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Clothing packing!

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Hi guys!! i just used the scale to see where I am with the clothing i am taking for my camino Portuguese coastal in September. What do you think about what i am taking? I tried to cut as much as i could but not sure if the clothing is comparable enough in weight to most. This list is just my clothing. Top part goes inside backpack and bottom is what i wearing. Since i am always cold i was also thinking about getting a merino long sleeve mid-weight but i think the wind/rain Jacket with the other layers be enough. This is the only other piece i would like to add. Not sure.
I feel the coast will be windy and i may freeze in the early mornings. So was thinking to add the long sleeve merino for warmth. The ones i have now are lightweight long sleeves to just protect from sun. Thank you for any advice.

Backpack

Fleece 9.65 oz

Rain jacket 10.45 oz

1 Pants 7.48 oz

2 Pair Socks 2.48 oz

1 Sport long Sleeve 6.16 oz

1 Bottom down long sleeve 5.47oz

1 Merino short sleeve 4.87 oz

1 Sarong 5.79 oz

1 Buff 1.77 oz

Sleep bag 30.27 oz

Poncho 14.61 oz

Towel 2.89 oz

2 undewear 1.18oz

1 Bra 2.25 oz

Gloves 1.39 oz

TOTAL inside backpack:

6.669 lb or 3.02 kg


Wearing

1 darn tough sock 2.03 oz

1 short sleeve shirt 4.68 oz

Underwear 0.76 oz

Bra 2.10 oz

Leggings 6.97 oz

Shoes Hoka Stinsons 19.16
 
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Jeff B

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2019
Hi guys!! i just used the scale to see where I am with the clothing i am taking for my camino Portuguese coastal in September. What do you think about what i am taking? I tried to cut as much as i could but not sure if the clothing is comparable enough in weight to most. This list is just my clothing. Top part goes inside backpack and bottom is what i wearing. Since i am always cold i was also thinking about getting a merino long sleeve mid-weight but i think the wind/rain Jacket with the other layers be enough. This is the only other piece i would like to add. Not sure.
I feel the coast will be windy and i may freeze in the early mornings. So was thinking to add the long sleeve merino for warmth. The ones i have now are lightweight long sleeves to just protect from sun they are lightweight. Thank you for any advice.

Backpack

Fleece 9.65 oz

Rain jacket 10.45 oz

1 Pants 7.48 oz

2 Pair Socks 2.48 oz

1 Sport long Sleeve 6.16 oz

1 Bottom down long sleeve 5.47oz

1 Merino short sleeve 4.87 oz

1 Sarong 5.79 oz

1 Buff 1.77 oz

Sleep bag 30.27 oz

Poncho 14.61 oz

Towel 2.89 oz

2 undewear 1.18oz

1 Bra 2.25 oz

Gloves 1.39 oz

TOTAL inside backpack:

6.669 lb or 3.02 kg


Wearing

1 darn tough sock 2.03 oz

1 short sleeve shirt 4.68 oz

Underwear 0.76 oz

Bra 2.10 oz

Leggings 6.97 oz
this looks pretty frugal - good that is. i assume that you're carrying your backpack which weighs, maybe, 2 to 3 lbs.? Maybe add some light shoes/sandals for after your days walks, because one of the first things you will want to do at the end of a days walk is get out of your hiking shoes (?).
 

Jeff B

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2019
this looks pretty frugal - good that is. i assume that you're carrying your backpack which weighs, maybe, 2 to 3 lbs.? Maybe add some light shoes/sandals for after your days walks, because one of the first things you will want to do at the end of a days walk is get out of your hiking shoes (?).
also, don't forget to have some medical supplies - bandages, or whatever for blisters, etc.
 

David

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2005
Sounds nicely trim to me, a great list .. tell me, why both a rain jacket and a poncho? Is the rain jacket for light misty rain (and even as a windbreaker) and then the poncho to go over the top, protecting the pack too?

Also - don't forget to factor in guide book, paperwork, purse/wallet, money, phone and charger, first aid kit, corkscrew (oh yes), spork, toothbrush and paste, soap, flannel, toilet paper/tissues .. and maybe small containers for sea salt, real ground pepper, and olive oil (or is that just me?) plus any waterproof bags you put items into.
 
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Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
this looks pretty frugal - good that is. i assume that you're carrying your backpack which weighs, maybe, 2 to 3 lbs.? Maybe add some light shoes/sandals for after your days walks, because one of the first things you will want to do at the end of a days walk is get out of your hiking shoes (?).
Correct. An important detail is that this little first list is not counting the backpack itself which is 2lb. Yes i am trying to cut on the clothing as much as possible because some stuff like medications, Teva comfortable hiking sandals if needed because of blisters will be there to save me will be hard to cut. And they are not super super lightweight. Then toiletries, extra stufff and guidebook, etc... it all add. I imagine i will not reach my goal with all at 10 lb without water and snacks. I cant believe how i am committed to this camino being a person that usually use 5-10% of what i take to vacations. This is a nice radical change.
 
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Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I see sleeping bag and towel on the list. Is that a mistake?
Yes sorry i added few extra items not really clothing related. it was already close to me and since the sleeping bag is the heaviest item i got i want to account for it right away. I am very curious about how heavy it will all be at the end. I am shocked how much every little thing adds up. If i see when i am there that my knee is not making it well, i will do the luggage transfer for some breaks.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I imagine i will not reach my goal with all at 10 lb without water and snacks.
Ten pounds is very light. I always tried for under 15 lbs, and I usually end up at around 14.5 lbs. When I did the Portuguese Camino from Porto I went a bit lighter - 12 lbs. Don't get stuck on a number. Just take the essentials, and if you can carry it comfortably for 15 miles or so then it's all good.

May I ask why you are taking a sarong? I know that lots of people use them for different things, but the one time I took one I brought it instead instead of a towel. I see that you have a towel listed, but it's very lightweight, so maybe just a face towel?
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I am shocked how much every little thing adds up.
Yes, as they say, ounces lead to pounds and pounds lead to pain!
Lots of people will talk about something as "weighing nothing" when in reality it weighs maybe 4 ounces. Well you get four of those "nothings" together, and you have a pound!
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Sounds nicely trim to me, a great list .. tell me, why both a rain jacket and a poncho? Is the rain jacket for light misty rain (and even as a windbreaker) and then the poncho to go over the top, protecting the pack too?

Also - don't forget to factor in guide book, paperwork, purse/wallet, money, phone and charger, first aid kit, corkscrew (oh yes), spork, toothbrush and paste, soap, flannel, toilet paper/tissues .. and maybe small containers for sea salt, real ground pepper, and olive oil (or is that just me?) plus any waterproof bags you put items into.
Yes, you are right David and all these extras including phones and little cable, charger, power adapter... adds up. 😳About your question, yes the jacket is an Avalanche called weather shield is it is more to protect me from wind and cold because the only warm thing i have is the fleece and i am sure that with the wind on the coast i might feel cold. The fleece maybe not be enough for me. So that is the layer to break the wind and warm up. And the poncho i had a few flimpsy plastic ones at home but i think it is important spending money for better and appropriate equipment. Here is the poncho i just bought from amazon.
To cover me and pack from rain instead of just a pack cover. It is not super lightweight but have elastic for my arms. I didn't like the ones that the local Rei store here had, without elastic. Some other ones online that i liked were too heavy.
 
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Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Ten pounds is very light. I always tried for under 15 lbs, and I usually end up at around 14.5 lbs. When I did the Portuguese Camino from Porto I went a bit lighter - 12 lbs. Don't get stuck on a number. Just take the essentials, and if you can carry it comfortably for 15 miles or so then it's all good.

May I ask why you are taking a sarong? I know that lots of people use them for different things, but the one time I took one I brought it instead instead of a towel. I see that you have a towel listed, but it's very lightweight, so maybe just a face towel?
Yes the towel is very tiny. The sarong is mostly for if i share a room i can use for hanging from the bunk bed to avoid light and a bit of privacy, also if i need i can also use as a towel too like u said. I may rethink that later on then after i check the total weight. Thank u that is great advice about checking it all and not be stuck on the number.
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
You are doing great, Certainly not like most first-timers. Well done so far!
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
you guys and youtube are teaching me a lot. All i know is that the store and amazon is “loving” me as i didn't have 90% of this stuff. All the sudden the ticket became so cheap! Lol Exciting seeing the pack starting to be prepared!
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
you guys and youtube are teaching me a lot. All i know is that the store and amazon is “loving” me as i didn't have 90% of this stuff. All the sudden the ticket became so cheap! Lol Exciting seeing the pack starting to be prepared!
Remember one important thing: Whatever you buy at home, it is one more item you may have to throw away bc. of weight issues. All you discover that you really need, can be bought (much cheaper) while walking there. Portugal & Spain are very civilized countries.
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Remember one important thing: Whatever you buy at home, it is one more item you may have to throw away bc. of weight issues. All you discover that you really need, can be bought (much cheaper) while walking there. Portugal & Spain are very civilized countries.
Yes thank you. That is what i think i will do about this Mid weight merino long sleeve and also the hiking poles. Buy both there. I will be there anyways a week before i start hiking, so if i see it gets really cold for me i buy another layer there.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Yes thank you. That is what i think i will do about this Mid weight merino long sleeve and also the hiking poles. Buy both there. I will be there anyways a week before i start hiking, so if i see it gets really cold for me i buy another layer there.
Also, some albergues, especially at the beginning of each Camino, have leftovers from earlier pilgrims with too much in their packs. You can find poles, clothes, whatever, for free there. Ask. They will be happy to give it to you. :cool:
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
If it is any help to you, i added ounces to my current spreadsheet for comparison.
Some stuff you got seems heavier, some lighter. Being a guy, i save the bra, but still, about 1kg less clothing in backpack.

EDIT: Forget what i said. I just seen, that you included sleeping bag and stuff in those 3kg. Thats very good indeed!

1625083983726.png
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Also, some albergues, especially at the beginning of each Camino, have leftovers from earlier pilgrims with too much in their packs. You can find poles, clothes, whatever, for free there. Ask. They will be happy to give it to you. :cool:
Oh wow. I was planning to leave the poles there too. In this case i would not even need to go shop around. Just borrow for some days and leave it maybe in Compostela! But i may buy them because if i start without maybe the next little villages don't have stores selling them. Only the bigger cities?
 
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Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
If it is any help to you, i added ounces to my current spreadsheet for comparison.
Some stuff you got seems heavier, some lighter. Being a guy, i save the bra, but still, about 1kg less clothing in backpack.

EDIT: Forget what i said. I just seen, that you included sleeping bag and stuff in those 3kg. Thats very good indeed!

View attachment 103664
This is awesome will study it now. Thank you.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Oh wow. I was planning to leave the poles there too. In this case i would not even need to go shop around. Just borrow for some days and leave it maybe in Compostela! But i may buy them because if i start without maybe the next little villages don't have stores selling them. Only the bigger cities?
If you need poles, buy them when there. Cheaper. My golden rule:

If I know I'll need it, I'll get it. If I think I need it, it stays at home.

That is also the reason I use a backpack that is allowed as carry-on on planes: Not possible to overpack, and always with me.
 

Scott Sweeney

Active Member
If you need poles, buy them when there. Cheaper. My golden rule:

If I know I'll need it, I'll get it. If I think I need it, it stays at home.

That is also the reason I use a backpack that is allowed as carry-on on planes: Not possible to overpack, and always with me.
I agree, you haven't really enjoyed the Camino experience until your pack fails to meet up with when you get to Europe.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Yes the towel is very tiny. The sarong is mostly for if i share a room i can use for hanging from the bunk bed to avoid light and a bit of privacy, also if i need i can also use as a towel too like u said. I may rethink that later on then after i check the total weight. Thank u that is great advice about checking it all and not be stuck on the number.
Don't do what I did and leave your sarong hanging as a curtain! One night on the Norte I was in the bottom bunk of a bed that was on the end of a row, with open space on each side. I hung the sarong up as a curtain on the side that was facing another bunk, leaving just the side with open space uncovered. In the morning, when I was packing up I did so on that "open" side of my bed, and completely forgot my sarong! Fortunately, I was walking through Bilbao that day, and the Decathlon store there is only a couple of blocks off the Camino, so I bought a lightweight towel there, but it wasn't as pretty as my blue and white sarong.

To avoid light I use an eye mask.
 
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Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Don't do what I did and leave your sarong hanging as a curtain! One night on the Norte I was in the bottom bunk of a bed that was on the end of a row, with open space on each side. I hung the sarong up as a curtain on the side that was facing another bunk, leaving just the side with open space uncovered. In the morning, when I was packing up I did so on that "open" side of my bed, and completely forgot my sarong! Fortunately, I was walking through Bilbao that day, and the Decathlon store there is only a couple of blocks off the Camino, so I bought a lightweight towel there, but it wasn't as pretty as my blue and white sarong.

To avoid light I use an eye mask.
I will try to be very careful. Thank u. I will bring the eye mask but im not sure if i can sleep with those things. Lol Funny the sarong i got is also blue. But blue and black. 😉 I am working hard on my complete list. When i am done i will post.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I will bring the eye mask but im not sure if i can sleep with those things.
I have become so used to wearing the eye mask that I use it at home sometimes now! Make sure that you get one with molded eye cups so that your eyelashes don't hit it.

Something like these


I see them occasionally in Marshalls and TJMaxx for a few dollars.
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I have become so used to wearing the eye mask that I use it at home sometimes now! Make sure that you get one with molded eye cups so that your eyelashes don't hit it.

Something like these


I see them occasionally in Marshalls and TJMaxx for a few dollars.
Yes i got one of these at tJmaxx, we will see. Im an insomniac no matter what! I just imagine with this stuff in my head. hopefully i don't need to be in a hotel every night. As i want to experience this part of the camino too. My body will tell and i will need to obey.
 

David

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2005
Weight is always a problem .... we do our best and yet it still seems to add up. In the UK potatoes can be bought in plastic bags of 2.5 kilos - 5.5 lbs ... try this, put two bags into the shopping basket and carry them around the supermarket for a while and quite quickly you will realise how heavy 5 kilos - 11 lbs actually is ... on the back, plus the weight of the rucksack, then one or two kilos of water that weight is more - so carry three bags of potatoes in that basket along the supermarket aisles .... exactly, unpleasant isn't it - and that weight stresses our bodies - our bodies aren't designed to be load bearers, they are designed to be light and fast hunters. When we moved to farming we domesticated animals to be the load bearers, invented carts to carry loads .... and that is why we pack light - so if we will use it, take it .. if we may use it, leave it at home. Start with the size and weight of the rucksack and go from there (or, much better, use a hiking trailer ;)).
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
. . and that weight stresses our bodies - our bodies aren't designed to be load bearers, they are designed to be light and fast hunters.

Yes!!! When considering items and clothing, when available, 'Lighter is Righter". Ounces equal pounds, and pounds equal pain.


and that is why we pack light - so if we will use it, take it .. if we may use it, leave it at home.

I would add, if you are tempted to pack and item 'Just In Case', go to Google Maps and open it up to Spain. Do a search for retail stores. Then take comfort at how densely packed the map becomes with pins for shops and grocers. If you discover that you need something, you will be able to find it.
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
I would add, if you are tempted to pack and item 'Just In Case', go to Google Maps and open it up to Spain. Do a search for retail stores. Then take comfort at how densely packed the map becomes with pins for shops and grocers. If you discover that you need something, you will be able to find it.
Let's extend this to include pharmacies and medical services. Seen people carrying first aid kits and medication as if they would be going on an extended expedition in antarctica...
(yes, prescrepiton meds are something else, but for example my starting amount of ibuprofen is 6 pills and my starting amount of blister plaster / compeed is zero)
 

David

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2005
It would seem that at the core of all packing lists are two things. Fear and comfort. (Maybe there is a third, the joy of making packing lists).
Fear that we won't be able to cope "if that happens" and comfort in that we want to take those things that make our lives more comfortable, that our mobile 'home' should be like living at 'home' which, if you think about it, is ludicrous.

But we see how the packing list changes with those who go on multiple Caminos .. each time they take less and less - they become less fearful, have less need for that mythical comfort, more aware that the universe cannot be controlled, you just have to walk through it as it happens, that always All is Well, and if a problem arises? They will sort that one when/if it happens.

With the mention of Googling shops and pharmacies above, and Spain being a modern civilised country, we could even just use a double bum belt (fanny pack) or one of those tiny backpacks runners use. Water, toothbrush and paste, flannel, light poncho ..... if it gets cold? Why, be cold, and next day buy a fleece.
Underwear, shorts, shirt, get worn or smelly? Pop into a supermarket and buy the cheapest replacements - they don't have to be trekking clothing, just clothing, then bin the old stuff.
I am not saying that anyone should - only mentioning that someone could ;) .

I just re-read Laurie Lee's As I walked out one midsummer morning - a fifty year returning. 1930's he strolls across Spain in an old two piece suit, the same shoes he wore in London on the building site, violin wrapped in a blanket tied with rope over his shoulder ... stumbling across Mesetas in burning summer the young fool doesn't even carry water. Often he gets tired and beds down under the stars, stops overnight in poverty-stricken village inns and is given a straw mattress in the only room, sleeping with the sons and surrounded by pigs and chickens.
He never seems to change his clothes, rarely bathes, shaves ..... he gets rescued a lot, people are kind, gypsies take him in, children show him the way to an inn .... now, I am not saying we should Camino like this, not at all, but perhaps, just perhaps, we need less ... in summer? Strolling through Spain? Maybe we need less?
 
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BarbaraW

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Agree that's an impressive first list, and very useful feedback. This is what I took as a first timer for a 15 day September camino +4 days travelling. I also had a silk sheet sleeping bag and a light towel which could have doubled up as scarf/shawl if needed.
carriedworn
Hat087Could have had lighter, but I like this hat. (Tilley)
Loose silk robe, knee-length750Worn evenings and in bed.
Down quilt/poncho5600Home made. Used just once as a poncho on a cool evening but often as blanket at night.
3 pants (underwear)7025The heavier ones are ultra quick dry.
bra0100Didn’t wash and dry overnight as I’d hoped, so I bought a second en-route (+57gm)
Walking trousers (pants)2910
Knee length walking trousers (pants)0175
Long sleeved walking blouse (shirt)0170Dried v quickly, worn daily.
Short sleeved walking T shirt1080Mostly worn in evening, could have worn under blouse if necessary.
Long sleeved silk blouse (shirt)290Hardly wore this, unnecessary.
Merino cardigan (warm/smart layer)2050Left in albergue, replaced with a fleece someone had left behind elsewhere. 190 gm so "saved"15gm!
3 prs walking socks11858Could have used to keep hands warm if necessary.
Waterproof jacket3600Would have worn if cold
Waterproof over trousers700Would have worn over walking trousers if cold.
18866152501gm = 66oz+21oz =5lb 7oz total
 

pepi

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Sounds nicely trim to me, a great list .. tell me, why both a rain jacket and a poncho? Is the rain jacket for light misty rain (and even as a windbreaker) and then the poncho to go over the top, protecting the pack too?

Also - don't forget to factor in guide book, paperwork, purse/wallet, money, phone and charger, first aid kit, corkscrew (oh yes), spork, toothbrush and paste, soap, flannel, toilet paper/tissues .. and maybe small containers for sea salt, real ground pepper, and olive oil (or is that just me?) plus any waterproof bags you put items into.
Corkscrew? A wine drinker, I never needed one on my 5 past Camino‘s. Guidebook = mobile phone.
 
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woody66

This is my boy !
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
With the mention of Googling shops and pharmacies above, and Spain being a modern civilised country, we could even just use a double bum belt (fanny pack) or one of those tiny backpacks runners use. Water, toothbrush and paste, flannel, light poncho ..... if it gets cold? Why, be cold, and next day buy a fleece.
Underwear, shorts, shirt, get worn or smelly? Pop into a supermarket and buy the cheapest replacements - they don't have to be trekking clothing, just clothing, then bin the old stuff.
I am not saying that anyone should - only mentioning that someone could ;) .
Hi David!
As i get older i honestly think; "i don't think" well logically anyway!
Absolute lightbulb moment with reading the above!
I have been juggling stuff in my pack for months adding stuff ;then thinking no don't need it/to heavy etc.
I think it has just been about being immersed in Camino and really wanting a lighter pack!
I have already previously posted that Camino is not on the moon and you can buy what you need!!!!!
Here is the numpty old guy bit :D i never considered that advice myself how dumb is that? very!

After many years of touring on a motorcycle (upon which i carried very little) i always took my mankiest clothes;and would bin them or clean the bike with them and then bin them and buy some more!
Oh well with that in mind i shall begin pack list version number 55 ha!ha!
Woody
 
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TrvlDad1

Covidyard Bob
Year of past OR future Camino
2017 Frances from Saria
2018 Finnisterre & Ingles
2019 Portuguese from Valenca
2020 Assisi(cancel.)
Wow, what a woman...would you give my wife instructions about packing?
Seriously, great thought process.
I limit my pack to max 10% of my body weight, all in, and usually find one or two things I could have done without. Since I don't always think clearly after a strenuous day of walking, I "chart' my pack contents on a 3x5 card and take care to replace things where they should be. Sounds simple and obsessive, but avoids lumps and pressure in the wrong places from just stuffing things in as I go/use them.
A happy pack is a happy track!
 

MaryB2624

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
August/September 2018
Oh wow. I was planning to leave the poles there too. In this case i would not even need to go shop around. Just borrow for some days and leave it maybe in Compostela! But i may buy them because if i start without maybe the next little villages don't have stores selling them. Only the bigger cities?
Yes! This happened to me. I didn't bring any poles and opted not to buy some when we were in Porto. I realized when we got to Viana do Castelo that I desperately needed poles (we were doing the coastal route). However, we checked everywhere in Viana do Castelo and every town after for anything that could work and didn't find a store with poles until the Decathalon in Vigo. Yes, Spain and Portugal have stores with items you can purchase, but it may be a few days of painful walking before you get to a town with one of those stores.
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Yes! This happened to me. I didn't bring any poles and opted not to buy some when we were in Porto. I realized when we got to Viana do Castelo that I desperately needed poles (we were doing the coastal route). However, we checked everywhere in Viana do Castelo and every town after for anything that could work and didn't find a store with poles until the Decathalon in Vigo. Yes, Spain and Portugal have stores with items you can purchase, but it may be a few days of painful walking before you get to a town with one of those stores.
Have been to Europe several times i will not be guessing around with my knee without a walking pole because i know that sometimes even “food” lol is hard to find at certain hours because everything is closed in mid of the day. One must be aware and respect cultural differences.
 
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Pilgrim Patricia

Want to do the VdlP again!
Year of past OR future Camino
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Sounds nicely trim to me, a great list .. tell me, why both a rain jacket and a poncho? Is the rain jacket for light misty rain (and even as a windbreaker) and then the poncho to go over the top, protecting the pack too?

Also - don't forget to factor in guide book, paperwork, purse/wallet, money, phone and charger, first aid kit, corkscrew (oh yes), spork, toothbrush and paste, soap, flannel, toilet paper/tissues .. and maybe small containers for sea salt, real ground pepper, and olive oil (or is that just me?) plus any waterproof bags you put items into.
Hi David.
Totally agree with you about the real ground pepper. When I was on the VdlP I couldn't fine black pepper of any kind where I ate, but there was salt, oil and pepper (hot) sauce in abundance. I would have killed for even the crummy black pepper you get in little packets at fast food outlets!
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
You could search for a member called #spreadsheetdirtbags (IIRC) who is a petite female and posted her detailed packing list some time ago. She seems as particular as our good friend #anhalter in terms of minimising weight.

here you go: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ions-thoughts-on-each-item.64295/#post-884922
I will definitely check for inspiration but with the all other stuff it will put me for sure around the 10% plus, so i will be careful but will try to find a balance, if i need to i use tuitrans then. I will be lucky to have this flexibility any time i want.
But as i am adding things to my list i realize how big the list gets and weight goes along with it. This here is basically just clothing.
I don't want to waste too much time there looking for stores and buying stuff (other than food and hope not a pharmacy). I want to enjoy it. Will try to not have too much to not hurt myself and not too little that i need to go hunt for things. If i knew i was going to carry it for sure the whole path from Porto to SDC then in that case, i would want to leave more behind. It is shocking how the other stuff beyond clothing add so much weight. 😳 This new frugal study really will improve how i also pack for other regular vacations. This is the camino packing school! 😊
 
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David

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2005
I will definitely check for inspiration but with the all other stuff it will put me for sure around the 10% plus, so i will be careful but will try to find a balance, if i need to i use tuitrans then. I will be lucky to have this flexibility any time i want.
But as i am adding things to my list i realize how big the list gets and weight goes along with it. This here is basically just clothing.
I don't want to waste too much time there looking for stores and buying stuff (other than food and hope not a pharmacy). I want to enjoy it. Will try to not have too much to not hurt myself and not too little that i need to go hunt for things. If i knew i was going to carry it for sure the whole path from Porto to SDC then in that case, i would want to leave more behind. It is shocking how the other stuff beyond clothing add so much weight. 😳 This new frugal study really will improve how i also pack for other regular vacations. This is the camino packing school! 😊

Jack Reacher just carries a toothbrush and buys as he needs (mind you, he is fictional).

An old adage - spread out all your packing items and your money on your bed - take half the packing items and twice the money ;) .
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
Sounds nicely trim to me, a great list .. tell me, why both a rain jacket and a poncho? Is the rain jacket for light misty rain (and even as a windbreaker) and then the poncho to go over the top, protecting the pack too?

Also - don't forget to factor in guide book, paperwork, purse/wallet, money, phone and charger, first aid kit, corkscrew (oh yes), spork, toothbrush and paste, soap, flannel, toilet paper/tissues .. and maybe small containers for sea salt, real ground pepper, and olive oil (or is that just me?) plus any waterproof bags you put items into.
She said this list was just her clothes, so first aid, etc, wouldn't be on this list.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
I just re-read Laurie Lee's As I walked out one midsummer morning -. .

I loved that trilogy. I enjoyed the read of each book so much, trying to choose a favorite ain't happening ;)

I do have the three books, plus a few more of his writings. Dang, now you made me get all, like, got to go read them again.
 

dick bird

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Hi guys!! i just used the scale to see where I am with the clothing i am taking for my camino Portuguese coastal in September. What do you think about what i am taking? I tried to cut as much as i could but not sure if the clothing is comparable enough in weight to most. This list is just my clothing. Top part goes inside backpack and bottom is what i wearing. Since i am always cold i was also thinking about getting a merino long sleeve mid-weight but i think the wind/rain Jacket with the other layers be enough. This is the only other piece i would like to add. Not sure.
I feel the coast will be windy and i may freeze in the early mornings. So was thinking to add the long sleeve merino for warmth. The ones i have now are lightweight long sleeves to just protect from sun. Thank you for any advice.

Backpack

Fleece 9.65 oz

Rain jacket 10.45 oz

1 Pants 7.48 oz

2 Pair Socks 2.48 oz

1 Sport long Sleeve 6.16 oz

1 Bottom down long sleeve 5.47oz

1 Merino short sleeve 4.87 oz

1 Sarong 5.79 oz

1 Buff 1.77 oz

Sleep bag 30.27 oz

Poncho 14.61 oz

Towel 2.89 oz

2 undewear 1.18oz

1 Bra 2.25 oz

Gloves 1.39 oz

TOTAL inside backpack:

6.669 lb or 3.02 kg


Wearing

1 darn tough sock 2.03 oz

1 short sleeve shirt 4.68 oz

Underwear 0.76 oz

Bra 2.10 oz

Leggings 6.97 oz

Shoes Hoka Stinsons 19.16
How much water were you thinking of carrying? You'll need at least a litre (= 1 kg) when you set out in the morning. You haven't mentioned toiletries: soap, towel, toothbrush etc. or a simple first aid kit (as someone else mentioned). These add to the weight. You can manage with either a rain-jacket or a poncho, you don't need both (also mentioned elsewhere). If it doesn't rain in Portugal, you can guarantee it will in Galicia, so if you are expecting rain, put everything in dry sacks - easy to squash down small, easy to find things, don't make an annoying rustling sound when you get up in the morning and they keep stuff dry (pack covers are useless except for being fluorescent when you walk along roads in the dark). You could also substitute a long-sleeved merino for one (or both) of the other long-sleeved items. If you get cold, how about a lightweight down jacket instead of the fleece? They squash down very small and could be lighter than the fleece and are much warmer. But September isn't necessarily cold and wet in the north east of the Iberian peninsula. Take a hat or cap and think about sunscreen - seriously, if you are out all day in the sun, it is not good for the skin.

By the way (and I know I am going to attract some flak for saying it) this idea that you shouldn't carry more than 10% of your body weight needs to be taken with a pinch of salt. Does a short, skinny pilgrim really require less than a tall overweight pilgrim?
 
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dick bird

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
It would seem that at the core of all packing lists are two things. Fear and comfort. (Maybe there is a third, the joy of making packing lists).
Fear that we won't be able to cope "if that happens" and comfort in that we want to take those things that make our lives more comfortable, that our mobile 'home' should be like living at 'home' which, if you think about it, is ludicrous.

But we see how the packing list changes with those who go on multiple Caminos .. each time they take less and less - they become less fearful, have less need for that mythical comfort, more aware that the universe cannot be controlled, you just have to walk through it as it happens, that always All is Well, and if a problem arises? They will sort that one when/if it happens.

With the mention of Googling shops and pharmacies above, and Spain being a modern civilised country, we could even just use a double bum belt (fanny pack) or one of those tiny backpacks runners use. Water, toothbrush and paste, flannel, light poncho ..... if it gets cold? Why, be cold, and next day buy a fleece.
Underwear, shorts, shirt, get worn or smelly? Pop into a supermarket and buy the cheapest replacements - they don't have to be trekking clothing, just clothing, then bin the old stuff.
I am not saying that anyone should - only mentioning that someone could ;) .

I just re-read Laurie Lee's As I walked out one midsummer morning - a fifty year returning. 1930's he strolls across Spain in an old two piece suit, the same shoes he wore in London on the building site, violin wrapped in a blanket tied with rope over his shoulder ... stumbling across Mesetas in burning summer the young fool doesn't even carry water. Often he gets tired and beds down under the stars, stops overnight in poverty-stricken village inns and is given a straw mattress in the only room, sleeping with the sons and surrounded by pigs and chickens.
He never seems to change his clothes, rarely bathes, shaves ..... he gets rescued a lot, people are kind, gypsies take him in, children show him the way to an inn .... now, I am not saying we should Camino like this, not at all, but perhaps, just perhaps, we need less ... in summer? Strolling through Spain? Maybe we need less?
Not all pilgrimages go to Santiago. 'As I Walked Out One Midsummer's Morning' made a huge impression on the 19 year old me, so last visit to the UK (pre-camino) I made a point of visiting Slad. I also re-read the book recently and found an addition - an account of his involvement in the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War which was omitted in the 70's version for fear it would implicate local people, Franco being still alive at that point. The stone house is the old schoolhouse and the pub seems to have not changed much (although the beer may have improved).

DSC05587.JPG DSC05588.JPG DSC05589.JPG DSC05590.JPG DSC05591.JPG . DSC05578.JPG
 

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AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
please see signature
@Renascer, Hi and I'm just focussing on your list.

My first impressions were how many tops you had. My count was six in the bag.

I would suggest you reconsider Fleece and Poncho.

With the Rain Jacket, the 2 LS and 1 SS top in the bag that is 4 tops.
Add the one you wear. If it is really cold put all five on!!

With north American terminology I am not sure what "pants" are. I didn't notice similar stuff being worn. There might be some "in the bag" savings here.

With two left behind that is 24 oz saved. If the pants are not in the bag the total saved there is around 32 oz (2 lbs) from the bag.

So I say to you, kia kaha (be strong, take care) from now until you return home.
 

dick bird

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Yes thank you. That is what i think i will do about this Mid weight merino long sleeve and also the hiking poles. Buy both there. I will be there anyways a week before i start hiking, so if i see it gets really cold for me i buy another layer there.
If you are in Oporto, they definitely have a Decathlon (pretty sure there'll be one in Lisbon too, but I would Google it first).
 

sojourners

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015
Sounds like you have a good, sensible start, and you've received good advice. A few tips you might find useful:

1. Using a small, lightweight pack helps to keep weight down and to promote minimalism.

2. As others have mentioned, everything is available in Europe, and usually at lower prices. We’re Americans but have lived most of the past ten years in Europe, and so have a pretty good understanding of European resources.

3. All gear doesn’t have to be purpose designed and sourced from outdoor stores.

To give you a general sense of these points I’ll mention a few items we carried.

I used a North Face Verto Pack, 12 oz, 26 liters. My wife, ML, arrived in Spain with an Osprey (don't recall the model name) that weighed a little over two pounds. She soon ditched (donated) it and bought a McKinley, 13 oz, 20 liters at Intersport for 20 Euro. Those packs were large enough for all our gear, and food and water.

Bivouac gear (not camping gear) in case we were caught out:
Cut down foam sleep pads that insulated us from shoulder to hip and functioned as pack frames
One each SOS double size Space Blanket, about 3oz each. Don’t recall cost, a few bucks.
One each light fleece blanket, 14oz each, about ten dollars each at a street market in France, less than half the weight of a sleeping bag and more versatile. The blankets also served us in rooms with inadequate heating, and as shawl/wraps when we wearing a puffy jacket would be too much. We could have also used them as an extra layer, but were never that cold.

We each carried a wind jacket, about 3 oz, Decathlon 15 Euro each, and plastic ponchos, a couple of ounces and a couple of dollars, and lightweight puffy jackets, mine about 12oz, ML’s a bit less, also Decathlon 20 Euro each. These items were more than adaquate for the worst weather we encountered.

Other clothing:
We each had one pair of shorts and one pair of pants, all light cotton with elastic/drawstring waists, bought in a bazaar in Turkey for less than ten bucks each. My pants weigh about 12oz, ML’s less.
One light L/S cotton shirt
Two t-shirts, light cotton
Two underwear, light cotton, wear one carry one
Cotton creates a micro-atmosphere when you perspire and so is more comfortable than any synthetic I know of in hot weather. Yes, the old saying, “cotton kills,” is true – in the mountains and if you have no other clothing. On the plains of Spain, not so much.
Two pair sox, wool, although we rarely wore them
We started with Keen Sandals. I left mine at a hostel and continued in canvas espadrilles, purchased locally.
Wide brim straw hats, purchased locally

I carried a small medical kit. ML supplemented that with various herbal preparations, all of which help to keep our ancient bodies functional. We carried one iPhone. Other things included a tiny folding knife, a firestarter, pinch lights, one liter water bottles, bandanas and one yard each of light cotton fabric cut from Turkish towels and hemmed. The towels were about 7oz and five dollars. The bandanas soaked in water and worn under our hats and hanging to our shoulders provided cooling and prevented sunburn.

My basic load, not counting food or water, was about seven pounds. ML’s was about five. Since our loads were so light we had no issues of pack comfort. In fact, we were barely conscious of any load and carried our packs, which were essentially daypacks, into cafés and other places where large packs were not welcome.

A note: These are just examples to stimulate thinking about minimalism and the difference between things you need and things you want. In one of my books I told the story of a young American woman who we advised and who walked the Lycian Way in Turkey, a much tougher route than the Camino, with improvised gear weighing no more than this and emerged energized, happy and stronger.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
After losing a lot of pieces of clothing along the way (forgetting to take them off the line, etc.), I discovered that I really needed much less than I thought. I ended up the last half the Camino with:

2 tee shirts (one from a lost and found box in an albergue, because I'd lost all but one of my tee shirts by then)
1 pair of shorts (wore every single day walking)
1 lightweight dress (wore around town while shorts and tee shirt were drying)
1 set of merino wool long underwear top and bottoms (to wear under my shorts and tee shirt if it got cold)
1 down jacket (packed down really small and very lightweight, but very warm)
1 rain jacket
2 underwear, 2 bras
1 baseball hat
1 bandana
1 pair of trail shoes and 1 pr. of socks (which I rarely wore, as I almost always wore my sandals walking)
1 pair of Chaco sandals

A great tip: if you decide you need something more along the way, check with the hospitalero/a for the box of stuff other people left behind or abandoned. I got a great travel towel once and numerous European plug adaptors (apparently a lot of people are like me and forget to unplug those when they move out). I still wear the baggy tee shirt somebody left in Astorga some years ago.. it's a sentimental favorite.
 
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Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
If you are in Oporto, they definitely have a Decathlon (pretty sure there'll be one in Lisbon too, but I would Google it first).
Yes i will be enjoying both cities before i head to the camino and will look for a pair.
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
How much water were you thinking of carrying? You'll need at least a litre (= 1 kg) when you set out in the morning. You haven't mentioned toiletries: soap, towel, toothbrush etc. or a simple first aid kit (as someone else mentioned). These add to the weight. You can manage with either a rain-jacket or a poncho, you don't need both (also mentioned elsewhere). If it doesn't rain in Portugal, you can guarantee it will in Galicia, so if you are expecting rain, put everything in dry sacks - easy to squash down small, easy to find things, don't make an annoying rustling sound when you get up in the morning and they keep stuff dry (pack covers are useless except for being fluorescent when you walk along roads in the dark). You could also substitute a long-sleeved merino for one (or both) of the other long-sleeved items. If you get cold, how about a lightweight down jacket instead of the fleece? They squash down very small and could be lighter than the fleece and are much warmer. But September isn't necessarily cold and wet in the north east of the Iberian peninsula. Take a hat or cap and think about sunscreen - seriously, if you are out all day in the sun, it is not good for the skin.

By the way (and I know I am going to attract some flak for saying it) this idea that you shouldn't carry more than 10% of your body weight needs to be taken with a pinch of salt. Does a short, skinny pilgrim really require less than a tall overweight pilgrim?
Thank you. Yes i am still creating the FULL list. Yes i plan to carry two of those small water bottles and refil as i go to not carry too much weight. Water is heavy. That counting there is enough area to fill up in route if not i need to bring more water. That is interesting your point of substitute fleece+ wind/rain jacket with just one down Jacket. I wonder if would be lighter just the down jacket and i could just leave home what i bought and buy this lightweight jacket.
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
@Renascer, Hi and I'm just focussing on your list.

My first impressions were how many tops you had. My count was six in the bag.

I would suggest you reconsider Fleece and Poncho.

With the Rain Jacket, the 2 LS and 1 SS top in the bag that is 4 tops.
Add the one you wear. If it is really cold put all five on!!

With north American terminology I am not sure what "pants" are. I didn't notice similar stuff being worn. There might be some "in the bag" savings here.

With two left behind that is 24 oz saved. If the pants are not in the bag the total saved there is around 32 oz (2 lbs) from the bag.

So I say to you, kia kaha (be strong, take care) from now until you return home.
Yes the tops are total with one i am wearing.
2 short sleeves
2 lightweight long sleeves
1 Fleece
1Wind/rainjacket for cold
Poncho for rain and backpack-protection.
is this too much? I don't even have a mid weight there. And i know i get cold easily. Maybe like was advised here turn fleece and rain jacket in one then i have 5 tops total?
 

dick bird

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Thank you. Yes i am still creating the FULL list. Yes i plan to carry two of those small water bottles and refil as i go to not carry too much weight. Water is heavy. That counting there is enough area to fill up in route if not i need to bring more water. That is interesting your point of substitute fleece+ wind/rain jacket with just one down Jacket. I wonder if would be lighter just the down jacket and i could just leave home what i bought and buy this lightweight jacket.
I didn't mean ditch the rain jacket - just replace the fleece with a down jacket - lighter, smaller, and warmer. And please do not rely on filling up with water as you go, make sure you have at least 1 litre when you set out in the morning. Here in Australia we take the risk of dehydration very seriously and whereas cold is uncomfortable, being dehydrated is life-threatening.
 

Renascer

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I didn't mean ditch the rain jacket - just replace the fleece with a down jacket - lighter, smaller, and warmer. And please do not rely on filling up with water as you go, make sure you have at least 1 litre when you set out in the morning. Here in Australia we take the risk of dehydration very seriously and whereas cold is uncomfortable, being dehydrated is life-threatening.
Those two bottles is not enough if i keep them full? They will be one liter total, as i walk and drink i fill to the top again. Should i carry more? I plan to walk around 20 miles . And if I see that there is no city in between i would carry more. For the Portuguese with many cities in between how much water you guys carry? I have never done this so i dont know. I dont want to risk. I was imagining that in that path there is always a village to refill my 1 liter again if needed? I am going in September if that matters.
 
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Meggins

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - One complete St.J.P.P to Santiago plus twice more for 500km each time.
I loved that trilogy. I enjoyed the read of each book so much, trying to choose a favorite ain't happening ;)

I do have the three books, plus a few more of his writings. Dang, now you made me get all, like, got to go read them again.
\love laurie Lee - have several books of his!
 

David

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2005
Those two bottles is not enough if i keep them full? They will be one liter total, as i walk and drink i fill to the top again. Should i carry more? I plan to walk around 20 miles . And if I see that there is no city in between i would carry more. For the Portuguese with many cities in between how much water you guys carry? I have never done this so i dont know. I dont want to risk. I was imagining that in that path there is always a village to refill my 1 liter again if needed? I am going in September if that matters.

It is horrible to become truly thirsty. Happened to me once and I don't want to experience it again.
But - it isn't going into the unknown - at the refugio each night you can get a weather forecast for the next day and also the supply/ies of water on the way .... though on the CF there is a really long open stretch, miles and miles (Roman road - you walk on a Roman road!), and the two hand pump water points along the way were both not working and hadn't been for some years.
One litre is one kilo - 2.2 lbs. If you carry a bottle either side then drink from each alternately so that your pack doesn't feel lop-sided if you empty one on only one side. If doing the CF and it is really hot then drink the one on your left side as that is the one that faces the sun and will get terribly warm!

Depends when you are going - September weather can be really hot - which route, etc ... a good compromise in Europe is that you can buy water in 750ml bottles - 3/4 of a litre. I buy two of those when I start and refill as I go along. In hot weather I never pass a water point without drinking all I have (after checking it is working!) and then filling up.
If no fountains or pumps and you need to buy from a shop or bar remember that you will be at your hottest, and possibly driest, when they are all closed for siesta. But if it is a cool grey day and there will be lots of water on the way don't burden yourself with too much.
 
Last edited:
Hi guys!! i just used the scale to see where I am with the clothing i am taking for my camino Portuguese coastal in September. What do you think about what i am taking? I tried to cut as much as i could but not sure if the clothing is comparable enough in weight to most. This list is just my clothing. Top part goes inside backpack and bottom is what i wearing. Since i am always cold i was also thinking about getting a merino long sleeve mid-weight but i think the wind/rain Jacket with the other layers be enough. This is the only other piece i would like to add. Not sure.
I feel the coast will be windy and i may freeze in the early mornings. So was thinking to add the long sleeve merino for warmth. The ones i have now are lightweight long sleeves to just protect from sun. Thank you for any advice.

Backpack

Fleece 9.65 oz

Rain jacket 10.45 oz

1 Pants 7.48 oz

2 Pair Socks 2.48 oz

1 Sport long Sleeve 6.16 oz

1 Bottom down long sleeve 5.47oz

1 Merino short sleeve 4.87 oz

1 Sarong 5.79 oz

1 Buff 1.77 oz

Sleep bag 30.27 oz

Poncho 14.61 oz

Towel 2.89 oz

2 undewear 1.18oz

1 Bra 2.25 oz

Gloves 1.39 oz

TOTAL inside backpack:

6.669 lb or 3.02 kg


Wearing

1 darn tough sock 2.03 oz

1 short sleeve shirt 4.68 oz

Underwear 0.76 oz

Bra 2.10 oz

Leggings 6.97 oz

Shoes Hoka Stinsons 19.16
To each their own! I noticed you aren't wearing pants.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Depends when you are going - September weather can be really hot
I reverse walked the camino from Tui to Porto in November (I was heading home and had time before my flight), and It was still quite pleasant walking weather.

I take a second long sleeved merino instead of a fleece, and wear both if it’s cold. I have a down vest for evening warmth. The rain/wind jacket as your outer layer and your sarong as a scarf should keep you warm. While walking, you are likely to get toasty warm; it’s the breaks where you feel it get cool.
 
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JillGat

la tierra encantada
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
I didn't mean ditch the rain jacket - just replace the fleece with a down jacket - lighter, smaller, and warmer. And please do not rely on filling up with water as you go, make sure you have at least 1 litre when you set out in the morning. Here in Australia we take the risk of dehydration very seriously and whereas cold is uncomfortable, being dehydrated is life-threatening.

I tried a poncho once. Walked into a storm in Portugal and it was like walking in a flock of panicking birds and I still got wet. I ditched it and bought a lightweight rain jacket there. My pack has a rain cover.
 

sojourners

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015
I tried a poncho once. Walked into a storm in Portugal and it was like walking in a flock of panicking birds and I still got wet. I ditched it and bought a lightweight rain jacket there. My pack has a rain cover.
A tip you might find useful one day, if you get caught like that tie a length of cord around the outside of your poncho like a belt. Stops flapping but still provides protection. I give all my students plastic ponchos and nylon cord before starting out. Many cannot afford a rain jacket and by giving them to everyone those kids are not set apart. Also, I often carry small packages of poncho, cord and emergency blanket to give to those in need.
 

dick bird

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Those two bottles is not enough if i keep them full? They will be one liter total, as i walk and drink i fill to the top again. Should i carry more? I plan to walk around 20 miles . And if I see that there is no city in between i would carry more. For the Portuguese with many cities in between how much water you guys carry? I have never done this so i dont know. I dont want to risk. I was imagining that in that path there is always a village to refill my 1 liter again if needed? I am going in September if that matters.
1 litre is the minimum. Ask someone e.g. the hospitalero or check the guidebook/app about what to expect for the next day's walk (always a good idea). If in doubt, buy a bottle of water from a local shop so you have extra. As I said, an bit of extra weight is better than becoming ill and don't get obsessed about keeping your weight to a minimum - an extra kilo or two won't kill you, dehydration can.
 
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JillGat

la tierra encantada
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
A tip you might find useful one day, if you get caught like that tie a length of cord around the outside of your poncho like a belt. Stops flapping but still provides protection. I give all my students plastic ponchos and nylon cord before starting out. Many cannot afford a rain jacket and by giving them to everyone those kids are not set apart. Also, I often carry small packages of poncho, cord and emergency blanket to give to those in need.
I did wrap a piece of webbing around my waist and it was still ridiculous.
 

dick bird

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
I reverse walked the camino from Tui to Porto in November (I was heading home and had time before my flight), and It was still quite pleasant walking weather.

I take a second long sleeved merino instead of a fleece, and wear both if it’s cold. I have a down vest for evening warmth. The rain/wind jacket as your outer layer and your sarong as a scarf should keep you warm. While walking, you are likely to get toasty warm; it’s the breaks where you feel it get cool.
We lived in Oporto for three years. September is unpredictable - it can be very wet, it can be very hot, it shouldn't be particularly cold (depending on what you call 'cold', of course).
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I agree that one of the tops could go, if you want to reduce weight. If you layer a longsleeve, a short sleeve and a jacket (or the fleece), you hardly need the other top. Layers are your friends!

Also, September in Portugal tends to be pleasant. It usually varies between 14-24C (57-75F).
I don´t know where you live and the temperatures you are used to, but cold mornings can warm up quickly while walking. Anyway, whatever works best for you!
 

Scott Sweeney

Active Member
Good question.
Do you need BOTH?
I don't see why. Most rain coats don't breath and you sweat and end up just as uncomfortable. We usually carry a windbreaker which folds up in its own pocket and sheds a light rains and when not in use it's a pillow. Depressing thing regardless of what you wear, the bottom half of you will get wet.(or knees down).
 

David

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2005
Re the walking trousers. One shorts worn and one long unworn. If you take zip-offs you can take two identical pairs of shorts but only one pair of the zip on legs. This gives you two pairs of shorts and two pairs of longs.
 
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alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
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I did the coastal route in May a few years ago and had some very chilly mornings, especially when the wind off the ocean picked up. I often wore a long-sleeved t-shirt, fleece, windbreaker, and rain jacket to combat the cold, peeling off layers as the day warmed up. I also had a down vest I could add Or replace the fleece with. AND I took a rain poncho too (a modified Frogg Togg’s poncho). I was very pleased with all the combinations I could create with the above clothing.

I come from a very warm climate and feel the cold too. Others may not feel the cold as much and can get away with less layers but what I had worked for me.
 

dick bird

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Glad someone else thinks so. It's handy to have a rule of thumb, until it becomes some kind of law and people agonise over how to comply. It doesn't make sense anyway - why should a short, slim pilgrim (55kgs) need less than a tall, slightly overweight pilgrim (80kgs)? I usually carry 10kgs or more on the camino when I 'should' only be carrying 7.5kgs or less. It doesn't kill me. On an overnight camp I might be carrying more than 15kgs and I am not a he-man. It is particularly disturbing when people start to leave behind stuff they might need, like warm clothing or water.
 

dick bird

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
I will definitely check for inspiration but with the all other stuff it will put me for sure around the 10% plus, so i will be careful but will try to find a balance, if i need to i use tuitrans then. I will be lucky to have this flexibility any time i want.
But as i am adding things to my list i realize how big the list gets and weight goes along with it. This here is basically just clothing.
I don't want to waste too much time there looking for stores and buying stuff (other than food and hope not a pharmacy). I want to enjoy it. Will try to not have too much to not hurt myself and not too little that i need to go hunt for things. If i knew i was going to carry it for sure the whole path from Porto to SDC then in that case, i would want to leave more behind. It is shocking how the other stuff beyond clothing add so much weight. 😳 This new frugal study really will improve how i also pack for other regular vacations. This is the camino packing school! 😊
Some other pilgrims are starting to point out that the 10% doesn't have to be an iron rule, you can go over that without breaking the law (or a leg). And it is much quicker and simpler to ditch stuff you don't need (donate it or post it home) than run around trying to buy stuff you do need.

If you're worried about it, try going for a long walk at home with bags of rice or something (e.g. the weekly shopping) in your backpack, equivalent to 10% of your weight, just to see how it feels.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
....
If you're worried about it, try going for a long walk at home with bags of rice or something (e.g. the weekly shopping) in your backpack, equivalent to 10% of your weight, just to see how it feels.

Indeed.
To get an idea of how it feels to walk for a day with a loaded backpack carry 6 kilos or 13 pounds of potatoes continually for at least six hours around the house rarely sitting down.

The most common injury is the result of trying to walk too far too quickly carrying too much! Easy does it.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2018
I personally, although without any specific data points, suspect that the 10% standard has resulted in more misery for newbie walkers than any other item of Camino conventional wisdom, although using the term "wisdom", conventional or not, seems a stretch. This is not to say that experienced backpackers, trekkers or veteran pilgrims should not carry whatever weight they are comfortable with. But these kind of discussions, in my view, should be cognizant of how the new pilgrim without experience may interpret our posts. Just from observation, and yes there are exceptions, the vast majority of pilgrims fall somewhere in the 100 to 250 lbs range. Seems to me those of us towards the higher end of that range are the ones who should really avoid the 10% rule, threshold, limit or however one may want to characterize it. I have gotten in trouble with the board before when I make these kind of comments which some take as doctrinaire. As I have emphasized in a few posts over the past few years, dispensing advice within the existing veteran community is one thing. But when the new hiker is looking to the forum for advice, it's not a matter of what forum members have carried or can carry, but rather what the newly minted pilgrim, often without pack carrying experience, would be comfortable with. Yes, some of us may need a medical device or some other reason for additional weight, but that is the exception. A lot of what we have in terms of shoes and backpacks derive from the experiences of wilderness backpackers, especially thru hikers on the JMT, PCT and AT, where they must carry shelter, cooking gear and likely a heavier duty sleeping bag. And then cover terrain day after day that us Camino people only experience for a day or two (if that) on the way to Santiago. Yet, most of them manage to get their base weight down to 7-9 lbs, although that can get expensive with truly lightweight gear. Seems to me a reasonable weight goal for inexperienced backpackers would be in the 10-12 lbs range--again absent any specific physical condition that would require more. Less is more in many aspects of life.
 

BookGirl305

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Ingles (after Covid)
As one of those new, inexperienced hikers, I can tell you that my practice weight of 9 pounds (contents and pack, no water or snacks) is at the top end of what I think I can carry for my first time out. I have the 8oz sleeping quilt I decided I liked better than a bag, a rain jacket, a fleece I'm not taking, some sandals, and my trusty 4 pound bag of sugar in a ziploc that is mimicking everything else I might take. Pack weighs 2.5, contents 5.5 . I am quickly ditching "suggested items to carry" like the headlamp and the bowl that turns into a cutting board and a fleece and assorted other doodads. We're not going up Mt. Everest here. I'm a grown woman with a credit card and if I don't take something I turn out to need, they sell things in Spain. Along with modifying my expectations on pack weight, I had to modify my expectations on distance as well. I may very well find I can do more, but recalculating the planning based on current distance vs what others do or the guidebook says was a good decision. I'm roughly 60 days out and I don't see myself having a burst of added ability before I go.
 

HaveringRob

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Along with modifying my expectations on pack weight, I had to modify my expectations on distance as well. I may very well find I can do more, but recalculating the planning based on current distance vs what others do or the guidebook says was a good decision. I'm roughly 60 days out and I don't see myself having a burst of added ability before I go
Perhaps not, but maybe increased strength and endurance?
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
Pack weighs 2.5, contents 5.5
While i congratulate you on the low weight of your packs content and the spirit of "if something is missing, i can get it"... the pack seems a bit on the heavy side for such a light content. Dont get me wrong, you'll likely be fine, but i guess you could easily save another 1lbs there without losing to much comfort.
 

BookGirl305

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Ingles (after Covid)
(smile)- I have the 4 pound bag of sugar in there right now in place of the shirts and the shorts and the toiletries and the fork and the hairbrush and such.
 
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