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Compostela for those starting after Sarria (Morgade, km101)

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JAMM

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Not enough
Any help will be much appreciated: I am a bit confused by the reporting of changes in official distances (and the 100km ‘mojón’) around Sarria. I understand that 100km is the minimum to get the Compostela but there seems to be some discussion as to where that point is currently (for the purposes of the Pilgrims’ Office that is) on the CF.

Has anyone started after Sarria but before the km 100 point and still got a Compostela? We are planning on starting in Morgade which is, allegedly, km 101 but may need to revisit the plan.

Thank you!
 
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november_moon

Veteran Member
The rule is 100 km, so starting in Morgade should be fine. Hopefully someone with experience will chime in, but based on the stated rules from the Pilgrims' Office, starting at 101 km is enough. I think that Sarria is just talked about a lot because even though its about 113km out, it is the closest town of any size to 100km and it has good transport, so a lot of people start there.

If you are starting in Morgade, how are you getting there?
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
One does not simply walk into Morgade.
You can take a taxi. It is about 12 km by road, so the cost will be about 15E. I have taken a taxi to Ferreiros, and the trip is a bit more circuitous than Morgade; they follow the Sarria road route, then take a narrow road that reaches the albergue from the backside.

Ferreiros does qualify for a compostela. I have one.
 
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JAMM

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Not enough
Thank you!

We’ll be travelling from the UK with two kids (5 and 8) and plan to take a taxi from Santiago airport directly to Casa Morgade to overnight at the albergue there before setting off the next morning. We only have nine days and plan to walk eight of those, leaving one as a buffer in case of we need to move more slowly than hoped.

The aim is to cover 100km but not push things much further than that since our youngest is only five. Our daughter is about to do her First Communion five days before we start walking so the Compostela is particularly important to her; I really want to get my distances right!
 
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ELHS220

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés - 2015, 2017
Norte (Oviedo Costa) - 2018
Finisterre/Muxía - 2018
Norte - (2019)
Any help will be much appreciated: I am a bit confused by the reporting of changes in official distances (and the 100km ‘mojón’) around Sarria. I understand that 100km is the minimum to get the Compostela but there seems to be some discussion as to where that point is currently (for the purposes of the Pilgrims’ Office that is) on the CF.

Has anyone started after Sarria but before the km 100 point and still got a Compostela? We are planning on starting in Morgade which is, allegedly, km 101 but may need to revisit the plan.

Thank you!
Here is a chart town by town.

 

Pilger99

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
addicted since 1999 (Aragones, CF), lots of caminos in Spain and Portugal since then
Just doing some statistics. 230 pilgrims got their Compostela last month by starting in Ferreiros.
On the milestones you will already read 98,5km, the the way around the airport had undergone some changes since 1993.
None was mentioned with a start in Morgade (maybe some among the 13 "other place in Galicia). Sarria had been at the top of all starting points (33,53% 10637!!!).
source: https://oficinadelperegrino.com/estadisticas/
 

JAMM

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Not enough
Just doing some statistics. 230 pilgrims got their Compostela last month by starting in Ferreiros.
On the milestones you will already read 98,5km, the the way around the airport had undergone some changes since 1993.
None was mentioned with a start in Morgade (maybe some among the 13 "other place in Galicia). Sarria had been at the top of all starting points (33,53% 10637!!!).
source: https://oficinadelperegrino.com/estadisticas/
Thank you Pilger. I checked the statistics too and got a bit concerned that Morgade is not mentioned but I am wondering whether this has to do with the status of the place; I believe it “belongs” to Ferreiros administratively speaking.

It seems the milestones have been changed recently and that the one in Morgade now says km101. Ferreiros comes after Morgade al if a Compostela is possible from Ferreiros (see falcon above), Morgade should qualify too since it is further away... but I admit this confusion is making me a bit nervous!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Personally, I have a problem spitting hairs like this. Why not do what 99.99 percent of pilgrims do, and just walk from Sarria? It is only about 18 additional kilometers.

Yes, the official rule says you must walk AT LEAST the final 100 km in any recognized route into Santiago. Yes, you can finagle, finesse, and cut proverbial corners to walk not one meter more than you must to qualify.

Each person walks their own Camino, and no one, including me has the right or standing to challenge how you accomplish YOUR Camino. I am, nonetheless, uncomfortable with “armchair lawyering” just to get a piece of paper, that evidently is not that important to you.

Let’s face it, if you put that much effort into shaving this thing to the absolute minimum required, perhaps you should avoid having to stand in a waiting queue for 2 hours plus to get this document, which acknowledges your difficult and arduous journey to come to the tomb of the Apostle Saint James to venerate his relics. You would be performing a service to other pilgrims by NOT queuing for a Compostela.

We do offer a “solo sello” conclusion for pilgrims who only want evidence that they made it to the Pilgtim Office, and not wanting a Compostela. All you have to do to obtain this stamp is to tell the security fellow at the front door that “yo quiero solo sello.” (I only want a sello.)

Many repeat pilgrims do exactly this, instead of seeking the piece of paper. Even pilgrims who have walked very long distances many times frequently opt to simply get the stamp to close out their credencial. They know in their heart that they earned the Compostela, and to not need another piece of paper.

Requesting “solo sello” is immediate and avoids further wasting your clearly valuable time waiting in the line for hours with pilgrims who may have walked 600, 800, 1,000 kilometers or more to qualify for that piece of paper. They will have justifiably earned it. I cannot say whether you will have.
 
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NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Personally, I have a problem spitting hairs like this. Why not do what 99.99 percent of pilgrims do, and just walk from Sarria? It is only about 18 additional kilometers.

Yes, the official rule says you must walk AT LEAST the final 100 km in any recognized route into Santiago. Yes, you can finagle, finesse, and cut proverbial corners to walk not one meter more than you must to qualify.

Each person walks their own Camino, and no one, including me has the right or standing to challenge how you accomplish YOUR Camino. I am, nonetheless, uncomfortable with “armchair lawyering” just to get a piece of paper, that evidently is not that important to you.

Let’s face it, if you put that much effort into shaving this thing to the absolute minimum required, perhaps you should avoid having to stand in a waiting queue for 2 hours plus to get this document, which acknowledges your difficult and arduous journey to come to the tomb of the Apostle Saint James to venerate his relics. You would be performing a service to other pilgrims by NOT queuing for a Compostela.

We do offer a “solo sello” conclusion for pilgrims who only want evidence that they made it to the Pilgtim Office, and not wanting a Compostela. All you have to do to obtain this stamp is to tell the security fellow at the front door that “yo quiero solo sello.” (I only want a sello.)

Many repeat pilgrims do exactly this, instead of seeking the piece of paper. Even pilgrims who have walked very long distances many times frequently opt to simply get the stamp to close out their credencial. They know in their heart that they earned the Compostela, and to not need another piece of paper.

Requesting “solo sello” is immediate and avoids further wasting your clearly valuable time waiting in the line for hours with pilgrims who may have walked 600, 800, 1,000 kilometers or more to qualify for that piece of paper. They will have justifiably earned it. I cannot say whether you will have.

As per post #6, they are walking with two young children and are planning to go very slowly over 8 days so the children can manage the whole distance.

Hope this helps to clarify...
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
Personally, I have a problem spitting hairs like this. Why not do what 99.99 percent of pilgrims do, and just walk from Sarria? It is only about 18 additional kilometers.

Yes, the official rule says you must walk AT LEAST the final 100 km in any recognized route into Santiago. Yes, you can finagle, finesse, and cut proverbial corners to walk not one meter more than you must to qualify.

Each person walks their own Camino, and no one, including me has the right or standing to challenge how you accomplish YOUR Camino. I am, nonetheless, uncomfortable with “armchair lawyering” just to get a piece of paper, that evidently is not that important to you.

Let’s face it, if you put that much effort into shaving this thing to the absolute minimum required, perhaps you should avoid having to stand in a waiting queue for 2 hours plus to get this document, which acknowledges your difficult and arduous journey to come to the tomb of the Apostle Saint James to venerate his relics. You would be performing a service to other pilgrims by NOT queuing for a Compostela.

We do offer a “solo sello” conclusion for pilgrims who only want evidence that they made it to the Pilgtim Office, and not wanting a Compostela. All you have to do to obtain this stamp is to tell the security fellow at the front door that “yo quiero solo sello.” (I only want a sello.)

Many repeat pilgrims do exactly this, instead of seeking the piece of paper. Even pilgrims who have walked very long distances many times frequently opt to simply get the stamp to close out their credencial. They know in their heart that they earned the Compostela, and to not need another piece of paper.

Requesting “solo sello” is immediate and avoids further wasting your clearly valuable time waiting in the line for hours with pilgrims who may have walked 600, 800, 1,000 kilometers or more to qualify for that piece of paper. They will have justifiably earned it. I cannot say whether you will have.
What happened to the much vaunted "don't judge other pilgrims"? The OP has already told you that they have limited time and are travelling with 2 children. 18km may be trivial to you but to some people it's a very long way indeed.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Having more information about this pilgrim and the family effort involved, I temper my criticism. They should do what they think best for their family.

However, it does not change my opinion of otherwise able pilgrims who seek to cut the distance to the bare minimum just to qualify for the Compostela. Too many people genuinely strain and suffer to walk from the standard places.

I continue to maintain that shaving the distance ad nauseun cheapens the result.

In this rare case, as was pointed out, there are mitigating factors that I failed to recognize when I read this thread. I am sorry for that oversight.

In my experience volunteering at the pilgrim office for the past six years I have seen a wide variety of corner cutting and outright cheating to obtain Compostelas. It hurts my heart to see this, especially when I also see the extreme efforts made by persons with physical handicaps who manage to cover the full distances using crutches, canes, walking frames and wheelchairs.

My ire is well founded. But, I withdraw criticism of the OP in this case.
 
Past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
We do offer a “solo sello” conclusion for pilgrims who only want evidence that they made it to the Pilgtim Office, and not wanting a Compostela.
“We”? 🤔

But I agree, the obsession with distances in km down to not only the last kilometre but even the last metre is ridiculous. Witness the silly indication of something like 124,573 km on the distance markers in Galicia - an idea of the regional administration. 124 km is precise enough.

Maybe it helps to frame it like this: a Compostela is for anyone who has walked from home, Pamplona, Leon or Ferreiros. 🙃
 
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JAMM

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Not enough
Having more information about this pilgrim and the family effort involved, I temper my criticism. They should do what they think best for their family.

However, it does not change my opinion of otherwise able pilgrims who seek to cut the distance to the bare minimum just to qualify for the Compostela. Too many people genuinely strain and suffer to walk from the standard places.

I continue to maintain that shaving the distance ad nauseun cheapens the result.

In this rare case, as was pointed out, there are mitigating factors that I failed to recognize when I read this thread. I am sorry for that oversight.

In my experience volunteering at the pilgrim office for the past six years I have seen a wide variety of corner cutting and outright cheating to obtain Compostelas. It hurts my heart to see this, especially when I also see the extreme efforts made by persons with physical handicaps who manage to cover the full distances using crutches, canes, walking frames and wheelchairs.

My ire is well founded. But, I withdraw criticism of the OP in this case.

Thank you for your second message. I am sorry that my question upset you. I am even more sorry that I have got so upset about reading your answer: this is the first time I have encountered such ire and judgment in a pilgrim. I should add that I grew up literally on the Camino -I could see the pilgrims from my window- until life took me to a different country so it is not through lack of exposure. Perhaps my blessings in always encountering kindness have made me too naive. You mentioned that people cheating hurts your heart: your angry judgment has hurt mine and I admit I really hope to find more kindness when we finally, Dios mediante, make it to Santiago and to the Oficina del Peregrino. I am now honestly concerned that someone is going to accuse us of trying to cheat or worse when we finally make it to the desk, if we do.

There are multiple reasons (inc. health) which have prevented me from doing a full Camino so far. We are taking 10 days (including two days of travelling) to make this Camino. This is the longest time we have managed to take from work other than for health reasons in over 17 years. 100km and 8 days with is all we can manage. It is not 1000km and 50 days: we wish it could be but we are not in that lucky position right now. That does not mean our pilgrimage will be meaningless, or not for us anyway. I have never seen the Camino as a competition in suffering or time invested: everyone's circumstances are different. People are different. Every Camino is different, even when undertaken by the same person. No Camino is better or more worthy than others if it has been done sincerely and with kindness towards others, in my opinion. How could any of us judge or establish a hierarchy of worthiness for people's Caminos? Some will cheat when it comes to the paperwork: fine, that is annoying but they are not cheating other people's efforts and experiences: they are only cheating themselves.

My children have been brought up with a love and understanding of the Camino - I do not want to give their names, but that alone could give you an idea of my family's bond with what the Camino is and means. The little one is 5: he wants to do this, has been 'training' to do it and the road will be a significant effort for him. 18 km extra -starting from Sarria- would be two more days we do not have and stamina his body does not have. The eldest is 8: our very short Camino is to celebrate her First Holy Communion. It will be a big challenge for her too and she has decided to offer it for a homeless charity. She has asked her friends to sponsor the shelter per km she walks. This is the first opportunity she has to earn a Compostela and it means a lot to her; she feels she has had to wait too long. For all your experience at the office -and I am very grateful for the invaluable work that volunteers like you do- I do not think you can judge what is inside a young girl's heart or doubt her sincerity or devotion (or indeed anyone else's). This is not measured in km yet the Compostela, as a document, is precise in its demands: that is from where the 'obsession' stems. Perhaps if there was less of an 'official' emphasis on the precise requirements, things would be different. I can assure you that there will be nothing 'cheap' (to quote your words) about my children's efforts, commitment and understanding. I dare say there will be nothing cheap about their parents' efforts either - this is what we can manage right now and we are happy to be able to attempt our first Camino as a family (however short). We hope retirement will bring us the opportunity of several lengthy, slow Caminos but that is some time away. For now, this is what our family can manage (if we indeed manage to do those infamous 100km) and that, in my book, does not deserve ire.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Thank you for your second message. I am sorry that my question upset you. I am even more sorry that I have got so upset about reading your answer: this is the first time I have encountered such ire and judgment in a pilgrim. I should add that I grew up literally on the Camino -I could see the pilgrims from my window- until life took me to a different country so it is not through lack of exposure. Perhaps my blessings in always encountering kindness have made me too naive. You mentioned that people cheating hurts your heart: your angry judgment has hurt mine and I admit I really hope to find more kindness when we finally, Dios mediante, make it to Santiago and to the Oficina del Peregrino. I am now honestly concerned that someone is going to accuse us of trying to cheat or worse when we finally make it to the desk, if we do.

There are multiple reasons (inc. health) which have prevented me from doing a full Camino so far. We are taking 10 days (including two days of travelling) to make this Camino. This is the longest time we have managed to take from work other than for health reasons in over 17 years. 100km and 8 days with is all we can manage. It is not 1000km and 50 days: we wish it could be but we are not in that lucky position right now. That does not mean our pilgrimage will be meaningless, or not for us anyway. I have never seen the Camino as a competition in suffering or time invested: everyone's circumstances are different. People are different. Every Camino is different, even when undertaken by the same person. No Camino is better or more worthy than others if it has been done sincerely and with kindness towards others, in my opinion. How could any of us judge or establish a hierarchy of worthiness for people's Caminos? Some will cheat when it comes to the paperwork: fine, that is annoying but they are not cheating other people's efforts and experiences: they are only cheating themselves.

My children have been brought up with a love and understanding of the Camino - I do not want to give their names, but that alone could give you an idea of my family's bond with what the Camino is and means. The little one is 5: he wants to do this, has been 'training' to do it and the road will be a significant effort for him. 18 km extra -starting from Sarria- would be two more days we do not have and stamina his body does not have. The eldest is 8: our very short Camino is to celebrate her First Holy Communion. It will be a big challenge for her too and she has decided to offer it for a homeless charity. She has asked her friends to sponsor the shelter per km she walks. This is the first opportunity she has to earn a Compostela and it means a lot to her; she feels she has had to wait too long. For all your experience at the office -and I am very grateful for the invaluable work that volunteers like you do- I do not think you can judge what is inside a young girl's heart or doubt her sincerity or devotion (or indeed anyone else's). This is not measured in km yet the Compostela, as a document, is precise in its demands: that is from where the 'obsession' stems. Perhaps if there was less of an 'official' emphasis on the precise requirements, things would be different. I can assure you that there will be nothing 'cheap' (to quote your words) about my children's efforts, commitment and understanding. I dare say there will be nothing cheap about their parents' efforts either - this is what we can manage right now and we are happy to be able to attempt our first Camino as a family (however short). We hope retirement will bring us the opportunity of several lengthy, slow Caminos but that is some time away. For now, this is what our family can manage (if we indeed manage to do those infamous 100km) and that, in my book, does not deserve ire.

T2andreo apologized for misunderstanding your situation. If you don't accept his apology, fine; but what you wrote is basically the Pot calling the Kettle black. . . judging and criticizing him for your perception that he judged and criticized you. Tom is a great guy, he has a very generous heart, and as a volunteer in the Pilgrim's Office in SdC, he has probably seen and experienced a lot of issues with folks trying to game the system.

But the most important thing in this is that he apologized and was gracious enough to admit a mistake.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Thank you for your second message. I am sorry that my question upset you. I am even more sorry that I have got so upset about reading your answer: this is the first time I have encountered such ire and judgment in a pilgrim. I should add that I grew up literally on the Camino -I could see the pilgrims from my window- until life took me to a different country so it is not through lack of exposure. Perhaps my blessings in always encountering kindness have made me too naive. You mentioned that people cheating hurts your heart: your angry judgment has hurt mine and I admit I really hope to find more kindness when we finally, Dios mediante, make it to Santiago and to the Oficina del Peregrino. I am now honestly concerned that someone is going to accuse us of trying to cheat or worse when we finally make it to the desk, if we do.

There are multiple reasons (inc. health) which have prevented me from doing a full Camino so far. We are taking 10 days (including two days of travelling) to make this Camino. This is the longest time we have managed to take from work other than for health reasons in over 17 years. 100km and 8 days with is all we can manage. It is not 1000km and 50 days: we wish it could be but we are not in that lucky position right now. That does not mean our pilgrimage will be meaningless, or not for us anyway. I have never seen the Camino as a competition in suffering or time invested: everyone's circumstances are different. People are different. Every Camino is different, even when undertaken by the same person. No Camino is better or more worthy than others if it has been done sincerely and with kindness towards others, in my opinion. How could any of us judge or establish a hierarchy of worthiness for people's Caminos? Some will cheat when it comes to the paperwork: fine, that is annoying but they are not cheating other people's efforts and experiences: they are only cheating themselves.

My children have been brought up with a love and understanding of the Camino - I do not want to give their names, but that alone could give you an idea of my family's bond with what the Camino is and means. The little one is 5: he wants to do this, has been 'training' to do it and the road will be a significant effort for him. 18 km extra -starting from Sarria- would be two more days we do not have and stamina his body does not have. The eldest is 8: our very short Camino is to celebrate her First Holy Communion. It will be a big challenge for her too and she has decided to offer it for a homeless charity. She has asked her friends to sponsor the shelter per km she walks. This is the first opportunity she has to earn a Compostela and it means a lot to her; she feels she has had to wait too long. For all your experience at the office -and I am very grateful for the invaluable work that volunteers like you do- I do not think you can judge what is inside a young girl's heart or doubt her sincerity or devotion (or indeed anyone else's). This is not measured in km yet the Compostela, as a document, is precise in its demands: that is from where the 'obsession' stems. Perhaps if there was less of an 'official' emphasis on the precise requirements, things would be different. I can assure you that there will be nothing 'cheap' (to quote your words) about my children's efforts, commitment and understanding. I dare say there will be nothing cheap about their parents' efforts either - this is what we can manage right now and we are happy to be able to attempt our first Camino as a family (however short). We hope retirement will bring us the opportunity of several lengthy, slow Caminos but that is some time away. For now, this is what our family can manage (if we indeed manage to do those infamous 100km) and that, in my book, does not deserve ire.
I have to agree TOTALLY with Mr Bugg. T2 and I have had a few minor discussions that would never rise to the level of even a disagreement. HE COMPLETELY APOLOGIZED. Not only is this a case of the kettle calling the pot black it is a case of someone reading and understanding what they want to read and twist words to justify your belief. You have not walked since 2008 and much has changed since then. There are many pilgrims that are pilgrims in name only. None of us care how long anyone walks, the reasons that they walk, or the time or physical restraints many have. I believe that Tom made it painfully obvious that he was sorry for what he said and that although he was sorry his words still ring true. His words had nothing to do with you at all, It had to do with people who do cheat, people who do shortcut and take without giving back to the camino. As someone who has spent many months walking in solitude and peace there is a spirit and energy to each camino that is precious and needs to be nurtured and appreciated. I totally agree that those people are as you say, cheating themselves, but they are also sucking the energy and love that so many pilgrims do need from the soul of the Camino.
Also I always find it sad when people play the wonderful child "card" and in this case how much they are sacrificing or how much they want to do this. It is great that they want to do the camino but dont weaponize it. Especially against a generous soul like Tom.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Having more information about this pilgrim and the family effort involved, I temper my criticism. They should do what they think best for their family.

However, it does not change my opinion of otherwise able pilgrims who seek to cut the distance to the bare minimum just to qualify for the Compostela. Too many people genuinely strain and suffer to walk from the standard places.

I continue to maintain that shaving the distance ad nauseun cheapens the result.

In this rare case, as was pointed out, there are mitigating factors that I failed to recognize when I read this thread. I am sorry for that oversight.

In my experience volunteering at the pilgrim office for the past six years I have seen a wide variety of corner cutting and outright cheating to obtain Compostelas. It hurts my heart to see this, especially when I also see the extreme efforts made by persons with physical handicaps who manage to cover the full distances using crutches, canes, walking frames and wheelchairs.

My ire is well founded. But, I withdraw criticism of the OP in this case.
Hi Tom, Posted a little comment also. I probably said to much but Dave Bugg got me going with his comment and you deserved better than what you received. Buen Camino
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
T2andreo apologized for misunderstanding your situation. If you don't accept his apology, fine; but what you wrote is basically the Pot calling the Kettle black. . . judging and criticizing him for your perception that he judged and criticized you. Tom is a great guy, he has a very generous heart, and as a volunteer in the Pilgrim's Office in SdC, he has probably seen and experienced a lot of issues with folks trying to game the system.

But the most important thing in this is that he apologized and was gracious enough to admit a mistake.
You got my juices flowing with this comment.
 
Past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
Perhaps you didn't know, but he happens to be there, right now, in Santiago, as part of the team at the Pilgrim Office, so his use of "we" is understandable.
I did know.

Perhaps time to let the thread rest as the question itself has been answered: Ferreiros is a valid lugar de salida, a valid starting point for gaining a Compostela as confirmed by @falcon269 and as can be seen in the Oficina del Peregrino‘s yearly and monthly statistics published on their website. Only a tiny percentage of pilgrims start there or in Morgade which is actually barely a „place“, having just a few houses and perhaps 3 inhabitants as far as I can tell. And no public transport to get to Morgade or Ferreiros.
 
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