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Daily cost of the Camino?

Spiritual Lady

New Member
Past OR future Camino
I have walked half the French in 2014 and would like to walk the whole this year, 2020.
How many euros will I need on a daily basis for food and staying in the albergues? I am going self catering.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2012
Thats one of the impossible questions :)

Albergue: €10 - 20; Hostel €20-40
Breakfast: Depends on whether you breakfast on coffee & Orujo like me or want something slightly more nourishing
Lunch: You'll get a sandwich and a drink for less than €10 maybe even €5 but who knows post Covid
Evening meal: ?????? depends on what you like to eat. Cooking facilities available. Whether you are sharing with others or trying to buy bits and pieces to make a meal for one. How much weight of staples: rice / pasta / stock cube / chorizo you are willing to carry between stops.

I used to budget €30 - 50 a day depending on accommodations. I'm planning now on €50+
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I think Tincatinker is close but in these post-Covid times I would plan on more if I was going this year. Supply and demand will determine what albergues and restuarants are charging.
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Some, and with luck, some more.
I think Tincatinker is close but in these post-Covid times I would plan on more if I was going this year. Supply and demand will determine what albergues and restuarants are charging.
Wise words as usual.

If I may add, I would like to suggest that if we can afford it, regardless of the cost, this time, we provide an extra amount to that asked, in the hope of keeping our Camino providers providing for those that follow us.
 
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JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
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It's anything between nil and however much you can afford, limited only by how much it is materially possible to spend per day if you're mostly just walking.

For most pilgrims not starting from home though, the lower limit will be the travel costs home to "start" and from "finish", plus cost of the kit.

And it's only ever nil as such day-to-day if you are literally penniless, which makes it impossible to spend any money at all in any circumstances whatsoever.

Wise words as usual.

If I may add, I would like to suggest that if we can afford it, regardless of the cost, this time, we provide an extra amount to that asked, in the hope of keeping our Camino providers providing for those that follow us.
Very well spoken.
 
Past OR future Camino
2012
While I can understand a desire to self-cater on camino I'm not convinced that it is the budget option. An Albergue bed, a menu del dia, never the menu peregrino ;) , and a glass or two and a tapas in the evening could be achieved on sub €30 a day. My inclinations to more than the occasional drink or up-market dining pushed my budget upwards. The future? Oh if we only knew what the future will bring.
 

Jean Ti

Active Member
While I can understand a desire to self-cater on camino I'm not convinced that it is the budget option. An Albergue bed, a menu del dia, never the menu peregrino ;) , and a glass or two and a tapas in the evening could be achieved on sub €30 a day. My inclinations to more than the occasional drink or up-market dining pushed my budget upwards. The future? Oh if we only knew what the future will bring.

With the current pilgrims on the caminos...

We will get this info pretty soon !
 

Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
How many euros will I need on a daily basis for food and staying in the albergues? I am going self catering.
Like the answers before: it depends.

I did my CF in 2019 for the average of ~22€ per day incl. Albergue, drinks and most of the time the pilgrim's menue. If you will do self catering, you can go with 15€ per day. Did self-catering or cooking in larger pilgrims group three times. Stayed in Donativos 2 times and in municipal Albergues also 2 times.

Personally I think, post-pandemic it will be a little more expensive, maybe 20-22€ per day if you do self-catering. Be aware that not all Albergue will have a kitchen.
My budget for the CP-coastal in fall will be ~30€ per day. I hope that this will be sufficent to walk in that time.

BC
Roland
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
An Albergue bed, a menu del dia, never the menu peregrino ;) , and a glass or two and a tapas in the evening could be achieved on sub €30 a day.
Only in Spain. In France, it is far more important to consider feeding yourself with market/supermarket provender. (Italy is weird)
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Like the answers before: it depends.

I did my CF in 2019 for the average of ~22€ per day incl. Albergue, drinks and most of the time the pilgrim's menue. If you will do self catering, you can go with 15€ per day. Did self-catering or cooking in larger pilgrims group three times. Stayed in Donativos 2 times and in municipal Albergues also 2 times.

Personally I think, post-pandemic it will be a little more expensive, maybe 20-22€ per day if you do self-catering. Be aware that not all Albergue will have a kitchen.
My budget for the CP-coastal in fall will be ~30€ per day. I hope that this will be sufficent to walk in that time.

BC
Roland
I am impressed with your budget but as a “budget” pilgrim myself how did you do it? Days that I stayed in donativos with communal dinners I can see it. But I can come in at about 25 with a municipal and shopping at night for dinner and lunch the next day. If there is no breakfast at the albergue a coffee and tortilla in the morning and another coffee or snack during the day gets me to 25 or so. Would love to know the secrets of your budgetary magic! I do eat a lot on Camino ha ha.
 
Tincatcher pointed out cooking facilities. So public albergues don't compete with the few eating establishments, many no longer have pots, pans and plates. Be prepared ! You will need everything to prepare meals and contents and time. I too think 30 Euros is low. Donativos rely on real donation to cover costs, be grateful not cheap, help all pilgrims by showing generosity.
 

Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
I am impressed with your budget but as a “budget” pilgrim myself how did you do it? Days that I stayed in donativos with communal dinners I can see it. But I can come in at about 25 with a municipal and shopping at night for dinner and lunch the next day. If there is no breakfast at the albergue a coffee and tortilla in the morning and another coffee or snack during the day gets me to 25 or so. Would love to know the secrets of your budgetary magic! I do eat a lot on Camino ha ha.
That's easy: 8-10€ per day for the Albergue, ~8-10€ for the pilgrims menue, 1-3€ for breakfast or some fruits (bananas, apples) from a discounter. My part for the shared meals: 3€ + work (I do cook a lot at home). Some days (3) only breakfast, nothing more. Water for free. I've lost 7kg weight on my CF and it felt very comfortable.
In the Donativos / Municipals it was 5€ for the night, they weren't well maintained or very "rural" nor did anyone show up after the check-in. In Grañon I gave 12€.

In total there were a few days with expenses higher than 25€ but most were ~20€.
My goal was not to spend more than 20€ per day, but I missed it.

As far as I'm informed, the Galician Municipals are now 10-12€ per night and most private Albergues are 12-15€. Not a chance for a super-cheapo-CF anymore ;) but worth every Penny!

BC
Roland
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2015, 2017, 2019) and plans for 2021 (Sept, Oct)
I kept detailed daily cost records for our first two caminos. During our first Camino Frances (2015), my wife and I spent 35 euros each and mostly stayed in municipal albergues. Most evenings we had the menu del perigrino for around 10 euros per person. During our second camino (2017) we hiked with my brother and his wife. We stayed in a few municipal albergues, but mostly in quad rooms with two bunk beds and a private bath. We spent 50 euros per person. During our third amino (2019) we stayed in private rooms every night and I did not bother keeping a notebook on expenses! We're planning to hike again this Sept-Oct, will stay in private rooms and not track our expenses. Bob
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
That's easy: 8-10€ per day for the Albergue, ~8-10€ for the pilgrims menue, 1-3€ for breakfast or some fruits (bananas, apples) from a discounter. My part for the shared meals: 3€ + work (I do cook a lot at home). Some days (3) only breakfast, nothing more. Water for free. I've lost 7kg weight on my CF and it felt very comfortable.
In the Donativos / Municipals it was 5€ for the night, they weren't well maintained or very "rural" nor did anyone show up after the check-in. In Grañon I gave 12€.

In total there were a few days with expenses higher than 25€ but most were ~20€.
My goal was not to spend more than 20€ per day, but I missed it.

As far as I'm informed, the Galician Municipals are now 10-12€ per night and most private Albergues are 12-15€. Not a chance for a super-cheapo-CF anymore ;) but worth every Penny!

BC
Roland

I think you are 100% correct on the prices of albergues going up. I think the key difference between the two of us is food. As I also eat alot of meals in albergues always trying to go in with a few pilgrims and I do have some pilgrim dinners at times I do spend more during the day. There are some days where I can't shop because I have arrived to late or it is Sunday or the village is too small. But I do buy fruit, bananas like you and I love kiwi. But even though I will buy a baguette at night and some slices of turkey or ham and some cheese I still find myself eating a second lunch many days and I usually end up with 3 coffees a day. In the morning I HAVE to have my coffee and like I said a tortilla if possible. With all my eating I still lose weight also. Metabolism is a beautiful thing hahaha.
 
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JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
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I think the should say donativo albergue (Minimum 10 €)
That is antithetical to the whole idea of them.

I do not advise anyone to be penniless on the Camino, but €300/month not including food is not in everyone's means.

Your suggestion would force all of the poorer pilgrims into sleeping outdoors in misery, as you comforted yourself snug on your soft pillow. That is not the Way.
 

Jean Ti

Active Member
That is antithetical to the whole idea of them.

I do not advise anyone to be penniless on the Camino, but €300/month not including food is not in everyone's means.

Your suggestion would force all of the poorer pilgrims into sleeping outdoors in misery, as you comforted yourself snug on your soft pillow. That is not the Way.
When I walk the Norte, and la Plata some of the donativo were asking the minimum 10€ simply to covert there fees.

Instead of closing them why not having a minimum cost to survive...
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
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If I cannot afford a minimum fee on a particular day & night, I sleep outdoors.

The donativos are a necessary help, and of course when you can give, then you do.

As are BTW those albergues charging €5 not 10.

€10 minimum would just be some more touristification.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2012
The Donativo debate has been thrashed more often than the average rescued Donkey. The reality never changes - donate what you can afford. If you can't work out what you can afford it would probably be a good idea to ask the Court of Protection or your local equivalent to appoint someone as Deputy for your financial affairs.

Those still puzzled by the concept probably need to walk a Camino, or possibly walk again.
 

julia-t

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2015-17
Kumano Kodo March 2018
Camino Portuguese Valenca-SdC April 2018
I think this year, every pilgrim needs to factor in having a back up fund.

It is quite possible that a 3rd wave (maybe the Indian variant now sweeping across the UK) will happen, and then borders may close again, countries may be put on the red list meaning hotel quarantine at one's own expense on return. And if you test positive at any point before your return flight you'll have to be able to fund yourself in quarantine in Spain or Portugal. And pay for another flight home.

Although we in the UK thought we were now allowed to travel to Spain and France (on the amber list) as long as we were prepared to self isolate for 10 days on return, we are now being told that we should only be travelling to these countries for urgent and essential reasons - not holidays. (Or Caminos.) And that anyone travelling should have a back up fund of at least £3000 to cover us should we have to quarantine at our own expense, pay for additional flights, medical costs, further tests, etc.

Travel insurance is an essential component of any trip, but now is really quite costly if Covid cover is included.

And even if the situation is stable when you fly over and start your Camino - well, things can change very quickly, and in the 4-6 weeks you are on the Camino the world could turn topsy-turvy again.

As an example, last year I flew to Poland with my daughter to discover shortly after we arrived that Poland was likely to go on the banned list within 36 hours. So my daughter flew back home the following morning as she could not take the time off work to self isolate for 14 days. This change in rules didn't really affect me so I stayed there, but I did have to spend 14 days alone when I got home, not even allowed out of my garden gate to walk in the fields and woods near my house.

Frankly, much as we all want to get back to the Camino, I think we still need to have much caution - and some back up money, just in case.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I think this year, every pilgrim needs to factor in having a back up fund.

It is quite possible that a 3rd wave (maybe the Indian variant now sweeping across the UK) will happen, and then borders may close again, countries may be put on the red list meaning hotel quarantine at one's own expense on return. And if you test positive at any point before your return flight you'll have to be able to fund yourself in quarantine in Spain or Portugal. And pay for another flight home.

Although we in the UK thought we were now allowed to travel to Spain and France (on the amber list) as long as we were prepared to self isolate for 10 days on return, we are now being told that we should only be travelling to these countries for urgent and essential reasons - not holidays. (Or Caminos.) And that anyone travelling should have a back up fund of at least £3000 to cover us should we have to quarantine at our own expense, pay for additional flights, medical costs, further tests, etc.

Travel insurance is an essential component of any trip, but now is really quite costly if Covid cover is included.

And even if the situation is stable when you fly over and start your Camino - well, things can change very quickly, and in the 4-6 weeks you are on the Camino the world could turn topsy-turvy again.

As an example, last year I flew to Poland with my daughter to discover shortly after we arrived that Poland was likely to go on the banned list within 36 hours. So my daughter flew back home the following morning as she could not take the time off work to self isolate for 14 days. This change in rules didn't really affect me so I stayed there, but I did have to spend 14 days alone when I got home, not even allowed out of my garden gate to walk in the fields and woods near my house.

Frankly, much as we all want to get back to the Camino, I think we still need to have much caution - and some back up money, just in case.
Very sound advice. We can only hope that for those of us who are fully vaccinated, restrictions will be removed. If not, what is the point of vaccination? It is done in order to stop the spread, and it seems to be working nicely. But I, for one, will have extra funds available for the unexpected.
 
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Past OR future Camino
See signature. Too many to list here.
Last time i stayed at a donativo the water shut off in the middle of the night (imagine toilets) and we all woke up to a bed bug scare. A sweet young perigrina (who was on a bottom bunk) was crying hysterically.

Now, I will never stay at a donativo again.

Not saying its all of them... but... well... you get what you pay for, mostly, IMO.

Note: The hospitaleros obviously enjoyed their positions of power and were eeking it out until obviously that place needed to be shut down.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Last time i stayed at a donativo the water shut off in the middle of the night (imagine toilets) and we all woke up to a bed bug scare. A sweet young perigrina (who was on a bottom bunk) was crying hysterically.

Now, I will never stay at a donativo again.

Not saying its all of them... but... well... you get what you pay for, mostly, IMO.

Note: The hospitaleros obviously enjoyed their positions of power and were eeking it out until obviously that place needed to be shut down.
Hmm. Not my experience in 12 years on the Caminos. Bedbugs are transported from one place to another by pilgrims, not hospitaleros. I think they are doing their very best when hit with this unwelcomed visit. One of the best places on the CF is the donativo in the bell tower in Granon. There are many other good donativo places all over the place, so to speak. Never saw a bedbug.

Bedbugs have become a plague not only on the Caminos, but also in the rest of the world, due to our extended travel behaviour.

Edit: I now see that we are dragging this thread away from its origin. So I stop here :)
 
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David61

Active Member
How many euros will I need on a daily basis for food and staying in the albergues? I am going self catering.
Unfortunately no one can say yet what future costs will be. There will undoubtedly be extra costs involved for albergues and hostels if they try to improve standards in terms of social distancing and hygiene. Add in the fact that some albergues will not be re-opening after experiencing some large losses. There will be some profiteering due to reduced availability ( albergue owners are human and have been struggling). As for self-catering, many do not/did not. Going forward the difficulties of providing self-catering within the new rules mean many will remove the facilities.
All I can say for anyone planning on walking is a quote
But I, for one, will have extra funds available for the unexpected.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
Tincatcher pointed out cooking facilities. So public albergues don't compete with the few eating establishments, many no longer have pots, pans and plates. Be prepared ! You will need everything to prepare meals and contents and time. I too think 30 Euros is low. Donativos rely on real donation to cover costs, be grateful not cheap, help all pilgrims by showing generosity.
A friend of mine walked part of El Norte last year, starting on 3rd October 2020 from Villaviciosa near Gijón. He said that almost all albergues he stayed in had the kitchen closed off as part of COVID-19 measures.
However, we are now in a different position here in Spain, so it could be that some albergues are now able to open up the kitchens (those that have them) for pilgrims to use.
Spain has a decentralised structure for public administration, so some provinces and regions might impose or remove restrictions at relatively short notice once they get judicial approval. This has been happening for some time over the last 6 months, with different curfew hours, opening/closing times etc. The feeling is (I live in Madrid by the way) is things are opening up and there is even talk that face masks in public may no longer be a requirement BUT this will all depend on case numbers and hospital pressure in each health district. Be positive and be prepared for changes, the situation is not really stable but with vaccination program picking up there is more confidence and less fear around free movement and risks of infection or transmission. Only this last weekend were people from Madrid and Barcelona, for example, able to travel freely to other regions in Spain. We'll find out in a few weeks if that was a good move or not. Fingers crossed for everybody.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Last time i stayed at a donativo the water shut off in the middle of the night (imagine toilets) and we all woke up to a bed bug scare. A sweet young perigrina (who was on a bottom bunk) was crying hysterically.

Now, I will never stay at a donativo again.

Not saying its all of them... but... well... you get what you pay for, mostly, IMO.

Note: The hospitaleros obviously enjoyed their positions of power and were eeking it out until obviously that place needed to be shut down.
I know the experience you have relayed would sour anyone but that is just one donative. There are wonderfully clean donativos.
Bed bugs are a problem everywhere.
Here are a couple of articles from The New York Times from last year and the New York Daily News regarding bedbugs. The best hotels in the world have had to deal with this creepy problem.


 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
1989
Only in Spain. In France, it is far more important to consider feeding yourself with market/supermarket provender. (Italy is weird)
I thought (from what I've been reading, not from personal experience) that in France most pilgrims stay in gites and most gites are demi pension, providing much of the needed daily food. Not so much a menu del dia or menu peregrino but shared meals in the hostel. Is that not the case?
 
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When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears
Past OR future Camino
April / May (2016) CF
I think it is reasonable to expect that costs will go up for accommodations and meals as the owners will have to pay more to maintain very high hygienic standards and may not be able to host or seat as many people due to public health restrictions. Right now, here in Italy one can only eat outdoors at a restaurant. Indoor seating is not expected until some time in June and can vary from region to region. Be prepared and be flexible. Things can change very quickly if infection rates start to go up.
 
Past OR future Camino
See signature. Too many to list here.
Bed bugs are a problem everywhere.
Totally agree. Ok here is what I was getting at and I know its controversial. All based on personal experience. I believe this discussion is entirely relevant to any budgetary considerations.

1) Privados made an investment in their Camino experience, maybe with their livelihoods, often because, I think, the privado people have walked the camino and fell in love with it. And they want to make it their life. They know, being business people, they have to supply a sound user experience to get positive reviews and keep the dream alive. These people want to be here next year. They also regularly offer cool stuff like communal dinners.

2) Municipals - well, these are almost always really clean and I think they offer a great value and a great opportunity for meeting people. They can't get away with lax vermin routines... at least that is my impression.

3) Donativos - these ones know they got you because they aren't charging any money (yeah right). They offer minimal comforts and sometimes a nice meal with the other peregrinos. Very often, however, this meal is accompanied by some kind of "speech" about contributing, and about the "spirit" of the camino, but often this is intermingled with the personal indulgences of the hospitalero.

Always exceptions, no doubt.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Totally agree. Ok here is what I was getting at and I know its controversial. All based on personal experience. I believe this discussion is entirely relevant to any budgetary considerations.

1) Privados made an investment in their Camino experience, maybe with their livelihoods, often because, I think, the privado people have walked the camino and fell in love with it. And they want to make it their life. They know, being business people, they have to supply a sound user experience to get positive reviews and keep the dream alive. These people want to be here next year. They also regularly offer cool stuff like communal dinners.

2) Municipals - well, these are almost always really clean and I think they offer a great value and a great opportunity for meeting people. They can't get away with lax vermin routines... at least that is my impression.

3) Donativos - these ones know they got you because they aren't charging any money (yeah right). They offer minimal comforts and sometimes a nice meal with the other peregrinos. Very often, however, this meal is accompanied by some kind of "speech" about contributing, and about the "spirit" of the camino, but often this is intermingled with the personal indulgences of the hospitalero.

Always exceptions, no doubt.
As I believe Tinker mentioned there have been many conversations about Donativos and what is the right amount to donate etc. I think your description of private and municipal albergues are generally correct I will say using your words exceptioms
may vary. Personally I have had wonderful experiences in Donativos. Some not so wonderful also. You have done more Camino’s than I have so you have a greater
Experiencial pool to draw from. I have also had wonderful and not so memorable nights in private and munis.
I think your statement that there are exceptions is really accurate because each one of us have our own personal “exceptions” on what makes for a good or bad experience.
I think what it comes down to and it means a lot more than the cost or the hospitalario (except if you get bedbugs haha) is the people you share a beer and then a meal with. I have a feeling if some of us all met up for dinner somewhere on a future Camino in a donativo/muni/privado we would have a night we would remember with a big smile.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I thought (from what I've been reading, not from personal experience) that in France most pilgrims stay in gites and most gites are demi pension, providing much of the needed daily food. Not so much a menu del dia or menu peregrino but shared meals in the hostel. Is that not the case?
Only on the Le Puy route, which I have never walked, is that the norm. But I was speaking of France vs. Spain generally, not the Le Puy compared to the Francès specifically.

Of course people can sleep in gîtes throughout France if they can afford to, but the Camino lodging on the other routes is typically quite basic.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
1989
Only on the Le Puy route, which I have never walked, is that the norm. But I was speaking of France vs. Spain generally, not the Le Puy compared to the Francès specifically.

Of course people can sleep in gîtes throughout France if they can afford to, but the Camino lodging on the other routes is typically quite basic.
Good to know. Most of what I have come across has been about the Le Puy route.
 
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mai

Member
Past OR future Camino
CF
Pamplona-S 4/18
SJPP-S-F/M 4/19
SJPP-S. (4/21)
That's easy: 8-10€ per day for the Albergue, ~8-10€ for the pilgrims menue, 1-3€ for breakfast or some fruits (bananas, apples) from a discounter. My part for the shared meals: 3€ + work (I do cook a lot at home). Some days (3) only breakfast, nothing more. Water for free. I've lost 7kg weight on my CF and it felt very comfortable.
In the Donativos / Municipals it was 5€ for the night, they weren't well maintained or very "rural" nor did anyone show up after the check-in. In Grañon I gave 12€.

In total there were a few days with expenses higher than 25€ but most were ~20€.
My goal was not to spend more than 20€ per day, but I missed it.

As far as I'm informed, the Galician Municipals are now 10-12€ per night and most private Albergues are 12-15€. Not a chance for a super-cheapo-CF anymore ;) but worth every Penny!

BC
Roland
Agree with you. I have the similar budget for my CF in 2018.

I would like to add some tips for saving money regarding self catering.
1) Self catering may not mean cooking all the time. So cooking facilities are not necessary in this regard. Some packed food in supermarket may be cheaper than self catering.
2) It is easier to find supermarkets in cities or towns. Most of tiny villages have no food store. Better stay in cities or towns. Or, buy some packed food and bread in supermarkets before staying tiny villages.
3) In the morning, if order a bocadillo or tortilla in a bar, eat half for breakfast and save the other half for lunch. It could save money and trouble to find food for lunch. I learn it from a pilgrim in 2018.
4) Sometimes It is good to have pilgrim menu with other pilgrims. It's fun to have food in local bars as well, and talk with local people (ex the bar in the center of Itero de la Vega).

It is interesting to see various ways how pilgrims from all over the world choose what to eat on the camino.
 
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
2019
How many euros will I need on a daily basis for food and staying in the albergues? I am going self catering.
Hello
This is a bit like asking How long is a piece of string? I have done 4 Caminos. It depends but 5 Euros for breakfast 5-10 for lunch 10 -15 for dinner 10 - 15 for an alberque. I know you say you are self catering but this is not always possible. However most restaurants do a 3 course Pilgrim's Menus for 10 -12 euros with a good deal of choice. My first Camino cost about 25 euros per day but now I think 40 - 50 would be a reasonable estimate.
Buen Camino
Vince
 

Owensr23

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
My wife and I spent 40-50 euros per day for the two of us in 2016 and 2018. For two there we times a room was cheaper than getting two beds in a common space. Also, we could split meals at times. I got a bocadillo for breakfast for 1.5 euros and it had 5 eggs — so the wife had to help.

I would/will budget more for 2021. I will a leaving a bit more in the donativo to help post COVID recovery.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
If I cannot afford a minimum fee on a particular day & night, I sleep outdoors.

The donativos are a necessary help, and of course when you can give, then you do.

As are BTW those albergues charging €5 not 10.

€10 minimum would just be some more touristification.
I used to think that way (charge a minimum fee for a donativo) - just so that they could go on.... until I was put right by a wonderful hospitalero in Auch. He just told me off (nicely but firmly) for having such a thought and... it hit home! Not to be forgotten. Mea culpa! 😉
 
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Donativos should not be considered cheaper. If anything, I try to pay a little more to make up for the people who think they are "free".
I totally agree that donativos do not mean free at all. I have seen people walk past the donation box with hundreds of dollars of brand new clothes and equipment on their backs. I stay in Donativos as much as possible as I do have limited resources. I always pay my fair share. I also have walked with people who are on tighter budgets than I am. I shop every day and make lunch that I eat along the way and almost always eat dinner in an albergue. Donativos don't mean free but for many of us they are a lifesaver and allow us to walk with a whole lot less economic stress. Thank you for paying more for helping those who have alot less. Not just those who haven't yet learned the meaning of camino love and spirit.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I would like to suggest that those who are concerned about resurgence of COVID-19 and possible expenses for emergencies might consider buying insurance: travel medical and whatever else you think that you may need. MIne is looking like it will cost more than my return air ticket from Western Canada. But then, with a little extra to pay for accommodation, etc., I can know where I am financially. This is specifically for those like myself who have some savings to draw on. Only you can know if you are called to pilgrimage now, and each of us must decide what items we consider in our budget before going. My lively imagination is telling me that I want to be as safe as possible when traveling, and what might happen if I did not consider possible risks when planning my budget.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I would like to suggest that those who are concerned about resurgence of COVID-19 and possible expenses for emergencies might consider buying insurance: travel medical and whatever else you think that you may need.
I wouldn't consider traveling abroad without insurance!! Covid or no Covid.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I am not speaking to those who already have decided to purchase insurance, but to those who might consider it at this time. It is their decision, and the issue of the cost of such insurance, balanced against the possibility of being ill without it, is one that each of us will make.
 

NYSE

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances & Camino Finisterre/Muxia April 2019
How many euros will I need on a daily basis for food and staying in the albergues? I am going self catering.
I tried to keep it under €25 per day. That included lodging, dinner, a mid day snack, beer and wine.
 
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