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CPAP Machines and Albergues

LorneB

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Portugues - Porto to Vigo, 2017; Vigo to SDC to Muxia, 2018
Hi, there. I know this topic has shown up in some threads, but as most of the comments I've seen seem to come from other CPAP users, I'd be interested in hearing from those who aren't. Most likely, I'll get a range of responses, but I'm curious to hear from those who would care to indulge the question.

In recent years, I've taken to using a CPAP machine, and it's improved my sleep considerably. I now have a portable machine, and whenever I go afoot next (quite likely in a few months), I'd be tempted to take it with me (my sleep apnea is mild, so it wouldn't be essential). I hate to inconvenience others, though, and am wondering whether it would be a great annoyance in the albergues. For some, it might represent white noise, but I sure don't want to leave others unrested because I'm rested :)

For those who can be bothered, if you go to 1:00 of the video below, it does a good job of capturing the noise:


Thanks,


LorneB
 
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Hi,
Last spring, an Italian peregrino climbed into a top bunk in Mercadoiro and plugged his CPAP in. I was surprised that there was little to no noise, and I was also surprised that the machine did not prevent a dramatic episode of apnea during the night.
Sleep is a beautiful thing. If a CPAP machine helps give you a consistent sleep, it sure beats snoring. It’s quieter too.
My only concern is that it might be necessary to carry an extension cord to reach an outlet in some of the massive old stone albergues that have been retrofitted with electricity, unless there’s a portable, or battery, power source for your CPAP.
Bottom line, you’ll sleep better, and those around you likely will too.
All the best,
Paul
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
Firstly congratulations on actually being able to sleep with a CPAP machine - in nearly a year of trying I've never managed a decent night's sleep with mine.
Have you considered a MAD (mandibular advancment device)? Easier to transport, no need for a mains hook-up. Of course they may not work for you but I sleep like a sedated baby with mine.
 
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notion900

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
>
It's a lot better than listening to snoring! Judging by my friend's experience, who has walked several caminos with his machine, I think definitley bring an extension lead.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I slept one night in a convent with about a dozen people, including a father and son. At about the time everyone arriving was settling in (probably before dinner), the father told the pilgrims in the room that he had a CPAC and needed to use it. He asked if it would be OK. Of course, we all said, no problem. I slept like a baby, and the sound (can't call it noise) was not an issue. I especially appreciated that the man told us ahead of time, I thought it was considerate of him.
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
It wouldn't bother me. I ALWAYS have ear plugs in and I don't hear a thing!
 

Viggen

Vigo
Year of past OR future Camino
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
Hi, there. I know this topic has shown up in some threads, but as most of the comments I've seen seem to come from other CPAP users, I'd be interested in hearing from those who aren't. Most likely, I'll get a range of responses, but I'm curious to hear from those who would care to indulge the question.

In recent years, I've taken to using a CPAP machine, and it's improved my sleep considerably. I now have a portable machine, and whenever I go afoot next (quite likely in a few months), I'd be tempted to take it with me (my sleep apnea is mild, so it wouldn't be essential). I hate to inconvenience others, though, and am wondering whether it would be a great annoyance in the auberges. For some, it might represent white noise, but I sure don't want to leave others unrested because I'm rested :)

For those who can be bothered, if you go to 1:00 of the video below, it does a good job of capturing the noise:


Thanks,


LorneB
On Via Francigena, I walked with a pilgrim who used CPAP machine. I never heard the machine, nor did I hear anyone complain about it. Make sure you have an extension, you won't always be close to an outlet.
 
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LorneB

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Portugues - Porto to Vigo, 2017; Vigo to SDC to Muxia, 2018
Firstly congratulations on actually being able to sleep with a CPAP machine - in nearly a year of trying I've never managed a decent night's sleep with mine.
Have you considered a MAD (mandibular advancment device)? Easier to transport, no need for a mains hook-up. Of course they may not work for you but I sleep like a sedated baby with mine.

I'm sorry sleeping with a CPAP machine has been a problem for you. Although I often find mine to be a distraction, most nights the quality of my sleep is about 500% better than it was before I got it. I already have a travel machine, so I guess MAD isn't for me (unfortunately, lower case "mad" is not entirely unfamiliar...but that's why one has spiritual practice :)
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
A few times
I have been in albergues before where another pilgrim was using a CPAP and quite honestly I cannot say I even noticed it was on. If one of those ever bothered me in any way I do not remember it.
Now one thing that does keep me from sleeping in an albergue is the puzzling habit some pilgrims have of wanting all the windows and doors shut at night. That is worse than anything, but a whole different rant.
 

Walkerooni

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
C. Frances SJPdP to Santiago (June-ish 2018)
YES, PLEASE...bring your CPAP! I shared rooms with those who did and it was heaven compared to those who think that in this day and age there is any excuse for snoring, the likes of which could crack walls! At the very least it would be great if they would book a private room. So thank you for your consideration of others. There were dozens of people I encountered on my last Camino who I hope when they got home, ran, not walked,to their doctor, because their sleep apnea was such that at any moment they could die in their sleep!
 
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Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Year of past OR future Camino
Bike: Mont St Michel-SdC. Budapest-Vezelay. Alicante-Burgos
Walk: Le Puy-SJPdP. Dax-(CF)-SdC.
I am a light sleeper and sometimes find it difficult to get proper sleep in dorms with their concertos of wheezing, snoring and other noises. So I bit my lip when, after I had already made up the last (top) bunk in a compact dorm in Ages last September, the Aussie underneath me checked whether I minded him using the one electric socket to plug in his CPAP.
The machine did make a noise, but I found it much less disturbing than the usual 'music', which it seemed to cover, and I had a decent night's sleep.
I found out later that another pilgrim had caused a scene earlier when he had unpacked the machine, so he was relieved at my acceptance.
His wife confided to me that his snoring without the CPAP would have disturbed not just our dorm but the whole building, so I say 'Good on yer' for carrying the extra weight of the CPAP machine, in order to maximise everyone's sleep opportunity!
 

Paul Michetti

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Portuguese Sept "2019" Porto to Santiago
Via Francigena May "2021" Siena to Rome (hoping)
Hi,
Last spring, an Italian peregrino climbed into a top bunk in Mercadoiro and plugged his CPAP in. I was surprised that there was little to no noise, and I was also surprised that the machine did not prevent a dramatic episode of apnea during the night.
Sleep is a beautiful thing. If a CPAP machine helps give you a consistent sleep, it sure beats snoring. It’s quieter too.
My only concern is that it might be necessary to carry an extension cord to reach an outlet in some of the massive old stone albergues that have been retrofitted with electricity, unless there’s a portable, or battery, power source for your CPAP.
Bottom line, you’ll sleep better, and those around you likely will too.
All the best,
Paul
Hi,
Last spring, an Italian peregrino climbed into a top bunk in Mercadoiro and plugged his CPAP in. I was surprised that there was little to no noise, and I was also surprised that the machine did not prevent a dramatic episode of apnea during the night.
Sleep is a beautiful thing. If a CPAP machine helps give you a consistent sleep, it sure beats snoring. It’s quieter too.
My only concern is that it might be necessary to carry an extension cord to reach an outlet in some of the massive old stone albergues that have been retrofitted with electricity, unless there’s a portable, or battery, power source for your CPAP.
Bottom line, you’ll sleep better, and those around you likely will too.
All the best,
Paul
Hi Paul

Everything you wrote is exactly what happened in our Porto to Santiago trek last September. One of our group had a CPAP machine and it didn't make a sound and bothered no one. The extension cord comment is appropriate in some locations.
 

taigirl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2019
Hi, there. I know this topic has shown up in some threads, but as most of the comments I've seen seem to come from other CPAP users, I'd be interested in hearing from those who aren't. Most likely, I'll get a range of responses, but I'm curious to hear from those who would care to indulge the question.

In recent years, I've taken to using a CPAP machine, and it's improved my sleep considerably. I now have a portable machine, and whenever I go afoot next (quite likely in a few months), I'd be tempted to take it with me (my sleep apnea is mild, so it wouldn't be essential). I hate to inconvenience others, though, and am wondering whether it would be a great annoyance in the auberges. For some, it might represent white noise, but I sure don't want to leave others unrested because I'm rested :)

For those who can be bothered, if you go to 1:00 of the video below, it does a good job of capturing the noise:


Thanks,


LorneB
Take a poweboard or something similar as well. You will be very unpopular if you take up one of the few sockets all night when there are phones and headlamps to be charged.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
YES, PLEASE...bring your CPAP! I shared rooms with those who did and it was heaven compared to those who think that in this day and age there is any excuse for snoring, the likes of which could crack walls! At the very least it would be great if they would book a private room. So thank you for your consideration of others. There were dozens of people I encountered on my last Camino who I hope when they got home, ran, not walked,to their doctor, because their sleep apnea was such that at any moment they could die in their sleep!
I have previously expressed my opinion about people who think snorers should be the ones to book a private room. I see this as both intolerant and unjustified. I take the view that albergues are for all pilgrims, and if you are intolerant of what is relatively natural and almost normal behaviour like snoring, it is up to you to resolve the issue by seeking out more private accommodation.

I wonder if your casual observations of people who snore are actually suffering from sleep apnoea are based on any particular medical qualifications. Snorers might also be apnoea sufferers, but ongoing snoring is not, of itself, sufficient evidence of apnoea. It is the cessation of breathing that is the issue, when a snorer actually stops breathing, and stops snoring. This is quite different from, for example, stopping because the snorer has changed position and cleared their airway.

Further, sleep apnoea sufferers are unlikely to ever die in their sleep, unless perhaps they have so anesthetized themselves with alcohol before retiring to bed that their natural reactions to stopping breathing don't kick in. Normally, if they stop breathing, they will start to wake and start breathing again. My understanding, as an apnoea sufferer, is that the major deleterious effects are long term, and nothing so dramatically sudden as you are suggesting.
 

Gene_781

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino francés, Camino portugués (Tui), Pilgrims Welcome Office, hospitalero 8 times
The rest of us *greatly* appreciate your concern for your fellow albergue residents! I'm going to recommend that you take a light weight extension cord - maybe 20 ft or so. Most albergue dorms don't have many outlets and you may find yourself removed from what's available.
 
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Walkerooni

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
C. Frances SJPdP to Santiago (June-ish 2018)
I have previously expressed my opinion about people who think snorers should be the ones to book a private room. I see this as both intolerant and unjustified. I take the view that albergues are for all pilgrims, and if you are intolerant of what is relatively natural and almost normal behaviour like snoring, it is up to you to resolve the issue by seeking out more private accommodation.

I wonder if your casual observations of people who snore are actually suffering from sleep apnoea are based on any particular medical qualifications. Snorers might also be apnoea sufferers, but ongoing snoring is not, of itself, sufficient evidence of apnoea. It is the cessation of breathing that is the issue, when a snorer actually stops breathing, and stops snoring. This is quite different from, for example, stopping because the snorer has changed position and cleared their airway.

Further, sleep apnoea sufferers are unlikely to ever die in their sleep, unless perhaps they have so anesthetized themselves with alcohol before retiring to bed that their natural reactions to stopping breathing don't kick in. Normally, if they stop breathing, they will start to wake and start breathing again. My understanding, as an apnoea sufferer, is that the major deleterious effects are long term, and nothing so dramatically sudden as you are suggesting.


Thank you for your opinion. I’m merely expressing my own, suggesting that if I were a high-decibel snorer, I would feel it was more considerate for me to get a private room, than expect everyone else to be happily accommodate my nighttime symphony./

I wonder if your casual observations of people who snore are actually suffering from sleep apnoea are based on any particular medical qualifications. Snorers might also be apnoea sufferers, but ongoing snoring is not, of itself, sufficient evidence of apnoea. It is the cessation of breathing that is the issue, when a snorer actually stops breathing, and stops snoring. This is quite different from, for example, stopping because the snorer has changed position and cleared their airway.

/As a matter of fact, yes. I have particular medical qualifications. And I well understand the difference between snoring and sleep apnea./

Further, sleep apnoea sufferers are unlikely to ever die in their sleep, unless perhaps they have so anesthetized themselves with alcohol before retiring to bed that their natural reactions to stopping breathing don't kick in. Normally, if they stop breathing, they will start to wake and start breathing again. My understanding, as an apnoea sufferer, is that the major deleterious effects are long term, and nothing so dramatically sudden as you are suggesting.
[/QUOTE

/Sleep apnea sufferer have a much higher rate of high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke, cardiac arrhythmias, etc, etc. People do die of these things. Sometimes in their sleep. Sometimes in broad daylight. So I stand by my comment that sleep apnea suffers should get to a doctor, where it can be diagnosed and often successfully treated before it leads to chronic severe health issues.[/QUOTE]
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Thank you for your opinion. I’m merely expressing my own, suggesting that if I were a high-decibel snorer, I would feel it was more considerate for me to get a private room, than expect everyone else to be happily accommodate my nighttime symphony.
I have extracted only part of your response, because I do think that the issue of apnoea sufferers, snorers and CPAP use needs more than a glib response with what appears to be a sense of entitlement on your part that others should have to pay more to stay in private rooms to ensure your comfort.

It seems that the relative rate of regular snoring in men and women is about 40% and 25% respectively. In a room of four couples, there would be a less than 1 in 20 chance, about 4.3%, that there will be no regular snorer in the groups. In a group of two couples, the chance is still less than 1 in 10 there will be no snorer. There would be an infinitesimal chance of having a snore free night over even the shortest of camino routes if you are using communal rooms.

The second part of my observation was that albergues are for all pilgrims. I think this is a relatively non-controversial position to take. This egalitarianism seems not just axiomatic, but a fundamental proposition of the operation of the albergue movement. The mere fact that you would take a position clearly contrary to this fundamental in seeking to pressure pilgrims who snore to find private accommodation really does worry me.

If such an action were without additional cost, I might object less, but it is not. To take your position, you are saying that is the responsibility of someone else to pay extra so you can have a good night's sleep in communal accommodation. What entitles you to expect others to pay for your comfort? Let me suggest that it is your responsibility, and yours alone, if you are uncomfortable with a particular level of noise in the albergue dormitory, to pay for getting a good sleep in a private room.

As for the rest of you response, it seems that what you originally posted, and what you now say you posted are sufficiently different that it would just be too difficult to respond.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
A few times
Snorers, farters, equipment strewn about, packs on the bunks, thieves, smelly, loud talkers, others that expect complete silence, drunks, naked, electric outlet hogs, selfish long showers, slow clothes washers, tightwads that do not pay up at donativos, crappy mattress or pillow, eccentric hospitalero, pilgrims eating on the beds, doors and windows shut on hot nights etc....
All part of communal living. Just have to get over it, or get private room instead.
 

Walkerooni

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
C. Frances SJPdP to Santiago (June-ish 2018)
I have extracted only part of your response, because I do think that the issue of apnoea sufferers, snorers and CPAP use needs more than a glib response with what appears to be a sense of entitlement on your part that others should have to pay more to stay in private rooms to ensure your comfort.

It seems that the relative rate of regular snoring in men and women is about 40% and 25% respectively. In a room of four couples, there would be a less than 1 in 20 chance, about 4.3%, that there will be no regular snorer in the groups. In a group of two couples, the chance is still less than 1 in 10 there will be no snorer. There would be an infinitesimal chance of having a snore free night over even the shortest of camino routes if you are using communal rooms.

The second part of my observation was that albergues are for all pilgrims. I think this is a relatively non-controversial position to take. This egalitarianism seems not just axiomatic, but a fundamental proposition of the operation of the albergue movement. The mere fact that you would take a position clearly contrary to this fundamental in seeking to pressure pilgrims who snore to find private accommodation really does worry me.

If such an action were without additional cost, I might object less, but it is not. To take your position, you are saying that is the responsibility of someone else to pay extra so you can have a good night's sleep in communal accommodation. What entitles you to expect others to pay for your comfort? Let me suggest that it is your responsibility, and yours alone, if you are uncomfortable with a particular level of noise in the albergue dormitory, to pay for getting a good sleep in a private room.

As for the rest of you response, it seems that what you originally posted, and what you now say you posted are sufficiently different that it would just be too difficult to respond.

Oh my goodness. I apologize for anything I said that could be so upsetting to you. I in fact love albergues and agree 100% that they are for all! I enjoy them and almost always sleep amazingly well in them. Earplugs and rhythmic breathing are great tools. I was, in my original post, referring to snoring “the likes of which would crack walls” and not routine snoring. I do not in any way feel entitled, and I did during the course of my last Camino, opt for and happily pay for private accommodation about 1/4 of the time, and likely will again. So again, I apologize for any misunderstanding. But please, no need to keep beating me up on this. I promise I am not the ogre you make me out to be. Good night.
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
OK - let's not let this thread deteriorate. Everyone is entitled to state a position, and to disagree, but not to be rude or belittle anyone. Nor is there any point in continuing an argument, just for the sake of the argument.
 

Davybhoy

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (August 2019)
Portuguese (planned August 2020)
Just to add my tuppence ha'penny worth...

I walked the CF last August and used my CPAP every night except two nights where I had somehow lost a part of it (the nasal pillow). I had no complaints ever from anyone about using it. I found everyone most understanding about it when I had to use the electricity socket. I did take a 3 metre extension cord with me and found that I had to use it about three times over the 37 days we walked.

When I arrived at an albergue I gave the hospitalero a pre-typed note in both Spanish and English which explained that I needed the cpap for medical reasons and could I please be given a bed next to a power point. I was never once denied. In Trabadelo at Casa Susi, Susi told me that she has someone with a CPAP most nights - they were very common. Maybe she was just being nice as on our trip I never met another cpap user. Having said that, in Zubiri I was in a dorm and I was sure I could hear the low hum of a machine but couldnt see who had it!!
 

Damico Walking

Ready, and waiting, to walk
Year of past OR future Camino
Portuguese coastal route May 2020 (not to be)
Portuguese coastal route TBD post COVID-19
Firstly congratulations on actually being able to sleep with a CPAP machine - in nearly a year of trying I've never managed a decent night's sleep with mine.
Have you considered a MAD (mandibular advancment device)? Easier to transport, no need for a mains hook-up. Of course they may not work for you but I sleep like a sedated baby with mine.
I can certainly understand and empathize. My experience was awful for the first 2 months. I hated it and didn't have decent sleep the entire time. Then my doctor changed a couple of settings and, more importantly, changed my mask. After that all was good, I got good sleep and it has worked out well.

Keep working on it and hopefully you will find the combination that works.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
I can certainly understand and empathize. My experience was awful for the first 2 months. I hated it and didn't have decent sleep the entire time. Then my doctor changed a couple of settings and, more importantly, changed my mask. After that all was good, I got good sleep and it has worked out well.

Keep working on it and hopefully you will find the combination that works.
Many tweaks and have changed masks twice - glad it worked for you, but after 10 months of trying I've given up as the MAD works brilliantly for me.
 
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NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Snorers, farters, equipment strewn about, packs on the bunks, thieves, smelly, loud talkers, others that expect complete silence, drunks, naked, electric outlet hogs, selfish long showers, slow clothes washers, tightwads that do not pay up at donativos, crappy mattress or pillow, eccentric hospitalero, pilgrims eating on the beds, doors and windows shut on hot nights etc....

I really miss the camino.

———
CPAP users are welcome in my dorm room.
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
My husband also has a travel sized CPAP and carries an extra plug that allows for cell phone charging while the plug is in use. The only issue we ever encountered was that he needed more light to ensure he had everything in the stuff sack the next day so we could not leave early unless we were in a private room where he could turn on an overhead light.

When we serve as hospitaleros, we always had an extension cord in reserve (and a lot of other stuff like a hair dryer, giant electric wok, and other seldom used stuff). When you check in show the hospitaleros a card that says you have a CPAP and would like to be near an outlet. You will be accommodated.

Other pilgrims who recognize that a CPAP will keep the snoring to a minimum will be grateful and probably want to sleep near you to have a little white noise from your machine lull them to sleep.
 

Delphinoula

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
C. PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C.Franconia 2019 C.Algeciras Sevillia 2019
Swabian C. (2020)
People will make noises. Some you can control like coming in late totally drunk and arguing to set world right as you see it some are out of our control We all do them all the time.
Having three asthmatic kids I slept with open door so I could hear if someone was in distress. I would be there within seconds if their breathing pattern would change. Now for me it would be more distressing when you fighting for each breath you take and then suddenly stop breathing. Please use what you need.
If I have in our day and age a problem with the natural humanity noises I allways have the option to get a private room as of not to inconvenience my fellow pilgrims with my problems.
Have a plan B if your machine should stop working. They do have them in Spain but not in every little town and if your health insurance will cover this?
 

Kym Camino

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 2014
April 2018
October 2020
Hi, there. I know this topic has shown up in some threads, but as most of the comments I've seen seem to come from other CPAP users, I'd be interested in hearing from those who aren't. Most likely, I'll get a range of responses, but I'm curious to hear from those who would care to indulge the question.

In recent years, I've taken to using a CPAP machine, and it's improved my sleep considerably. I now have a portable machine, and whenever I go afoot next (quite likely in a few months), I'd be tempted to take it with me (my sleep apnea is mild, so it wouldn't be essential). I hate to inconvenience others, though, and am wondering whether it would be a great annoyance in the albergues. For some, it might represent white noise, but I sure don't want to leave others unrested because I'm rested :)

For those who can be bothered, if you go to 1:00 of the video below, it does a good job of capturing the noise:


Thanks,


LorneB
Hi, I shared a room with 6 other people in Leon. 2 of them had those machines and honestly, the sound is not intrusive. I slept just fine and I am a light sleeper.
Cheers Kym
 
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Wovoka

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April, 2015
My husband also has a travel sized CPAP and carries an extra plug that allows for cell phone charging while the plug is in use. The only issue we ever encountered was that he needed more light to ensure he had everything in the stuff sack the next day so we could not leave early unless we were in a private room where he could turn on an overhead light.

When we serve as hospitaleros, we always had an extension cord in reserve (and a lot of other stuff like a hair dryer, giant electric wok, and other seldom used stuff). When you check in show the hospitaleros a card that says you have a CPAP and would like to be near an outlet. You will be accommodated.

Other pilgrims who recognize that a CPAP will keep the snoring to a minimum will be grateful and probably want to sleep near you to have a little white noise from your machine lull them to sleep.
All cell phones have handy flashlights, which should not be intrusive on sleepers if one of you shades it with a hand while the other packs. Just a thought...
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 CF;
Hospitalera, Zamora 2017, Hospitalera Grañón 2018, Hospitalera Estella 2019
Actually we left all our charging cords on the first night out on our first Camino. :mad:Small lights are not the best choice for us when packing.
 
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CF- Finisterre-Muxia 03/17; Camino SK 10/17; Norte 03/18; Ingles 11/18; Augusta 03/19
Hi, there. I know this topic has shown up in some threads, but as most of the comments I've seen seem to come from other CPAP users, I'd be interested in hearing from those who aren't. Most likely, I'll get a range of responses, but I'm curious to hear from those who would care to indulge the question.

In recent years, I've taken to using a CPAP machine, and it's improved my sleep considerably. I now have a portable machine, and whenever I go afoot next (quite likely in a few months), I'd be tempted to take it with me (my sleep apnea is mild, so it wouldn't be essential). I hate to inconvenience others, though, and am wondering whether it would be a great annoyance in the albergues. For some, it might represent white noise, but I sure don't want to leave others unrested because I'm rested :)

For those who can be bothered, if you go to 1:00 of the video below, it does a good job of capturing the noise:


Thanks,


LorneB
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