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Cheapest Way to Way

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
I have been reading and planning to walk the Camino for about 3 years now. I really want to do this! But I'm pretty much the working poor, it so hard to even afford a plan ticket much less take 4 months to walk the Camino. So, I'm trying to get my costs down as low as I can.

I would like to:
1. Buy food from grocery store as much as I can and prepare or eat cold
2. Camp as much as I can for free.

Can anyone give advice for the two things above? Where is good? When is good? How? Any negative things you've experience with these two things? Any safety advice?
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012-2018 Frances, Norte, Salvador, Aragones, Portuguese, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakibspaad.
Hello Chantal. I am not sure which Camino you plan to walk but I guess you mean the Frances ?
I have no experience with camping, but I know there have been some threads on camping before, so you may want to search them for any tips. Be aware though that you can stay in most albergues for app 6 euro per night, so I do not know if budget reasons outweigh the burden of carrying a tent here.
As for food. On the Frances, many albergues have a kitchen (including pots and pans) where you can prepare your own meal. In your case, it would be good to check beforehand which albergues have kitchen facilities, and which ones have not. In most villages there are grocery stores where you can buy the essentials. I am not really sure which other advice I can give on this, but let me know if you have any further specific questions.
As for budgets in general. To give you an idea, my daily budget is usually 30 euro per day. This includes staying in the albergue, usually eating out for a pilgrim's meal (app 10 euro), and I have breakfast and lunch usually in bars, and several beers and coffees per day in bars. I guess you can easily manage on 15 - 20 euro per day by staying in albergues & buying all your food in stores, and restricting yourself on coffees and other drinks in bars.
Hope this is helpfull. Marc.
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Hello Chantal. I am not sure which Camino you plan to walk but I guess you mean the Frances ?
I have no experience with camping, but I know there have been some threads on camping before, so you may want to search them for any tips. Be aware though that you can stay in most albergues for app 6 euro per night, so I do not know if budget reasons outweigh the burden of carrying a tent here.
As for food. On the Frances, many albergues have a kitchen (including pots and pans) where you can prepare your own meal. In your case, it would be good to check beforehand which albergues have kitchen facilities, and which ones have not. In most villages there are grocery stores where you can buy the essentials. I am not really sure which other advice I can give on this, but let me know if you have any further specific questions.
As for budgets in general. To give you an idea, my daily budget is usually 30 euro per day. This includes staying in the albergue, usually eating out for a pilgrim's meal (app 10 euro), and I have breakfast and lunch usually in bars, and several beers and coffees per day in bars. I guess you can easily manage on 15 - 20 euro per day by staying in albergues & buying all your food in stores, and restricting yourself on coffees and other drinks in bars.
Hope this is helpfull. Marc.
Hi Marc, Thank you for the reply

My plan is to walk the Frances Camino from Pamplona to Finisterre. I know the albergues are very reasonable, but being a working poor with bills back home, cost is really stopping me. I'm trying to find a way to cut them. Even if I make half the days in the tent, that would give me some flexibility. Plus, even sleeping at home, I always have the window open, I can't stand closed up rooms even if they are big.

I did find some others who provided me with places. Part of me is also thinking about many who make their living by pilgrims. I do still need to support the local businesses.

Part of me thinks I should just get out there! It's not like I will be on safari in the middle of Africa! If I run out of money I can return home!
 
Camino(s) past & future
June 2015
I have been reading and planning to walk the Camino for about 3 years now. I really want to do this! But I'm pretty much the working poor, it so hard to even afford a plan ticket much less take 4 months to walk the Camino. So, I'm trying to get my costs down as low as I can.

I would like to:
1. Buy food from grocery store as much as I can and prepare or eat cold
2. Camp as much as I can for free.

Can anyone give advice for the two things above? Where is good? When is good? How? Any negative things you've experience with these two things? Any safety advice?



Hello Writer,


My wife and I did our Camino in May 2015. We found that we could share a Pilgrims meal between the two of us and we were full. If you had a hiking partner you could not only share meals but share the weight of your tent. Buen Camino
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
True. Sadly, I'm the most adventurous out of my family and friends!
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I think what they mean is that a pilgrim meal can be a lot of food, no matter who you share with, family or Camino folk. I find that communal cooking is the cheapest way to go. Cook for yourself and you might as well eat out. But if ompne buys pasta, the other tuna and tbe third a tomato or two you'll do well on a budget.
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
I think what they mean is that a pilgrim meal can be a lot of food, no matter who you share with, family or Camino folk. I find that communal cooking is the cheapest way to go. Cook for yourself and you might as well eat out. But if ompne buys pasta, the other tuna and tbe third a tomato or two you'll do well on a budget.
Ah, that's a good point. Makes a lot of sense!
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
If someone has a list of albergues you can look up the donation ones but they still ask for 5 euros , the only way I think to save will be:
Air fare start looking 6 months out cheapo air the more you reduce here will enable you to get alburgues Madrid round trip seems to be the cheapest take a bus or train to Pamplona.

Carry the lightest 1 person tent you can afford but be prepared you will have a difficult time using in Cities. You will need a 1 burner stove this may be tough to find gas cartridges. Do not use in tent. Sleeping pad.

Food from markets will be very reasonable, the bars for liquids will add up quick. As it can be more expensive than alburgues for the night.

When you compare other vacations to Europe this is very reasonable in comparison. Once you leave the Camino trails the places are like every place very expensive in comparison. So make sure you have a tablet to search Online. Slow down if you end up arriving days ahead of schedule into Santiago as the places to stay become 100 euros +

The Spanish party until morning in the big cities stay in alburgues for your safety.

I simply do not know your experience level camping. You will be isolating yourself, so depending on your experience camping you may get extremley lonley & scared.
 

don88

Member
Just yesterday I purchased my ticket from Calif. Through Orbitz. The cost of the ticket and one hotel night in Madrid was $300 less than the airfare alone. Nothing says you have to use the hotel, but I will use it when I get back to Madrid the day before my flight home. Brings the Camino cost way down.
Bien Camino.
 

mountaingoat999

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
we are due out Jan 2016
Just yesterday I purchased my ticket from Calif. Through Orbitz. The cost of the ticket and one hotel night in Madrid was $300 less than the airfare alone. Nothing says you have to use the hotel, but I will use it when I get back to Madrid the day before my flight home. Brings the Camino cost way down.
Bien Camino.

Did a price comparison yesterday and sent examples in pm and found skyscnner.com the cheapest from the location Writerrchantal is coming from...did same dates and found orbitz more expensive by $17.. difference being Orbitz offered free cancellation before 10th October this year .8 days time.
 

Pilgrim Rick

Looking for ...
Camino(s) past & future
October 2014 Camino Frances SJPP to Santiago
Hi Last year a few Peregrinos used tents.
They were very heavy to carry in the heat along with the equipment needed to support that idea, cooking, water, washing yourself and your socks shirts and underwear. Carrying food.
Some Minicipal Albergues are almost free €5 per night and you can shower wash and eat out very cheaply
I did pass a few places were there was fallen fruit good to try maybe? Water was available at fountains read the signs carefully as some are not suitable for drinking though!!
A 3-5 course pilgrim meal with wine is under €10 euros
Local supermercados for cheese ham fruit bread water etc offer great value
Try and have enough money for a taxi in an emergency You may have blisters or aches or swelling that could need attention
Use walking sticks/ hiking poles they greatly reduce stress on your joints especially if you are over 25 years old.
Take your time.'
You can walk the Camino France's in 30 plus days comfortably
Enjoy your trip
Buen Camino
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
My opinion:

Stay in albergues. It is the best way to rest, sleep, shower, wash clothes, prepare and eat food, socialize, get new walking friends, etc. It is a big part of the Camino experience. It will also greatly reduce the weight of your backpack, thereby making you less vulnerable to injuries, and ease each day's walk.

Cook in the albergue kitchens. Find other people to cook food with, sharing cost. You will make many friends that way. You can easily come down to 3-4 Euros/person for full dinner, including wine. Buy all your food in local groceries: It is very cheap.

Stay away from buying too much in bars during walking. Fill up your water bottle(s) from wells/fountains. They are marked "Potable" (drinkable) or "No potable" (Not drinkable). Water is good in Spain.

Buen Camino (and planning)!
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
While one may think that a piece of bread, cheese and a couple of tomatos may make for an inexpensive dinner, or a packer of pasta that you will have to carry with you due to size, do have a look in the freezer. You can find lazagna for 2 for 2€ for example, or in the fresh meat section slices of pork for a € or 2.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
Pretty much what Alex said.
I'd stay in albergues and eat food from the tiendas that you cook yourself.
There are a LOT of great options for picnic foods as well as cooking.
Along the route, also, you can buy JUST what you need - ONE egg or TWO slices of cheese, etc.
If you want the occasional Spanish meal, choose the Menu del Dia instead of Menu del Peregrino.
It is cheaper and more food and better, in my opinion. It is offered mid day.

Here are some blogs I did on the food:

Breakfast: http://caminosantiago2.blogspot.com/2011/08/eating-on-camino-santiago-coffee-and.html

Lunch and Dinner: http://caminosantiago2.blogspot.com/2011/08/lunch-on-camino-santiago.html

For breakfast, there are wonderful pastry options, you can buy eggs and boil them in the albergue, or just have bread, cheese, and jam.
For lunch, see the blog - lots of cheap options. Same for dinner.

As far as camping, I've camped quite a bit. If you're going in hot weather, consider a lightweight tarp or screen tent that you can set up with your poles.
But honestly, with the money it takes to buy that, you could just stay in Albergues where you can cook and save cash.

I'm not sure where you live (forgot to look) but I think the best place to fly in is Madrid. From there you can get an inexpensive bus to Pamplona or SJPP or you can just start walking. The Madrid route is wonderful and less traveled and meets up with the Frances about two weeks away.

Have fun planning and have a wonderful Camino!
Annie
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
My opinion:

Stay in albergues. It is the best way to rest, sleep, shower, wash clothes, prepare and eat food, socialize, get new walking friends, etc. It is a big part of the Camino experience. It will also greatly reduce the weight of your backpack, thereby making you less vulnerable to injuries, and ease each day's walk.

Cook in the albergue kitchens. Find other people to cook food with, sharing cost. You will make many friends that way. You can easily come down to 3-4 Euros/person for full dinner, including wine. Buy all your food in local groceries: It is very cheap.

Stay away from buying too much in bars during walking. Fill up your water bottle(s) from wells/fountains. They are marked "Potable" (drinkable) or "No potable" (Not drinkable). Water is good in Spain.

Buen Camino (and planning)!
I kind of have an aversion to staying in the albergue's beds. So that may also influence my decision.
But I did not know about some things I am really learning for you guys:
1. kitchens you can use in the albergue's. Excellent point!
2. the listing of the albergues on the main page shows some very reasonable prices. ( I thought 15 euros was the cheapest, but I see many 5's. That is a great price)
3. I could tent camp (2 lb tent) right next to *some* albergue's and use the restroom/kitchen and give them a donation of 8/10 euros. (best of both worlds)
4.I could get together with other pilgrims and share the cost of meals. Would be fun to try diff cooking styles. But then again, every now and then, the peregrino dinner is still not expensive. I've written down this: Menu del Dia.

Keep them coming friends, you are soothing my worrywort mind!

Thank you!
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Pretty much what Alex said.
I'd stay in albergues and eat food from the tiendas that you cook yourself.
There are a LOT of great options for picnic foods as well as cooking.
Along the route, also, you can buy JUST what you need - ONE egg or TWO slices of cheese, etc.
If you want the occasional Spanish meal, choose the Menu del Dia instead of Menu del Peregrino.
It is cheaper and more food and better, in my opinion. It is offered mid day.

Here are some blogs I did on the food:

Breakfast: http://caminosantiago2.blogspot.com/2011/08/eating-on-camino-santiago-coffee-and.html

Lunch and Dinner: http://caminosantiago2.blogspot.com/2011/08/lunch-on-camino-santiago.html

For breakfast, there are wonderful pastry options, you can buy eggs and boil them in the albergue, or just have bread, cheese, and jam.
For lunch, see the blog - lots of cheap options. Same for dinner.

As far as camping, I've camped quite a bit. If you're going in hot weather, consider a lightweight tarp or screen tent that you can set up with your poles.
But honestly, with the money it takes to buy that, you could just stay in Albergues where you can cook and save cash.

I'm not sure where you live (forgot to look) but I think the best place to fly in is Madrid. From there you can get an inexpensive bus to Pamplona or SJPP or you can just start walking. The Madrid route is wonderful and less traveled and meets up with the Frances about two weeks away.

Have fun planning and have a wonderful Camino!
Annie

I have copied all this to my file to research! Thank you!

Sidenote: The reason I said to go to supermarkets, is because I had the gastric bypass, so I really can't eat bread and heavy pastas. I do sometimes have a little pasta or rice, but we are talking 2 tablespoons cooked. Most of the time I eat: fruit, salad, veggies, canned beans and canned tuna or chicken. So, it doesn't need to be cooked. And I eat so little, a cup at most, that I find myself eating a little every 4 hours or so. So, carrying it with me makes sense.(an apple, stick of cheese, etc) It takes me 30 mins to eat about 8 ozs of food.
 

Pilgrim Rick

Looking for ...
Camino(s) past & future
October 2014 Camino Frances SJPP to Santiago
I kind of have an aversion to staying in the albergue's beds. So that may also influence my decision.
But I did not know about some things I am really learning for you guys:
1. kitchens you can use in the albergue's. Excellent point!
2. the listing of the albergues on the main page shows some very reasonable prices. ( I thought 15 euros was the cheapest, but I see many 5's. That is a great price)
3. I could tent camp (2 lb tent) right next to *some* albergue's and use the restroom/kitchen and give them a donation of 8/10 euros. (best of both worlds)
4.I could get together with other pilgrims and share the cost of meals. Would be fun to try diff cooking styles. But then again, every now and then, the peregrino dinner is still not expensive. I've written down this: Menu del Dia.

Keep them coming friends, you are soothing my worrywort mind!

Thank you!

It won't be possible to stay " outside" many of the Albergues in a tent as a lot of them are in towns or built up areas.
Why pay 8-10 € ? And stay outside.
It's not always safe too. Items do get stolen and the weather is not always brilliant...
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Did a price comparison yesterday and sent examples in pm and found skyscnner.com the cheapest from the location Writerrchantal is coming from...did same dates and found orbitz more expensive by $17.. difference being Orbitz offered free cancellation before 10th October this year .8 days time.
I've always used priceline and find the prices are around the same. But I didn't think about the cancellation policies. Did find 1242.00 on skycanner. Not bad at all.
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
It won't be possible to stay " outside" many of the Albergues in a tent as a lot of them are in towns or built up areas.
Why pay 8-10 € ? And stay outside.
It's not always safe too. Items do get stolen and the weather is not always brilliant...
That's why I put **'s around some. I know that it will not be all. And of course, it's a case by case base. And I also would take into account the larger the city, the safer it is inside.
It have stayed in hostels here in the U.S. , met some nice people, but the noises, the body sounds, smells, stickinest of the breathing... just becomes too much sometimes. That's when the tent ( again only 2 lbs total) becomes handy.
and like I said, not all the time, but cut costs by doing it some of the time.
 

mountaingoat999

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
we are due out Jan 2016
I've always used priceline and find the prices are around the same. But I didn't think about the cancellation policies. Did find 1242.00 on skycanner. Not bad at all.
another well know man from America who wrote a camino guide book not the for the francas told me about skyscanner a few years back, and a lot of USA pilgrims use it among others..the example I sent you including the bus to Pamplona and the cheap flight to Madrid from Santiago meets all your cost needs being economical
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 1/2 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
The albergues with smaller rooms etc may cost more, but if you're happy in a bunk bed in a room shared with 19 pilgrims, of whom at least three snore, it can get very cheap - 5-8 Euros is not unusual. After 25 km, I can sleep anywhere, but it IS nice to splurge on a 35 Euro double room occasionally...
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
If you're 'crafty' you might be able to pass those lazy afternoons making little souvenirs that other pilgrims could buy. You don't necessarily need to carry lots of equipment. You can do a lot with a ball of craft twine, for example; rope rosaries, Celtic knot bookmarks etc. Check all the 'how to' videos on YouTube. The good thing about material like twine is that you can probably find something that would suffice in any significant town along the way, so you don't need to carry everything from Day 1. Your work would be light and easy for you and your 'customers' to carry. It could also be a good way of meeting people who wanted to watch you at work. Don't be pushy about selling, though, and just accept any donations that come your way.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
WriterChantel

I am going to PM you & mountaingoat999
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
@WriterChantel

Since you are very new to this forum (and the Camino, I guess), I'll spend some more time trying to help you out of your worries...:)

1. kitchens you can use in the albergue's. Excellent point!

You can only use their facilities if you are staying there.

2. the listing of the albergues on the main page shows some very reasonable prices. ( I thought 15 euros was the cheapest, but I see many 5's. That is a great price)

Albergues are many, and very fairly priced (5-10 Euros). Here is my strong suggestion: Get yourself a cheap but good guide ASAP. Here is where to buy it:

http://www.csj.org.uk/product/camino-frances/

I use only their guides, having 6 years of walking on my CV. For the price of 7 English £s, similar to 8-10$s, it is a real bargain. It gives you albergues (with prices!), hostals, restaurants, distances, etc. etc. for the whole Way. Don't think about it: Just buy it. It is a wealth of valuable info for your planning. And very fun! But it only contains what you really need: no quasi-philosofing... And it weights almost nothing in your backpack, compared to many/most guides.

3. I could tent camp (2 lb tent) right next to *some* albergue's and use the restroom/kitchen and give them a donation of 8/10 euros. (best of both worlds)

No need to: Many/most albergues charge less for the full package. A 2 lb. tent is a LOT of weight on long walking days, not to mention stove/other camping items... Keep it simple. You will not believe what's being left behind in the albergues by pilgrims the first days of their walk...o_O

4.I could get together with other pilgrims and share the cost of meals. Would be fun to try diff cooking styles. But then again, every now and then, the peregrino dinner is still not expensive. I've written down this: Menu del Dia.

Now we're talking ;) I too take some Menu del dia, but it is sooo cost-effective to cook in the albergue kitchens ;) Especially when I find other friendly creatures to share costs with!

Do not worry: Use this forum for studies: you will find information overload in here :). Use the Search function before starting new threads ;)

All the best to your Camino planning!

PS: Here is a nice place for planning your walking stages: Study it carefully_

http://www.godesalco.com/plan/frances

I use it for my planning, then print it and laminate, then put it in my backpack together with my CSJ guide.
 
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WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Keep it coming! I'm saving all this and heeding advice! Thank you
 

aerdna

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ingles (2013), Norte/Primitivo (2014)
I have been reading and planning to walk the Camino for about 3 years now. I really want to do this! But I'm pretty much the working poor, it so hard to even afford a plan ticket much less take 4 months to walk the Camino. So, I'm trying to get my costs down as low as I can.

I would like to:
1. Buy food from grocery store as much as I can and prepare or eat cold
2. Camp as much as I can for free.

Can anyone give advice for the two things above? Where is good? When is good? How? Any negative things you've experience with these two things? Any safety advice?
I agree with grocery stores. I walked the Norte/Primitivo last Oct/Nov and had been warned of the lack of services, but found no problems if I planned ahead. I did occasionally eat the menu del dia or pilgrims menu, and cooked or ate cooked food in albergues even more rarely.

Fruiteria- sells fresh and sometimes dried fruit
Panaderia- bakery

I seriously bought 3 carrots for less than 25cents one evening. Bread could also be found for a very low price.

Canned tuna, bags of olives, cheese, Maria biscuits (round cookie crackers), chocolate, yogurts, packages salami/lunch meats. All added to the bread and fruit. And didn't necessarily need to be cooked.

I also bought instant coffee packs and chicken bouillon for those days I needed something warm in the morning or evening. Albergues didn't always have well equipped kitchens, but it helped to be able to boil water.

And supermarkets also have the prepared food section. Empanadas are neat or veggie pies -sort of- and you can buy them by the slice or as a whole one (1-3€). We would sometimes split one between a few pilgrims.

You can also cut some cost by not drinking alcohol or coffee, unless you get a pilgrim meal and it comes with it. There were days I spent more on coffees than food!

Picnics and communal meals are some of my favorite memories of my Camino.
 

vgen5122

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (August 19-sept 30,2013) (8/2017)
The best advise you can take is from the people in this forum. Listen to them. Especially the pilgrims who have walked the Camino many times. Expect the unexpected to happen along the way no matter what you plan.Things that make sense regarding cost cutting sometimes don't make sense in reality. It has been my experience that a 2 lb weight is very heavy over time. This is especially true when walking steep grades. As far as sleeping in albergues and hearing noises-go to Walmart and buy some ear plugs. They are very inexpensive. The Camino is a wonderful experience. I know what it's like to be very budget conscience. You might want to think about postponing your Camino for a short time so that you can come up with some more money to stay in albergues. The Camino is a long wonderful stretch. Your budget is important, but so is your safety. Have a great trip-Buen Camino
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
I agree with grocery stores. I walked the Norte/Primitivo last Oct/Nov and had been warned of the lack of services, but found no problems if I planned ahead. I did occasionally eat the menu del dia or pilgrims menu, and cooked or ate cooked food in albergues even more rarely.

Fruiteria- sells fresh and sometimes dried fruit
Panaderia- bakery

I seriously bought 3 carrots for less than 25cents one evening. Bread could also be found for a very low price.

Canned tuna, bags of olives, cheese, Maria biscuits (round cookie crackers), chocolate, yogurts, packages salami/lunch meats. All added to the bread and fruit. And didn't necessarily need to be cooked.

I also bought instant coffee packs and chicken bouillon for those days I needed something warm in the morning or evening. Albergues didn't always have well equipped kitchens, but it helped to be able to boil water.

And supermarkets also have the prepared food section. Empanadas are neat or veggie pies -sort of- and you can buy them by the slice or as a whole one (1-3€). We would sometimes split one between a few pilgrims.

You can also cut some cost by not drinking alcohol or coffee, unless you get a pilgrim meal and it comes with it. There were days I spent more on coffees than food!

Picnics and communal meals are some of my favorite memories of my Camino.
This is exactly the kind of thing I had hoped for. To me, a peach or apple, carrot and wedge of cheese sounds fresh and delicious simple meal. I will be splurging on coffee. That's just a fact of life. :)
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
This is exactly the kind of thing I had hoped for. To me, a peach or apple, carrot and wedge of cheese sounds fresh and delicious simple meal. I will be splurging on coffee. That's just a fact of life. :)
Unfortunatley this will not sustain you as you will be walking 7 or 8 hours a day. You will need proper meals.
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
I'm going to guess you didn't mean 4 months, but 4 weeks?
I didn't include all of my plans. I had planned to make it a longer trip, going to Ireland and France doing some genealogy work. But I've scuttled that. The Camino is enough. But No, not four weeks. I'm not in THAT good of shape:)

I am now thinking two months will be plenty of time plus time for me to be slower in the beginning and then take a day or two off to see museums or just rest.
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Unfortunatley this will not sustain you as you will be walking 7 or 8 hours a day. You will need proper meals.
Okay. Please let's try to think things through here a little bit. I did not say this would be the only thing I would eat. Please give me some credit for common sense! Carbs and protein are needed.
I am a gastric bypass person, so my meals are smaller and more. I will have to carry food with me to eat along the way. As I do now, I will eat 5 to 6 times a day about 8 oz of food plus supplements and protein powder mixed with my food.
I just didn't think that was needed to mention in my post. The point I was making is: by supplementing buying cooked meals with purchased items at a market and carry it with me whenever I get to a store.. Things that do not need to be cooked to eat and share cost with other pilgrims. This will cut the costs down.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Here is my low-budget tomato soup recipe:

-Find a nearly empty bottle of ketchup in the albergue's fridge.
-Top up with really hot water from the tap.
-Shake vigorously for 30 seconds.

Serve with bread & water.

Sunday/luxury version:

Put in a good handful of macaroni (there are "always" half-full bags of macaroni/spaghetti left in albergue kitchens) and a boiled egg (peeled) before shaking.

Add an extra slice of bread.

;)
 
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WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Here is my low-budget tomato soup recipe:

-Find a nearly empty bottle of ketchup in the albergue's fridge.
-Top up with really hot water from the tap.
-Shake vigorously for 30 seconds.

Serve with bread & water.

Sunday/luxury version:

Put in a good handful of macaroni and a boiled egg (peeled) before shaking.

Add an extra slice of bread.

;)

PS: Taken from a cook book for bachelors...:)
HAH! you are crazy
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
Unless you are a superfit hiker better to cycle if you carry a tent, and better to camp on the quieter Camino routes where there are less albergues anyway. You soon get used to albergue sleeping, the nights are very short and you are up and out again before you realise... I was dreading the communality as I live in a very rural area with total darkness and silence at night - but it turned out to be a real treat - I loved it, even the monumental snoring..!
I met a guy on a small budget at an albergue near Finisterra and he spent less than 10 euros a day - staying in donativo albergues and eating bread and beans from a jar... He also walked around in baggy white underpants but I don't recommend that!
The good thing about a budget is that you only have that much a day to spend - once it's gone - it's gone, so that kinda enforces you to stick to it!
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
Oh - and there are always leftover bits and bobs in albergue kitchens. It is good form to leave stuff that won't travel or is too heavy and then the next people in can use it up. Folk are really good at sharing too.
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Oh - and there are always leftover bits and bobs in albergue kitchens. It is good form to leave stuff that won't travel or is too heavy and then the next people in can use it up. Folk are really good at sharing too.
That would be kind of fun to leave something baked with a <3 drawn on it. Lol. I would like to leave heart shaped cookies behind for pilgrims. "that chantal person has been here" ;)
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Unless you are a superfit hiker better to cycle if you carry a tent, and better to camp on the quieter Camino routes where there are less albergues anyway. You soon get used to albergue sleeping, the nights are very short and you are up and out again before you realise... I was dreading the communality as I live in a very rural area with total darkness and silence at night - but it turned out to be a real treat - I loved it, even the monumental snoring..!
I met a guy on a small budget at an albergue near Finisterra and he spent less than 10 euros a day - staying in donativo albergues and eating bread and beans from a jar... He also walked around in baggy white underpants but I don't recommend that!
The good thing about a budget is that you only have that much a day to spend - once it's gone - it's gone, so that kinda enforces you to stick to it!
I really am getting the message that the tent is really not needed and may be more of a burden. Plus the fact that I have to use a cpap. It's really becoming obvious that tent sleeping is just not feasible. Like the @vgen5122 said , buy some earplugs!
 

mountaingoat999

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
we are due out Jan 2016
its the cpap that's the problem when tenting in this case for power source..also when you mentioned in a pm your daily likely distance of 10k to 15k this would not give you albergues with grassed areas where you can tent at such specific intervals....camping wild and using a tent with sleep apnoea is too risky...so your making a wise move in your situation to drop the tent..it would hinder more than help in your situation.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Another thing to consider is that the Camino goes through fields owned by farmers, and you will need permission in order to put up your tent. Several posts on this forum have discussed that fact in the past.

My sincere advice is to stay in inexpensive albergues, for reasons I and others have stated. Safety is one of them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago May 21 to June 3, 2014
Ponferrada to Santiago September 2015
Hello Chantal. I am not sure which Camino you plan to walk but I guess you mean the Frances ?
I have no experience with camping, but I know there have been some threads on camping before, so you may want to search them for any tips. Be aware though that you can stay in most albergues for app 6 euro per night, so I do not know if budget reasons outweigh the burden of carrying a tent here.
As for food. On the Frances, many albergues have a kitchen (including pots and pans) where you can prepare your own meal. In your case, it would be good to check beforehand which albergues have kitchen facilities, and which ones have not. In most villages there are grocery stores where you can buy the essentials. I am not really sure which other advice I can give on this, but let me know if you have any further specific questions.
As for budgets in general. To give you an idea, my daily budget is usually 30 euro per day. This includes staying in the albergue, usually eating out for a pilgrim's meal (app 10 euro), and I have breakfast and lunch usually in bars, and several beers and coffees per day in bars. I guess you can easily manage on 15 - 20 euro per day by staying in albergues & buying all your food in stores, and restricting yourself on coffees and other drinks in bars.
Hope this is helpfull. Marc.
Chantal,
You can buy and cook food as you go. Just one caution some towns have no stores open on Sunday. We found ourselves unable to buy groceries in Palais de Rei on a Sunday. Diane
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Just learned that octopus offers 30 grams of proetein per 100grams of cooked meat. Same for calamari. May have to start cooking calamari on the Camino as it's inexpensive and available in the larger grocery stores.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Just learned that octopus offers 30 grams of proetein per 100grams of cooked meat. Same for calamari. May have to start cooking calamari on the Camino as it's inexpensive and available in the larger grocery stores.
Darn tasty ever wonder how many calories it takes to chew octopus?
 

rita n/

Member
Camino(s) past & future
na
i'm not trying in anyway to be negative, but it seems like the best option you'd have to save some money would be to reduce the amount of time you were gone from work either by training before you set out so you could walk further per day. (i know what it's like to be in poor shape and want to walk the camino. two years i decided i wanted to, but i have leukemia, and so i've now spent 2 years working toward it. i'm finally healthy enough, and able to walk 5k in about an hour.) or walking a shorter camino.

trying to stay in a tent and cook for yourself and all while carrying a cpap machine, seems a bit much for most people, let alone someone who figures they can only walk about 10k a day. i'd work toward walking every day and increasing the length of walk so that you could reasonably work toward walking more each day, so you could take fewer days off work. and need to feed yourself less, as well as needing to pay for where you stay for fewer days.
 
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good_old_shoes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('15)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
Hello WriterChantal,


Others already gave so much good advice, like stay in albergues (always look for the „municipal“/ „parroquial“ ones, those are cheapest), cook, if possible together with others. If there's no kitchen, you can still eat canned stuff, cheese, olives ect. No problem once in a while. Carry a spoon and a small pocket knife for those days.


Another few things that might also be helpful to think about:

1) Stay flexible, creative and tolerant. The less money you've got, the more you need to be able to adjust to the circumstances and/or take things as they are. Remember the Camino saying „the tourist demands, the pilgrim thanks“? So true.

2) Equipment: Take what you've already got or buy second hand, no need for expensive new things, but test at home what works and what doesn't. Keep in mind if you can't buy the equipment that fits best to you, you have to adjust to what you have (more rest breaks, slower walking pace, extra shirt if yours dont dry quickly enough, ect. ect...).

3) If you are going to walk in summer, you could ask in the albergues if you're allowed to sleep in the garden (if there is one) when the weather is fine; a warm sleeping bag and sleeping mat is required then, of course. That way you'd have bath, kitchen&company of other pilgrims, but still fresh air (and the night sky and stars) at least a few times, which maybe is a compromise if you generally don't sleep well in closed rooms.

4) If you can only eat small amounts of food, make sure you still get enough calories (and salt, especially when you sweat) throughout the day without having to buy in bars and cafés. Carry olives, cooked eggs, salted nuts and raisins, chocolate... also bananas and oranges! (both healthy, not expensive, and very, very tasty in Spain)

5) Find out what food is cheap locally, don't just buy what you're used to eat at home.

6) Maybe bring a tiny, light weight cooking pot. Albergues in Galicia have kitchens, but no pots (other pilgrims will be so happy if you share the pot with them in those places).

7) Make sure you have enough money for a worst case scenario, so you can get home at any time and whatever happens.


I hope your dream will come true. Anyway, in your mind and heart your journey probably already started. Good luck and buen Camino :)
 

Pilgrim Rick

Looking for ...
Camino(s) past & future
October 2014 Camino Frances SJPP to Santiago
That's why I put **'s around some. I know that it will not be all. And of course, it's a case by case base. And I also would take into account the larger the city, the safer it is inside.
It have stayed in hostels here in the U.S. , met some nice people, but the noises, the body sounds, smells, stickinest of the breathing... just becomes too much sometimes. That's when the tent ( again only 2 lbs total) becomes handy.
and like I said, not all the time, but cut costs by doing it some of the time.
Very often there will only be a few people staying. Sometimes you can have a place almost to yourself. I personally would not go down the tent route. It won't save you money in the long run as your knees feet and an uncomfortable nights sleep will reap any financial benefits
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Very often there will only be a few people staying. Sometimes you can have a place almost to yourself. I personally would not go down the tent route. It won't save you money in the long run as your knees feet and an uncomfortable nights sleep will reap any financial benefits
Through this thread, I've pretty much decided against the tent route.
 

mountaingoat999

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
we are due out Jan 2016
Through this thread, I've pretty much decided against the tent route.
Good move in this instance
I, and many do tent on the camino.....in this instance for you Chantal with your circumstances going without a tent will enhance your camino.
and with decent earplugs and some good positioning next to a window in albergues your mange well to lessen the issues you mention.

people are very helpful offering the bottom bunk etc.
you can always mention you need to be by window and prefer fresh air so need a window open and so on

and it can be the same price if three or four people share a private room in albergue.

I will continue with the three way pm we are having and provide you with the more spacious albergues location in due course along the route....
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)
I've only walked in Galicia (English & Portuguese), where I found that most places you stop for a drink will also include a small 'tapa' to eat along side. Is it the same on the rest of the French Route? Or perhaps not?

Just this year on my first day walking, I forgot about the free tapas and asked for a piece of cake to go with my coffee at a morning stop. After the waitress brought me a huge piece, I noticed that smaller pieces were being given for free with the coffee ... the smaller piece would have totally been enough for me, so I remembered to first see what came with the drink, then order if I wanted something else or more.

One afternoon last year the bar next to our hotel served this cold tuna pasta salad that was enough to be my dinner (one of my walking companion didn't want his, so the double serving was plenty) alongside a nice cold bottle of Estrella Galicia (beer). On the Portuguese this year I was served a small ham sandwich (on really delicious bread) that was perfect to keep going for another few km. And even if there isn't a complimentary tapa given, many places you stop will have small plates of tapas (a bit larger than the free tapa) or "raciones" (larger portions, but still smaller than a full meal) at reasonable prices. Since you've had GB, OP, this may help to stretch your budget a bit further.

I fear that a Menu del Dia may be a bit of a waste for you since you aren't able to eat that kind of volume, but will need instead to focus on smaller meals throughout the day. That 10 euro may be better spent buying your own food from the grocery, or picking up a tapa here and there in bars. A piece of Tortilla Espanola normally costs 1 euro, and may be a good bit of nutrition for you, since it's potatoes and eggs.

I love how you are open to figuring out what works! Doing so much research ahead of time will pay off when you get to the camino. Buen Camino!!
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Hey there, @good_old_shoes
I just love this: "the tourist demands, the pilgrim thanks" I had never heard that, but now its a mantra! :)

Some wonderful people have offered loans of their stuff or to help me get the right kit. I'm getting excellent advice. :) I'm also using my current back pack with some day items and measuring how fast and long I walk to get a better grasp on how long it takes. Since it's so far away (July/August 2016) This will be good practice. Plus, less oxygen up in Colorado will give me a plus in Spain ( only for a week or so ) hah!

"sleep in the garden (if there is one) when the weather is fine" I will do that and yes, it will be summer. I have a CPAP, but maybe I could run a ext cord. I dunno, I'm still working on that situation. Some solar power devices I can carry with me and are fairly cheap. I'm still researching that. Because the fact is, I do like to camp. and unlike now (where I can run of my trucks battery) I'm going to have to find a solution. I'm not letting it keep me from camping (even if I don't do it on this camino)

"Carry olives, cooked eggs, salted nuts and raisins, chocolate... also bananas and oranges! " Yum, yum and more yum! I had imagined carrying little bit of cheese, nuts and fruit. There is a maple almond paste that a company (Justin's) makes here in Colorado that is individual packets. I love sticking a few of those in my pockets for protein plus carbs to keep going. Plus, I notice that if I walk right after I eat it makes digestion better. So I think this is a Win-Win!

"Find out what food is cheap locally" Good idea! I have been reading others adventures on here and everyone puts things they have eaten as well. It would the spirit of the whole thing to try new things and local cuisine. I can't just eat from grocery stores all the time.

"light weight cooking pot" I can look into this. I have also been learning how to use a can and make it into a tiny grill, then after done, throw it away. (Pintrest) I might get adventurous in my back yard with that and see how it works.

"enough money for a worst case scenario" Amen. I have thought that I should tally what I think and then double it. I also thought I should leave some money with my sister just in case to buy a ticket or something. Will think more on this, thank you!

"in your mind and heart your journey probably already started" Ever since I saw the movie "the Way" and read Jack Hitt's "Along the Way". I want to go. To be a part of something ancient. To meet people from all over the world. To test my limits. But mostly, I feel compelled by something I can't put my finger on.

buen camino, fellow peregrino :)
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
"Just this year on my first day walking, I forgot about the free tapas and asked for a piece of cake to go with my coffee at a morning stop. After the waitress brought me a huge piece, I noticed that smaller pieces were being given for free with the coffee ... the smaller piece would have totally been enough for me, so I remembered to first see what came with the drink, then order if I wanted something else or more."

---Oooo. Good to know! I will keep that in my back pocket as well. It can't be all grocery stores, I can splurge and get tapas :) Just using the stores will cut back on the costs, that's what I'm thinking about. When all is said and done, I think I will post a record of how much I spent and what I ate. put it on my blog or pintrest. ( hopeless social media geek)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)
"I think I will post a record of how much I spent and what I ate. put it on my blog or pintrest."

That would be very interesting!! Please post a link when it gets closer!
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
@mountaingoat999

"people are very helpful offering the bottom bunk etc.
you can always mention you need to be by window and prefer fresh air so need a window open and so on"

You know the thing I was thinking about is, I'm going to have a mask on my nose anyway, and the cpap has a filter. The other hostel I stayed in San Francisco was hot and sticky (but that was because it was winter and the windows were locked shut) But I bet will be different in the summer in Spain. Plus, it's easy to take the little sponge that is my air filter and put lemon drops on it. ( I always carry lemon essence when I travel, helps me sleep)
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
But mostly, I feel compelled by something I can't put my finger on.
It is called "The calling of the Camino". It is for real.

Many of us in here never get rid of it. I will be starting April 2 from Pamplona (most likely).
 

wawpdx

Active Member
If you do decide to have a go at the "ask to sleep in the garden" idea, I would suggest that you do not borrow and do not bring a sleeping pad. You will need one if you sleep out but I have heard many times that this is the item most often relegated to the the donation box. I know that I only carried my sleeping pad for the first four days and then donated it to an albergue -- where it had plenty of company. If you keep asking for a few days and one does not come your way, you can always buy one in the next big city if you still like this plan once you have your feet on the ground in Spain. On the other hand, if you borrow one before you leave, you are pretty much stuck with carrying it, whether you still want it or not.
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
If you do decide to have a go at the "ask to sleep in the garden" idea, I would suggest that you do not borrow and do not bring a sleeping pad. You will need one if you sleep out but I have heard many times that this is the item most often relegated to the the donation box. I know that I only carried my sleeping pad for the first four days and then donated it to an albergue -- where it had plenty of company. If you keep asking for a few days and one does not come your way, you can always buy one in the next big city if you still like this plan once you have your feet on the ground in Spain. On the other hand, if you borrow one before you leave, you are pretty much stuck with carrying it, whether you still want it or not.
I really think I'm going to work on my kit and start doing some walking in weekends. Test things out.
 

rita n/

Member
Camino(s) past & future
na
I really think I'm going to work on my kit and start doing some walking in weekends. Test things out.
I found that I was much more capable of walking than I expected. I've built up from a couple km with breaks to 5 km at a time without a problem. I bet you are stronger than you think. (Makes me think of a Winnie the Pooh movie " braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, smarter than you think ").
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
@mylifeonvacation , the free tapa thing is mostly found in Leon and surrounding area. I think I was only served the freebe twice si I would not count on it. But yes to tapas: thry are a great way to sample local dishes, and since you can point at them while they sit on the countertop you know, more or less, what you are ordering. Again, not available everywhere but certainly in cities (Pamplona, Logrono, Burgos, Leon have great ones, also smaller towns like Najera, Viana and Los arcos have a number of restaurants that serve good ones.)
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Hi, and welcome to the Forum, writerChantal...just stumbling on this thread now, so there is very little to add to the very good practical advice that others have offered already.
Except to say that a lot of the Camino is as much about the heart and mind as it is about the body--and the preparation of those happens long before you leave. What others have said, like:
1) Stay flexible, creative and tolerant. The less money you've got, the more you need to be able to adjust to the circumstances and/or take things as they are. Remember the Camino saying „the tourist demands, the pilgrim thanks“? So true.
sums it up very well. You have physical limits (the GB, the sleep apnea), that you'll obviously need to respect and to be working around...and the rest is a learning process. Always when I've been 'doing my Camino homework' I end up surprised at how my tolerance levels and equanimity can grow.

For me, that's a huge part of what the Camino is about: moving through all possible preferences and hang-ups about conditions to that sweet place of contentment--where life can just be what it is without any unnecessary fighting back on my part. It's a lesson that's easy to forget, but the more I find that place the more I can naturally go there. It's great--and one of the reasons to be addicted to this 'pilgrimage thing'!
So...Buen Camino!
(And...yes...tapas--and culinary ingenuity--go a long way to making that journey fun!;))
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
I wish, was never served one.
Really?.
We got a tapa every time we stopped and had a drink of any kind....coffee, water, Aquarius, Coke...everything
It was almost laughable at times. I was with my grandsons and they would get a kick out getting a piece of bread with a sardine on it with their soda.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Really?.
We got a tapa every time we stopped and had a drink of any kind....coffee, water, Aquarius, Coke...everything
It was almost laughable at times. I was with my grandsons and they would get a kick out getting a piece of bread with a sardine on it with their soda.
I will never forget the first time I was given one. Hospital de Obrigo, in the morning. My feet were killing me and I walked into a bar. Ordered a cafe con leche and proceeded to removed walking boots to replace them with Croc sandals which were at the bottom of my backpack. Coffee appeared witha peice of toast and scrambled eggs. I thought the lady was feeling sorry for me. To thank her for her kind gesture I ordered a second cafe con leche. It also appreared with a peice of toast, with jam this time. I did not order a thrid cafe con leche or I would still be there :D. But last fall and this spring not once on the Norte and Primitivo. I have been told by a fellow pilgrim, from Spain, that it's a Leonese tradition.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
Strange how we have different experiences in the same places.

I have also received tapas along the CF, the Portuguese and even a type of tapa in France on the LePuy. I usually don't eat them as they are not too appetizing to me.
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
and in many places in Greece and Portugal too...
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
In Carrión de Los Condes, I was given a tapa along with the Coke I ordered. Perhaps the barkeep felt sorry for me as I had hobbled into the bar obviously in great distress because of tendinitis. If such caritas didn't do much to improve my body that day, it certainly did a lot to restore my flagging spirits. :)
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
I ordered a can of coca cola at the bar across the street from the church in Mansilla de las Mulas and surprisingly I got tapas, it was a slice of bread with a chunk of tortilla.
 

Pilgrim Rick

Looking for ...
Camino(s) past & future
October 2014 Camino Frances SJPP to Santiago
I ordered a can of coca cola at the bar across the street from the church in Mansilla de las Mulas and surprisingly I got tapas, it was a slice of bread with a chunk of tortilla.
Many bars in Spain will often give you a few tapas with your drink it's quite traditional. I'm not quite sure why they do it but I think that there may be a slight obligation to buy a second drink or tempt your tastebuds sufficiently to perhaps order something more substantial either way it's a lovely and welcome unique gesture for all Peregrinos to enjoy...make mine a "Canya" ( not sure about the spelling ...a small beer !! :))
 

mountaingoat999

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
we are due out Jan 2016
Tapas, Some argue they were an invention of Spanish King Alfonso X ‘The Wise’, who took small portions of food with a glass of wine between meals. The more widely accepted theory is that tapas originated as a snack for field workers during the long hours between breakfast and lunchtime. Wine was also served in a ceramic jug covered with a piece of bread and some Serranoham or cheese to prevent flies diving straight into the wine (tapa literally means cover or lid).

Tapas are meant to be a light appetiser between meals to help gulp down some wine or beer. No wonder the most popular times to go de tapeo for Spaniards is midday or during the evening before dinner time. This may surprise the thousands of tourists who have been sold a different concept back in their home countries, but there are many differences between these tapas restaurants and the real Spanish experience.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
On all of my Caminos (see left under the avatar) in most bars I have stopped in I got some sort of tapa with my cerveza(s). It varied very much - olives, potato chips, tortilla, slice of bread with cheese/choriso/salchicon, peanuts etc., salty cakes/pies, scrambled eggs, small portion of lentil soup or beef stew, pulpo... It was half of the food I need for a day, but surely you can't count on that for sure to happen everywhere.

I think this tapas thing has to do mainly with their habbit to eat something all the time when socializing, tons of peanuts, different dried seeds/fruits (you can see many vans with signs for frutos secos), bocadillos etc. I find it nice :)

EDIT: mountaingoat999 explained it all ;)
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
Other stories on the origin of the tapa was the king seeing people get drunk in the bars and having ordered that food be brought when alcohol is served to slow down intoxication.
 

WriterChantal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to Walk the Camino in July/Aug of 2016
Okay. I just did 1 km with just 10 lbs of weight (could only find two hand weights) in 14mins 34 secs. Rough estimates for right now would be 4km's an hour, 20 km for five hours of walking. Today's date is 10/07/15. Next goal is to get it up to 20 lbs but keep my time. I will give myself through the end of the year for this goal.
plus note, my jeans kept sliding down as walking. :) 45 lbs lost since July :)
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
Okay. I just did 1 km with just 10 lbs of weight (could only find two hand weights) in 14mins 34 secs. Rough estimates for right now would be 4km's an hour, 20 km for five hours of walking. Today's date is 10/07/15. Next goal is to get it up to 20 lbs but keep my time. I will give myself through the end of the year for this goal.
plus note, my jeans kept sliding down as walking. :) 45 lbs lost since July :)
Good for you for the weight loss and your willingness to train. But please, don't sweat the speed and distances. Truth is nothing you can do at home will compare to what you will do on the Camino. In Spain you will walk in uneven tractor tracks that will slow you down, in slippery rock and will have to jump over or contour mud puddles. You will also be walking day after day after day. Just get used to walking with your bag and shoes to make sure they fit well, and perhaps build up arm strength so that you can use your poles properly therefore putting less stress on the legs. Really, never mind the time. It is not a race, in particular since you said you'll be doing short distances on the Frances which will allow you to find a bed. Just enjoy the scenary and every foot step. FYI, my average is 3km an hour, including my brief coffee breaks.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I would suggest that basic walking should be your focus - getting comfortable with an hour or 2 or 3 of steady pace. Perhaps use a small pack with water and a jacket, to get used to it. Weight training could come layer (perhaps) but walking is more important and it's easy to build into your daily life.

(While I was writing this, I see that @Anemone del Camino posted some similar advice.)
 

mountaingoat999

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
we are due out Jan 2016
Okay. I just did 1 km with just 10 lbs of weight (could only find two hand weights) in 14mins 34 secs. Rough estimates for right now would be 4km's an hour, 20 km for five hours of walking. Today's date is 10/07/15. Next goal is to get it up to 20 lbs but keep my time. I will give myself through the end of the year for this goal.
plus note, my jeans kept sliding down as walking. :) 45 lbs lost since July :)
Good to hear Chantal your taking positive action......easy does it . slowly but surely.. water is a good weight to carry later on for practice that way if you find it too much your can jettison some water.

the idea as I mention privately is to work towards a routine so by the time you arrive on camino its a continuation of what you are already doing...once your feet are conditioned you a good way there.. you will also discover what style suits you best ....

if your bored walking on your own borrow a dog or find friends who like walking...join a club..begin your own pre camino walking meetups

you have time to build regular routine increasing very slowly.. your have lots of varied gradients in you state and not that far from Colorado springs. you have lovely mountains in the distance. to drive out too later and do some easy walks......combinations of tarmac.....compacted dirt tracks will be good to practice on....

Enjoy
 

Pezley

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hope to do my first walk next year
Okay. Please let's try to think things through here a little bit. I did not say this would be the only thing I would eat. Please give me some credit for common sense! Carbs and protein are needed.
I am a gastric bypass person, so my meals are smaller and more. I will have to carry food with me to eat along the way. As I do now, I will eat 5 to 6 times a day about 8 oz of food plus supplements and protein powder mixed with my food.
I just didn't think that was needed to mention in my post. The point I was making is: by supplementing buying cooked meals with purchased items at a market and carry it with me whenever I get to a store.. Things that do not need to be cooked to eat and share cost with other pilgrims. This will cut the costs down.
I am hoping to walk my first Camino by 2017, and am also worried about finances.. i am learning by reading your thread.. i cannot offer you any practical advice about loding, but i can regarding your need for portable food.. try carrying a quantity of jerky..beef, turkey, whatever suits your fancy.. i do not know if it is a common food item over there, so you may have to bring it from home.. jerky packs quite a protein punch and is, of course, light and easy to pack... easy to munch on multiple times a day as you need it. Also consider dehydrated fruits, nuts, and other nutrient rich goodies.. hope this helps.
 
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Anemone del Camino

Guest
I am hoping to walk my first Camino by 2017, and am also worried about finances.. i am learning by reading your thread.. i cannot offer you any practical advice about loding, but i can regarding your need for portable food.. try carrying a quantity of jerky..beef, turkey, whatever suits your fancy.. i do not know if it is a common food item over there, so you may have to bring it from home.. jerky packs quite a protein punch and is, of course, light and easy to pack... easy to munch on multiple times a day as you need it. Also consider dehydrated fruits, nuts, and other nutrient rich goodies.. hope this helps.
Noone makes cured meats better than the spaniards, so my recommendation is to pass on breaking the law by importing meet into Spain from the US and enjoy the high quality, locally made specialties.
 
Camino(s) past & future
June 2015
I have been thinking about what Tyrrek suggested back on Oct. 2, about making crafts and selling them to raise money. Here is a photo of a hand tied rosary someone gave me at the Pilgrim's Mass in Santiago. You could learn to tie these and sell them before you embark on your Camino and while you are on your Camino.

Buen Camino
 

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Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
I am hoping to walk my first Camino by 2017, and am also worried about finances.. i am learning by reading your thread.. i cannot offer you any practical advice about loding, but i can regarding your need for portable food.. try carrying a quantity of jerky..beef, turkey, whatever suits your fancy.. i do not know if it is a common food item over there, so you may have to bring it from home.. jerky packs quite a protein punch and is, of course, light and easy to pack... easy to munch on multiple times a day as you need it. Also consider dehydrated fruits, nuts, and other nutrient rich goodies.. hope this helps.
Carrying a bunch of food from home was a big mistake and is the reason why my initial pack weight was so heavy, it was an easy 3-4kg, I ditched an unopened jar of Skippy Natural on the picnic table at Orisson, packed several packs of beef jerky, and a couple bags of pistachios. Took over a week to finish up all that food and my knees paid for it.
I wouldn't do that again! Once I learned my lesson I packed a tin of sardines for emergency rations, that was it.
Spain has the most inexpensive food and drink compared to the rest of the EU, for €1 each, you can buy a pack of sliced meat such as chorizo, salchichon, jamon york, and jamon serrano, a pack of sliced manchego cheese, and a baguette, enough to feed two people for €3. All the dehydrated fruits, fresh fruit, and nuts are all readily available and cheaper than what I would pay in the US.
Leave all the food stuff from home at home, shopping at the supermercado and cooking when available will bring your daily expenses down.
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
A lovely idea for someone to make. I bought a shell necklace from someone on the beach at Finisterra, a lovely reminder every time I wear it...
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
I have been thinking about what Tyrrek suggested back on Oct. 2, about making crafts and selling them to raise money. Here is a photo of a hand tied rosary someone gave me at the Pilgrim's Mass in Santiago. You could learn to tie these and sell them before you embark on your Camino and while you are on your Camino.
New
A lovely idea for someone to make. I bought a shell necklace from someone on the beach at Finisterra, a lovely reminder every time I wear it...

oh dear - it's taken me 7 years to learn how to 'quote' .... and still not perfectly!



Buen Camino
 

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