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Celebrate the Menú del Dia!

2020 Camino Guides

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I don't like the look of this one bit:

The concern seems to be a lot about this:
Restaurants serving menús del día often make just enough to maintain the families that run them – the catering equivalent of subsistence farming. When owners retire the next generation can be reluctant to take over.
Will it hold its own, or fold to the pressure of change? Or is this just journalistic hype?

Either way it's time to enjoy those Menús del Dia while we can, and support the places that offer them!
The Menú del Dia is so much better than the Pilgrim Menú, and I had no idea until I ventured off the Frances.
It's definitely worth a try!
(Edited for content...)
 
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Peter Fransiscus

Be proud of who you are.
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
I don't like the look of this one bit:

The bottom line seems to be this:

It's time to enjoy those menus del dia while we can, and support the places that offer them!
We will , next May when we are voluntering in Santiago. 🙏❤
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
It looks lovely, doesn't it? One thing that struck me reading about it is that it's family-run, over several generations. That kind of love is what makes a place. Like Casa Morgade and some of my favorite places in Santiago.
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
I saw that article yesterday. I’m currently in Valladolid and have enjoyed the traditional restaurants and bars in the very centre.

Walk no more than 300m away from the Plaza Major and you find the ubiquitous KFC, BK, McDs and (spit!) Papa Johns.

The public sector in large towns seem to resolutely stick to the 2-4 closure, necessary or not. In smaller places where it is more feasible that people can still go home at lunchtime I sense it’s more widespread.
 
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thejoker

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
many
Gobalisation and its resulting steady loss of traditional restaurants and richly distinct cultures is a real loss in my opinion.
All this talk of the marvels of diversity and cultural enrichment doesn't make sense when every town is filled with fast food places that are global corporations.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
All this talk of the marvels of diversity and cultural enrichment doesn't make sense when every town is filled with fast food places that are global corporations.
Well they do usually deign to have local 'specialties'...
(No emoji for tongue-in-cheek irony...except this pallid one... ;) )

I was visiting a friend in Switzerland a few years ago when Starbucks began to invade the train stations. No-one was at all thrilled. And here in Burma, people think Burger King and KFC are 'special, ' but the local teashops are vastly cheaper, better, and more crowded with patrons - so those guys are not hurt by the influx.. I'm guessing in Spain the feeling is likely the same. No-one's going to jettison the local bar for a franchised global conglomerate.

The influx of more trendy restaurant businesses and a shifting culture of eating are other stories....
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
I have good hopes that the menu del dia/ traditional restaurants will keep a strong position in Spain.
Ok, Barcelona, Madrid and the bigger cities will have their fair share of fastfood restaurants but I believe the family run hostales-restaurantes in smaller towns will keep thriving.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature
I have good hopes that the menu del dia/ traditional restaurants will keep a strong position in Spain.
Ok, Barcelona, Madrid and the bigger cities will have their fair share of fastfood restaurants but I believe the family run hostales-restaurantes in smaller towns will keep thriving.
My experience in Alicante is that the ‘menu del dia’ is more popular than ever : I now have to book in quite a few places if I want a table at lunchtime.
 

david46

Should be old enough to know better...
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Portugese, St. Jaume, Del Sur, Primitivo, Vadiniense. Salvador
I don't like the look of this one bit:

The concern seems to be a lot about this:


Will it hold its own, or fold to the pressure of change? Or is this just journalistic hype?

Either way it's time to enjoy those Menús del Dia while we can, and support the places that offer them!
The Menú del Dia is so much better than the Pilgrim Menú, and I had no idea until I ventured off the Frances.
It's definitely worth a try!
(Edited for content...)
I don't like the look of this one bit:

The concern seems to be a lot about this:


Will it hold its own, or fold to the pressure of change? Or is this just journalistic hype?

Either way it's time to enjoy those Menús del Dia while we can, and support the places that offer them!
The Menú del Dia is so much better than the Pilgrim Menú, and I had no idea until I ventured off the Frances.
It's definitely worth a try!
(Edited for content...)
….and the bottle of wine certainly takes the edge of the afternoon's walk!
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I have good hopes that the menu del dia/ traditional restaurants will keep a strong position in Spain.
Ok, Barcelona, Madrid and the bigger cities will have their fair share of fastfood restaurants but I believe the family run hostales-restaurantes in smaller towns will keep thriving.
The quaint, personal family owned bars/cafes/restaurants are one of the special enjoyable pleasures of walking the Caminos. If we were left with only fast food chains or high end establishments as the only choices it would be a big disappointment, and take away some of the endearing and quirky charm of what the camino is about for me.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
The quaint, personal family owned bars/cafes/restaurants are one of the special enjoyable pleasures of walking the Caminos.
Absolutely. I couldn't agree more.
And the memorable ones are really memorable - and that is usually about the people as much as it is about the food.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Absolutely. I couldn't agree more.
And the memorable ones are really memorable - and that is usually about the people as much as it is about the food.


Remember our great find in Miranda de Ebro with restaurante Tartan? Especially the choice of vegetarian dishes? :)

When in Spain, especially on a Sunday, I just follow the local families to their restaurants and I'm never dissapointed with their choice ;).
I love it how different generations take the time on those days to gather together!
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Remember our great find in Miranda del Ebro with restaurante Tartan?
Ohhhhh, absolutely. That place was fantastic.
And stumbling by chance on the family connection with the young waitperson in the wonderful restaurant in Tolosa who recommended her parents' (also wonderful) Taberna in Zegama?
 

BROWNCOUNTYBOB

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015 & 2017) and plans for 2019 (Sept, Oct)
I "discovered" the Menu del Dia during my semester abroad studies in Valencia the spring of 1978. As a poor student, this provided a delicious and affordable meal, particularly when travelling. It quickly became my main meal of the day, with fruit / bread and café con leche for breakfast, then a light meal for dinner. That was 40 years ago. I've returned to Spain many times, and routinely eat the Menu del Dia or Pilgrim's meal during our three caminos.

However, times have changed and during our recent camino, we experienced several changes. The cost of the pilgrim's meal has increased to 12 euros or higher in most restaurants. Some restaurants offer a combination plate for 10 euros, but then charge extra for bread and wine. And some have cut back on giving a full bottle of vinto tinto to be shared by two pilgrims to offering a single glass per person, then charging for more wine.

Despite the changes, it is still part of the Spanish culture and we'll embrace the menu del dia / pilgrim's meal most days of our camino.

Bob
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
However, times have changed and during our recent camino, we experienced several changes. The cost of the pilgrim's meal has increased to 12 euros or higher in most restaurants. Some restaurants offer a combination plate for 10 euros, but then charge extra for bread and wine. And some have cut back on giving a full bottle of vinto tinto to be shared by two pilgrims to offering a single glass per person, then charging for more wine.
These are changes to the price of a pigrim's menu, not the menu del dia, right BCB?
 

BROWNCOUNTYBOB

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015 & 2017) and plans for 2019 (Sept, Oct)
Yes, mostly to the pilgrim's meal, although the cost of menu del dia is about the same. One thing we learned is that the menu del dia is mostly offered only during the day, since the "main" meal is traditionally eaten around 2 pm. You can order a menu del dia up until 4 or 5 pm, then it is not offered during the evening, whereas the pilgrim's meal can be ordered for dinner. There are exceptions. We had an tasty menu del dia at a restaurant in Carrion de los Condes during the evening. Bob
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
One thing we learned is that the menu del dia is mostly offered only during the day, since the "main" meal is traditionally eaten around 2 pm. You can order a menu del dia up until 4 or 5 pm
Which is why it pays to get where you're going by 3 at the latest (or continue to walk after that), then forget the crummy Pilgrim's Menu in the evening. ;)
I learned that from @SabineP...and owe her a debt of gratitude.🙏
 

Guy Strachan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013+2014), Portugues (2015), Finisterre (2016+2019); Ingles (2017) & Sanabres (2018)
I don't like the look of this one bit:

The concern seems to be a lot about this:


Will it hold its own, or fold to the pressure of change? Or is this just journalistic hype?

Either way it's time to enjoy those Menús del Dia while we can, and support the places that offer them!
The Menú del Dia is so much better than the Pilgrim Menú, and I had no idea until I ventured off the Frances.
It's definitely worth a try!
(Edited for content...)
The simple answer is to support them as well and as often as we can!
We do and very rarely have had bad experience.
Vivan los independientes!
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
We had the most incredible del dia in Grado on the Primitivo in 2016. I'll never forget it...it included 7 courses, no joke! They owners spoke no English and we weren't sure what we had actually ordered since we speak almost no Spanish. Here are my exact words from my journal as the experience was hilarious...
""Lunch was interesting today. We were passing through the small town of Grado and decided to eat at a cute cafe. No one was eating in there yet, but we were assured(inSpanish)that they were serving.They had no menu, but brought a visiting friend to the table who spoke just a little English.He tried to explain about the food being some soup that was very good from their region of Asturias, and we said, "OK, yes, sounds good."
So the waiter brought us first a big bowl of yellowish broth soup with small pieces of bread floating in it and a ladle for spooning it ourselves,along with some good bread and bottle of wine. We were disappointed as the soup looked like "nothing much", but ate most of it anyway because for all we knew that was the whole meal. Then the server took it away and replaced it with another bowl of garbanzo bean soup with small pieces of meat. We were happier and ate quite a bit of that one.Then the server took it away and replaced it with a bowl of beef stew that was quite good so we ate some, but were starting to get full. Then he brought more bread and took the bowl of stew away. He returned again with another bowl of soup. This time it was chorizo, spinach and potato soup. We tried to eat it, but could only pick out a few pieces of meat to eat. He took it away later and next brought out a huge platter of peas(about 4 cans worth)with sauce and sliced hard boiled eggs on top. We were getting stuffed by this time, so we tried to refuse it, but he indicated through charades "take a little bit at least" so we did. We were getting alarmed by this time as we envisioned being charged euros for each item separately. The restaurant started filling up with locals by now who were given the same order of soups as us.Then the waiter came back and took the peas away and brought out a platter of moist, succulent breaded pork cutlets over french fries with melted cheese on top...yum, the best part of the meal, but we were too full to eat much or enjoy it. Our stomachs felt like after a Thanksgiving meal. This all took place over a full hour or more. He never came with the bill so finally we got up and Matthew pointed to his wallet. The waiter then said in broken English, "No flan or ice cream"? We said "No thanks."Luckily the bill was only 12 euro each, not bad since we had 6 courses and had we stayed for dessert, 7 courses would have been included! Needless to say, we are not eating any dinner tonight!""
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Which is why it pays to get where you're going by 3 at the latest (or continue to walk after that), then forget the crummy Pilgrim's Menu in the evening. ;)
I learned that from @SabineP...and owe her a debt of gratitude.🙏

Even if it meant I was running around " like a headless chicken " and then noting that 3.30 was still ok to get served...Ha!
I remember our stop at the servicestop/hostal just before Burgos where we were the only females in a room full of construction workers/ truckers and policemen.
Let's say they were all munching enormous amounts of meat.
Now that was a menu del dia with not much veggie choices....:eek:
 
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Bob from L.A. !

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
Kind of sobering to think something we all take for granted could just change in a heartbeat...

Thank you for posting...
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
Again, such articles demonstrate the danger of journalists only frequenting the fancy cities. Let them do some strolling into obscure villages and dusty little cathedral towns, and discover the reality of Spain.

As soon as I discovered the menu de dia, I abandoned the menu de peregrino, and altered my daily rhythm. It became my goal to arrive at my pension by 1.00 or 1.30, shower and wash, then be at the table by 2.00; enjoy my meal, and be at my siesta by 3.30. A racion in the evening, and I was well fuelled for another day of walking and spiritual development.

I soon learned my way around the menu de dia, and began to chat with the señor/señorita as to what might be interesting, or worthy of exploring. On the really obscure trails, pilgrims are an exception, and Canadians are considered most exotic, and my John Wayne accent horrifying/charming, so my earnest request to have something which will remind me of this pueblo for it is certain I will only come this way once in my life, appears to be well-received. In a manner reflective of travellers' tales of 40 years ago, the cook comes out of the kitchen and engages in a heated discussion of whether or not the pollo or the albondigas are best for me, and an unlabelled bottle of tinto appears on the table. Second helpings seemed to happen. A little bit of cheese (de este país, por favor, por mi recuerdo) and fruit for dessert. A glass of orujo casero helps me sleep.
As pilgrims, we must realize that our rôle is to provide the Spanish with entertainment and diversion, as well as an outlet for their natural hospitality. The menu de dia is the stage which Providence provides.
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
In some of the smaller villages on some of the more obscure caminos you can get the menú del día presented with no choice. It happened to me a couple of times on the Lana last year. Most memorably at Miedes de Atienza, a two street village high up near the Guadalajara-Soria border. The tiny bar was empty when I walked in, asking the barman nervously ¿puedo comer? - assuming, rightly, that there would be nothing at journey's end, 10km further on. Fortunately the reply was "claro". He put a paper tablecloth on the only table not already laid, and shortly brought me an excellent lunch of soup, stew and salad and flan, all clearly casero, and a harsh, tasty local red. As I was eating the other four tables filled up with most of the rest of the village, who clearly ate there every day, and got the same as I did. They were most welcoming and curious about the foreigner in their midst, and wanted me to drink orujo with them, which did not make my ascent of the goat track up to 1400m and the Soria border any steadier.
 

DeansFamily

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 18/916/10/17 Muxia/Finisterre 18/10-22/10/17 Norte 21/4-29/5/18 Primitive 20/9-5/10/18 VdlP
The best Menu del Día we have had the pleasure to eat was at Oviedo at the sideria opposite the private alburgue. They only offer it on weekdays as is tradition and it was sensational. First course was an amazingly good and huge sized Fabada (an Asturian specialty) and we chose a variety of second and desserts to share between the 3 of us. Tonight we experienced the best Pigrims Menu we have ever had the pleasure to eat at Me Gusta Comer, the restaurant across the road from the alburgue at Rionegro del Puente on the Camino Sanabres. If you plan to walk this way don’t miss it, the meal is truly amazing. I’m still smiling :)
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Three of us will be in Oviedo this April during the week. I will be sure to have us check out your suggestion. Do you have a name for the establishment or the private albergue across the street? We are staying at the Santa Cruz Hotel. Thanks for any extra info.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
This is totally NOT true in Spain outside big cities.
This is my one gripe about foreign press like BBC, Guardian, etc. covering Spain... they never leave Barcelona and Madrid except for the occasional plane crash. They make sweeping statements about "Spain," and evidently haven't left the city limits for a verrrry long time.
If there wasn't a Menu del Dia, there would be no restaurants in Castilla y Leon!
 

natefaith

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
... and Canadians are considered most exotic, and my John Wayne accent horrifying/charming, so my earnest request to have something which will remind me of this pueblo for it is certain I will only come this way once in my life, appears to be well-received.
🤣🤣🤣
 

Levi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015
VDLP 2016
Portuguese March 2017
Sanabres September 2017
Madrid September 2018
Just back from a few days in Madrid...many menus del dia...no need to panic...
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
The Menu del dia was implanted in Spain in 1964, being Minister of Turismo Manuel Fraga. He also created the Paradores network.
In democracy, being President of Xunta relaunched the Camino de Santiago in 1993.
He was the only one who defended the creation of albergues (not only private accommodation).
So, many things on the Camino have to do with him.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
When we were there last October there was the Municipal and La Peregrina in the old quarter, but that could have changed. The sideria is opposite La Peregrina. 😁
Very helpful info, thanks!
 

witsendwv

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015)
We had the most incredible del dia in Grado on the Primitivo in 2016. I'll never forget it...it included 7 courses, no joke! They owners spoke no English and we weren't sure what we had actually ordered since we speak almost no Spanish. Here are my exact words from my journal as the experience was hilarious...
""Lunch was interesting today. We were passing through the small town of Grado and decided to eat at a cute cafe. No one was eating in there yet, but we were assured(inSpanish)that they were serving.They had no menu, but brought a visiting friend to the table who spoke just a little English.He tried to explain about the food being some soup that was very good from their region of Asturias, and we said, "OK, yes, sounds good."
So the waiter brought us first a big bowl of yellowish broth soup with small pieces of bread floating in it and a ladle for spooning it ourselves,along with some good bread and bottle of wine. We were disappointed as the soup looked like "nothing much", but ate most of it anyway because for all we knew that was the whole meal. Then the server took it away and replaced it with another bowl of garbanzo bean soup with small pieces of meat. We were happier and ate quite a bit of that one.Then the server took it away and replaced it with a bowl of beef stew that was quite good so we ate some, but were starting to get full. Then he brought more bread and took the bowl of stew away. He returned again with another bowl of soup. This time it was chorizo, spinach and potato soup. We tried to eat it, but could only pick out a few pieces of meat to eat. He took it away later and next brought out a huge platter of peas(about 4 cans worth)with sauce and sliced hard boiled eggs on top. We were getting stuffed by this time, so we tried to refuse it, but he indicated through charades "take a little bit at least" so we did. We were getting alarmed by this time as we envisioned being charged euros for each item separately. The restaurant started filling up with locals by now who were given the same order of soups as us.Then the waiter came back and took the peas away and brought out a platter of moist, succulent breaded pork cutlets over french fries with melted cheese on top...yum, the best part of the meal, but we were too full to eat much or enjoy it. Our stomachs felt like after a Thanksgiving meal. This all took place over a full hour or more. He never came with the bill so finally we got up and Matthew pointed to his wallet. The waiter then said in broken English, "No flan or ice cream"? We said "No thanks."Luckily the bill was only 12 euro each, not bad since we had 6 courses and had we stayed for dessert, 7 courses would have been included! Needless to say, we are not eating any dinner tonight!""
Casa Pachon in Salas also fed us this way a few years ago. We were the only customers and the food kept coming. We had to finally say STOP. I would walk the Primitivo again just to eat here. 😋
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I read somewhere that to cater for a growing tourist industry, Franco introduced the idea of a mandatory ‘tourist menu’ to help the tourist industry grow.
When the menu del dia was created in 1964 every establishment that served food and drink had to offer a daily 3 course menu consisting of an appetizer, main course and desert, as well as bread and a litre of Spanish win4e, beer or sangria. The dishes had to change every day. Complaining was not an option so every establishment complied!
The attached photograph from a local newspaper dated 1971 claims that "no hay restaurantes sin el menu del dia" (You can search copies of the La Vanguardia on this website).
 

Attachments

Annet2020

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues 2020
The Menú del Dia is so much better than the Pilgrim Menú
I haven't walked the camino yet, so the difference is not very clear to me.

From what I understand the Menu del Dia is originally for the Spaniards themselves, but of course everyone can order them, including pilgrims. Served at lunch time.
Pilgrim Menu is 'invented' for the pilgrims because they prefer to have dinner earlier than the Spaniards and is served around 7 PM.

Am I right about this?
Or do they also serve a Menu del Dia at dinner time?
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I haven't walked the camino yet, so the difference is not very clear to me.

From what I understand the Menu del Dia is originally for the Spaniards themselves, but of course everyone can order them, including pilgrims. Served at lunch time.
Pilgrim Menu is 'invented' for the pilgrims because they prefer to have dinner earlier than the Spaniards and is served around 7 PM.

Am I right about this?
Or do they also serve a Menu del Dia at dinner time?
They sell a menú similar to the menú del día in the evenings called the menú peregrino.
 

Annet2020

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues 2020
They sell a menú similar to the menú del día in the evenings called the menú peregrino.
But the topic starter just said the menu del dia is much better than de menu peregrino 🤔
Or is Pilgrim Menu not the same as menu peregrino?
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
But the topic starter just said the menu del dia is much better than de menu peregrino 🤔
Or is Pilgrim Menu not the same as menu peregrino?
I said that they are similar. In some places they are the same, in others they aren't.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Menu del dia in our experience is local style food - fabada, sopa gallego, various types of stew etc. Menu del peregrino is 'what the pilgrims want' as seen by the cafes - that is often effectively bacon and eggs with chips.

This is a great generalisation but in some places there really is a difference
 

Paul J W

Paul J
Camino(s) past & future
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
Key to dining in Spain (as elsewhere, of course) is to ask around!
A menu del dia, normally but not always served only at lunchtime (and here, be aware of the later dining habits in Spain), is a set menu at a reasonable price. This menu is often not served at weekends and on public holidays.
By asking the locals at any town where it is good and reasonable to eat you can invariably find a restaurant, not necessarily very salubrious.
A menu peregrino can sometimes be advertised to lure the pilgrims and not provide best value!
Despite the advent of the fast food outlets there are still many local restaurants.
Asturias has a deserved reputation for quality food and, for me, the siderea directly opposite the excellent albergue in Pola de Siero (some 16 km east of Oviedo) takes some beating!
Bon appetit!
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Via de La Plata, Portuguese, Camino Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan and Aragones, Norte
The best Menu del Día we have had the pleasure to eat was at Oviedo at the sideria opposite the private alburgue. They only offer it on weekdays as is tradition and it was sensational. First course was an amazingly good and huge sized Fabada (an Asturian specialty) and we chose a variety of second and desserts to share between the 3 of us. Tonight we experienced the best Pigrims Menu we have ever had the pleasure to eat at Me Gusta Comer, the restaurant across the road from the alburgue at Rionegro del Puente on the Camino Sanabres. If you plan to walk this way don’t miss it, the meal is truly amazing. I’m still smiling :)
As a peregrina who rarely partakes in meals in restaurants (we carry a camping stove, pots, etc. in order to prepare our own food every day), I can still recall my meal at this place from three years ago. What an event! Lovely service, delicious food with vegetarian options, unlimited wine, endless liqueurs after the meal...all for only 10 euros. We chose to eat there based on raving recommendations. No doubt the best pilrgim meal we have ever eaten. It was all we could do to stumble across the road to the albergue and roll into bed by the time we had finished feasting.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Am I right about this?
They sell a menú similar to the menú del día in the evenings called the menú peregrino.
There are of course exceptions, but peregrino menú food is usually the quality of food you get in tourist ghetos everywhere. The clientelle is transient so it's possible to serve the cheapest food possible without negative consequence. The menú del dia, on the other hand, is geared to local custom, so if it's good the word gets out. And vice versa. The only similarity is that there are 3 courses.
Other than that it's a different universe.

I'm loving these stories of epic menús del dia! Thank you, everyone. On out of the way caminos they are a god-send!
.
 
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llandaff

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April 2016
Ingles June 2018
Finisterre June 2018
We just spent a month in Fisterra and were spoiled for choice of wonderful menu del dias. It was possible to find them even at the weekend. What a phenomenal value.
 

Annet2020

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues 2020
I've seen some you tube video's from menu del dia's on the camino and it looked like the main was always something like chicken or cod with fries. No problem with meat or fish with fries, but every day?
Would love to try the local specialties but I think you have to order from the carta then?
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I've seen some you tube video's from menu del dia's on the camino and it looked like the main was always something like chicken of cod with fries. No problem with meat or fish with fries, but every day?
Would love to try the local specialties but I think you have to order from the carta then?
I think those videos were likely the menu del peregrino in the evening rather than the menu del dia in the afternoon.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
I've seen some you tube video's from menu del dia's on the camino and it looked like the main was always something like chicken of cod with fries. No problem with meat or fish with fries, but every day?
Would love to try the local specialties but I think you have to order from the carta then?
Yes fries will be on most pilgrim's menus.

If you take a menu del dia or choose a la carta you could ask for a stew. Then , most often, one of the ingredients will be potatoe.

Take a look at this menu. We found this restaurant Tartan in Miranda de Ebro. Lots of veggiechoices and a modern twist to Spanish classics. 14.90 € for a menu in Spain gets me an average spaghetti here in Belgium.


Tartan.jpg
 

Annet2020

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues 2020
Take a look at this menu. We found this restaurant Tartan in Miranda de Ebro. Lots of veggiechoices and a modern twist to Spanish classics. 14.90 € for a menu in Spain gets me an average spaghetti here in Belgium.
This menu looks good, lot of variety!
And I'm definitely not complaining about the price of the menu's.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
This menu looks good, lot of variety!
And the food was soooo delicious.
@SabineP , I'm so glad you took a photo! It is a wonderful memory. So not to mention thanking you for asking the local lady where she would recommend eating! On my own I'd likely have missed it.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Yes fries will be on most pilgrim's menus.

If you take a menu del dia or choose a la carta you could ask for a stew. Then , most often, one of the ingredients will be potatoe.

Take a look at this menu. We found this restaurant Tartan in Miranda de Ebro. Lots of veggiechoices and a modern twist to Spanish classics. 14.90 € for a menu in Spain gets me an average spaghetti here in Belgium.


View attachment 66756
I love french fries as we call them in America, but at home generally stay away as they are high calorie. On the camino I enjoy them with gusto, as it's not my fault they come as part of the meal! However, I do like when regular potatoes are offered on the camino as it's a nice change and I love them, too!..."You say potato, I say patato"! 😅
 
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Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Yes fries will be on most pilgrim's menus.

If you take a menu del dia or choose a la carta you could ask for a stew. Then , most often, one of the ingredients will be potatoe.

Take a look at this menu. We found this restaurant Tartan in Miranda de Ebro. Lots of veggiechoices and a modern twist to Spanish classics. 14.90 € for a menu in Spain gets me an average spaghetti here in Belgium.


View attachment 66756
"Solo mesas completas" is not an usual indication on a menu. Maybe it indicates that if the table is not full then the menú is more expensive?
 

SioCamino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2015, CPo 2016, VDLP[Sev-Các] 2017, VDLP[Các-Sal] 2018
"Solo mesas completas" is not an usual indication on a menu. Maybe it indicates that if the table is not full then the menú is more expensive?
I would guess that means that everyone at the table must order from the menu ... but that’s just a guess, I haven’t noticed that on a menu before
 

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