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Chuletitas de Cordero

Martin 888

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2019, Camino Frances 2020, Camino del Norte 2021
I've been wanting to find a way to re-create Chuletitas de Cordero, the ubiquitous and delicious lamb chop dish found across Northern Spain. My absolute favourite food along the Camino. I think I've finally cracked it so I thought I would share a few details here to hopefully inspire others to try.
The key is finding the raw material. Most western supermarkets and butchers just don't seem to sell the thin rib chops that feature in this dish so I have tried various things to figure out the right cut. You need to buy a large rack of lamb, as it comes from the animal and certainly not 'frenched'. Ask them to sell you one 'un-butchered' and do it yourself. With a sharp knife, cut along the line of the ribs but instead of just turning your rack into simple rib chops.....cut much thinner and create two slices for each rib, one will contain a rib bone and a second will not.
As always in Spain their dishes tend to be meat focused with very little vegetable and these fabulous chops are most often pared with a few home made fries and roasted peppers.....I repeated that here.
Fries are easy....I used russet potatoes and sunflower oil.
Together with red and orange bell peppers, I added a couple of jalapeño chillis and a couple of hot red chillis. Roasted at 410F (convection) for about 20 mins in olive oil with several cloves of garlic and a sprinkling of Herbs de Provence.
I seasoned my chops with fresh ground black pepper and Maldon sea salt and brushed them with oil. Turning several times I cooked them on a rack over a baking sheet in the oven with the peppers....turn your extractor fan on full as it creates lots of smoke as the fat renders (all worth it).
That's about it.....I can promise you it is the most authentic reproduction of the food we're all longing for along the Way in a post covid world (vegetarians excepted of course).
Enjoy! 6C52B8DB-0113-4A49-A904-D96D7189C0F7_1_201_a.jpeg 89862584-1D9F-4AE2-9C6A-846E19118BDD_1_201_a.jpeg 610A1993-3B55-4A3C-9CDB-6569839B8D6E_1_201_a.jpeg 5FD0869A-84F0-49E1-9C4C-B0E5AAF59F2B_1_201_a.jpeg D0490F13-BDBA-4902-B1F2-1862B8B3D277_1_201_a.jpeg 385B225C-7ED2-4AE8-A588-8DEFCC3B0CBE_1_201_a.jpeg
 
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Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Year of past OR future Camino
Many, various, and continuing.
just a minor point or two: Here in Palencia, the heart of lamb country, those tiny ribs are "chuletillas," not "chuletitas." The finest of those come from "lechazos," tiny suckling lambs less than six weeks old! I find the "lamb" sold across the water is from much more mature animals, with the "chuletillas" a bit more like "chuletas..." but that's what's available, and that's what makes a plate of real Castilian chuletillas de lechazo such a wonderful treat. Here in Palencia the finest of the fine is a lechazo from a "Parra" sheep, a black-faced breed you only see around here. The Meson de Pablo in Villacazar de Sirga is famous all over Spain for just that... and they make their own superb chorizo and morcilla, too. (it's a landmark on the Frances, zillions of pilgrims pose for photos with the bronze statue seated at a table out front.)
 
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Arn

Veteran Member
I've been wanting to find a way to re-create Chuletitas de Cordero, the ubiquitous and delicious lamb chop dish found across Northern Spain. My absolute favourite food along the Camino. I think I've finally cracked it so I thought I would share a few details here to hopefully inspire others to try.
The key is finding the raw material. Most western supermarkets and butchers just don't seem to sell the thin rib chops that feature in this dish so I have tried various things to figure out the right cut. You need to buy a large rack of lamb, as it comes from the animal and certainly not 'frenched'. Ask them to sell you one 'un-butchered' and do it yourself. With a sharp knife, cut along the line of the ribs but instead of just turning your rack into simple rib chops.....cut much thinner and create two slices for each rib, one will contain a rib bone and a second will not.
As always in Spain their dishes tend to be meat focused with very little vegetable and these fabulous chops are most often pared with a few home made fries and roasted peppers.....I repeated that here.
Fries are easy....I used russet potatoes and sunflower oil.
Together with red and orange bell peppers, I added a couple of jalapeño chillis and a couple of hot red chillis. Roasted at 410F (convection) for about 20 mins in olive oil with several cloves of garlic and a sprinkling of Herbs de Provence.
I seasoned my chops with fresh ground black pepper and Maldon sea salt and brushed them with oil. Turning several times I cooked them on a rack over a baking sheet in the oven with the peppers....turn your extractor fan on full as it creates lots of smoke as the fat renders (all worth it).
That's about it.....I can promise you it is the most authentic reproduction of the food we're all longing for along the Way in a post covid world (vegetarians excepted of course).
Enjoy! View attachment 93578 View attachment 93579 View attachment 93580 View attachment 93581 View attachment 93582 View attachment 93583
Lamb is my speciality dish, bar none. While stationed in Hawaii, I was introduced to Huli Huli chicken. What made the half a bird memorable is the marinade. My boer Maisie, being South African, suggested trying it on lamb.
I experimented over several weeks and finally settled on a liquid base of: Soy Sauce, Sesame Seed Oil, Worcester and a combination of spices I shall not divulge.
Over the years, due to requests for the ingredients, I have instead given packets to friends and family on special occasions.
My dad, who served in Europe during WWII, refused to eat mutton because that was the staple of the mess. He loved my lamb.
To be honest, I had a difficult time finding lamb chops on Camino. Possibly, I didn't try hard enough.
Buen “Chops please!” Camino
Arn
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Ourense to Santiago (2019), CF: (2014, 2004, 2002, 2001). On to Fisterra, (2002, 4, 14).
I've been wanting to find a way to re-create Chuletitas de Cordero, the ubiquitous and delicious lamb chop dish found across Northern Spain. My absolute favourite food along the Camino. I think I've finally cracked it so I thought I would share a few details here to hopefully inspire others to try.
The key is finding the raw material. Most western supermarkets and butchers just don't seem to sell the thin rib chops that feature in this dish so I have tried various things to figure out the right cut. You need to buy a large rack of lamb, as it comes from the animal and certainly not 'frenched'. Ask them to sell you one 'un-butchered' and do it yourself. With a sharp knife, cut along the line of the ribs but instead of just turning your rack into simple rib chops.....cut much thinner and create two slices for each rib, one will contain a rib bone and a second will not.
As always in Spain their dishes tend to be meat focused with very little vegetable and these fabulous chops are most often pared with a few home made fries and roasted peppers.....I repeated that here.
Fries are easy....I used russet potatoes and sunflower oil.
Together with red and orange bell peppers, I added a couple of jalapeño chillis and a couple of hot red chillis. Roasted at 410F (convection) for about 20 mins in olive oil with several cloves of garlic and a sprinkling of Herbs de Provence.
I seasoned my chops with fresh ground black pepper and Maldon sea salt and brushed them with oil. Turning several times I cooked them on a rack over a baking sheet in the oven with the peppers....turn your extractor fan on full as it creates lots of smoke as the fat renders (all worth it).
That's about it.....I can promise you it is the most authentic reproduction of the food we're all longing for along the Way in a post covid world (vegetarians excepted of course).
Enjoy! View attachment 93578 View attachment 93579 View attachment 93580 View attachment 93581 View attachment 93582 View attachment 93583

I love lamb.

I don’t know how I missed this dish.

Next time.

Boy, does that look delicious.
 

Peligro

I walk between cafe breaks
Year of past OR future Camino
St. Jean to SdC the slow way (Aug'15, Aug'17, Jan'18, Aug'18, Jan'19, Jul'19) Primitivo (May'20)
As always in Spain their dishes tend to be meat focused

Beautiful pictures of fantastic food Martin - bravo!

I seen others on here make this same observation frequently so I must be missing something. My feeling is that there is not near as much meat as I'm used to and depending on what part of Spain you are in they turn a modest portion of meat into a full meal by using rice, potatoes, beans, garbanzos, lentils, bread, etc. My wife is from Valencia so Paella is what best demonstrates this for me, but in all of the colder parts of the country they eat lots and lots of stews. In the hotter parts of the country the fresh salads seem to be the largest dish on the table and it seems they want you to be mostly full before they serve the main protein.

I'm curious why this observation about lots of meat in Spain is made so frequently on this forum. Could you folks please tell me what I've been missing?
 

Martin 888

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2019, Camino Frances 2020, Camino del Norte 2021
just a minor point or two: Here in Palencia, the heart of lamb country, those tiny ribs are "chuletillas," not "chuletitas." The finest of those come from "lechazos," tiny suckling lambs less than six weeks old! I find the "lamb" sold across the water is from much more mature animals, with the "chuletillas" a bit more like "chuletas..." but that's what's available, and that's what makes a plate of real Castilian chuletillas de lechazo such a wonderful treat. Here in Palencia the finest of the fine is a lechazo from a "Parra" sheep, a black-faced breed you only see around here. The Meson de Pablo in Villacazar de Sirga is famous all over Spain for just that... and they make their own superb chorizo and morcilla, too. (it's a landmark on the Frances, zillions of pilgrims pose for photos with the bronze statue seated at a table out front.)
You're so lucky to have access to this wonderful raw material.....so called 'lambs' are often the size of small moose before they hit the food chain in Newfoundland !
 
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Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Year of past OR future Camino
Many, various, and continuing.
Lamb is my speciality dish, bar none. While stationed in Hawaii, I was introduced to Huli Huli chicken. What made the half a bird memorable is the marinade. My boer Maisie, being South African, suggested trying it on lamb.
I experimented over several weeks and finally settled on a liquid base of: Soy Sauce, Sesame Seed Oil, Worcester and a combination of spices I shall not divulge.
Over the years, due to requests for the ingredients, I have instead given packets to friends and family on special occasions.
My dad, who served in Europe during WWII, refused to eat mutton because that was the staple of the mess. He loved my lamb.
To be honest, I had a difficult time finding lamb chops on Camino. Possibly, I didn't try hard enough.
Buen “Chops please!” Camino
Arn
Arn, please sign me up for a consignment of your special spice blend. You've made it sound so appealing, and we have PLENTY o lamb to try it out with.
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Arn, please sign me up for a consignment of your special spice blend. You've made it sound so appealing, and we have PLENTY o lamb to try it out with.
Reb,
What makes it VERY special is enjoying it in company with good friends. When I am next on Camino (2021/2022) and come by the Peaceable Kingdom, you and Paddy provide the lamb and I do the cooking. A Braai to die for. In most cases the spices don't travel well...best if fresh. Let me think on this and I'll come up with a plan.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Year of past OR future Camino
Many, various, and continuing.
Reb,
What makes it VERY special is enjoying it in company with good friends. When I am next on Camino (2021/2022) and come by the Peaceable Kingdom, you and Paddy provide the lamb and I do the cooking. A Braai to die for. In most cases the spices don't travel well...best if fresh. Let me think on this and I'll come up with a plan.
You're on. We'll have to invite some lucky pilgrims in to help us eat it all!
 
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

Marcus-UK

Old Git
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
My dad, who served in Europe during WWII, refused to eat mutton because that was the staple of the mess. He loved my lamb.
To be honest, I had a difficult time finding lamb chops on Camino. Possibly, I didn't try hard enough.
Buen “Chops please!” Camino
Arn

In the UK, the meat of sheep 6 to 10 weeks old is usually sold as baby lamb, and spring lamb is from sheep of five to six months.
Mutton is from sheep over 12 months old. Mutton can be tougher and needs a different type of cooking. However mutton cooked with capers has more depth of taste than lamb and slow cooked curried mutton is superior to Lamb curry in my own opinion.
Sometimes the term Mutton was actually used for Goat meat perhaps your father was being force fed Goat?
Out of season Lamb in the UK generally is shipped from Canterbury New Zealand. This has the advantage that some of it arrives frozen. I get my butcher to cut frozen racks of lamb ultra thin on his meat saw, which he can't do when the lamb is unfrozen. I marinate these with black pepper, a little oil and sea salt and serve with Padron peppers from my greenhouse.
 

Marcus-UK

Old Git
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017 Considering Invierno late (2020) In lieu of VdlP (2020)
Beautiful pictures of fantastic food Martin - bravo!



I'm curious why this observation about lots of meat in Spain is made so frequently on this forum. Could you folks please tell me what I've been missing?
For a long period the majority of Spain was made up of people surviving on mainly carbs from rice, potatoes and pulses with home grown vegetables with very small amounts of meat and fish.
They could not afford large cuts of expensive meat. However there has always been a tradition of Master Asadors who roast and grill Beef, Lamb and Sucking pig to perfection. In any of the larger towns on the the various Caminos you will be able to find such a restaurant.
In most towns, a cheap meal that is served in most restaurants is Veal Chuletta/Chuleton? which is a large T-Bone style veal chop served with Fries. careful of the name though one is a chop the other is a roast for two or more people.
 
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Arn

Veteran Member
In the UK, the meat of sheep 6 to 10 weeks old is usually sold as baby lamb, and spring lamb is from sheep of five to six months.
Mutton is from sheep over 12 months old. Mutton can be tougher and needs a different type of cooking. However mutton cooked with capers has more depth of taste than lamb and slow cooked curried mutton is superior to Lamb curry in my own opinion.
Sometimes the term Mutton was actually used for Goat meat perhaps your father was being force fed Goat?
Out of season Lamb in the UK generally is shipped from Canterbury New Zealand. This has the advantage that some of it arrives frozen. I get my butcher to cut frozen racks of lamb ultra thin on his meat saw, which he can't do when the lamb is unfrozen. I marinate these with black pepper, a little oil and sea salt and serve with Padron peppers from my greenhouse.
Marcus when are you inviting me for Lamb/mutton? I'm sure we would have a great time sharing preparation stories and enjoying the results.
Arn
 

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