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Coastal vs Inland

Anton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-Sept-Oct '15
#1
Hello everyone,

Once again this forum is such a wonderful cornucopia of info and such a great tribe!
I hiked the Camino Frances in September/October 2015 and this September my girlfriend and I will be trekking from Porto to Santiago and then out to Finisterre. I have been really pondering whether to take the coastal route or the central route and the details here have been very helpful. I suppose my question is whether the coastal route has enough resources (hostals, cafes, waymarkers, etc) or if the tried and true central route is the more safe and sound way to travel. I've seen quite a bit that the initial trek out of Porto can be a real bear along roads with little to no shoulder.
I understand that this is a very subjective question, all replies and explanations of your experiences are very appreciated!
Ultreia!
 

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Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (Planning)
#2
Hi Anton!

I have only walked Central, and took the metro out of Porto. Having done that, the following walk was lovely and I had no issues with walking by urban or industrial areas.
Another thing that influenced my decision is that I lived most of my life on the beach and I did not feel the need to see the ocean all the time.
Third point is that in Central route I could visit Barcelos and also stop at Casa da Fernanda, two things I really wanted to do - and I'm so happy I did! :D

At the same time, I hear the coastal walk out of Porto is quite lovely. So, whatever you choose, you will be fine. Make sure to take some time to enjoy Porto, the city is just amazing!
 
Camino(s) past & future
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
#3
The Central offers nice towns, more churches and other seights to visit, e. g. the big thursday market in Barcelos (biggest in Portugal). You will pass through forests, climb smaller hills, come across little villages, rivers and vineyards.

But for going out of Porto you can do 1 and a half day on the coastal then switching back to the central and meet it in Rates. Thus you do not really need a guide-book. In Porto you follow the river Douro to the seaside, then walk up North with the sea at your left Hand until you reach the village of Vila do Conde. There, after crossing the river, you follow the river to the right with the river remaining at your right hand. Before meeting the metro-station you will see the first yellow arrows which will lead you to Rates.

BC
Alexandra
 

Anton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-Sept-Oct '15
#4
Aaahhhh, I knew I’d get the best replies here!!! Thank you peregrinas!!!
 

Beeker40

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2013 Camino Frances SJdP to Santiago. September 2016 Camino Portugese Porto to Santiago.
#5
Hi Anton totally agree with Alexandra. Grabbed train to Vila de Conde with my wife Brid. Lovely inland walk to wonderfultraditional but spotless hostel in Rates. Highlight was DEFINITELY Casa de Fernanda....what an experience and totally worth planning to stay there 1 night to enjoy the company and wonderful hospitality. Must be booked in advance or you may have to walk on....So really I think walking a mix of coastal and inland is your best bet. Then Ponte de Lima and on to border crossing into Tui. You will love the whole journey and a lot quieter than the Camino Frances....Enjoy and take it handy. We spent 10 days and it was so memorable. Ger
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Frances May 2017
#6
Hi Anton, I did the Coastal in May of this year and had a wonderful Camino experience, great ocean views from Porto to Vila dos condes, it is all boardwalk with very little road. The accommodations were excellent especially Casa Puertas in Oia. The food and people the best. The variety of forest, beach villages and always somewhere for a coffee and pastry. I highly recommend the coastal route
 

Ajrk

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
#7
Hello everyone,

Once again this forum is such a wonderful cornucopia of info and such a great tribe!
I hiked the Camino Frances in September/October 2015 and this September my girlfriend and I will be trekking from Porto to Santiago and then out to Finisterre. I have been really pondering whether to take the coastal route or the central route and the details here have been very helpful. I suppose my question is whether the coastal route has enough resources (hostals, cafes, waymarkers, etc) or if the tried and true central route is the more safe and sound way to travel. I've seen quite a bit that the initial trek out of Porto can be a real bear along roads with little to no shoulder.
I understand that this is a very subjective question, all replies and explanations of your experiences are very appreciated!
Ultreia!
Hi Anton
I pondered the very same thing for my second Camino last year and I decided to walk the costal from Porto as far as Caminha then turned in towards Valenca and over the bridge and in to Tui and the plan is the next time I do the Portuguese I will go inland as far as Valenca turn left and head to the coast and Cross from Caminha over to La Garda and continue along the coast till I get to Redondela so over the two journeys I will have completed the coastal and central
Alan
 

Jon Hebertson

2 feet and a heartbeat
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese - Lisbon to SdC September 2017
Finisterre - September/October 2017
#8
Hello everyone,

Once again this forum is such a wonderful cornucopia of info and such a great tribe!
I hiked the Camino Frances in September/October 2015 and this September my girlfriend and I will be trekking from Porto to Santiago and then out to Finisterre. I have been really pondering whether to take the coastal route or the central route and the details here have been very helpful. I suppose my question is whether the coastal route has enough resources (hostals, cafes, waymarkers, etc) or if the tried and true central route is the more safe and sound way to travel. I've seen quite a bit that the initial trek out of Porto can be a real bear along roads with little to no shoulder.
I understand that this is a very subjective question, all replies and explanations of your experiences are very appreciated!
Ultreia!
Hi Anton,

The best route out of Porto is to keep the river on your left and follow it to the ocean, then keep that on your left and pretty soon you’ll see the arrows. I’ve done the CP and wanted a mix of inland and coast so I walked Porto to Vila do conde, from there took the inland route to pontevedra, then did espiritual variant (takes you back to the coast) which ends up in pontevedra and from there it’s a strait shot to Santiago. But whatever route you take I wish a bom caminho.
 

arleneo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Camino de Santiago French Way
Portuguese Camino - Central Route
#9
I am so delighted to read all the options of combining Coastal and Central routes after Porto. Thanks, All!
 



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