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Choosing between the via gebennensis or via francigena??

2020 Camino Guides

Livo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues Camino
Le Puy
Frances
Hi thank you for the add to this group.
I have walked the Camino Portugues (combination of coastal and interior routes) in June 2017.
I am now looking into my next walk. At the moment I am trying to decide which between the Via Francigena or the Via Gebennensis. We were initially looking at the Via Francigena however we are now not able to start any until late May/June so we are thinking that the Francigena will be too hot at that time of year, hence looking at Via Gebennensis. Would love to hear any options or recommendations on either route in regards to accomodation and facilities. The more I read the more confused I seem to be getting and I do believe personal recommendations are always the best.
Thank you in anticipation of any assistance. Regards, Annie
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
... late May/June ...Via Gebennensis.
Since I haven't walked in Italy, I can't speak to conditions on the Francigena. Switzerland in late May/early June is lovely and that's a perfect time. I departed Geneva in the middle of July, had stinking hot weather, and lots of competition from tourists for the available lodging.
 

Livo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues Camino
Le Puy
Frances
Thank you we don't plan on walking more than 15/20 kms per day as we really want to enjoy our time there. Did you find sufficient accomodation and cafes etc along the way. My basic understanding is that it is very different to the Spanish Caminos.....
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I'm quite unsure on how far you intend to walk and in which direction ... and I'm always mystified by "caminos" without a definite pilgrim goal in sight -- which might be whichever Sanctuary of course, even one very local, but I've personally always found walking for walking' sake to be somewhat ungratifying.

But then of course I know exactly nothing of your own motivations nor purposes, so autant pour moi.

But I must say that the oldest and most traditional pilgrim Way in that area of the world is roughly the pathway down to Rome pretty much directly North-South from the broad Pass through the Tirol in Austria then onward South.

Though the better variant of it seems to be from Vaduz in Liechtenstein down to Milan, then Piacenza Parma, Modena Bologna, Florence Siena, then that delightful last stretch through old Etruscan Tuscany and the deeply civilised Lazio to Rome.

You say that your purpose is to enjoy your time there ?

In that respect at least, as long as you keep a watch on your possessions like a hawk against thieves, and can manage to suffer some short periods of inconvenience from the presence of Industry in the Pô valley, the Ways in Italy are basically unbeatable in terms of simple pleasures.

Especially once you reach the astoundingly, breath-takingly beautiful Tuscany.
 

Stroller

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2015), Frances (2016)
It could depend where you start from. The Francigena can and for many does start in Canterbury, crosses France and Switzerland then on from Aosta to Rome. If you start in Canterbury at the time proposed you could be crossing the St Bernard pass late August early September, definitely don't try and cross much later. By the time you get to lower southern elevations in Italy, particularly taking your time, the worst of the heat and mosquitos will have passed. So where you start as well as when are both important.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (2017), plus more than 2000 Km/year of trekking, hiking and minor caminos since 2000.
May/June is a very good time for the Italian tract of Via Francigena.
Stable, warm but no hot weather, albergues not yet crowded, because it's still low season / school time.
Along with September it'is my favorite period of the year to walk on it
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
I walked the VF during that time of the year (from London to Rome in early April - mid July). Yes, it is getting hotter as one heads towards Rome, but I have found Italy a drier heat than the more humid French heat. I crossed the Gran San Bernard Pass two days before it was opened - perfect timing as I was able to safely walk on the road with no traffic. I have no experience with snow, and the only way on the path at the end of winter snow is using snow shoes - or it was the year I walked it.

Another option could be the Cammino di Assisi. Starting in Davadola, the way is often through parks and in forests. Pilgrim accommodation is adequate, and the way visits the Hermitage that are important in the life of Saint Frances - a really beautiful way, and a road less travelled. You have a few stopping places. Many end their journey in la Verna, others in Assisi, and others in Rome - all appropriate conclusions to a very special journey.

And on a different tangent altogether - what about the via Romea Germanica (Stade, near Hamburg to Rome)? Haven't walked it yet, but set off in 2 weeks time.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Did you find sufficient accomodation and cafes etc along the way.
There are sufficient accommodations; this area is popular with non-hiking tourists too. Current accommodation listings are available in the guide http://chemins.amis-st-jacques.org/?page_id=6 This is France, so cafes for meals mid-day are not the norm. A picnic lunch and demi-pension dinner is the usual practice.
My basic understanding is that it is very different to the Spanish Caminos.....
Well yes. France is different from Spain. Hospitality infrastructure is a constellation of local businesses driven by a revenue stream that is entirely dependent on the number of customers. On the Camino Frances, 4000 a day. On the Le Puy route, 40. On the Geneva route, 4.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
The Geneva route is stunning and well served with communal gites interspersed with family based pilgrim lodgings accueil St Jacques, which make this route unique. I have walked it twice and would do it again in a flash. It is nice and quiet, no cities to negotiate and the countryside is varied and beautiful. Hardly any roadwalking.
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
AJGuillaume Geneva to LePuy 1
OLDER threads on this topic
Between Valencogne and Le Pin

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