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Compeed use.

Dochollis

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning April 7, 2018 from St Jean
Looking at Compeed products online, there cushions and plasters. Anyone have thoughts as to whether I should buy one, the other, or both. Thanks
 

SabineP

Camino = Gratitude + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Looking at Compeed products online, there cushions and plasters. Anyone have thoughts as to whether I should buy one, the other, or both. Thanks

I personally am anti Compeed or "Segunda Piel" as they call it in Spain.
For me Isobetadine works better in combination with a small compress and some tape.

If you use the search button in the upper right corner and type in Compeed you will find some older threads on this subject.
 
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kaixo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2012
Norte 2012
Geneva/Le Puy/SJPP/Bilbao 2015
Prague/Geneva ?
The key to Compeed is two-fold.
1) Apply as soon as you feel a hot spot. Stop and put on the Compeed plaster immediately.
2) Leave it on. Do NOT peel the Compeed plaster off or you may tear off a tender layer of skin. Let it come off on it's own which will take days.
 

Peter Fransiscus

Be a Rainbow in someone else's cloud.
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
I saw Pilgrims putting compeed on open blisters , that is a no go i.m.o.
Thats why I'am Anti Compeed , what I take with me are some steril needles and a role of tape .
Never used it for myself but I love the extra weight , just kidding. :cool:
Wish you well and take good care of your feet.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Looking at Compeed products online, there cushions and plasters. Anyone have thoughts as to whether I should buy one, the other, or both. Thanks
What are you thinking about using Compeed for; blister prevention or blister treatment?

For prevention and to reduce friction over hot spots, I like Leukotape P, placed on the area after an application of Tincture of Benzoin, which increases the already strong adhesive holding power of the tape. There's no shifting, rolling up, or peeling away of the tape when combined with the benzoin.

For treatment and protection of a blister, I will first try using Leukotape P, applying an antibiotic ointment to the top skin on the blister -- to keep the tape from ripping of the skin when removed and to provide some sepsis control. This is done after the blister has been slightly incised along its 'side' to prevent the fluid from re-collecting. Sometimes needle pokes re-seal. And don't get me started on the increased risk of infection that occurs when leaving even a sterilized thread, twine, floss, hemp rope, etc in the blister. Folks can do what they want with thread and I won't say a word... unless directly asked :) Debates are not going to change one's firmly held beliefs.

For treatment of severely blistered areas where the underlying area is exposed, I have taken a liking to Spenco 2nd Skin Aquaheal Hydrogel Bandages. It has some therapeutic similarities to Compeed, but for wound care I like the Spenco product better.

When treating someone with an area where the blistered skin has peeled off, I will trim away any remaining flap of skin, then apply an antibiotic ointment directly onto the wound. Then Hydrogel is applied on top of the ointment. Apply tincture of benzoin to the surrounding skin, followed with an application of Leukotape.

I never get blisters, so the compact blister treatment kit I carry -- with the minimal first aid supplies in my pack -- is generally used to help others I find in need. :) I replenish supplies as they get used ;)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Dochollis

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning April 7, 2018 from St Jean
Both, as needed, I guess. I'm not familiar with the product.
 

Chromatistes

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances sections (2012, 2014, 2015)
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino del Norte (2019)
I have ceased to use Compeed, after it aggravated blisters on my first camino. Instead I take needles, cotton thread and a tube of iodine. With a Swiss Army Knife and insect repellent, that is the sum total of my medical bag.
 

HaraldS

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-2017: Home(Germany) to SdC via Cologne-Taizé-Le Puy-Somport-Camino Aragones-Camino Frances
Compeed? Never again. First, it covered the blister and took away the pain, yes. But then it sticked to the skin as well as to sock when I wanted to take off my shoes and socks. I neither could be seperated from the sock nor from my foot. It was hell. I finally pulled it off ruthlessly with lots of pain and covered the blister with a usual sticking plaster.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019

Antonius Vaessen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2016 VdlPlata - Sanabres
2016.Primitivo
2017 Salvador
2018 Norte (to Sobrado)
2019 Norte again
I saw Pilgrims putting compeed on open blisters , that is a no go i.m.o.
Thats why I'am Anti Compeed , what I take with me are some steril needles and a role of tape .
Never used it for myself but I love the extra weight , just kidding. :cool:
Wish you well and take good care of your feet.
From a website "blister prevention" I understand the opposite . Compeed should only be used on blisters when the skin of the blister is open. In that case it should work perfectly. (Best to tape the sides of the Compeed)In all other cases Compeed should not be used.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
We do not like Compeed either. If you like waterproof plasters and they stay on tight then Compeed will do so only more so. If they usually fall off then so will Compeed. Your usual preferred plasters will make a better job.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
It's interesting how we all have had different experiences using compeed. I've had a few hot spots on my various caminos, and being ignorant at the time of these helpful suggestions using other products/methods, I have to say I loved compeed. It is soft, cushiony and I was amazed at how well it stayed on in the shower, lasting at least 3 days and when removed it hot spots were gone... Maybe dealing with full-fledged blisters is an entirely different story.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
From a website "blister prevention" I understand the opposite . Compeed should only be used on blisters when the skin of the blister is open. In that case it should work perfectly. (Best to tape the sides of the Compeed)In all other cases Compeed should not be used.
Rebecca Rushton from https://www.blisterprevention.com.au has YouTube videos on blisters. See youtube .com/user/ENGOblister/videos

Foot Blister Treatment - Top 3 Mistakes to Avoid When Using Compeed
The video ID for this one is youtube .com/watch?v=car0aN4PpyM
 
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tomnorth

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015)
I had great success with Compeed as did the others with me. I heard of it from friends who walked the CF a couple years earlier. I learned how to apply Compeed from a Spanish pharmacist. It is important to put them on properly. I learned to only put them on at night after showering and shortly before going to bed. I would drain the blister using a cleansed needle. I would also snip the dead skin a bit with the scissors in my Leatherman to ensure that the opening didn’t seal. I cleaned the blister extensively with an antiseptic cleaning solution recommended to me by the pharmacist. After the site was completely dry I applied the Compeed, ensuring it sealed around all sides. Do not put any antibiotic lotion on the blister. In the morning you will find that the Compeed has seemingly fused itself to your skin, creating a second, protective layer. If you do need to remove the Compeed for some reason, I found that soaking the foot in warm, soapy water will enable you to eventually remove it without damaging the skin or causing pain.
 

FLEUR

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
I like compeed. I also use a compeed stick, it's like a fat lipstick , just rub it on a hot spot and the skin then toughens up , don't use it with the plasters .
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Compeed? Never again. First, it covered the blister and took away the pain, yes. But then it sticked to the skin as well as to sock when I wanted to take off my shoes and socks. I neither could be seperated from the sock nor from my foot. It was hell. I finally pulled it off ruthlessly with lots of pain and covered the blister with a usual sticking plaster.

I'm not a Compeed fan myself. For exactly the same reason! Fortunately I tend not to get bad blisters, when I have got them I've found that antibiotic powder and a normal plaster has done the trick. The antiseptic powder was readily available.
 
Camino(s) past & future
First Camino April-May 2017
Run as fast as you can! A fab reference for Foot Care: Fixing Your Feet: Injury Prevention & Treatment is a must read. I brought $100 worth of Compeed on our Camino and my spouse ended up with a toe degloving wound. Do NOT peel off Compeed. Prevention is the key. All praise the Camino podcast for all things blisters, foot care , es todo! Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
What are you thinking about using Compeed for; blister prevention or blister treatment?

For prevention and to reduce friction over hot spots, I like Leukotape P, placed on the area after an application of Tincture of Benzoin, which increases the already strong adhesive holding power of the tape. There's no shifting, rolling up, or peeling away of the tape when combined with the benzoin.

For treatment and protection of a blister, I will first try using Leukotape P, applying an antibiotic ointment to the top skin on the blister -- to keep the tape from ripping of the skin when removed and to provide some sepsis control. This is done after the blister has been slightly incised along its 'side' to prevent the fluid from re-collecting. Sometimes needle pokes re-seal. And don't get me started on the increased risk of infection that occurs when leaving even a sterilized thread, twine, floss, hemp rope, etc in the blister. Folks can do what they want with thread and I won't say a word... unless directly asked :) Debates are not going to change one's firmly held beliefs.

For treatment of severely blistered areas where the underlying area is exposed, I have taken a liking to Spenco 2nd Skin Aquaheal Hydrogel Bandages. It has some therapeutic similarities to Compeed, but for wound care I like the Spenco product better.

When treating someone with an area where the blistered skin has peeled off, I will trim away any remaining flap of skin, then apply an antibiotic ointment directly onto the wound. Then Hydrogel is applied on top of the ointment. Apply tincture of benzoin to the surrounding skin, followed with an application of Leukotape.

I never get blisters, so the compact blister treatment kit I carry -- with the minimal first aid supplies in my pack -- is generally used to help others I find in need. :) I replenish supplies as they get used ;)
Debates are not going to change one's firmly held beliefs.
Never a truer word has been written...so, restricting myself to my own experience, compeed made my blisters worse. Another remedy worked perfectly. Part of the remedy was my walking pal, whose day job was being a doctor... so i just stuck out the offending foot and it got taken care of.
 

Tonylash

Member
Camino(s) past & future
None
If you are a diabetic then do not use compeed , I believe it is in the smallprint
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
CF (17) Sarria - Portomarín
CF (17) SJPdP - SdC
CF (18) SJPdP - Fisterra
CP (19) Porto - Muxia
+ 1 on the Leukotape P and @davebugg post. I brought about a half role with me. I gave it away to someone with a badly sprained ankle in Villatuerta. I later replaced my role with a Leukotape, but it was slightly different than the Leukotape P that I brought with me. It was still good tape, but did not adhere nearly as well. I think it was also slightly thinner. I looked at a couple of different farmacias before buying. I am bringing Leukotape P with me again next time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 2016 April - Jun
Del Norte, Finesterre 2018 May - Jun
I had great success with Compeed as did the others with me. I heard of it from friends who walked the CF a couple years earlier. I learned how to apply Compeed from a Spanish pharmacist. It is important to put them on properly. I learned to only put them on at night after showering and shortly before going to bed. I would drain the blister using a cleansed needle. I would also snip the dead skin a bit with the scissors in my Leatherman to ensure that the opening didn’t seal. I cleaned the blister extensively with an antiseptic cleaning solution recommended to me by the pharmacist. After the site was completely dry I applied the Compeed, ensuring it sealed around all sides. Do not put any antibiotic lotion on the blister. In the morning you will find that the Compeed has seemingly fused itself to your skin, creating a second, protective layer. If you do need to remove the Compeed for some reason, I found that soaking the foot in warm, soapy water will enable you to eventually remove it without damaging the skin or causing pain.
I used this exact method to treat my partners massive heel blister 5cm x 3cm with double Compeed. I must admit I really had a fit when I saw it!!!! I changed the Compeed once after a few days to check how it was healing ( I did watch it like a hawk over that time) and then reapplied more Compeed to protect the area. Compeed needs to be stretched out working around the edges to remove it, not just pulled off. To my relief the heel was totally healed, the skin stayed intact with only a tiny area peeling. A Camino miracle!!
 

Diane Booth

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April (2018)
My 2 cents What I've learned - training for camino I've been walking daily, 5-10-15 K depending, breaking in shoes, hips, knees, whatever. Anyhow long ramble short, I'm a walker, blisters aren't something that I tend to get. The other day I'm off and out the door, I think nah, don't need to change my socks, only doing 5K the ones I have on are good enough... mistake #1 - 1K in I feel a hot spot on my heel, those costco dress socks...I will pick up a blister pad at the store 1K away ,Mistake 2. Blister pad didn't adhere, now I've got a honking nasty blister on my heel instead of a mild inconvenience, also when I removed the bandage I also removed the roof of that blister. Lucky I'm at home but learned a valuable lesson.

Here's my personal finding for what it's worth - prevention is better than treatment.

Wear proper socks!
Keep your laces tight! Your foot should not move in that shoe.
Treat hot spots immediately, not in 1K, not even in 10 metres - if you even 'think' that there might be a hot spot, stop walking and treat it, a bit of tape and off you go.
Pay attention to you feet, they are taking you a very long way, when they complain you need to listen.

61 sleeps to go but who's counting. haha
Diane
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2018}
Looking at Compeed products online, there cushions and plasters. Anyone have thoughts as to whether I should buy one, the other, or both. Thanks
I dont buy either. Compeed stays on until it comes off on its own. Unfortunately in my case, the only time I used it, it came off in my sock and ruined a good pair of socks. I go more for prevention by smearing my feet with Umguentum del Peregrino although the hospitalera in Cizur Menor swears by Vick. Seems the smell can keep bed bugs away too but who can tell
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
Leuko Tape or kinesiology tape from a pharmacy to cover hot spots. If the blister is evident cut a hole in the take and surround it then cover. When you rest in the evening soak in hot water with vinegar several hospitaleros were helping pilgrims with this.
 
Camino(s) past & future
April / May (2016) CF
I did not use comped (I used paper tape), but my friend did. She used them as blister prevention every day on an area that she found was prone to hot spots while she was training. She did not seem to have any problem peeling them off in the evening. She did not get any blisters.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I did not use comped (I used paper tape), but my friend did. She used them as blister prevention every day on an area that she found was prone to hot spots while she was training. She did not seem to have any problem peeling them off in the evening. She did not get any blisters.
Compeeds are pretty expensive. Seems to me to be a waste of money to use a new one every day when they will stay on for several days.
 

pablo.m

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (09-10.12) Portuguese(05-06.13) Norte (05-06.15)
used it once, never again! as in never E-V-E-R again!!
vaseline, applied liberally, does the trick.
that & don't wear wet socks.
Buen Camino
 

JoEllen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
2019
Looking at Compeed products online, there cushions and plasters. Anyone have thoughts as to whether I should buy one, the other, or both. Thanks
I used the Compeed plasters almost every day as a preventative. It can get costly, but I had no trouble with my feet once I started with them. I also used that pilgrim salve over my whole foot (over top of the Compeed as well), and it really worked for me!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Omnifix (and paper tape as a preventative) are my go-to ways of dealing with blisters. (My only experience with Compeed was not a happy one, at all.)

Listen to what @davebugg says, it's seriously good advice:
For prevention and to reduce friction over hot spots, I like Leukotape P, placed on the area after an application of Tincture of Benzoin, which increases the already strong adhesive holding power of the tape. There's no shifting, rolling up, or peeling away of the tape when combined with the benzoin.

For treatment and protection of a blister, I will first try using Leukotape P, applying an antibiotic ointment to the top skin on the blister -- to keep the tape from ripping of the skin when removed and to provide some sepsis control. This is done after the blister has been slightly incised along its 'side' to prevent the fluid from re-collecting. Sometimes needle pokes re-seal. And don't get me started on the increased risk of infection that occurs when leaving even a sterilized thread, twine, floss, hemp rope, etc in the blister. Folks can do what they want with thread and I won't say a word... unless directly asked :) Debates are not going to change one's firmly held beliefs.

For treatment of severely blistered areas where the underlying area is exposed, I have taken a liking to Spenco 2nd Skin Aquaheal Hydrogel Bandages. It has some therapeutic similarities to Compeed, but for wound care I like the Spenco product better.

When treating someone with an area where the blistered skin has peeled off, I will trim away any remaining flap of skin, then apply an antibiotic ointment directly onto the wound. Then Hydrogel is applied on top of the ointment. Apply tincture of benzoin to the surrounding skin, followed with an application of Leukotape.

I never get blisters, so the compact blister treatment kit I carry -- with the minimal first aid supplies in my pack -- is generally used to help others I find in need. :) I replenish supplies as they get used ;)
@Rick of Rick and Peg 's recommendation of Rebecca Rushton's website is also right on.
 

Northernlights

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
I personally am anti Compeed or "Segunda Piel" as they call it in Spain.
For me Isobetadine works better in combination with a small compress and some tape.

If you use the search button in the upper right corner and type in Compeed you will find some older threads on this subject.
I agree. I used compeed on my blisters, and my blisters got infected because they couldn’t breathe. Thankfully I brought antibiotics with me and they cleared up and I didn’t have to stop walking. I prefer something I buy here in Canada. I believe it’s called glacier blister pads and they are amazing. Compeed would probably be great before you get blisters. Placed in hotspots
 

Michael Gray

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France (2015 and 2016)
I'm dead against Compeed. Your skin simply turns to mush under the dressing. They might work for a one-off, one-day problem, but not when you're walking day after day. A breathable dressing on top and something on the surface of the blister to disinfect it, dry it out and toughen the skin. Tea Tree oil does all this, and comes in very small bottles that don't take up a lot of space or add weight. You just apply with a cotton bud. And hikers wool to prevent blisters in the first place; again, the skin breathes under it and stays dry.
 

Heather John

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Ponferrada to Muuxia . returning to SJPD to Finisterra Sept to Nov 2018 with n2 friends
Looking at Compeed products online, there cushions and plasters. Anyone have thoughts as to whether I should buy one, the other, or both. Thanks
you can buy them in Spain in most places - Farmacea and supermarkets. not all have them depending on where you live . In Australia you can get them at most chemists, BigW good luck
 
D

Deleted member 39850

Guest
I saw Pilgrims putting compeed on open blisters , that is a no go i.m.o.
Thats why I'am Anti Compeed , what I take with me are some steril needles and a role of tape .
Never used it for myself but I love the extra weight , just kidding. :cool:
Wish you well and take good care of your feet.
Peter and all the lovely Pilgrims — I say as a person with some relevant training in clinical ethics — which means lots of access to medical clinics and “best practices”...
Please stop the marathoner’s trick with the needle and thread. It is a main contributor to the arrival of infection in many pilgrims’ feet. Marathoners go home at the end of the day; they do not continue day after day with less than hygienic conditions. The blister bubble is sterile, lubricating and protective. The pressure is uncomfortable (even painful), but protects and heals the underlying skin.
A burst blister has an entry point for bacteria and can so easily become the reason that a Camino turns ugly. I’ve seen so many blackened blisters, usually secondary to the needle (and the thread “trick”, which is just a super-highway for germ invasion).
I use the compeed on the few small but very uncomfortable blisters I get every season, regardless of Camino or not... (I walk about 3500 km per year, always). Diabetics cannot use compeed; neither can those with allergies to the medical ingredients. But, for those who *apply it properly* and do NOT remove it, the Compeed (Bandaid brand makes equivalent in N. America, and it’s the same product, same manufacturer etc), will remove the hot pressure that makes a blister so horrible.
I have heard of others using duck tape — but I think many could be burned by the glue. And some pilgrims use Moleskin plasters. Whatever gets rid of the pressure and the friction...
Just please everyone remember that the blister is your protection from infection. Don’t pop it. Take the day off instead of losing a trip!
Sleep with feet outside the covers... keep feet dry while walking; use the anti-friction stick (Compeed makes one available all along the trail, but your local pharmacy will have an equivalent in the diabetic foot care aisle). Have great socks (In summer, I love the Wright Sock with the “no blister” guarantee. Really great merino socks even in summer are a great option as well. And they should last several thousand KM.
Finally, get footwear that does not have your feet suffering hotspots.
All these things should help.
My only blister now is one that recurs on a broken, mishapen baby toe, so I tend to pre-wrap it with a Compeed and just keep it there. No more problems.
Wishing everyone well!
Morgan
 

Peter Fransiscus

Be a Rainbow in someone else's cloud.
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
Peter and all the lovely Pilgrims — I say as a person with some relevant training in clinical ethics — which means lots of access to medical clinics and “best practices”...
Please stop the marathoner’s trick with the needle and thread. It is a main contributor to the arrival of infection in many pilgrims’ feet. Marathoners go home at the end of the day; they do not continue day after day with less than hygienic conditions. The blister bubble is sterile, lubricating and protective. The pressure is uncomfortable (even painful), but protects and heals the underlying skin.
A burst blister has an entry point for bacteria and can so easily become the reason that a Camino turns ugly. I’ve seen so many blackened blisters, usually secondary to the needle (and the thread “trick”, which is just a super-highway for germ invasion).
I use the compeed on the few small but very uncomfortable blisters I get every season, regardless of Camino or not... (I walk about 3500 km per year, always). Diabetics cannot use compeed; neither can those with allergies to the medical ingredients. But, for those who *apply it properly* and do NOT remove it, the Compeed (Bandaid brand makes equivalent in N. America, and it’s the same product, same manufacturer etc), will remove the hot pressure that makes a blister so horrible.
I have heard of others using duck tape — but I think many could be burned by the glue. And some pilgrims use Moleskin plasters. Whatever gets rid of the pressure and the friction...
Just please everyone remember that the blister is your protection from infection. Don’t pop it. Take the day off instead of losing a trip!
Sleep with feet outside the covers... keep feet dry while walking; use the anti-friction stick (Compeed makes one available all along the trail, but your local pharmacy will have an equivalent in the diabetic foot care aisle). Have great socks (In summer, I love the Wright Sock with the “no blister” guarantee. Really great merino socks even in summer are a great option as well. And they should last several thousand KM.
Finally, get footwear that does not have your feet suffering hotspots.
All these things should help.
My only blister now is one that recurs on a broken, mishapen baby toe, so I tend to pre-wrap it with a Compeed and just keep it there. No more problems.
Wishing everyone well!
Morgan
Hi Morgan ,
I only use needles and tape (and doctors cloves). I don't use a thread as you stated .

Wish you well,Peter.
 
D

Deleted member 39850

Guest
Hi Morgan ,
I only use needles and tape (and doctors cloves). I don't use a thread as you stated .

Wish you well,Peter.
And I wish you well also. I am glad to hear you don’t use the thread.... and I sincerely hope it is a trend that has died on the long-distance trails... It is still preferable to avoid popping the blisters if you can. That’s the appeal of Compeed (or its equivalents) for those who can use it.
Burn Camino all... Spouse leaves for his first at the end of July, and I entrust him to the care of the pilgrims. I hope to join him at Sarria, so I will take all the good wishes for me to be able to walk into Santiago a second time, but this time with joy instead of devastation.
mh
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I'm dead against Compeed. Your skin simply turns to mush under the dressing. They might work for a one-off, one-day problem, but not when you're walking day after day. A breathable dressing on top and something on the surface of the blister to disinfect it, dry it out and toughen the skin. Tea Tree oil does all this, and comes in very small bottles that don't take up a lot of space or add weight. You just apply with a cotton bud. And hikers wool to prevent blisters in the first place; again, the skin breathes under it and stays dry.
Spot on. And you can buy Iodine (Betadine in Spain) in any pharmacy, instead of tea tree oil, for the same purpose.
 
D

Deleted member 32363

Guest
I personally am anti Compeed or "Segunda Piel" as they call it in Spain.
For me Isobetadine works better in combination with a small compress and some tape.

If you use the search button in the upper right corner and type in Compeed you will find some older threads on this subject.
 
D

Deleted member 32363

Guest
Since I started to wear women's Ankle high, (or higher,) nylon stockings under my hiking sox, I don't get blisters!!! Awesome, and amazingly simple. Happy Feet!!! You can buy black ones too! If you are picky, or men may feel strange. It's so worth it! Before this, I'd have blisters by the time I was off the 1st mountains!! Now "Blister care" is non existent in my hikes or Camino's!!
 

zrexer

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15,16 & 19 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo
2020 Camino Del Norte
It's interesting how we all have had different experiences using compeed. I've had a few hot spots on my various caminos, and being ignorant at the time of these helpful suggestions using other products/methods, I have to say I loved compeed. It is soft, cushiony and I was amazed at how well it stayed on in the shower, lasting at least 3 days and when removed it hot spots were gone... Maybe dealing with full-fledged blisters is an entirely different story.
This has been my experience as well. Compeed works great for a hot spot, not so much on a blister. The key thing always is that the second something feels off with your feet, deal with it right away, not hours later.

Have not needed it much since I quit wearing boots in favor of trail shoes and discovered 'Wrightsocks.' I also change out my socks at mid-day or sooner some days if it is hot which keeps blisters at bay.
 

RevBarbaraG

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2018)
OK, so I am 3 days into my Camino and have been using Compeeds on the pre-existing blister (from training) which is in a really awkward spot at the back of my instep.

I’m diabetic, so probably shouldn’t use them... but can anyone say why not?

I’ve just been advised by another peregrino to pop and pull thread through. Just seems like a bad idea to me.

Is dry dressing held down with micro pore good?

I’ve also had someone just tell me not to do the double sock thing.... I’ve always done the double sock thing. And blisters are rare for me. Except now I’m on the Camino with one.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I’m diabetic, so probably shouldn’t use them... but can anyone say why not?
A website for doctors and clinicians:
https://woundcareadvisor.com/pros-and-cons-of-hydrocolloid-dressings-for-diabetic-foot-ulcers/

I’ve just been advised by another peregrino to pop and pull thread through. Just seems like a bad idea to me.
And professionals think it is a bad idea also.

Is dry dressing held down with micro pore good?
Seems like the thing to do. The webpage linked above say diabetics should keep an eye on the wound often. It would be easy to replace this but removing compeed can lead to bad results.

I’ve also had someone just tell me not to do the double sock thing.... I’ve always done the double sock thing. And blisters are rare for me. Except now I’m on the Camino with one.
So try one sock for awhile and see if it works. Pay attention for hot spots so they don't get worst. Possibly the two socks are causing too much compression between the boot and foot.

Good luck and buen camino Barbara.
 
D

Deleted member 39850

Guest
The "thread trick" is for marathoners. Marathoners go home at the end of the day, and they are competing, so they can't take a day off; they need to relieve pressure and keep moving. But the thread trick is absolutely *dangerous* for long distance walking, day after day through dirt, etc. Your un-popped blister has protective fluid in it, fluid that is antiseptic and protects your underlying skin from further wounding. If you pop it -- and *especially* if you run a thread through it you are creating an infection super-highway. People who swear by it on these walks have been *lucky*; many more end up taking bad advice and ending up with *severe* infection, leaving the trail and spending time in hospital.

Thanks for the great links Rick! I hope people will pay attention to them.

I swear by competed for the small blisters or hotspots I get, but I'm not diabetic, and it sticks well to me, allowing the fluid to do its work, while removing pressure from the shoes -- miraculous. But it's not for everyone. I caution any diabetic person not to use them for the reasons given in the link provided by Rick.

Be well everyone!
Ultreia!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I swear by competed for the small blisters or hotspots I get, but I'm not diabetic, and it sticks well to me, allowing the fluid to do its work, while removing pressure from the shoes -- miraculous.
Thank you Morgan for your praise but I do want to comment about the statement quoted above. The hydrocollid will not help with healing a hot spot as it does not come in contact with one's exudate fluid. It will supply some padding though and may help that way. It may help some if you have a blister with a roof but with a tear but there the problem is that removing the bandage may tear the roof completely away because the adhesive is so strong. I think Compeed was developed for ulcers or blisters with the roof torn off. Of course if the manufacturer stresses this then they won't sell as many bandages.
 
D

Deleted member 39850

Guest
Thank you Morgan for your praise but I do want to comment about the statement quoted above. The hydrocollid will not help with healing a hot spot as it does not come in contact with one's exudate fluid. It will supply some padding though and may help that way. It may help some if you have a blister with a roof but with a tear but there the problem is that removing the bandage may tear the roof completely away because the adhesive is so strong. I think Compeed was developed for ulcers or blisters with the roof torn off. Of course if the manufacturer stresses this then they won't sell as many bandages.
Totally agree and understand. I just use the compels on my hotspots because *for me* it sticks *so well* that it prevents further friction (and I don't need to be wearing double-layers etc). After 3-4 days it just falls off in the shower and I'm all good.
The original bandages, interesting, were designed to seal the stomas (openings) for people's ileostomies. That's still the major use, but Compeed/Bandaid (it's just EU, vs N. Am.) saw that they could extend the market with blister care.
But yeah, never use on a blister with an open roof. I'm not sure why it seals the stoma safely but destroys an open blister. That's a matter of ongoing curiosity to me, but not something to monkey around with; feet are too important on Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 2016 April - Jun
Del Norte, Finesterre 2018 May - Jun
Totally agree and understand. I just use the compels on my hotspots because *for me* it sticks *so well* that it prevents further friction (and I don't need to be wearing double-layers etc). After 3-4 days it just falls off in the shower and I'm all good.
The original bandages, interesting, were designed to seal the stomas (openings) for people's ileostomies. That's still the major use, but Compeed/Bandaid (it's just EU, vs N. Am.) saw that they could extend the market with blister care.
But yeah, never use on a blister with an open roof. I'm not sure why it seals the stoma safely but destroys an open blister. That's a matter of ongoing curiosity to me, but not something to monkey around with; feet are too important on Camino.
Your curiosity may be solved!! I think the hydrocolloid dressing is used as part of the stomal flange where it adheres to the peristomal skin around a stoma, be it a colostomy or ileostomy, which is unbroken skin. It protects from the contents burning the skin. I haven't heard of it to be used to seal an ileostomy.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Good morning and a very buen camino to you over there, Barbara, wherever you are!
I’ve just been advised by another peregrino to pop and pull thread through. Just seems like a bad idea to me.
I'm not a medical professional. But that said, I'm with Rick on this one. Trust your gut. It IS a super bad idea.
Is dry dressing held down with micro pore good?
I’ve also had someone just tell me not to do the double sock thing.... I’ve always done the double sock thing. And blisters are rare for me. Except now I’m on the Camino with one.
Bummer, but it may turn into no big deal.
I always used 2 sock layers too, but now only go with one, and sometimes a quite thin one at that. So it can't hurt to try it. And same with the micropore - try it.

We're all unique, so blister prevention is often trial and error at first - and in the process you eventually find what works for you.
Here's information about blister prevention from a professional that's been a Godsend for me:
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/a-guide-for-blister-prevention.603/
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
The best blister prevention tape that I've found is Omnifix Stretch. It's thin and flexible, sticks all day, yet comes off easily with no sticky residue. You can find it in most farmacias in Spain.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
The best blister prevention tape that I've found is Omnifix Stretch. It's thin and flexible, sticks all day, yet comes off easily with no sticky residue. You can find it in most farmacias in Spain.
What @trecile said. This was one of the best discoveries ever.
I use it to prevents blisters and over my hipbones, where the hipbelt can 'rub me the wrong way.'
 
D

Deleted member 39850

Guest
Your curiosity may be solved!! I think the hydrocolloid dressing is used as part of the stomal flange where it adheres to the peristomal skin around a stoma, be it a colostomy or ileostomy, which is unbroken skin. It protects from the contents burning the skin. I haven't heard of it to be used to seal an ileostomy.
Thanks for the clarification on original use! Fascinating how tech for very medically specific use can move into our everyday uses.

BTW everyone, Compeed makes a very nice anti-chafing stick for feet. Very small, almost weightless in your pack. If I had to take a guess, I'd say it's a mix of paraffin wax (smell) vaseline and cornstarch. You can try making your ow and see how it goes, or just pick some up in a farmacia. Canadians can find a similar product in the foot-care section of Shopper's Drug under the LIFE brand.
 

RevBarbaraG

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2018)
Thanks all for input. That reference was to diabetic foot *ulcers*, which this isn’t... but interesting anyway.

It has certainly felt fine yesterday and today covered with a dry dressing, so I have stocked up. I have to declare the one sock experiment a failure ( for me), though, as despite a mid-day change of socks yesterday, I acquired an extra small blister on a toe of the other foot yesterday.

I have given myself an easy day today- 5K into Pamplona, dawdle about a bit, 5K out. I now have a new dry dressing on the first blister, which looked no worse, and possibly better than the last time I looked at it yesterday morning, and have put a compeed on the toe.

Back to two pairs of socks today, and from now one.

I do have one of the compeed blister prevention sticks, which I used liberally today, but no good once you’ve already got a blister that you want to be covering with something else.
 

RevBarbaraG

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2018)
And just to report back that, with 2 weeks of Camino under my belt, a dry dressing secured with micropore is a much better blister treatment than Compeeds. I would use them in everyday life if I had a blister, but not if I was going to walk for 3+ hours. They just won’t go the distance for me.
 

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