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Changing horses in the middle of the Camino

When I set out on my first Camino, I basically began with the hiking gear I used on the Appalachian Trail: Merrell hi-top Boots, sleeping bag, external pack, water purification system, rain jacket, walking sticks. By Pamplona it became obvious the Merrells had to go. My ankles were sore and feet developing blisters...I switched to a local sneaker (the name is Milano something). my sleeping bag was big and bulky...I ditched it in Burgos and bought a lightweight sleeping bag and lightweight jacket at Summit (cost nearly 300 euros, on sale). I mailed home the Merrells, water purification system and jacket. I also bought an Altus poncho.
Have you started out in a similar situation?
What did you convince yourself "you just had to take that...only to find out it was the wrong choice"?
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I still walk the camino routes in the same boots that I wear to the mountains. But the sleeping bag that I bought for my first camino proved to be too heavy and too warm for conditions in Spain, so I bought a lighter one for my second camino and have been using it ever since. However, this lighter sleeping bag has proved itself to not be warm enough for mountain use, even with all my clothes on underneath. So it's back to the heavier, warmer bag for this summer's mountain excursions, then the lighter one for autumn in Spain, if that camino proves possible.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
When I set out on my first Camino, I basically began with the hiking gear I used on the Appalachian Trail: Merrell hi-top Boots, sleeping bag, external pack, water purification system, rain jacket, walking sticks. By Pamplona it became obvious the Merrells had to go. My ankles were sore and feet developing blisters...I switched to a local sneaker (the name is Milano something). my sleeping bag was big and bulky...I ditched it in Burgos and bought a lightweight sleeping bag and lightweight jacket at Summit (cost nearly 300 euros, on sale). I mailed home the Merrells, water purification system and jacket. I also bought an Altus poncho.
Have you started out in a similar situation?
What did you convince yourself "you just had to take that...only to find out it was the wrong choice"?
Arn, I don't know what year you walked your first Camino, but mine was in 2015. I had so much knowledge gained from this forum that I do not believe I have really had to tweak a thing. In addition, my son had walked the Appalachian Trail prior, so between those two sources of information...all has been good.
 
Arn, I don't know what year you walked your first Camino, but mine was in 2015. I had so much knowledge gained from this forum that I do not believe I have really had to tweak a thing. In addition, my son had walked the Appalachian Trail prior, so between those two sources of information...all has been good.
I thru-hiked the AT in 1996 and my first Camino was 2008. The Forum, I believe, began in 2004. The Forum is LIGHT YEARS ahead of where it was then. Ivar's tenacity and stewardship results in what you and many find to be the most complete on line guide to the Camino.
As to my poor choices in equipment...hubris should be one of the Deadly Sins.
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
I bought an inexpensive, light down quilt for my November Portuguese Camino and kept it to the end, but put it in a donations bin that the San Martin do Pinario hostal because I'll have enough use for it ever again as I learned a lesson about walking in the rainy season (my body can't hack it).
I still take my boots for the hilly parts, but I learned on Camino one that I needed something lighter. The signs were showing around Los Arcos, and when I reached Sto. Domingo I bought a pair of Keen sandals. I carry both now for all treks and switch out as needed.
No water purification system, but one lifestrpaw just in case we need it for a day when we run through our water and can't find a guaranteed supply.
And I think next trek will have light weight frog-togs for rain instead of heavy poncho.
No solar power mat required either. I have a 20,000 Ohm power bank and it's all good. Charge my lamp from it, my phone, my watch and my iPad. And who knows? Maybe by my next Camino I won't have to have any connections to work at all! So far I've always had to carry the iPad to be able to take the time away from campus at all.
 
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Isca-camigo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Various ones.
On the link up route between Chemin Arles and Lourdes I decided to go to the Decathlon in Tarbes and get a new backpack and some merino baselayers. I had started in Montpelier and thought it would be hot and dry however it was mostly cold and damp all the way, now going to Lourdes and potential hike over the Pyrenees only 4/5 days away I decided to alter somethings, it worked for me.
 
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pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
When I set out on my first Camino, I basically began with the hiking gear I used on the Appalachian Trail: Merrell hi-top Boots, sleeping bag, external pack, water purification system, rain jacket, walking sticks. By Pamplona it became obvious the Merrells had to go. My ankles were sore and feet developing blisters...I switched to a local sneaker (the name is Milano something). my sleeping bag was big and bulky...I ditched it in Burgos and bought a lightweight sleeping bag and lightweight jacket at Summit (cost nearly 300 euros, on sale). I mailed home the Merrells, water purification system and jacket. I also bought an Altus poncho.
Have you started out in a similar situation?
What did you convince yourself "you just had to take that...only to find out it was the wrong choice"?
Believe it or not, I started out my first one with a portable Italian espresso machine plus a pound of coffee. The backpack weighing 11kg. In Leon, I had to buy a pair of trail-runners, but could not overcome to chuck my heavy boots away....carried espresso gear and boots (additional 1.6 kg) all the way to SdC. That was in 2013, both items were never used again since and rot in the cellar. But on my second Camino, I started with half the pack weight. 😬

Mini_Espresso.jpg
 
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mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Much has been written about camino equipment and kit. It can often be either amazing or amusing to see what some pilgrims attempt to lug. (On my first camino for sentimental reasons I carried a beloved stuffed moose!! We both made it to Santiago but once with a moose is enough.

For the next 10 autumn/winter caminos here is my kit and tips

New changes included a smaller 30 liter backpack, a lighter more compact sleeping bag, runners winter tights, and the invaluable water heating coil which was the only "luxury".
 
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Pilgrim9

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (2017)
SdC-Muxia-Fisterra-SdC (2017)
Lisboa-SdC (2018)
Ferrol-SdC (2018)
A few years before my first pilgrimage I purchased from the UK Confraternity of Saint James, printed paper Camino guidebooks for almost all of the French and Spanish routes. I really enjoyed pouring over them at home, deciding which route to take. Eventually I decide to start in SJPdP, and took the CF guidebook with me.

A day or so before Burgos I realized that I had not even once opened my guide book, and probably never would until after returning home. The well known multi-purpose mapping/navigation app that I was using, in combination with Google Maps and Booking.com, and Google, was meeting all of my needs.

In Burgos, I mailed the guidebook back home.

I still have the guidebooks and plan to keep them. For me they are a valid planning tool and form part of my memory system.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
The gear I took on my first in 2016 is the same as I took my most recent in 2019 (note I say recent and not last - as I hope there will be more). My pack was 6kgs with water, so I was pretty happy when it sat on the airport scales and would have been light enough for cabin baggage. There was nothing additional I wished I had brought with me. I bought books to read on the plane and gave them away when I was finished with them and a small light knitting project.
Unfortunately I have to take a number of medications with me which are bulky (I have them blister packed) but light. The only change I have made was to get lighter poles (bought them in Leon) so I could give my poles to someone else, a better poncho - the first one was an utter failure and a bigger towel.
And a guidebook, I didnt take one the first time but have bought one since.
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Believe it or not, I started out my first one with a portable Italian espresso machine plus a pound of coffee. The backpack weighing 11kg. In Leon, I had to buy a pair of trail-runners, but could not overcome to chuck my heavy boots away....carried espresso gear and boots (additional 1.6 kg) all the way to SdC. That was in 2013, both items were never used again since and rot in the cellar. But on my second Camino, I started with half the pack weight. 😬

View attachment 95610
If it can be of any comfort to you, on my first Camino I carried a bicycle chain lock (3/4 kg.) all the way to SdC. Never used it, of course. The idea/concept was that I could lock my backpack to a chair/table/whatever, if I had to leave it for a while, not understanding that all a thief needed was a knife to cut it open and take what he/she needed. Today, the lock is somewhere at the garbage depot... And on the Camino, my backpack is never out of sight until in the albergue and all my valuables are with me...
 
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Believe it or not, I started out my first one with a portable Italian espresso machine plus a pound of coffee. The backpack weighing 11kg. In Leon, I had to buy a pair of trail-runners, but could not overcome to chuck my heavy boots away....carried espresso gear and boots (additional 1.6 kg) all the way to SdC. That was in 2013, both items were never used again since and rot in the cellar. But on my second Camino, I started with half the pack weight. 😬

View attachment 95610
Fantastic! Truly a Camino lesson well understood.
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
If it can be of any comfort to you, on my first Camino I carried a bicycle chain lock (3/4 kg.) all the way to SdC. The idea/concept was that I could lock my backpack to a chair/table/whatever, if I had to leave it for a while, not understanding that all a thief needed was a knive to cut it open and take what he/she needed. Today, the lock is somewhere at the garbage depot...
Whilst the weight is extraordinary, the concept is still valid in my opinion. I wouldn’t personally leave a rucksack unattended in a cafe or bar in any big city in the UK without some means of securing if it some way - not expecting that to provide muck protection, but to make it just that bit more difficult and time consuming to remove.

I was once checking into a hotel in central Rome. A woman was checking in at the adjacent desk when someone simply walked into the lobby, picked up the cases from either side of her and strode straight out. Nobody batted an eyelid.
I use a Mountain Warehouse cable lock at about 200g. It wouldn’t hold the real Henry the Dog away from his food at dinner time - but it looks fairly strong and if it causes anyone to think twice, that’s good.
 
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Whilst the weight is extraordinary, the concept is still valid in my opinion. I wouldn’t personally leave a rucksack unattended in a cafe or bar in any big city in the UK without some means of securing if it some way - not expecting that to provide muck protection, but to make it just that bit more difficult and time consuming to remove.

I was once checking into a hotel in central Rome. A woman was checking in at the adjacent desk when someone simply walked into the lobby, picked up the cases from either side of her and strode straight out. Nobody batted an eyelid.
I use a Mountain Warehouse cable lock at about 200g. It wouldn’t hold the real Henry the Dog away from his food at dinner time - but it looks fairly strong and if it causes anyone to think twice, that’s good.
There are many ways to relieve you of your gear. Bus compartments being easiest. You put in your pack, board to get a good seat, the thief waits, you get settled, he lifts your pack. Solution, add your pack as driver is about to close the compartment. My pack is small enough to be a carry on.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Arn, I don't know what year you walked your first Camino, but mine was in 2015. I had so much knowledge gained from this forum that I do not believe I have really had to tweak a thing. In addition, my son had walked the Appalachian Trail prior, so between those two sources of information...all has been good.
Pretty much the same for me in 2016. I used everything in my pack, except my Kindle, which hasn't been on a Camino since the first one.
 

dick bird

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
If you're worried about the water (e.g. from a fuente), you could use water purification tabs. You can mask the taste by squeezing half a lemon into your water bottle. Tap water in Spain is as good as anywhere else though. I always drink it.
 
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Chenahusky

Happy Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
CFSJPP to SDC 2016
CIng x 2 2018
CPort. Tui May 2019
CF Ponf. June 2019
I have always been impressed by the warmth and helpful advice about equipment, people offer others on on the forum. I count myself fortunate that I have been doing long distance walks and mountain marathons since the 1970's. My first Camino I used a 35 litre rucsack/backpack, about 6.5 kgs and didnt fill it.
I spent a lot of time in albergues talking to people, who wanted to know how I could get away with so little and yet always seemed to have everything. Some of their bags were so heavy I do not know how they managed. I usually managed to help them trim a bit of weight. I did manage to persuade them to tip out their bags every few days and get rid of bills, tickets, museum brochures etc. and bits of paper. Doing this one Australian girl reduced her pack by 1 Kg! I didn't manage to chat to the guy in the picture.

IMG_20160605_085008281.jpg
 

KentuckyJay

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Hiked Leon to Santiago in May, 2014.
Hiked Porto to Santiago in May, 2016.
When I set out on my first Camino, I basically began with the hiking gear I used on the Appalachian Trail: Merrell hi-top Boots, sleeping bag, external pack, water purification system, rain jacket, walking sticks. By Pamplona it became obvious the Merrells had to go. My ankles were sore and feet developing blisters...I switched to a local sneaker (the name is Milano something). my sleeping bag was big and bulky...I ditched it in Burgos and bought a lightweight sleeping bag and lightweight jacket at Summit (cost nearly 300 euros, on sale). I mailed home the Merrells, water purification system and jacket. I also bought an Altus poncho.
Have you started out in a similar situation?
What did you convince yourself "you just had to take that...only to find out it was the wrong choice"?
By the time I did my first trek on the Camino in about 2014, I had already ditched much of my AT gear such as external frame pack and heavy sleeping bag. But my low cut Merells worked just fine. However, I did have to replace a too-light jacket with a warmer pile one in Leon. Adjusting on the fly seems to be the norm on the Camino. :)
 

El Cascayal

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Believe it or not, I started out my first one with a portable Italian espresso machine plus a pound of coffee. The backpack weighing 11kg. In Leon, I had to buy a pair of trail-runners, but could not overcome to chuck my heavy boots away....carried espresso gear and boots (additional 1.6 kg) all the way to SdC. That was in 2013, both items were never used again since and rot in the cellar. But on my second Camino, I started with half the pack weight. 😬
Pepi, Love that so cute espresso machine! Thank goodness there is good coffee everywhere in Spain. I didn’t find any ☕️ fountains on the Camino, yet!
View attachment 95610
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
1989
For me, there were two things I took on my 2016 camino that I decided I didn't need on future ones, although I didn't have the wisdom or fortitude to chuck them (or send them home) part way through and ended up carrying them to Finisterre and beyond.

One was a Scrubba Wash Bag, sold as essentially a small, portable, human-powered washing machine for travelers. I knew I was going to have to do laundry many times over the camino and taking a good tool for the job seems smart. As it turned out, I think I used it once towards the start of the trip. I generally preferred the laundry facilities in the albergues.

The other was a heavy travelers hoodie jacket with lots of specialty pockets and travel features. The idea was that this would be what I wore when it got cold in the early morning or at altitude. (Note: I was walking in July/August.) I also didn't end up needing it that much, as per a summer camino, and certainly didn't need one that heavy. For my next camino I took a much lighter warming layer.

I also never really needed my rain gear for my 2016 camino, but I don't think I would have wanted to ditch that, as there is no better way of ensuring some quite wet days.
 

CaminoGuy

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Walked (2015) Planning (2016) 7337
I still walk the camino routes in the same boots that I wear to the mountains. But the sleeping bag that I bought for my first camino proved to be too heavy and too warm for conditions in Spain, so I bought a lighter one for my second camino and have been using it ever since. However, this lighter sleeping bag has proved itself to not be warm enough for mountain use, even with all my clothes on underneath. So it's back to the heavier, warmer bag for this summer's mountain excursions, then the lighter one for autumn in Spain, if that camino proves possible.
This brought back memories: After an exhausting climb up to Roncesvalles in my 2015 walk on the Fr. Camino, I left a beautiful $300 tent, a pair of gators, a heavy journal, extra clothes, and a few other items I can’t recall, which reduced my pack weight to about 30 lbs! For my much wiser walk on the Camino Portuguese in 2018, my full pack weighed in at just about 11 lbs. 🤠
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Adjusting on the fly seems to be the norm on the Camino.
Since it's not a wilderness walk, and there are stores in Spain it's pretty easy to adjust 😊
One was a Scrubba Wash Bag, sold as essentially a small, portable, human-powered washing machine for travelers. I knew I was going to have to do laundry many times over the camino and taking a good tool for the job seems smart. As it turned out, I think I used it once towards the start of the trip. I generally preferred the laundry facilities in the albergues.
I added a very lightweight (1.2 oz/34 gm) dry bag to my gear after my 1st Camino which serves the same purpose as a Scrubba for a lower cost in both money and weight. And it's really not much added weight because I carry other gear in the bag.
My dirty clothes go in as I get into the shower. While the water is warming up I fill the bag with water and add a half a laundry detergent strip. Then I leave it aside to soak while I shower and dress. After my shower I shake the bag a bit to agitate it before emptying everything into the laundry sink where I rinse my clothes, which come out cleaner after their long soaking time than when I only used the albergue laundry sinks.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
We learn through experience. Another item which I carried on my first camino, but not since, was a fairly light-weight pile vest: 250 g. And now I am struggling as to whether to leave behind a 170 g. long sleeved, high neck merino wool pullover. I don't think that I wore it much on previous caminos, but it is warm and comfortable and I don't have any other comparable long sleeved garment. On balance, I think that I shall take it this year, since it may be quite cold when I walk in the fall. But it is definitely something that I shall only need in the albergues, as I walk quite warm. Maybe because I always carry too much.
 
We learn through experience. Another item which I carried on my first camino, but not since, was a fairly light-weight pile vest: 250 g. And now I am struggling as to whether to leave behind a 170 g. long sleeved, high neck merino wool pullover. I don't think that I wore it much on previous caminos, but it is warm and comfortable and I don't have any other comparable long sleeved garment. On balance, I think that I shall take it this year, since it may be quite cold when I walk in the fall. But it is definitely something that I shall only need in the albergues, as I walk quite warm. Maybe because I always carry too much.
If you know you carry too much...that's half the battle. That said, now remove the "too much"!
 

pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Unfortunately, "too much to carry" does not always mean "things that I don't need." Or feel that I need.
But it's so simple and easy: A set of clothes to wear, another to carry, plus rain gear and toiletry, that's all one needs, so just leave it at that when leaving home. Anything missing can be purchased on the way if really needed. (Once walking a few days, you'll think about buying any additional item 3 three times, a natural limiter😃)
BC
 
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Yoyo

✿ Se hace el camino al andar. ✿
Past OR future Camino
2021
Since it's not a wilderness walk, and there are stores in Spain it's pretty easy to adjust 😊

I added a very lightweight (1.2 oz/34 gm) dry bag to my gear after my 1st Camino which serves the same purpose as a Scrubba for a lower cost in both money and weight. And it's really not much added weight because I carry other gear in the bag.
My dirty clothes go in as I get into the shower. While the water is warming up I fill the bag with water and add a half a laundry detergent strip. Then I leave it aside to soak while I shower and dress. After my shower I shake the bag a bit to agitate it before emptying everything into the laundry sink where I rinse my clothes, which come out cleaner after their long soaking time than when I only used the albergue laundry sinks.
@trecile may I ask you what brand of detergent strips you use? The ones I have seen so far say that they are not suitable for wool, but I use merino wool tops and woolen socks. And I seem to remember from former posts that you walk in a merino dress. So what product has worked for you?
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
In the summer of 2015 I went with a fully loaded 75 liter pack. The idea was that after the CF we would try to hike the length of the Pyrenees so I was carrying a lot of backpacking stuff. I knew of a place in Pamplona that would hold some stuff for us but after hiking from SJPDP to there I was completely comfortable and just kept it all. After 10 days I decided my sleeping bag was too warm and I bought a cooler one. I didn't like the idea of carrying two bags and so I filled up a big box provided by the shop and mailed to the Santiago post office (Ivar's service would have been better but I didn't know of it at the time). That box held a significant investment and I had to ensure a few times that it was still being held by correos as we ended up getting way behind schedule.

Peg stayed behind in Santiago for a few days while I walked to Finisterra. To make her bus trip there easier I put all the shipped stuff back in my pack and carried it there and then to Muxia (Peg walked these last two stages with me). We only had about ten days left on our visas so we did some bus and train touring for our remaining time and skipped the Pyrenees. I can't remember me ever having a bad time with the pack.

In the autumn of 2019 though I walked from Barcelona to Pamplona (the weather robbed me of San Sebastián and a coast to coast). Since no camping was in the plans this time I got away with using a 25 liter day pack I had.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
@trecile may I ask you what brand of detergent strips you use? The ones I have seen so far say that they are not suitable for wool, but I use merino wool tops and woolen socks. And I seem to remember from former posts that you walk in a merino dress. So what product has worked for you?
I use Breezeo strips, though there are others like them. 1/2 strip for each wash. Yes, I usually wear a merino wool dress on the Camino, and there is no problem using these strips with wool.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
But it's so simple and easy: A set of clothes to wear, another to carry, plus rain gear and toiletry, that's all one needs, so just leave it at that when leaving home. Anything missing can be purchased on the way if really needed. (Once walking a few days, you'll think about buying any additional item 3 three times, a natural limiter😃)
BC
You know what? I could almost manage with just that, if I stayed only in hotels, where towels and bedding were provided and someone else did my laundry, especially in a warmer season. I must try it someday, when I have a lot more money than I do now. I might not even need my own toiletries.
 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
A set of clothes to wear, another to carry, plus rain gear and toiletry, that's all one needs... Anything missing can be purchased on the way if really needed.
Of course. But those two "sets of clothes" need to include the various layers that can be mixed and matched for various conditions while walking and while not. I walk in early spring or late fall when there might be any weather from blazing sun to snow, and I chill easily. Further, you often cannot buy medicines and clothes at exactly the time the need becomes apparent!
 
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pepi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
You know what? I could almost manage with just that, if I stayed only in hotels, where towels and bedding were provided and someone else did my laundry, especially in a warmer season. I must try it someday, when I have a lot more money than I do now. I might not even need my own toiletries.
@Albertagirl, @C clearly, I was referring to walking a man's summer Camino; sorry ladies 🤷
And yes, keeping the pack light is easier when staying in rooms with a bath either at albergues or small pensions, hotels. (my usual CF budget is a bit less than €70/day.) Sorry again, wasn't thinking.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
@Albertagirl, @C clearly, I was referring to walking a man's summer Camino; sorry ladies 🤷
And yes, keeping the pack light is easier when staying in rooms with a bath either at albergues or small pensions, hotels. (my usual CF budget is a bit less than €70/day.) Sorry again, wasn't thinking.
@pepi
I was mostly joking, thinking about all the things that I need to take care of myself when walking caminos. A change of clothes and a few toiletries sounds wonderful. But, actually, it put a thought in my mind as to how I could go on walking caminos in my later years, when I cannot carry all my gear and take care of my own needs as I do now. I don't want to use a baggage carrying service. That would really limit where I can go: there are so many caminos to walk. But I might just walk some shorter routes and stay in hotels when my physical capacity lessens. No sleeping bag, or towel or . . . to carry, but I still could walk. Thanks for the inspiration.
 

Yoyo

✿ Se hace el camino al andar. ✿
Past OR future Camino
2021
I use Breezeo strips, though there are others like them. 1/2 strip for each wash. Yes, I usually wear a merino wool dress on the Camino, and there is no problem using these strips with wool.
Thank you, @trecile . Unfortunately, Breezeo strips are not available in Germany.
Maybe I'll just try one of the products I can get here (Magic Leaves or Tru Earth – officially not suited for wool or silk) on an older merino shirt and see what happens. I mean, what could happen? 🤔
 

Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Have you started out in a similar situation?
What did you convince yourself "you just had to take that...only to find out it was the wrong choice"?
As a totally unexperienced hiker in Spain I took what I had, added some of the pieces I learned from this forum and the gear they adviced me at my hiking store. More than half of the salesmen did walk a Camino before.

Most of the gear I did have before and I had nothing to ditch. Started lightweight (~5.2kg in total w/o water and food) and came back with almost the same in my pack.
 
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how to successfully prepare for your Camino
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
1989
@Albertagirl, @C clearly, I was referring to walking a man's summer Camino; sorry ladies 🤷
And yes, keeping the pack light is easier when staying in rooms with a bath either at albergues or small pensions, hotels. (my usual CF budget is a bit less than €70/day.) Sorry again, wasn't thinking.
Some men like to take showers and do laundry in the summer caminos, too. Perhaps especially in the summer. :)
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Thank you, @trecile . Unfortunately, Breezeo strips are not available in Germany.
Maybe I'll just try one of the products I can get here (Magic Leaves or Tru Earth – officially not suited for wool or silk) on an older merino shirt and see what happens. I mean, what could happen? 🤔
Tru Earth website says that it can be used on wool, if special care is taken.
 

Calimocho

Mark
Past OR future Camino
Oct. 2006 - Roncesvalles to Los Arcos
Oct. 2016 - Los Arcos to Burgos
Since it's not a wilderness walk, and there are stores in Spain it's pretty easy to adjust 😊

I added a very lightweight (1.2 oz/34 gm) dry bag to my gear after my 1st Camino which serves the same purpose as a Scrubba for a lower cost in both money and weight. And it's really not much added weight because I carry other gear in the bag.
My dirty clothes go in as I get into the shower. While the water is warming up I fill the bag with water and add a half a laundry detergent strip. Then I leave it aside to soak while I shower and dress. After my shower I shake the bag a bit to agitate it before emptying everything into the laundry sink where I rinse my clothes, which come out cleaner after their long soaking time than when I only used the albergue laundry sinks.
Great idea!
 

Frank Wortley

Member
Past OR future Camino
French Caminos - April/May 2013, March/April 2017 and (Sept/Oct 2018)
My first Camino pack weight was 19 kilos (a legacy of military thinking) and I now walk with about 12 kilos. I wear Aslo 520 boots - weigh a ton and don't last much beyond the Camino. I have changed to OBOS and added a solid insert unter the one provided. I use a lightweight sleeping bag. My pack is a Valhalla ALICE pack(All-purpose Lightweight Individual Carrying Equipment). Six pockets around the body and a large CLAYMORE pouch on top with external metal frame. To me it is heaven to wear being designed to carry heavy loads and I have had and used it for years walking our bush right across Australia . I guess I will not be too worried about weight on the principle that "If I can I will" and "when I can't I will modify". I hope to do at least 3 more FCs up to 75 yeaars old and take my daughter and two grandchildren along (individually). After that - we will see but I hope more. Enjoying the read. Thank you
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
First camino - 65+ litre pack, good leather (heavy) boots, 4kg sleeping bag, 3 layer Goretex long jacket, waterproof overpants, 3 litre platypus type hydration system. All wrong choices!
 

Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
First camino - 65+ litre pack, good leather (heavy) boots, 4kg sleeping bag, 3 layer Goretex long jacket, waterproof overpants, 3 litre platypus type hydration system. All wrong choices!
The knowledge gained by walking is the hardest part of the camino. In every aspect.

BC
Roland
 

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