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Creams, sprays, ointments... AGGGHH!

Mananath

Member
Past OR future Camino
July 2022
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M
 
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Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
Sunscreen on nose and ears occasionally - though as most of my Camino walking is in winter that's not very often. Zinc oxide cream once in a while if I have chafing in the groin/upper thighs. A blend of zinc oxide with a few drops of tea tree oil anywhere that gets a bit fungal.
 

pa’delante

Planning Portuguese Coast June 2022
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese coastal June 2022
I am doing the Portugués Coastal right now…. Tomorrow is day 6 and so far no blisters or issues. I don’t use any ointments on my feet. Double socks (with liner) worked for first few hours but got too warm after noon these last few warm days. I have been using every Waterfall or fountain to cool off my feet - sometimes 2-3 times a day. I have been using hikers wool every time I feel a hot area. I had to file one nail to ensure it was smooth. I have tried to be attentive to my feel- especially in the afternoon when it gets warm. I have changed my socks during the day as well if they feel warm. I have 2 pair of smart wool socks and wearing ankle boots. Hope it helps and happy to answer any questions. Buen camino
 

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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
At home in our daily lives, some people use various creams, sprays and other products on their skin. On the camino, some people do that, too - either the same or different creams, sprays and ointments.

I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?
Take whatever you guess might be useful - e.g. the sunscreen and fungal ointment you sometimes use at home. Consider some lotion that could be applied to your feet in case that is what your feet seem to want, but that can also be purchased easily in Spain.
 

Mananath

Member
Past OR future Camino
July 2022
At home in our daily lives, some people use various creams, sprays and other products on their skin. On the camino, some people do that, too - either the same or different creams, sprays and ointments.


Take whatever you guess might be useful - e.g. the sunscreen and fungal ointment you sometimes use at home. Consider some lotion that could be applied to your feet in case that is what your feet seem to want, but that can also be purchased easily in Spain.
I think that is part of my issue. Never having used anything for walking or day hikes I am not sure what will be useful or beneficial.
 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
Never having used anything for walking or day hikes I am not sure what will be useful or beneficial.
You will never know until you go through the experience, and even then you might need to try numerous options to find what works best for your skin. If you are not inclined to use those products now, you probably won't in Spain, either. However, if you are interested, you could try some of the suggestions (e.g. vaseline, cream for foot massage or dry skin) at home and see if you like them.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
My take on this is that, like the OP, I don't use a lot of skin care products. I pack sunscreen, an anti-fungal and an iodine based antiseptic ointment as a matter of course. I had a couple of minor infections along the CP this year, and visited a pharmacist, where I was provided with an antibiotic cream. Sometimes I use Vaseline if I get chafing, I normally won't need to use that for more than a few days, so I have bought a small tube at a pharmacy. Expensive, but much smaller than sizes that are available in supermarkets, etc.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M
Sunscreen regularly . I also take a small tube of cortisone cream for bedbug bites. It worked well, but only used if necessary
 

TMcA

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Pamplona to Santiago (2013)
Le Puy to Pamplona in segments (2013 - 2016)
Pamplona to León
Like the OP I had never used a foot cream or vaseline on probably a hundred day hikes. But on the CF and the Via Podiensis, it's a day after day after day effort. And with a pack, I think my feet flattened out. I got blisters. So I bought a pair of hiking boots a half size larger. And I learned to do the following:

When I first notice a hotspot - an irritation on part of a foot or feet - I stop. I do not wait for the next village. I just stop and take my shoes and socks off. I air my feet and massage them. If my socks are damp I put a new pair on.
Also a German recommended a foot cream called Gehwol. It seems to refresh my feet and I have used it since. It also makes my feet smell better. I apply that when I start and when I air my feet (once or twice a day). Result has been blister free hiking for over 1000kms.

Maybe it's a placebo, but it makes my feet feel cleaner and refreshed when I apply it.
 

truenorthpilgrim

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Geneva >> SJPdP May 2023
Bring your favorite sunscreen, spf lip balm, arnica for sore muscles...and maybe vaseline for the feet (not my thing but other folks use it). Don't forget there are plenty of farmacia's where you can pick up commonly used items.

Buen camino!
 
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Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
Maybe it's a placebo, but it makes my feet feel cleaner and refreshed when I apply it.
My first degree was mainly in anatomy and physiology. I used to spend a lot of time trying to work out the technical explanations of what should work and what shouldn't. But now I just stick with what my own experience tells me works for me. If your feet are happy it's probably a good solution. Just make sure you are using genuine top quality placebos and not Poundland knock-offs.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
Sunscreen and a good sun hat. That's really all that I consider essential.
Vaseline? Sure, why not. Can be quite handy if you get some chafing and helps me avoid blisters, otherwise most stuff like the creams carried are a "what-if" and not a need.
 

Scott Sweeney

Veteran Member
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M
Wear a hat with a brim and sunscreen. With pharmacies everywhere I can buy something for pain if and when I hurt. You smell a lot of Ben Gay on the Camino but I'm not sure that it works.
Wendy uses Vaseline and still gets small blisters so.....
Take sunscreen for your face and a small tube (pocket size) of Vaseline.
Happy walking.

And a "perfect Camino" is coming home uninjured.
 
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Scott Sweeney

Veteran Member
I am doing the Portugués Coastal right now…. Tomorrow is day 6 and so far no blisters or issues. I don’t use any ointments on my feet. Double socks (with liner) worked for first few hours but got too warm after noon these last few warm days. I have been using every Waterfall or fountain to cool off my feet - sometimes 2-3 times a day. I have been using hikers wool every time I feel a hot area. I had to file one nail to ensure it was smooth. I have tried to be attentive to my feel- especially in the afternoon when it gets warm. I have changed my socks during the day as well if they feel warm. I have 2 pair of smart wool socks and wearing ankle boots. Hope it helps and happy to answer any questions. Buen camino
I always found where soaking your feet may feel good but it also softens the skin. Soft skin in a walking shoe or boot sounds like a blister invitation. We each have our habit's I reckon.
 

celticone

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances '13,'18, '19
Portugues '15; Plata '16
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M
Hello. I am in the UK and a chiropodist recommended that I use Flexitol Heel Balm when I was preparing for my first big Camino in 2013. I used it daily with thin liner socks and other socks. I also wore shoes several sizes larger than normal. I know it is fashionable to choose Smartwool, but my outer socks have always been cheap Lidl hiking socks but making sure there is no seam across the toe. I got no blisters, so that is now my 'foot uniform' for all hikes.

I have since discovered Hydromol ointment, which appears to be just as good.

Both are more waxy than Vaseline.

Buen Camino
Ena
 

Amused212

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019 CF, 2022 CF, 2022 Finisterre-Muxia
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M
I am in the camp of take your favorite sunscreen and lip balm and you can pick up anything else you may need at a local pharmacia. That said, for me I discovered, particularly on the mesta, that my skin got so dry it started to itch and even crack in places. I had to pick up something that would heal. Second time around I took something with me for this purpose. Don't know which route you are taking or where you are from (i.e. what you are used to) but for me, am from the USA mid-south mountains, I found both Spain and Portugal to be dryer than what I am used to and the sun felt more brutal. If you add in wind it is even harder on your skin. Remember, you will be outside, exposed to the elements, probably every day for maybe 5+ hours.
 

Alexandra3

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, Fistera, Muxia, Igles (a coruna)
Originally, I only packed sunscreen, but on the way, I picked up Voltaren cream, Fenistril (for mosquito bites) and finally Cortisone cream for 3 monster bites from an unknown creature which blew up and would not go away with anything else.
 

Mary M

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2016 Primativo, have walked the 1200 km Shikoku 88 temple pilgrimage in 2015 June.
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
A Spanish pharmacist recommended a foot cream which I aleays use when walkimg now. Can only be biught in Spain. Ciuld not find it in southern Spain, only from Madrid north. It is called Saltratos. 104CF363-FF67-4BE9-A6A7-6556BDD30EC9.png
 
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This web site is one of the best places to find information about preventing and treating blisters.
 

Schamber

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
May and June 2022
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M
I’m in the Camino now and I put aquafor in my feet each morning before two pairs of socks and shoes. I’ve gotten 4 blisters anyway!
When we get to accommodation I usually put Voltaren in feet for pain. Husband puts on hip sometimes.
We put sunscreen on during day if it’s sunny.
 

mattythedog

Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M
What I use and why after 8 caminos and now 61 years old with known achilles tendonosis and tendonitis, but never blisters. Small tube of vaseline for between tight toes because I cannot get perfectly fitting shoes for my strangely shaped feet. I've had some occasion to use it for chafing underwear during very hot sweaty days, plus as lip balm on rare occasions with dry lips. Works on squeeky albergue doors also. You probably should not pack this because it can be had in Spain for about 2 euro per tube if you do start to develop issues. Small tube sunscreen; I am fair skinned and wife claims direct bright sun is not good for skin in any case. Voltaren gel as of 3 years ago when I started to get the tendonitis. I tried Arnica at that time with absolutely no effect-- I understand that clinical tests show no proof of effectiveness; although its alcohol content gave my skin nice cool feeling and it was slippery to facilitate massaging muscles. I used up the Arnica, but don't ever plan to get it again. I combine the Voltaren gel with Ibuprofen 600mg pill at 6am, and about 2pm only if I plan to do more than 35 km that day. If you start to have inflammation/sore muscles/painful joints, you might start with Ibuprofen or Voltaren pills to avoid the gel. I carry a micro 5 gram tube of triple antibiotic burn cream just in case. I have not needed it, but have treated other pilgrims' bloody feet with it; especially if there is no pharmacy immediately available; you can always get bigger tube if you get torn up. 27 gram dropper bottle of 91% isopropyl alcohol to clean hotspot skin areas before applying duct tape, and various disinfections for others' messed up feet. Just came back from 600 miles SJPP to Finnisterre and beyond, and only used 1/3 of the alcohol and 1/4 of the antibiotic cream. Toothpaste. Very small bottle hand sanitizer. Most albergues and cafes have plenty of hand sanitizer on hand, so you can refill the small bottle as necessary. Zycam nasal cold medication repacked into small dropper bottle. I have gotten colds on 5 caminos, and the Zycam greatly reduces their duration and symptoms for me. I have not been able to find Zycam in Europe through 20 years of traveling there. First camino I took mosquito repellent, cortizone cream, antifungal cream, lip balm, but never used any of that stuff. I do carry a very light mosquito head net, but never used it. One pilgrim told me he and his group fought numerous mosquitos in a small village just beyond Sarria in May this year; otherwise, I have never heard of mosquito problems on CF. Most of this stuff I repack into special smaller tubes and bottles you can get on AMAZON, etc, to save size and weight, and of course, all that excess. I carry a very small, wide mouth, pill bottle that I fill toward the end of each day with liquid hand soap. It is enough to shampoo, wash and do laundry. No need to carry slimy bar soap or other liquid soaps.
 
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Lynnhardy

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
I’m in the Camino now and I put aquafor in my feet each morning before two pairs of socks and shoes. I’ve gotten 4 blisters anyway!
When we get to accommodation I usually put Voltaren in feet for pain. Husband puts on hip sometimes.
We put sunscreen on during day if it’s sunny.
I didn’t think of doing that? Sounds a plausible use of Voltaren, might try that.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M

I think you got it right. If you end up needing anything anyway you can get it during the way.

Best
Andy
 

rinevl

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino del Norte
Squirrel's Nut Butter is the best anti-chafe stuff out there!! all my ultrarunner friends use it and ill def be bringing it on my Camino.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Squirrel's Nut Butter is the best anti-chafe stuff out there!! all my ultrarunner friends use it and ill def be bringing it on my Camino.
I 'm glad you like it. Can you let us know how many other anti-chafe preparations you have used to come to this conclusion and what they were?
 
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Like the OP I had never used a foot cream or vaseline on probably a hundred day hikes. But on the CF and the Via Podiensis, it's a day after day after day effort. And with a pack, I think my feet flattened out. I got blisters. So I bought a pair of hiking boots a half size larger. And I learned to do the following:

When I first notice a hotspot - an irritation on part of a foot or feet - I stop. I do not wait for the next village. I just stop and take my shoes and socks off. I air my feet and massage them. If my socks are damp I put a new pair on.
Also a German recommended a foot cream called Gehwol. It seems to refresh my feet and I have used it since. It also makes my feet smell better. I apply that when I start and when I air my feet (once or twice a day). Result has been blister free hiking for over 1000kms.

Maybe it's a placebo, but it makes my feet feel cleaner and refreshed when I apply it.
Exactly right!
 

Mananath

Member
Past OR future Camino
July 2022
Wear a hat with a brim and sunscreen. With pharmacies everywhere I can buy something for pain if and when I hurt. You smell a lot of Ben Gay on the Camino but I'm not sure that it works.
Wendy uses Vaseline and still gets small blisters so.....
Take sunscreen for your face and a small tube (pocket size) of Vaseline.
Happy walking.

And a "perfect Camino" is coming home uninjured.
Above all that is my hope.
 

Mananath

Member
Past OR future Camino
July 2022
What I use and why after 8 caminos and now 61 years old with known achilles tendonosis and tendonitis, but never blisters. Small tube of vaseline for between tight toes because I cannot get perfectly fitting shoes for my strangely shaped feet. I've had some occasion to use it for chafing underwear during very hot sweaty days, plus as lip balm on rare occasions with dry lips. Works on squeeky albergue doors also. You probably should not pack this because it can be had in Spain for about 2 euro per tube if you do start to develop issues. Small tube sunscreen; I am fair skinned and wife claims direct bright sun is not good for skin in any case. Voltaren gel as of 3 years ago when I started to get the tendonitis. I tried Arnica at that time with absolutely no effect-- I understand that clinical tests show no proof of effectiveness; although its alcohol content gave my skin nice cool feeling and it was slippery to facilitate massaging muscles. I used up the Arnica, but don't ever plan to get it again. I combine the Voltaren gel with Ibuprofen 600mg pill at 6am, and about 2pm only if I plan to do more than 35 km that day. If you start to have inflammation/sore muscles/painful joints, you might start with Ibuprofen or Voltaren pills to avoid the gel. I carry a micro 5 gram tube of triple antibiotic burn cream just in case. I have not needed it, but have treated other pilgrims' bloody feet with it; especially if there is no pharmacy immediately available; you can always get bigger tube if you get torn up. 27 gram dropper bottle of 91% isopropyl alcohol to clean hotspot skin areas before applying duct tape, and various disinfections for others' messed up feet. Just came back from 600 miles SJPP to Finnisterre and beyond, and only used 1/3 of the alcohol and 1/4 of the antibiotic cream. Toothpaste. Very small bottle hand sanitizer. Most albergues and cafes have plenty of hand sanitizer on hand, so you can refill the small bottle as necessary. Zycam nasal cold medication repacked into small dropper bottle. I have gotten colds on 5 caminos, and the Zycam greatly reduces their duration and symptoms for me. I have not been able to find Zycam in Europe through 20 years of traveling there. First camino I took mosquito repellent, cortizone cream, antifungal cream, lip balm, but never used any of that stuff. I do carry a very light mosquito head net, but never used it. One pilgrim told me he and his group fought numerous mosquitos in a small village just beyond Sarria in May this year; otherwise, I have never heard of mosquito problems on CF. Most of this stuff I repack into special smaller tubes and bottles you can get on AMAZON, etc, to save size and weight, and of course, all that excess. I carry a very small, wide mouth, pill bottle that I fill toward the end of each day with liquid hand soap. It is enough to shampoo, wash and do laundry. No need to carry slimy bar soap or other liquid soaps.
This was very helpful, thanks!
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Past OR future Camino
2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2022
I think that is part of my issue. Never having used anything for walking or day hikes I am not sure what will be useful or beneficial.
I use Compeed brand foot glide/antifriction stick to help stay off blisters between toes, and use Voltaren ( an NSAID ) gel for my knees , shoulders, and tops of feet when needed for sore joints/muscles. Both can easily be found in farmacias in Spain and Portugal if you need them. I also carry Arnica gel...natural muscle rub, helps with recovery after long days.
If you purchase Voltaren ( diclofinac gel ), be sure you aren't swallowing oral NSAIDs as well. )
If I were you, my decision would be a tube of Arnica for after shower on legs/knees/ shoulders/neck/tops of feet...massage in wherever it felt a bit sore. It helps with recovery of muscles in a natural way. If blisters or hot spots become an issue look for the comped there. If your muscles or joints are achy beyond normal, buy the diclofenac there.
A little prevention attention after each day goes a long way.
 
Past OR future Camino
06,CF;13,CP;17,SSal;19,Ingles
With just a few weeks before I start my camino I have reached that phase where I am scouring this message board for any nuggets to help make the "perfect" camino. It's a bit overwhelming and probably not too helpful. :) But I have noticed a lot of messages about various creams and ointments -from vaseline to pain killer creams - that people apply to their skin over the course of their Camino and I am wondering about this.

Over the course of my life I have rarely felt the need to apply any form of cream (other than sun or the occasional fungus) to my skin but I have also never walked the amount of miles of the camino in such a compressed period of time. So I am curious about what people use but more importantly how and why they use them and when they know to use them. It seems a bit basic but it's new to me! Any thoughts?

Thanks
M
You ask: Any thoughts? Plenty. Your feet, and all of your skin, are your trusted friends on camino. They need care and protection.
From my experience:-
Drink plenty. Water, not alcohol. Alcohol dehydrates. Up to you how much or little of that you imbibe. Replace salts whichever way you choose. We use a traditional powder from a pharmacy, called Litines. Older pharmacy staff will understand. You can also use commercial drinks and powders, probably more expensive, made for sporty people.
Some lubricant is helpful on the feet. I use vaseline. I do not find it gooey. It is easily absorbed.
I change socks regularly, hanging the damp ones from the back of the rucksack so they can dry. Smartwool of whichever brand suits your purse or that you can source locally.
Be aware of any hot spots appearing. If you get one, you will know what I mean. Some kind of tape applied each morning will ease that. I also sourced sheeps' wool from New Zealand, it is excellent. It is available in other countries also, including Denmark.
As for sun protection on the body: I use high factor on my face every day, on camino or at home. I use a version of same factor on neck, arms, legs. Non-irritant and unperfumed. You look young - but just wait!!!
On another issue, muscle pain: some people advise a preparation, Voltarol, (diclofenac) that my walking companion (a family physician) does not recommend on bare arms or legs as it can have an adverse effect on skin exposed to sunlight. Look it up if you have a different opinion or experience, and make up your own mind.
I hope this helps you somewhat. Some of these things can be easily purchased along the way. I would not recommend plucking sheeps' wool from a fence, even if it is free. 😁
Wishing you a truly buen camino. Try to report back, it will help others following you, and thanks for your question. I hope I have not strayed too far from what you asked for! 👣
 
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A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets
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