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Could you be a Hospitable Hermit?

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
We are kicking around an idea for camino hospitality and I wonder if some of you can help me hash it out.
The Camino ethos, at least among some of us hardcore hospitaleros, is based on donativo albergues, simple shelters with minimal facilities, watched-over by volunteer hospitaleros.
Some hardy souls out in the wildlife-rich wilderness of Spain and Portugal have found a disused camino road, and are re-developing its old infrastructure of priests' houses and town-hall meeting rooms. About 40 pilgrims a year now use this 200-km. path, which connects Zamora to Verin, via Braganza. It is waymarked and GPS-tracked, but there are still a couple of gaps in the line of albergues... which makes for at least one 40km. day... but those should be filled-in within the year. The road has much to commend it. Once it's all announced, it is projected to attract about 1,400 to 3,000 pilgrims per year. Every one of the albergues will subscribe to the donativo principle!

The albergues are small, the towns are small, there's not a whole lot of pilgrim action. Whoever watches the place would need to cover his own costs for food and transportation (there are daily buses), take care of the pilgrims who show up, keep the albergue clean and maintain good relations with the town. There is little need for teams of hospis in places so small, so the volunteer would likely be there on his own. This is Deep Spain, he'd need to speak Spanish. He'd need to be reasonably healthy. And he'd need to be willing to work without monetary recompense.

It wouldn't make sense to turn over the hospis every two weeks. These are shaping-up as longer-term gigs, a month or two or three, or even an entire pilgrim season... or year-round for the truly dedicated hermit.

This would seem to be a good gig for a student working on a thesis, or an author working on a book, or a retiree looking for a low-cost living experience in a faraway world. Or a religious solitary in search of silence, but dedicated to hospitality. Or someone in love with the "my own albergue" ideal who wants to try out the full-on hospitalero life before he buys a house in Spain?

What do you think, pilgrims? Do these people exist, or are we just dreaming? Where will we find them?
 

Michael K

New Member
Hi Rebekah, they do exist! (I just sent you a message.) If you reached out to the right places I could see people falling over themselves to get a chance at this- writers, language learners, students, Camino lifestyle lovers, get-away-from-it-all-ers, would-be albergue owners, the list goes on.
 

Kris85

Backpacker & traveler
Camino(s) past & future
Planning a trip from Bordeaux to Santiago de Compostela in march, april, may 2019.
You are not just dreaming. We excist.

I just moved to Porto, Portugal after retiring from work back home in Norway. I currently looking for some
meaningful things to do. After hosting over 300+ people at Couchsurfing, i like the idea of "free
hospitality", and i have dreamed about starting my own private hostel in the furture. I have a small income to take care of my self, so the projects im looking for dont need to be remunerative.

In fact; i have NO idea what to do with my life now. No partner, no kids, a passive stable income gives me a freedom I could never dream about. Im with no doubt lucky!

However i have no experiance in this world of pilgrims and have never done a camino before. But in March, im doing my first - and the plan is - to think about what i would like to do for the next few years. :)

So this appeals to me. However, i dont speak Spanish/Portuguese - and i cant live to isolated. However, i could always get a car. ;P But this sounds a bit to extreme for my taste. :) But i like the idea !!!
 

Java

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
planning
We are kicking around an idea for camino hospitality and I wonder if some of you can help me hash it out.
The Camino ethos, at least among some of us hardcore hospitaleros, is based on donativo albergues, simple shelters with minimal facilities, watched-over by volunteer hospitaleros.
Some hardy souls out in the wildlife-rich wilderness of Spain and Portugal have found a disused camino road, and are re-developing its old infrastructure of priests' houses and town-hall meeting rooms. About 40 pilgrims a year now use this 200-km. path, which connects Zamora to Verin, via Braganza. It is waymarked and GPS-tracked, but there are still a couple of gaps in the line of albergues... which makes for at least one 40km. day... but those should be filled-in within the year. The road has much to commend it. Once it's all announced, it is projected to attract about 1,400 to 3,000 pilgrims per year. Every one of the albergues will subscribe to the donativo principle!

The albergues are small, the towns are small, there's not a whole lot of pilgrim action. Whoever watches the place would need to cover his own costs for food and transportation (there are daily buses), take care of the pilgrims who show up, keep the albergue clean and maintain good relations with the town. There is little need for teams of hospis in places so small, so the volunteer would likely be there on his own. This is Deep Spain, he'd need to speak Spanish. He'd need to be reasonably healthy. And he'd need to be willing to work without monetary recompense.

It wouldn't make sense to turn over the hospis every two weeks. These are shaping-up as longer-term gigs, a month or two or three, or even an entire pilgrim season... or year-round for the truly dedicated hermit.

This would seem to be a good gig for a student working on a thesis, or an author working on a book, or a retiree looking for a low-cost living experience in a faraway world. Or a religious solitary in search of silence, but dedicated to hospitality. Or someone in love with the "my own albergue" ideal who wants to try out the full-on hospitalero life before he buys a house in Spain?

What do you think, pilgrims? Do these people exist, or are we just dreaming? Where will we find them?
Sounds like the life I am currently creating, working towards.
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
I would like to do this - and as this thread shows, people are interested in this. But I expect there will be gaps when volunteers aren't available in all the places that you'd like to have them.

You might find it helpful to have a chat with the Camino association in Almeria, since they manage 7 or 8 donativo albergues on the way to Granada. This route has fewer pilgrims than some other Caminos, and it passes through some depopulated, rural, areas. In general, the albergues / refuges do not have resident hospitaleros. The keys can be kept at a nearby bar or police station. Recently, the association has installed key safes at its albergues - and pilgrims can call the association to get the code to open the safe.

The association had a hospitalero in one of their albergues for some weeks last year (Wolf). But when there are no hospitaleros, the association still manages to keep the albergues clean and working well:

I think the association is kind of famous already - but if you need an introduction, I'll be happy to put you in touch with them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances (Sept-Nov 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2019)
We are kicking around an idea for camino hospitality and I wonder if some of you can help me hash it out.
The Camino ethos, at least among some of us hardcore hospitaleros, is based on donativo albergues, simple shelters with minimal facilities, watched-over by volunteer hospitaleros.
Some hardy souls out in the wildlife-rich wilderness of Spain and Portugal have found a disused camino road, and are re-developing its old infrastructure of priests' houses and town-hall meeting rooms. About 40 pilgrims a year now use this 200-km. path, which connects Zamora to Verin, via Braganza. It is waymarked and GPS-tracked, but there are still a couple of gaps in the line of albergues... which makes for at least one 40km. day... but those should be filled-in within the year. The road has much to commend it. Once it's all announced, it is projected to attract about 1,400 to 3,000 pilgrims per year. Every one of the albergues will subscribe to the donativo principle!

The albergues are small, the towns are small, there's not a whole lot of pilgrim action. Whoever watches the place would need to cover his own costs for food and transportation (there are daily buses), take care of the pilgrims who show up, keep the albergue clean and maintain good relations with the town. There is little need for teams of hospis in places so small, so the volunteer would likely be there on his own. This is Deep Spain, he'd need to speak Spanish. He'd need to be reasonably healthy. And he'd need to be willing to work without monetary recompense.

It wouldn't make sense to turn over the hospis every two weeks. These are shaping-up as longer-term gigs, a month or two or three, or even an entire pilgrim season... or year-round for the truly dedicated hermit.

This would seem to be a good gig for a student working on a thesis, or an author working on a book, or a retiree looking for a low-cost living experience in a faraway world. Or a religious solitary in search of silence, but dedicated to hospitality. Or someone in love with the "my own albergue" ideal who wants to try out the full-on hospitalero life before he buys a house in Spain?

What do you think, pilgrims? Do these people exist, or are we just dreaming? Where will we find them?

He. Or she...?
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
I agree with the others - there are enough folks out there that finding a few to cover a season at each donativo is an achievable task! However, us non-schengen citizens are limited to 90 days, so a one or two month assignment would be ideal.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Sounds like a great idea! I just need to get myself retired over the next few years! :oops:
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
We detoured to Valdeperdice from Zamora and slept on the wooden stage in the village hall. TBH, it was filthy but we fashioned a mop and cleaned the place up. I have very fond memories of our evening there chatting with the very elderly residents who were sitting out on the street playing cards, drinking their amazing spring water and climbing the hill for a fabulous view. The priest who covers that village and a bunch more was very kind via email and even offered to put us up at his house in another village but we opted for the “town hall”. Will this be one of the stops? It is very conveniently located for a visit to San Juan in the morning.

Your dreams excite me. I wonder if there would be a way around Schengen regulations for a longer term stay. I would LOVE to do a year of language learning whilst serving in this capacity.
 

Paladina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cycled caminos francés, Finisterre, primitivo & del norte (2017); VdlP/Sanabres, ingles et al (2018)
I could and I would. I already live as a semi-hermit in Ireland offering basic hospitality to intrepid travellers, and I’d relish the opportunity to do so in Spain.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I am thinking that if some association or another developed this assignment as a live-in, intensive Spanish language learning, practicum and immersive living experience, a student visa might be possible. Even if lodging is offered in return for basic housekeeping, you might not run afoul of the labor laws...then again...:eek:

If it were Camino-centric (doh!) and limited to persons who have already done at least one Camino, and who speak enough Spanish to function, you might be able to limit it to Camino veterans and experienced hospis who actually understand what you are asking for in return.

But, my research suggests that obtaining a student visa is relatively easier than qualifying for a long-stay (temporary residence) visa.

You would likely need a lawyer to maneuver the Spanish immigration system, to obtain an approval or certification.

Still, and all, it is a wonderful idea. Good luck developing it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from Astorga (2018)
Frances/Invierno from SJPP (2019)
I would love it.
I have commitments for the next year and a half but after that I would be able and (very) willing to take a few months leave and be a hospitable hermit.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
We are kicking around an idea for camino hospitality and I wonder if some of you can help me hash it out.
The Camino ethos, at least among some of us hardcore hospitaleros, is based on donativo albergues, simple shelters with minimal facilities, watched-over by volunteer hospitaleros.
Some hardy souls out in the wildlife-rich wilderness of Spain and Portugal have found a disused camino road, and are re-developing its old infrastructure of priests' houses and town-hall meeting rooms. About 40 pilgrims a year now use this 200-km. path, which connects Zamora to Verin, via Braganza. It is waymarked and GPS-tracked, but there are still a couple of gaps in the line of albergues... which makes for at least one 40km. day... but those should be filled-in within the year. The road has much to commend it. Once it's all announced, it is projected to attract about 1,400 to 3,000 pilgrims per year. Every one of the albergues will subscribe to the donativo principle!

The albergues are small, the towns are small, there's not a whole lot of pilgrim action. Whoever watches the place would need to cover his own costs for food and transportation (there are daily buses), take care of the pilgrims who show up, keep the albergue clean and maintain good relations with the town. There is little need for teams of hospis in places so small, so the volunteer would likely be there on his own. This is Deep Spain, he'd need to speak Spanish. He'd need to be reasonably healthy. And he'd need to be willing to work without monetary recompense.

It wouldn't make sense to turn over the hospis every two weeks. These are shaping-up as longer-term gigs, a month or two or three, or even an entire pilgrim season... or year-round for the truly dedicated hermit.

This would seem to be a good gig for a student working on a thesis, or an author working on a book, or a retiree looking for a low-cost living experience in a faraway world. Or a religious solitary in search of silence, but dedicated to hospitality. Or someone in love with the "my own albergue" ideal who wants to try out the full-on hospitalero life before he buys a house in Spain?

What do you think, pilgrims? Do these people exist, or are we just dreaming? Where will we find them?
Sounds good. I wish! Maybe... as a good friend says: not saying no...
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
@Leibniz that is true but there are others of us outside the EU who have to work out how to make it possible. @t2andreo your ideas of using camino vets is sensible - and getting a student visa to study Spanish (or Spanish literature in situ for those who are already fluent??) just might open the door for some of us.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
thanks guys. A few things are coming clear already: the need for solid pilgrimage and hospitalero experience, good Spanish, and ability to stay legally in the country. The people who are opening the albergues say it is most important that the volunteers be fully dedicated to the old-school camino hospitality ethos: donativo all the way, (which means no push for money from pilgrims), an open door to ALL pilgrims, and at least an appreciation (if not belief) in the spiritual roots of the pilgrimage.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Well, it seems we are getting closer to a fixed list of prerequisites. I know Rebekah will do this, and soon... Then, those of us who do not qualify (most through) lack of EU nationality, Spanish language, or lack of hospi training, can go back to dreaming...

Another thought, given the seriously donativo (with a religious) slant of this chain of albergues, would be to try to network with the ACC, at Santiago. Through them, you could link up with other indigenous, possibly church-affiliated groups. This, in turn, might lead to local folks in the region available to work.

Then again, it might not. One does not know until it is tried.

Hope this helps.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
@t2andreo don't just dream....start working on the Spanish, do the training and volunteer at another albergue...by the time you've done that, someone may have sorted student visa issues and you'll be ready to go.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 1/2 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
Make it possible for a couple to be hospitaleros, and I think you'd get more pensioners. I've come across a lot of youngish pensioners who say they don't know what to do with the rest of t heir lives - if they have Camino experience and speak Spanish, this could be an ideal placement for people who want to take time off to think.

(Just wait till my husband retires, and we'll volunteer - I can work from Spain if I have acceptable internet...)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
@t2andreo don't just dream....start working on the Spanish, do the training and volunteer at another albergue...by the time you've done that, someone may have sorted student visa issues and you'll be ready to go.
While this looks very interesting personally, I have familial responsibilities that preclude such a pursuit. So, I content myself with one annual pilgrimage in the Spring, followed by a month of volunteer work in July - August at the Pilgrim Office. It keeps my batteries charged.

When I am there (in Spain), I am fully there. When I am here, I am 'still there.' My daily hour or so on this Forum trying to help others, one-hour daily work on my Spanish in Duolingo.com, and my ongoing planning for the next Camino must suffice... It has become my daily routine...
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
The albergue chain will be finished next year. We are still working out this idea. Nothing is written in stone, but I've overseen enough albergue operations with international staff to know some of the things to avoid! I am very reassured that some fine hermits are out there. I know at least one of the albergues will be large enough to accommodate a couple.
Much remains to be worked-out. We all can take our time and develop the skills and paperwork we might require.
Do think about this idea, and please come back and post your thoughts and ideas. I cannot do it without you!
 

J Willhaus

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
24 May- 14 July (2016)CF
Hospitalera, Zamora Dec 15-31, (2017), Hospitalera Grañón Dec 15-31 (2018)
The albergue chain will be finished next year. We are still working out this idea. Nothing is written in stone, but I've overseen enough albergue operations with international staff to know some of the things to avoid! I am very reassured that some fine hermits are out there. I know at least one of the albergues will be large enough to accommodate a couple.
Much remains to be worked-out. We all can take our time and develop the skills and paperwork we might require.
Do think about this idea, and please come back and post your thoughts and ideas. I cannot do it without you!
I think there are certainly people out there who would respond to this opportunity. Phil attended the Encuentro de Hospitaleros last year and there were many in attendance plus hundreds more who could not attend due to timing and limitations of the host facility in Javier. It sounds like a wonderful experience. Caring for pilgrims is an awesome responsibility and I know that you will chose people more carefully than just those needing a cheap place to stay or a quiet place to study while writing a thesis. When I was a hospitalera in Zamora in Dec 2017, we had a pilgrim who had come from Santiago presumably backwards down this route through a portion of Portugal to us. He described staying a lot in firestations and said the way was not well marked especially for going backwards. He did not have a phone or gps and was really an old school type pilgrim with a long beard and a staff (looked a little like Gandolf from Lord of the Rings).

Your requirements of Spanish fluency and long term availability would seem to exclude many on an English speaking forum so I can only assume that this is just one place you might be trying to recruit?
 

SebasDDP

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(Via Plata) Starting from Vila Real, Portugal Last Year, (2018)
Plan On Original Camino (2019)
Hi Rebekah, I was referred to you by a mutual friend of ours from Santiago. He mentioned this project you are coming up with and ironically enough I am leaving in June all this behind in the states to follow a calling of which I do not know where it is to lead me but for some reason God brought me this answer a day after booking my one way ticket. Whatever I can help in I would be honored and would love to schedule a day we can have a phone conversation because I have some ideas as well.
 
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Sal Miller

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances
We are kicking around an idea for camino hospitality and I wonder if some of you can help me hash it out.
The Camino ethos, at least among some of us hardcore hospitaleros, is based on donativo albergues, simple shelters with minimal facilities, watched-over by volunteer hospitaleros.
Some hardy souls out in the wildlife-rich wilderness of Spain and Portugal have found a disused camino road, and are re-developing its old infrastructure of priests' houses and town-hall meeting rooms. About 40 pilgrims a year now use this 200-km. path, which connects Zamora to Verin, via Braganza. It is waymarked and GPS-tracked, but there are still a couple of gaps in the line of albergues... which makes for at least one 40km. day... but those should be filled-in within the year. The road has much to commend it. Once it's all announced, it is projected to attract about 1,400 to 3,000 pilgrims per year. Every one of the albergues will subscribe to the donativo principle!

The albergues are small, the towns are small, there's not a whole lot of pilgrim action. Whoever watches the place would need to cover his own costs for food and transportation (there are daily buses), take care of the pilgrims who show up, keep the albergue clean and maintain good relations with the town. There is little need for teams of hospis in places so small, so the volunteer would likely be there on his own. This is Deep Spain, he'd need to speak Spanish. He'd need to be reasonably healthy. And he'd need to be willing to work without monetary recompense.

It wouldn't make sense to turn over the hospis every two weeks. These are shaping-up as longer-term gigs, a month or two or three, or even an entire pilgrim season... or year-round for the truly dedicated hermit.

This would seem to be a good gig for a student working on a thesis, or an author working on a book, or a retiree looking for a low-cost living experience in a faraway world. Or a religious solitary in search of silence, but dedicated to hospitality. Or someone in love with the "my own albergue" ideal who wants to try out the full-on hospitalero life before he buys a house in Spain?

What do you think, pilgrims? Do these people exist, or are we just dreaming? Where will we find them?
 

Sal Miller

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances
Hi Rebekah, yes the people you are looking for actually do exist. In fact I met a pilgrim last fall, on CF, who was on his way to some remote albergue on a stretch that goes from Madrid to Santiago. He was French. He spoke fluent Spanish but no English. I am American, cannot speak French, but I'm fluent Spanish. We talked a long time about his plans. For me, this was a fascinating thing to do, sitting down to a pilgrim's dinner in an albergue and communicating with someone in my adopted language. He talked about his upcoming assignment, at a place with only a pilgrim or two maybe twice a week. He was concerned about the loneliness, but also excited to be doing something so contemplative.

When I saw your post describing the plans you and your friends have for developing a new segment of the camino, I couldn't help but think of my encounter with the French gentleman at the albergue on my camino.

My wife and I are returning to the CF in the spring of 2020 where we will do some volunteer work along the way. We intend to explore more of the camino opportunities in future years especially those like what you have described. If you have a website or an email, please send it to me so we can get in touch with you directly, if you don't mind. Thanks for your intriguing post.

smillerbigbig@gmail.com
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
my email is rebrites (at) yahoo.com
People please notice this project is still in development. If you show up at the door tomorrow, there won't be a place for you to go....
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Camino(s) past & future
yes...
I'll put my hand up as a yes :)

My Spanish is awful but I am working on it, my French is good... but I've yet to go on the course. In one or two years I'll be good to go! @J Willhaus and many others have inspired me to do this... and also @t2andreo in the Pilgrim's office. After all the love I have for walking in Spain it feels right to give something back or to just be part of it in other ways than walking.
 

SafariGirl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Vía de la Plata, Primitivo, Norte, Lebaniego & Vadiniense,
Aragonés
We are kicking around an idea for camino hospitality and I wonder if some of you can help me hash it out.
The Camino ethos, at least among some of us hardcore hospitaleros, is based on donativo albergues, simple shelters with minimal facilities, watched-over by volunteer hospitaleros.
Some hardy souls out in the wildlife-rich wilderness of Spain and Portugal have found a disused camino road, and are re-developing its old infrastructure of priests' houses and town-hall meeting rooms. About 40 pilgrims a year now use this 200-km. path, which connects Zamora to Verin, via Braganza. It is waymarked and GPS-tracked, but there are still a couple of gaps in the line of albergues... which makes for at least one 40km. day... but those should be filled-in within the year. The road has much to commend it. Once it's all announced, it is projected to attract about 1,400 to 3,000 pilgrims per year. Every one of the albergues will subscribe to the donativo principle!

The albergues are small, the towns are small, there's not a whole lot of pilgrim action. Whoever watches the place would need to cover his own costs for food and transportation (there are daily buses), take care of the pilgrims who show up, keep the albergue clean and maintain good relations with the town. There is little need for teams of hospis in places so small, so the volunteer would likely be there on his own. This is Deep Spain, he'd need to speak Spanish. He'd need to be reasonably healthy. And he'd need to be willing to work without monetary recompense.

It wouldn't make sense to turn over the hospis every two weeks. These are shaping-up as longer-term gigs, a month or two or three, or even an entire pilgrim season... or year-round for the truly dedicated hermit.

This would seem to be a good gig for a student working on a thesis, or an author working on a book, or a retiree looking for a low-cost living experience in a faraway world. Or a religious solitary in search of silence, but dedicated to hospitality. Or someone in love with the "my own albergue" ideal who wants to try out the full-on hospitalero life before he buys a house in Spain?

What do you think, pilgrims? Do these people exist, or are we just dreaming? Where will we find them?
I am such a person Rebecca. I've walked 7 caminos to Santiago (and one in reverse); worked in two different albergues as a Hospitalera; have done the Hospitalero training through the Confraternity of St James; speak Spanish, English and very basic German; have dreamed of running an albergue since my first camino 3 years ago; currently have temporary Spanish residency status; love remote wilderness areas; enjoy my own company; am independent-minded, sociable, friendly and calm; believe in the Donativo principle and the historical and spiritual ethos of caring for (physically and emotionally) weary pilgrims; and if I did this I'd be committed to doing it for at least a whole season...probably more.
Do you have a list yet of where the albergues are likely to be? I'd be interested in looking at the different town/village locations...
:)
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
Do you have a list yet of where the albergues are likely to be? I'd be interested in looking at the different town/village locations...
Map of route:
https://www.soutochao.com/camino-de-santiago/

Videos:

I have been looking at the existing accommodation possibilities since I am hoping to walk this route in September 2019:

STAGE 1
Zamora to Muelas del Pan 37.3km
(Casa Rural El Vedal)
[No accommodation before Muelas - Some people camp midway near Almendra]

** There is an effort to convert a disused building in Almendra to an albergue. You can find articles in La Opinion about it.

STAGE 2
Muelas del Pan to Fonfría 22.4km
(Albergue Municip. Fonfria)

STAGE 3
Fonfría to Alcañices 20.8km
(Albergue Municip. Alcañices)

STAGE 4
Alcañices to Quintanilha 25.5km
(Albergue Quintanilha)

STAGE 5
Quintanilha to Bragança 26.0km
(Room at Fire Station or Hotels in Bragança)

STAGE 6
Bragança to Vinhais 28.3km
(Room at Fire Station or cabins at an eco-resort Parque biológico Vinhais)

STAGE 7
Vinhais to Edral 18.3km
(Roof and floor at a day centre for the aged Casa De Dia Edral)

STAGE 8.1
Edral to Vilarvdevós 22.9km
(Hostal - Meson Muxia)

STAGE 8.2
Vilardevós to Verin 13.5km
(Albergue Xunta Verin)

After Verin - Can walk 17km to Laza and join Sanabres or continue on the path less travelled via Vlla del Rei, Xinzo de Lima, Sandias, and Allariz (which all have albergues of some description), to Ourense.
 
Last edited:

Bala

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (Oct. 2018)
These videos are gorgeous. And they're enhanced by beautiful music. @Raggy are they yours or the fruits of your research? I'm so glad I watched them, they make me wish I were there right now. 😊
 

SafariGirl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Vía de la Plata, Primitivo, Norte, Lebaniego & Vadiniense,
Aragonés
Map of route:
https://www.soutochao.com/camino-de-santiago/

Videos:

I have been looking at the existing accommodation possibilities since I am hoping to walk this route in September 2019:

STAGE 1
Zamora to Muelas del Pan 37.3km
(Casa Rural El Vedal)
[No accommodation before Muelas - Some people camp midway near Almendra]

** There is an effort to convert a disused building in Almendra to an albergue. You can find articles in La Opinion about it.

STAGE 2
Muelas del Pan to Fonfría 22.4km
(Albergue Municip. Fonfria)

STAGE 3
Fonfría to Alcañices 20.8km
(Albergue Municip. Alcañices)

STAGE 4
Alcañices to Quintanilha 25.5km
(Albergue Quintanilha)

STAGE 5
Quintanilha to Bragança 26.0km
(Room at Fire Station or Hotels in Bragança)

STAGE 6
Bragança to Vinhais 28.3km
(Room at Fire Station or cabins at an eco-resort Parque biológico Vinhais)

STAGE 7
Vinhais to Edral 18.3km
(Roof and floor at a day centre for the aged Casa De Dia Edral)

STAGE 8.1
Edral to Vilarvdevós 22.9km
(Hostal - Meson Muxia)

STAGE 8.2
Vilardevós to Verin 13.5km
(Albergue Xunta Verin)

After Verin - Can walk 17km to Laza and join Sanabres or continue on the path less travelled via Vlla del Rei, Xinzo de Lima, Sandias, and Allariz (which all have albergues of some description), to Ourense.
Many thanks Raggy, very interesting and informative :) . I'd also be interested in knowing if any villages/towns/building have already been identified as candidates for the planned albergues...
 

SafariGirl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Vía de la Plata, Primitivo, Norte, Lebaniego & Vadiniense,
Aragonés
Map of route:
https://www.soutochao.com/camino-de-santiago/

Videos:

I have been looking at the existing accommodation possibilities since I am hoping to walk this route in September 2019:

STAGE 1
Zamora to Muelas del Pan 37.3km
(Casa Rural El Vedal)
[No accommodation before Muelas - Some people camp midway near Almendra]

** There is an effort to convert a disused building in Almendra to an albergue. You can find articles in La Opinion about it.

STAGE 2
Muelas del Pan to Fonfría 22.4km
(Albergue Municip. Fonfria)

STAGE 3
Fonfría to Alcañices 20.8km
(Albergue Municip. Alcañices)

STAGE 4
Alcañices to Quintanilha 25.5km
(Albergue Quintanilha)

STAGE 5
Quintanilha to Bragança 26.0km
(Room at Fire Station or Hotels in Bragança)

STAGE 6
Bragança to Vinhais 28.3km
(Room at Fire Station or cabins at an eco-resort Parque biológico Vinhais)

STAGE 7
Vinhais to Edral 18.3km
(Roof and floor at a day centre for the aged Casa De Dia Edral)

STAGE 8.1
Edral to Vilarvdevós 22.9km
(Hostal - Meson Muxia)

STAGE 8.2
Vilardevós to Verin 13.5km
(Albergue Xunta Verin)

After Verin - Can walk 17km to Laza and join Sanabres or continue on the path less travelled via Vlla del Rei, Xinzo de Lima, Sandias, and Allariz (which all have albergues of some description), to Ourense.
Raggy, I've just watched the videos and they're beautiful, very evocative of the Via which I walked a couple of years ago. I hope you have a great time on your Camino.
All the best
Michele
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
These videos are gorgeous. And they're enhanced by beautiful music. @Raggy are they yours or the fruits of your research? I'm so glad I watched them, they make me wish I were there right now. 😊
Credit for the first video goes to Bjørg Tvetene Sæter

Credits for the music are listed at the end. After watching this, I expect that many of us will add some Fauré to our playlists ... and Luar Na Lubre for the authentic Galician feeling.

Credit for the second video goes to Bruno

Bruno has written a guide on his blog and published GPS tracks:

And here are a couple of other discussions about this Camino on this site:


I apologize for derailing the thread - but perhaps this information will get more people interested in the revival of this route and in the opportunity to serve as a hospitalero.
 
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Bala

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP-Burgos, 2015)
Camino Frances (Burgos-Sarria, 2018)
Sarria-Santiago (Oct. 2018)
Thanks for the info, @Raggy. And I agree, learning more about this Camino may well inspire others to offer help as hospitaleros. I hope so. I wish this program every success.
 

hal_cpt

Wandering South African in Gelderland
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Frances (2013),Portugues (2017)
Future: St Olav (Norway) (2019), VF (2022)
I would absolutely love to do this for a spell. I live in the Schengen area so that is not a problem. Possibly during my vacation next year or else while I write (part of) my PhD thesis the following year. In the former case I could manage a 3 or 4 week spell -- in the latter, things could be a bit more flexible as long as there is enough internet access to email drafts back and forth.
 

MileHighPair

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012, '14: Frances
2015: Chimayo, USA.
2016, '17: VdlP
2018: Madrid, Ourense, Salvador, Primitivo
Rebekah, please keep us informed. A month in a lonely Spanish village, helping pilgrims on the Way. What could be better?
Mike and Ruth.
 

dreampainter

New Member
Well. For an idea that you were just kicking around, you've got heaps of people interested.

So I'd like to throw my hat into the ring as well. I'll be in Spain from 12/4 for almost 3 months, i've just done the HosVol training in Sydney, i'll be volunteering somewhere along the way, not sure where yet, i'm writing a book on the camino, it may become a phd, and i'm contemplating setting up an albergue but need to suss things out first, how it might be possible and if it's the right thing for me to do at this stage.

I deeply love the Camino, this is my 3rd time walking, last year was the most beautiful springtime walking imaginable, hoping that this year will be as well.

Enjoy - Karen
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
This is a wonderful idea! If I spoke Spanish I would jump at the chance!

I am sure you won't have problems with finding volunteers

Davey
 

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