to live in Madrid, and yes, I had forgotten about medications and the Correos. P who want to send ahead their meds could try Mondial Relay, organisation that is often found in tobacco shops and small stores. For a small fee, you are able to send small parcels internationally. My wife’s small company sends parcels to Italy, Germany, the Netherlands and even to BREXIT countries. No assurances that this will work. They probably have a site.
 
Hi - just wondering how people carry a months worth of medication- I currently use blister packs but they will take up far too much room. Thanks 😊

I see that you are planning to walk in July. July on any Camino tends to be very hot.

Places where they know how to store medicines ( think humidity, temperature, safety, legal requirements) are called pharmacies, and most definitely not Mondial Relay or Correos.

Better figure out if your medication is available in Spain and bring a prescription from your doctors that is up to Spanish standards. There are threads with excellent advice on how to do this in this section of the forum.
 
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I also use small baggies for each day’s vitamins. I also carry the prescription and stick it to the larger baggie that holds all the smaller ones. This year because we were going for more than a month, I organized them by the week and always carried one week’s worth in my backpack (separated from my larger bag that was being transported, in case it got lost for a day or so…and I would then have some of my vitamins with me always). Finally I carried one extra week of everything in case one of us got COVID and had to quarantine for a few days…neither of us got sick!). Have a great Camino!!
Me, too. Jewelry supply stores sell ziploc baggies that are about 1.5" x 2.5", Which is a very compact and convenient size for a day's medications.
Lay out all your bottles with a pill outside each one, and take a picture of them on your phone (1 or 2 photographs showing multiple bottles and pills). That way if there is a question about what a given pill is you can show the authority a picture.
 
After explaining to my pharmacy what I was doing they packaged my meds in as small a containers as possible, even splitting one rather bulky prescription into 2 bottles, all with original labels. This avoided any potential conversations @Tincatinker alluded to and kept things small. All went into my kit with toothbrush, toothpaste, etc. Easy and no problems.
 
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After explaining to my pharmacy what I was doing they packaged my meds in as small a containers as possible, even splitting one rather bulky prescription into 2 bottles, all with original labels. This avoided any potential conversations Tincantinkar alluded to and kept things small. All went into my kit with toothbrush, toothpaste, etc. Easy and no problems.
Yes thats what I do now too, when I explained the reason pharmacist was happy to.
I tried the blister pack, and the bag options, but the smallest lightest bottle worked the best.
Halfway through, I had 2 tablets that were different colours, and when the bottles were half used, I tipped one into the other and reduced by one bottle. Unfortunately most of the others all look the same so no condensing there.
 

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