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Daily Distance Question

Elisha

Member
Past OR future Camino
Planning April/May 2018
Hi fellow Pilgrims!

Just a question regarding planned distances while walking my first Camino in April/May. I'm going to be walking with a few friends & I've roughly jotted out an estimate of our daily kms based on a few different aspects; recommended albergues, interesting towns, points of interest, walking ability etc. All four of us are extremely fit & could comfortably walk 25km/30km a day, but we don't want to miss out on opportunities along the way for sightseeing & want to allow for any injuries/blisters picked up along the way etc. I absolutely understand that the Camino often has it's own plans & that often the best laid ones do fall to the wayside; that being said, we're meeting a friend in Leon on a specific date who is going to walk the last section with us so have to keep to a certain schedule to allow for that. Taking all that into consideration, I don't want to underestimate our distances & find that we're at a loose end because we finish walking too early in the day etc.

So of course I'm keen for your feedback. Thoughts?


Day 1 - St. Jean Pied de Port - Orrison
Albergue Orisson
7.9km
Day 2 - Orrison - Espinal
Hostal Haizea
24.3km
Day 3 - Espinal – Zuburi
Suseia - The Pilgrim's Home
15.2km
Day 4 - Zuburi – Pamplona
Aloha Hostel
21km
Day 5 - Pamplona
Rest Day
-
Day 6 - Pamplona – Puente de la Reina
Albergue Jakue (or Albergue Puente)
24.5km
Day 7 - Puente de la Reina – Estella
Albergue Capuchinos Rocamador
22.5km
Day 8 - Estella – Los Arcos
Albergue Casa de la Abuela - Grandmother's House
21.8km
Day 9 - Los Arcos – Logrono
Hostel Entresueños Logroño
28.6km
Day 10 - Logrono
Rest Day - Rioja Winery Tour from Logrono
-
Day 11 - Logrono - Nájera
Albergue Puerta de Nájera
29.5km
Day 12 - Nájera - Santo Domingo de la Calzada
Albergue de Abadía Cisterciense (Operated by the order of nuns)
21.5km
Day 13 - Santo Domingo de la Calzada - Belorado
Albergue de Peregrinos Cuatro Cantones
23.4km
Day 14 - Belorado - Agés
Albergue San Rafael
28.1km
Day 15 - Agés - Burgos
Hostal riMboMbin
22.4km
Day 16 - Burgos
Rest Day
-
Day 17 - Burgos - Hontanas
Albergue Santa Brígida
32km
Day 18 - Hontanas - Boadilla del Camino
Albergue En el Camino
29.2km
Day 19 - Boadilla del Camino - Carrion de los Condes
Monasterio de Santa Clara
25.4km
Day 20 - Carrion de los Condes - Terradillos de los Templarios
Albergue Los Templarios
27.2km
Day 21 - Terradillos de los Templarios - Bercianos del Real Camino
Albergue Parroquial Casa Rectoral
23.9km
Day 22 - Bercianos del Real Camino - Mansilla de las Mulas
Albergue Municipal Amigos del Peregrino
27.1km
Day 23 - Mansilla de las Mulas - Leon
Globetrotter Hostel
19.1km
Day 24 - Leon
Rest Day
-
Day 25 - Leon - San Martín del Camino
Albergue de San Martin del Camino
25.6km
Day 26 - San Martín del Camino - Astorga
Albergue de Peregrinos Siervas de María (or San Javier Albergue)
24.4km
Day 27 - Astorga – Foncebadón
Albergue Monte Irago
26.5km
Day 28 - Foncebadón - Ponferrada
Albergue Guiana
28km
Day 29 - Ponferrada - Villafranca del Bierzo
Albergue de la Piedra (or Albergue Leo)
23.2km
Day 30 - Villafranca del Bierzo - La Faba
Albergue para Peregrinos La Faba
24.1km
Day 31 - La Faba - Triacastela
Albergue A Horta de Abel
26.3km
Day 32 - Triacastela - Sarria (or +4km to Barbadelo)
Albergue Obradoiro

25.5km
Day 33 - Sarria - Portomarín
de Peregrinos Ferramenteiro (or Albergue A Fontana De Luxo)
23.2km
Day 34 - Portomarín - Palas De Rei
Albergue San Marcos (or Albergue A Casina di Marcello)
25.5km
Day 35 - Palas De Rei - Ribadiso da Baixo
Albergue Los Caminantes
26.3km
Day 36 - Ribadiso da Baixo - Lavacolla
Albergue Lavacolla
32km
Day 37 - Lavacolla - Santiago de Compostela
The Last Stamp (or Roots & Boots)
10.4km
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
For purposes of planning when to meet your friend, I'd say it looks fine and you could tell him/her you will meet in Leon on day 25 (cause I think you need one day for contingencies). Having done that, I'd then throw the plan away. For me, not having a mental "lock" is important when I start.
 

Bogong

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
First, March 2014
I agree totally with Kanga. Throw the plan away as soon as you can. Just walk until you feel sated, don’t worry about accommodation, it’s all part of the experience. Also, you’ll see lots of wonderful things and have experiences you will never read about or hear about in a month of Sunday researching.

De Colores

Bogong
 

Elisha

Member
Past OR future Camino
Planning April/May 2018
You have no idea how valuable your advice feels. I’ve always been a staunch organiser & instinctively take on all the responsibility for a group when I’m travelling. I’m a Flight Attendant so people naturally look to me for support & guidance when overseas. You’re advice has really hit a soft spot for me, it’s a lesson I need to learn & I appreciate it. I think the Camino will be a good life lesson in that practice & seeing Day 25 as a sign post to keep us on track is perfect. Thank you!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
1989
Hi fellow Pilgrims!

Just a question regarding planned distances while walking my first Camino in April/May. I'm going to be walking with a few friends & I've roughly jotted out an estimate of our daily kms based on a few different aspects; recommended albergues, interesting towns, points of interest, walking ability etc. All four of us are extremely fit & could comfortably walk 25km/30km a day, but we don't want to miss out on opportunities along the way for sightseeing & want to allow for any injuries/blisters picked up along the way etc. I absolutely understand that the Camino often has it's own plans & that often the best laid ones do fall to the wayside; that being said, we're meeting a friend in Leon on a specific date who is going to walk the last section with us so have to keep to a certain schedule to allow for that. Taking all that into consideration, I don't want to underestimate our distances & find that we're at a loose end because we finish walking too early in the day etc.

So of course I'm keen for your feedback. Thoughts?


Day 1 - St. Jean Pied de Port - Orrison
Albergue Orisson
7.9km

Day 2 - Orrison - Espinal
Hostal Haizea
24.3km

Day 3 - Espinal – Zuburi
Suseia - The Pilgrim's Home
15.2km

Day 4 - Zuburi – Pamplona
Aloha Hostel
21km

Day 5 - Pamplona
Rest Day
-

Day 6 - Pamplona – Puente de la Reina
Albergue Jakue (or Albergue Puente)
24.5km

Day 7 - Puente de la Reina – Estella
Albergue Capuchinos Rocamador
22.5km

Day 8 - Estella – Los Arcos
Albergue Casa de la Abuela - Grandmother's House
21.8km

Day 9 - Los Arcos – Logrono
Hostel Entresueños Logroño
28.6km

Day 10 - Logrono
Rest Day - Rioja Winery Tour from Logrono
-

Day 11 - Logrono - Nájera
Albergue Puerta de Nájera
29.5km

Day 12 - Nájera - Santo Domingo de la Calzada
Albergue de Abadía Cisterciense (Operated by the order of nuns)
21.5km

Day 13 - Santo Domingo de la Calzada - Belorado
Albergue de Peregrinos Cuatro Cantones
23.4km

Day 14 - Belorado - Agés
Albergue San Rafael
28.1km

Day 15 - Agés - Burgos
Hostal riMboMbin
22.4km

Day 16 - Burgos
Rest Day
-

Day 17 - Burgos - Hontanas
Albergue Santa Brígida
32km

Day 18 - Hontanas - Boadilla del Camino
Albergue En el Camino
29.2km

Day 19 - Boadilla del Camino - Carrion de los Condes
Monasterio de Santa Clara
25.4km

Day 20 - Carrion de los Condes - Terradillos de los Templarios
Albergue Los Templarios
27.2km

Day 21 - Terradillos de los Templarios - Bercianos del Real Camino
Albergue Parroquial Casa Rectoral
23.9km

Day 22 - Bercianos del Real Camino - Mansilla de las Mulas
Albergue Municipal Amigos del Peregrino
27.1km

Day 23 - Mansilla de las Mulas - Leon
Globetrotter Hostel
19.1km

Day 24 - Leon
Rest Day
-

Day 25 - Leon - San Martín del Camino
Albergue de San Martin del Camino
25.6km

Day 26 - San Martín del Camino - Astorga
Albergue de Peregrinos Siervas de María (or San Javier Albergue)
24.4km

Day 27 - Astorga – Foncebadón
Albergue Monte Irago
26.5km

Day 28 - Foncebadón - Ponferrada
Albergue Guiana
28km

Day 29 - Ponferrada - Villafranca del Bierzo
Albergue de la Piedra (or Albergue Leo)
23.2km

Day 30 - Villafranca del Bierzo - La Faba
Albergue para Peregrinos La Faba
24.1km

Day 31 - La Faba - Triacastela
Albergue A Horta de Abel
26.3km

Day 32 - Triacastela - Sarria (or +4km to Barbadelo)
Albergue Obradoiro

25.5km

Day 33 - Sarria - Portomarín
de Peregrinos Ferramenteiro (or Albergue A Fontana De Luxo)
23.2km

Day 34 - Portomarín - Palas De Rei
Albergue San Marcos (or Albergue A Casina di Marcello)
25.5km

Day 35 - Palas De Rei - Ribadiso da Baixo
Albergue Los Caminantes
26.3km

Day 36 - Ribadiso da Baixo - Lavacolla
Albergue Lavacolla
32km

Day 37 - Lavacolla - Santiago de Compostela
The Last Stamp (or Roots & Boots)
10.4km
A few notes, based on my own experiences, your mileage may vary, of course.
Day 12 ends at Santo Domingo. If you walk a bit further, you get to Grañon. A lot of people find the parochial albergue there one of the most special on the Camino - although, fair warning, it is quite rustic.
If you really want to stay at Santo Domingo, there is an albergue in the village just past Belorado (Tosantos, I believe) that is similarly beloved and similarly rustic.

Day 19 ends in Carrion de los Condes. I would recommend staying in the other albergue with the nuns- the parochial one next to the church. It was a truly special experience.

Day 27 you leave Astorga. I would consider possibly taking a rest day in Astorga, or doing a short day to or from Astorga. There is a lot to see there with the Pilgrimage Museum (in Gaudi's episcopal castle) and the Chocolate Museum. Of course, that depends on timing it so you don't arrive when they are closed for the day.
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
1989
It is good to plan. It is good to know what is there and what is recommended and planning helps with that. Having a detailed plan is good. It really helps increase your knowledge. What isn't good is being attached to your plan. The Camino is great for freeing us from our attachments and attachments to plans are certainly counted among them. Recognize that you will really decide things on the day. The plan will be one factor that goes into the decision. So will how you feel, who you meet, what the weather is like, etc.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Someone gave me valuable advice last year - and yes, I'm always learning, always a "newbie" on the camino! The advice was "don't pack your fears". It was specifically in relation to pack weight, but I think the same advice applies to every day on the camino. Last September I kept encountering people who believed each day they would not find accommodation that night, and so they would book ahead. Every day the word would go round that people had to book that night (or the next). I never did. On a couple of occasions I did not get my first choice of albergue, but there was always a reasonable alternative. It takes a bit of courage for me to let go of my worries, but the freedom and joy, the lightness of soul, when I do! And the pleasure of finding that I am resourceful and can cope with some adversity, or come up with new strategies when needed. This has me thinking again, of all the subtle benefits of walking the Camino...
 

trevorcc

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPD to Santiago 2013,2014, Camino de Levante Sept. 2016, Frances March 2018, planning 2020
For purposes of planning when to meet your friend, I'd say it looks fine and you could tell him/her you will meet in Leon on day 25 (cause I think you need one day for contingencies). Having done that, I'd then throw the plan away. For me, not having a mental "lock" is important when I start.
Hey Kanga, could not agree more after Pamplona I saunter along as you never know what each day will bring, I see so many people over plan their Camino and then say....I never saw that. Go with the flow. after 3 Camino's I know I have not seen it all, well thats what I tell my wife.
 

Elisha

Member
Past OR future Camino
Planning April/May 2018
A few notes, based on my own experiences, your mileage may vary, of course.
Day 12 ends at Santo Domingo. If you walk a bit further, you get to Grañon. A lot of people find the parochial albergue there one of the most special on the Camino - although, fair warning, it is quite rustic.
If you really want to stay at Santo Domingo, there is an albergue in the village just past Belorado (Tosantos, I believe) that is similarly beloved and similarly rustic.

Day 19 ends in Carrion de los Condes. I would recommend staying in the other albergue with the nuns- the parochial one next to the church. It was a truly special experience.

Day 27 you leave Astorga. I would consider possibly taking a rest day in Astorga, or doing a short day to or from Astorga. There is a lot to see there with the Pilgrimage Museum (in Gaudi's episcopal castle) and the Chocolate Museum. Of course, that depends on timing it so you don't arrive when they are closed for the day.

This is fantastic, thank you!
 

Elisha

Member
Past OR future Camino
Planning April/May 2018
Hey Kanga, could not agree more after Pamplona I saunter along as you never know what each day will bring, I see so many people over plan their Camino and then say....I never saw that. Go with the flow. after 3 Camino's I know I have not seen it all, well thats what I tell my wife.

Thank you, I really appreciate hearing that & I consider it extremely valuable advice.
 
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Elisha

Member
Past OR future Camino
Planning April/May 2018
Someone gave me valuable advice last year - and yes, I'm always learning, always a "newbie" on the camino! The advice was "don't pack your fears". It was specifically in relation to pack weight, but I think the same advice applies to every day on the camino. Last September I kept encountering people who believed each day they would not find accommodation that night, and so they would book ahead. Every day the word would go round that people had to book that night (or the next). I never did. On a couple of occasions I did not get my first choice of albergue, but there was always a reasonable alternative. It takes a bit of courage for me to let go of my worries, but the freedom and joy, the lightness of soul, when I do! And the pleasure of finding that I am resourceful and can cope with some adversity, or come up with new strategies when needed. This has me thinking again, of all the subtle benefits of walking the Camino...

You’re absolutely right Kanga & it’s thrown a new perspective on looking at my notes & how I plan to utilize them... or not for that matter. I’ve always had the habit of overplanning everything & I believe I do this because I want those who are following me to feel confident in my ability to take care of them. Your words have rather flipped my perspective on its head & shown me that there’s another way to approach the Camino & that a different approach may teach me something more valuable than having a plan. Thank you!
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
I don't want to underestimate our distances & find that we're at a loose end because we finish walking too early in the day etc.
I think this is unlikely. Your plan looks reasonable, and I think that building in the 3 rest days is a good idea.
I want those who are following me to feel confident in my ability to take care of them.
That is very appropriate when you are at work as a flight attendant. However, when you are undertaking a pilgrimage, I'd advise everyone to consider the experience as their personal responsibility and joy where each person has to be resourceful and capable.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I have a detailed plan of stages for the whole CF.
Kms, hours, places we might stay.
Where we might stop for a nice Lunch!! :eek::eek:

I will throw it away on Day 1. ;);)

It was merely a bit of fun to put together, and it allowed me to research different towns and sights along the way. Places I missed last time.
And it gave me a very rough idea of how many days we might need.
And I added a few more days, as stuff ‘Happens’.

Where we actually stop, will be purely based on how we feel that day.
And the places and people we come across.

I’m not sure I would aim to meet someone on a specific day at this stage. That severely restricts your freedom. Are you able to confirm with them a ‘few days’ out what day you will arrive?
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
Looks good to me, but definitely use it as a guideline and not something set in stone. Definitely want to be flexible and relaxed when walking the Camino.
Nothing wrong with occasionally reaching a town on the Camino a bit early than expected. Can be nice sometimes.
 
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HedaP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
Lots of good info above. You do need to factor in stopping early on the occasional day with really bad weather. I don’t know about anyone else but I always slow down the closer I get to Santiago. I suspect because I dont want it to finish. ;)
Buen camino, peregrina.
 

MichaelC

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
next: Lucca to Rome, Spring 2023
(aye, all I meant to do was jot down a few notes for Elisha, not write a novel. This post has gotten away from me!)

I never saw a conflict between having a conceptual plan, and taking each day as it comes. As long as you're not wedded to your plan (and you say that you're not!) then I think they're really beneficial.

Some specific thoughts on your plan:

I don't want to underestimate our distances & find that we're at a loose end because we finish walking too early in the day etc.

I did this a few times. I'd be exhausted at 2 pm, but after a shower and a good meal I'd feel re-energized. What worked for me was to take a nice break mid-day, eat a slow lunch (and lunches were almost always better than the pilgrim dinners!), maybe check out the local church (if it was open) or a museum, maybe just have a glass of wine with other pilgrims, and then continue walking for a few hours late in the afternoon.

This meant arriving later in the day, and so I tended to make reservations more than other pilgrims, especially if I was planning to arrive in a smaller town with fewer albergues. Usually I would just check on booking.com the night before.

For your specific plans:

Orisson - It only takes a few hours to walk here. The restaurant and terrace are open all day, but I don't think the hostel itself opens until mid-afternoon. You have time to explore Saint Jean in the morning, and have a nice breakfast or even lunch, before walking.

Logroño and Pamplona - I timed my stages to overnight in both. I usually love cities, but, surprisingly, felt "off-camino" in both. In France they would call it hors du chemin, a feeling that you were somehow outside of that mental and spiritual space that we walk in.

A word of warning on the Aloha Hostel - It was fine, but it's a real hostel. There were three pilgrims (including me) and a British wedding party when I stayed there. I can sleep through anything (earthquakes, hurricanes, and apparently false warnings about a nuclear attack), but the other two pilgrims had a rough time of it.

I had reservations in both towns - this is where my planning didn't pay off. I would have been content stopping in each for a bit & then walking on.

Burgos and León, however, were both great rest days.

After León take the variant through Villar de Mazarife to Astorga. The camino principal, according to those who took it, has more road walking.

Foncebadón - An excellent stop, as it puts you at Cruz de Feirro the next morning. I found it much easier to do the big climbs in the morning rather than the afternoon! The Albergue Monte Irago was a party-stop when I was there. I don't know if that's the norm.

Villafranca del Bierzo / La Faba / Triacastela - And this is where my planning paid off! After Villafranca you can walk 4.5 km parallel to the highway, or take an 11.2 km route along the camino de la montaña. If you're going to La Faba or Cebreiro in one day then take the direct route. Almost everyone does. I would recommend taking the mountain route, as it's a nice walk, and staying at one of the towns before the big climb to Cebreiro (Vega de Valcarce, Ruitelán, or Las Herrerías).

I had read some negative comments about La Faba. The town looked fine to me, so I'm not sure what they were based on.

Also consider the variation for Samos. Very few people did it when I walked, which is a shame - its monastery is one of the major cultural sites in Galicia. This will add about a half-day to your schedule. I understand why people pass the detour, so close to the end of the camino. I think it's worthwhile.

A night in Samos will put you off-stage compared to the people following the Brierley guide. This means you arrive in Sarria for lunch, will end up staying in the smaller towns, and that you won't see the big camino groups for the next couple days. Depending on your perspective, this is either the best thing ever or a mistake you will never make again.

For me it was a great choice. There were about six people I saw over and over for a four-day period (Samos, Ferreiros, Eirexe, Melide). I got to know all of them. When I finally caught up with the crowd a day before Santiago (O Pedrouzo) there were literally hundreds of people. And while that was fun ... I'm glad it was only for the last day.

tl/dr: Consider Samos. Try to stop in towns before the big hills, so that you climb in the morning when you're fresh. Consider all the variations listed on www.gronze.com. Have fun planning!
 
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november_moon

Veteran Member
Also, when you get to Leon to pick up your friend, don't forget that your friend will be a newbie to the Camino, whereas the rest of you will be road-hardened pilgrims. All of the things that you all worked out in the first week or so of your Camino - getting into your rhythm, figuring out the dynamics of the group, dealing with blisters and sore knees, convincing the body that you can and will walk another 25km today, etc. etc. - will be brand new to your friend. So be patient. Take it slower. Give him or her the chance to work through all of that - with your help, of course, but allow for that time

Because your friend will need to get his or her Camino legs, I would take 3 days to get to Astorga rather than 2 - overnight in Villar de Mazarife and Hospital de Orbigo. This is a nicer route, as mentioned, and makes for shorter days to start.

Just a general comment about the ability to comfortably walk 25-30km per day - which a lot of people can - not necessarily comfortably, but they can. Do you all have experience with this sort of walking over a period of time? If so, then you know how your body will react - if not, then that is something you probably won't know until you get there. I found that on the Camino, I found that my maximum per day was just about 25km - the legs were willing, but the feet just weren't. And there were some days when 12km was my limit. The wear and tear of walking these distances day after day was something I hadn't anticipated. And I am in pretty good shape, didn't over pack, been hiking all of my life - but I'd never done sustained hiking or walking like this over a period of time like that.
 
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Anamya

Keeping it simple
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I found that on the Camino, I found that my maximum per day was just about 25km - the legs were willing, but the feet just weren't. And there were some days when 12km was my limit. The wear and tear of walking these distances day after day was something I hadn't anticipated. And I am in pretty good shape, didn't over pack, been hiking all of my life

Very good point, Moon!
I'm also a fit person, didn't overpack and my maximum in the camino is also around 25km/day. I feel very happy if I can keep an average of 20km along the route.

On my first camino, I had a day of 30km which required me to seek therapeutic massage afterwards, because I was broken. I could usually do 30km at home with some effort, but in the camino, after days of walking, it was too much.

On my second camino, we kept it around 20-22km/day and it was alright. But even so, depending on the weather and the quality of sleep, it could still be very challenging.

So many things can also happen during the camino that the best thing is always listen to your body and rest when you have to.

Dear Elisha, I'm also a natural overplanner (I work as an event manager at the moment, then you imagine...). In the camino, the way I managed my impulses to overplan was: Before sleeping, I would read in my guide where there were places with albergues and hotels in the next 20-odd km. Sometimes I would even book a place with Booking.com. So I would start walking, knowing what my options were if I wanted to stop earlier or later. There was no set goal, but there was peace of mind. If my body limit did not match my booking, I would simply cancel it and sort something else :)

The camino was freeing. So good that I went again and now I'm dreaming with a third one!
 

HedaP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
Also, when you get to Leon to pick up your friend, don't forget that your friend will be a newbie to the Camino, whereas the rest of you will be road-hardened pilgrims. All of the things that you all worked out in the first week or so of your Camino - getting into your rhythm, figuring out the dynamics of the group, dealing with blisters and sore knees, convincing the body that you can and will walk another 25km today, etc. etc. - will be brand new to your friend. So be patient. Take it slower. Give him or her the chance to work through all of that - with your help, of course, but allow for that time

Because your friend will need to get his or her Camino legs, I would take 3 days to get to Astorga rather than 2 - overnight in Villar de Mazarife and Hospital de Orbigo. This is a nicer route, as mentioned, and makes for shorter days to start.

Just a general comment about the ability to comfortably walk 25-30km per day - which a lot of people can - not necessarily comfortably, but they can. Do you all have experience with this sort of walking over a period of time? If so, then you know how your body will react - if not, then that is something you probably won't know until you get there. I found that on the Camino, I found that my maximum per day was just about 25km - the legs were willing, but the feet just weren't. And there were some days when 12km was my limit. The wear and tear of walking these distances day after day was something I hadn't anticipated. And I am in pretty good shape, didn't over pack, been hiking all of my life - but I'd never done sustained hiking or walking like this over a period of time like that.
Ditto. Such a good point about the new person joining in Leon!
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
No comment on planning or booking, to each their own. I walked a very similar plan last May/June so here are my thoughts.

If you’re all fit, SJPP to Orisson is a very short day. I think that by the time you get to Pamplona, you’ll probably have you Camino legs under you and may not need that rest day. We didn’t take a rest day until Burgos, definitely worth an extra day and it’s a great place to forward unneeded items to Santiago.

We took a rest day in Leon because we too met someone there. Leon is interesting but not necessarily worth an extra day. The Museo de Leon is very good.

Our final rest day was Astorga and we splurged for the Spa there. Astorga is an interesting town as well but, small.

Keep in mind that as you walk, you will build your Camino friends. Each time you stop, you loose touch with some of them but, meet others.

When I do it again, I’d take fewer rest days and take more of the alternate routes. I guess that’s where the expression “live and learn” comes from.

Whatever you decide, enjoy every moment and step, I know I did.

Buen Camino.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
All good comments above. I usually plan ahead, mainly to "try" to determine how much time it will take me to walk in order to book my flights. I then pre-book my first and last nights to coincide with those flights. After that its just day by day, planning only one day at a time as I go along.

I stayed at the Aloha Hostel in Pamplona on Easter Sunday 2017 and thought it was great. It was also very quiet! It shows that no two experiences in the same place are necessarily similar.

I stayed in LaFaba at the municipal albergue, a lovely renovated stone building. LaFaba is a very small village, but it did have provisions and its location helped to break up the climb to O'Cebrerio.
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Also consider the variation for Samos. Very few people did it when I walked, which is a shame - its monastery is one of the major cultural sites in Galicia. This will add about a half-day to your schedule. I understand why people pass the detour, so close to the end of the camino. I think it's worthwhile.
Definitely go to Samos. It is a charming little town. And stay at Casa Licerio. A wonderful little pensión. Unfortunately, I didn't stay there, but some of my Camino friends did. She does a little "happy hour" in the evening, and does everyone's laundry too!

In Pamplona I would recommend Casa Ibarrola. The beds are in little "pods" with privacy shades.

Consider stopping before Estella in Villatuerta and stay at La Casa Magíca. My friend called it a 5* albergue. It's very special.

And I can't talk about albergues without mentioning the wonderful La Finca in Población de Campos! Every bed is private - the lower "bunks" have curtains, and the upper bunks, accessible by mini staircases are like little rooms. And they have wonderful food too!
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
For planning and simple reference figure out what your walking pace is. Use that knowledge to plan each days' walk. But plan the night before.

So, in my experience, I found that I walked an average 4 km per hour. Going uphill, like the first day to Orisson, I would do about 3 km per hour. However, on the other side of the Napoleon Pass, where the going is all downhill to Roncesvalles, that pace accelerates to 5 km per hour.

Overall, on my five Caminos, I can reliably look at a planned waking distance and the elevation profile and accurately assess my likely walking plan for the day using the 3/4/5 model. Three km/hr going UP. Four km/hr on flat or undulating terrain. Five km/hr on downhill segments.

The OPs walking plan sounds about right. However, I caution that no plan survives the first shot in any battle. The same is true on the Camino.

Secondly, the Camino is about the journey not the destination. Enjoy the journey. Stop and look at things that interest you. It is not a forced-march. Enjoy getting there.

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

John McEvoy

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2017
It is good to plan. It is good to know what is there and what is recommended and planning helps with that. Having a detailed plan is good. It really helps increase your knowledge. What isn't good is being attached to your plan. The Camino is great for freeing us from our attachments and attachments to plans are certainly counted among them. Recognize that you will really decide things on the day. The plan will be one factor that goes into the decision. So will how you feel, who you meet, what the weather is like, etc.
I agree with David. It is good to plan because it gets you into a mindset to some degree. I had a similar plan which went out the window the second day.
It became very clear that each day was a plan. As you get nearer to the date to be in Leon just know that you can hope a train, bus , taxi to get to your location on the date. The Camino is NOT defined. You will see people continually jockeying for position along the way. It is difficult to relax and enjoy the moment but please try.

Buen Camino
 

Elisha

Member
Past OR future Camino
Planning April/May 2018
Definitely go to Samos. It is a charming little town. And stay at Casa Licerio. A wonderful little pensión. Unfortunately, I didn't stay there, but some of my Camino friends did. She does a little "happy hour" in the evening, and does everyone's laundry too!

In Pamplona I would recommend Casa Ibarrola. The beds are in little "pods" with privacy shades.

Consider stopping before Estella in Villatuerta and stay at La Casa Magíca. My friend called it a 5* albergue. It's very special.

And I can't talk about albergues without mentioning the wonderful La Finca in Población de Campos! Every bed is private - the lower "bunks" have curtains, and the upper bunks, accessible by mini staircases are like little rooms. And they have wonderful food too!

Brilliant! Thank you so much for all your recommendations, hugely appreciated :)
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Great advice, all of it. Don't forget that the weather and blisters can slow your group down to a snails pace. Look up the threads with advice for blister prevention on this Forum.
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
Hi fellow Pilgrims!

Just a question regarding planned distances while walking my first Camino in April/May. I'm going to be walking with a few friends & I've roughly jotted out an estimate of our daily kms based on a few different aspects; recommended albergues, interesting towns, points of interest, walking ability etc. All four of us are extremely fit & could comfortably walk 25km/30km a day, but we don't want to miss out on opportunities along the way for sightseeing & want to allow for any injuries/blisters picked up along the way etc. I absolutely understand that the Camino often has it's own plans & that often the best laid ones do fall to the wayside; that being said, we're meeting a friend in Leon on a specific date who is going to walk the last section with us so have to keep to a certain schedule to allow for that. Taking all that into consideration, I don't want to underestimate our distances & find that we're at a loose end because we finish walking too early in the day etc.

So of course I'm keen for your feedback. Thoughts?


Day 1 - St. Jean Pied de Port - Orrison
Albergue Orisson
7.9km

Day 2 - Orrison - Espinal
Hostal Haizea
24.3km

Day 3 - Espinal – Zuburi
Suseia - The Pilgrim's Home
15.2km

Day 4 - Zuburi – Pamplona
Aloha Hostel
21km

Day 5 - Pamplona
Rest Day
-

Day 6 - Pamplona – Puente de la Reina
Albergue Jakue (or Albergue Puente)
24.5km

Day 7 - Puente de la Reina – Estella
Albergue Capuchinos Rocamador
22.5km

Day 8 - Estella – Los Arcos
Albergue Casa de la Abuela - Grandmother's House
21.8km

Day 9 - Los Arcos – Logrono
Hostel Entresueños Logroño
28.6km

Day 10 - Logrono
Rest Day - Rioja Winery Tour from Logrono
-

Day 11 - Logrono - Nájera
Albergue Puerta de Nájera
29.5km

Day 12 - Nájera - Santo Domingo de la Calzada
Albergue de Abadía Cisterciense (Operated by the order of nuns)
21.5km

Day 13 - Santo Domingo de la Calzada - Belorado
Albergue de Peregrinos Cuatro Cantones
23.4km

Day 14 - Belorado - Agés
Albergue San Rafael
28.1km

Day 15 - Agés - Burgos
Hostal riMboMbin
22.4km

Day 16 - Burgos
Rest Day
-

Day 17 - Burgos - Hontanas
Albergue Santa Brígida
32km

Day 18 - Hontanas - Boadilla del Camino
Albergue En el Camino
29.2km

Day 19 - Boadilla del Camino - Carrion de los Condes
Monasterio de Santa Clara
25.4km

Day 20 - Carrion de los Condes - Terradillos de los Templarios
Albergue Los Templarios
27.2km

Day 21 - Terradillos de los Templarios - Bercianos del Real Camino
Albergue Parroquial Casa Rectoral
23.9km

Day 22 - Bercianos del Real Camino - Mansilla de las Mulas
Albergue Municipal Amigos del Peregrino
27.1km

Day 23 - Mansilla de las Mulas - Leon
Globetrotter Hostel
19.1km

Day 24 - Leon
Rest Day
-

Day 25 - Leon - San Martín del Camino
Albergue de San Martin del Camino
25.6km

Day 26 - San Martín del Camino - Astorga
Albergue de Peregrinos Siervas de María (or San Javier Albergue)
24.4km

Day 27 - Astorga – Foncebadón
Albergue Monte Irago
26.5km

Day 28 - Foncebadón - Ponferrada
Albergue Guiana
28km

Day 29 - Ponferrada - Villafranca del Bierzo
Albergue de la Piedra (or Albergue Leo)
23.2km

Day 30 - Villafranca del Bierzo - La Faba
Albergue para Peregrinos La Faba
24.1km

Day 31 - La Faba - Triacastela
Albergue A Horta de Abel
26.3km

Day 32 - Triacastela - Sarria (or +4km to Barbadelo)
Albergue Obradoiro

25.5km

Day 33 - Sarria - Portomarín
de Peregrinos Ferramenteiro (or Albergue A Fontana De Luxo)
23.2km

Day 34 - Portomarín - Palas De Rei
Albergue San Marcos (or Albergue A Casina di Marcello)
25.5km

Day 35 - Palas De Rei - Ribadiso da Baixo
Albergue Los Caminantes
26.3km

Day 36 - Ribadiso da Baixo - Lavacolla
Albergue Lavacolla
32km

Day 37 - Lavacolla - Santiago de Compostela
The Last Stamp (or Roots & Boots)
10.4km
One thing we did learn, if you have a group, and choose to call ahead, they will often have a room with 3,4 and even 7 beds and a private bath. Likely more quiet and shorter line for the shower.
 
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november_moon

Veteran Member
We mentioned group dynamics a bit - and although this is a bit off-topic from your specific questions, I think it is important to consider - what will your group do if someone needs an unplanned rest day or a shorter day than planned? Some groups want to stay together and will go as slow as the slowest person. Other groups will split up and walk at different paces, maybe the slower person or people busing ahead at some point along the way to catch up to the rest. Your group may not know the answer until you get there and come across the situation, but I think it is important to talk about it ahead of time so that everybody is ready for this possibility.
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
November_moon, excellent point about walking at your own pace. We were often strung out along each days path, I walked a bit faster than some and much faster than one person. For the faster walkers, walking slow is as difficult as walking faster to keep up, I found. I'd stop for a cafe or 2nd breakfast and we'd all re-connect. No pressure on anyone to walk at a pace that was uncomfortable. It was something that we discussed in advance but we had the advantage of being long-time friends. Afterwards, we all agreed that by doing this, we got time alone and time to meet other pilgrims. I described my Camino later as walking alone, together.
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Ourense to Santiago (2019), CF: (2014, 2004, 2002, 2001). On to Fisterra, (2002, 4, 14).
David,

If you go to Samos ask monks if you can attend vespers after evening mass. It is quite lovely. Think about stopping in Atapuerca: an historical site. And, do attend pilgrim's mass in Roncesvalles. Kicks off the pilgrimage it does. Grañon has a not to be missed communal meal and mass.

Oh, don't be surprised if unplanned days ensue. You can meet meet-up deadline as long as your are flexible.

Buen camino.
 

MaryLynn

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I walked the Camino the first time with a friend for the month of May in 2011 from Leon to Santiago--only the last 300km because we erroneously thought the rest of the Camino was either too dangerous (falling off a cliff in the Pyrenees) or too boring (the meseta). Before we left, I had mapped out our destination for every day of the month to fit our plan of walking for five days and resting for two days because we didn't want to overdo it. I could not imagine doing such a long, arduous walk without knowing where we would stay every single night. Of course, our plan soon went out the window when we realized that we could comfortably walk 20-25km/day and wherever we were near the end of each day's walk was where we would stay. We had one half-day of rest in Samos, otherwise we walked every day for a month and loved it.
The first lesson we learned on the Camino: "Let Go. All will be well."
 

E V Waight

It's the journey, not the destination.
Past OR future Camino
September (2017)
Possible September (2018)
Holy Year (2021) (all three Gladys, John and I)
Hi fellow Pilgrims!

Just a question regarding planned distances while walking my first Camino in April/May. I'm going to be walking with a few friends & I've roughly jotted out an estimate of our daily kms based on a few different aspects; recommended albergues, interesting towns, points of interest, walking ability etc. All four of us are extremely fit & could comfortably walk 25km/30km a day, but we don't want to miss out on opportunities along the way for sightseeing & want to allow for any injuries/blisters picked up along the way etc. I absolutely understand that the Camino often has it's own plans & that often the best laid ones do fall to the wayside; that being said, we're meeting a friend in Leon on a specific date who is going to walk the last section with us so have to keep to a certain schedule to allow for that. Taking all that into consideration, I don't want to underestimate our distances & find that we're at a loose end because we finish walking too early in the day etc.

So of course I'm keen for your feedback. Thoughts?


Day 1 - St. Jean Pied de Port - Orrison
Albergue Orisson
7.9km

Day 2 - Orrison - Espinal
Hostal Haizea
24.3km

Day 3 - Espinal – Zuburi
Suseia - The Pilgrim's Home
15.2km

Day 4 - Zuburi – Pamplona
Aloha Hostel
21km

Day 5 - Pamplona
Rest Day
-

Day 6 - Pamplona – Puente de la Reina
Albergue Jakue (or Albergue Puente)
24.5km

Day 7 - Puente de la Reina – Estella
Albergue Capuchinos Rocamador
22.5km

Day 8 - Estella – Los Arcos
Albergue Casa de la Abuela - Grandmother's House
21.8km

Day 9 - Los Arcos – Logrono
Hostel Entresueños Logroño
28.6km

Day 10 - Logrono
Rest Day - Rioja Winery Tour from Logrono
-

Day 11 - Logrono - Nájera
Albergue Puerta de Nájera
29.5km

Day 12 - Nájera - Santo Domingo de la Calzada
Albergue de Abadía Cisterciense (Operated by the order of nuns)
21.5km

Day 13 - Santo Domingo de la Calzada - Belorado
Albergue de Peregrinos Cuatro Cantones
23.4km

Day 14 - Belorado - Agés
Albergue San Rafael
28.1km

Day 15 - Agés - Burgos
Hostal riMboMbin
22.4km

Day 16 - Burgos
Rest Day
-

Day 17 - Burgos - Hontanas
Albergue Santa Brígida
32km

Day 18 - Hontanas - Boadilla del Camino
Albergue En el Camino
29.2km

Day 19 - Boadilla del Camino - Carrion de los Condes
Monasterio de Santa Clara
25.4km

Day 20 - Carrion de los Condes - Terradillos de los Templarios
Albergue Los Templarios
27.2km

Day 21 - Terradillos de los Templarios - Bercianos del Real Camino
Albergue Parroquial Casa Rectoral
23.9km

Day 22 - Bercianos del Real Camino - Mansilla de las Mulas
Albergue Municipal Amigos del Peregrino
27.1km

Day 23 - Mansilla de las Mulas - Leon
Globetrotter Hostel
19.1km

Day 24 - Leon
Rest Day
-

Day 25 - Leon - San Martín del Camino
Albergue de San Martin del Camino
25.6km

Day 26 - San Martín del Camino - Astorga
Albergue de Peregrinos Siervas de María (or San Javier Albergue)
24.4km

Day 27 - Astorga – Foncebadón
Albergue Monte Irago
26.5km

Day 28 - Foncebadón - Ponferrada
Albergue Guiana
28km

Day 29 - Ponferrada - Villafranca del Bierzo
Albergue de la Piedra (or Albergue Leo)
23.2km

Day 30 - Villafranca del Bierzo - La Faba
Albergue para Peregrinos La Faba
24.1km

Day 31 - La Faba - Triacastela
Albergue A Horta de Abel
26.3km

Day 32 - Triacastela - Sarria (or +4km to Barbadelo)
Albergue Obradoiro

25.5km

Day 33 - Sarria - Portomarín
de Peregrinos Ferramenteiro (or Albergue A Fontana De Luxo)
23.2km

Day 34 - Portomarín - Palas De Rei
Albergue San Marcos (or Albergue A Casina di Marcello)
25.5km

Day 35 - Palas De Rei - Ribadiso da Baixo
Albergue Los Caminantes
26.3km

Day 36 - Ribadiso da Baixo - Lavacolla
Albergue Lavacolla
32km

Day 37 - Lavacolla - Santiago de Compostela
The Last Stamp (or Roots & Boots)
10.4km
I did the camino francés in September last year and yes indeed it was en experiencia like no other. For purpose of planning I used www.godesalco.com. That site has a very práctical chart that you may want to look at. However, you will find that the best advice is to just go with the flow. At your own pace you will know when and where to stop for the day. No matter how well planned your agenda, there will be variations. Keep in mind your purpose for walking. It all depends on the time (amount if days), you have for walking. Have your plan, but only as a guide. Many days I pushed a town or two further than my original plan for that stage just because of my pace or at the time I was not tired and felt I could go more. Go your own pace. Buen Camino.
Hi fellow Pilgrims!

Just a question regarding planned distances while walking my first Camino in April/May. I'm going to be walking with a few friends & I've roughly jotted out an estimate of our daily kms based on a few different aspects; recommended albergues, interesting towns, points of interest, walking ability etc. All four of us are extremely fit & could comfortably walk 25km/30km a day, but we don't want to miss out on opportunities along the way for sightseeing & want to allow for any injuries/blisters picked up along the way etc. I absolutely understand that the Camino often has it's own plans & that often the best laid ones do fall to the wayside; that being said, we're meeting a friend in Leon on a specific date who is going to walk the last section with us so have to keep to a certain schedule to allow for that. Taking all that into consideration, I don't want to underestimate our distances & find that we're at a loose end because we finish walking too early in the day etc.

So of course I'm keen for your feedback. Thoughts?


Day 1 - St. Jean Pied de Port - Orrison
Albergue Orisson
7.9km

Day 2 - Orrison - Espinal
Hostal Haizea
24.3km

Day 3 - Espinal – Zuburi
Suseia - The Pilgrim's Home
15.2km

Day 4 - Zuburi – Pamplona
Aloha Hostel
21km

Day 5 - Pamplona
Rest Day
-

Day 6 - Pamplona – Puente de la Reina
Albergue Jakue (or Albergue Puente)
24.5km

Day 7 - Puente de la Reina – Estella
Albergue Capuchinos Rocamador
22.5km

Day 8 - Estella – Los Arcos
Albergue Casa de la Abuela - Grandmother's House
21.8km

Day 9 - Los Arcos – Logrono
Hostel Entresueños Logroño
28.6km

Day 10 - Logrono
Rest Day - Rioja Winery Tour from Logrono
-

Day 11 - Logrono - Nájera
Albergue Puerta de Nájera
29.5km

Day 12 - Nájera - Santo Domingo de la Calzada
Albergue de Abadía Cisterciense (Operated by the order of nuns)
21.5km

Day 13 - Santo Domingo de la Calzada - Belorado
Albergue de Peregrinos Cuatro Cantones
23.4km

Day 14 - Belorado - Agés
Albergue San Rafael
28.1km

Day 15 - Agés - Burgos
Hostal riMboMbin
22.4km

Day 16 - Burgos
Rest Day
-

Day 17 - Burgos - Hontanas
Albergue Santa Brígida
32km

Day 18 - Hontanas - Boadilla del Camino
Albergue En el Camino
29.2km

Day 19 - Boadilla del Camino - Carrion de los Condes
Monasterio de Santa Clara
25.4km

Day 20 - Carrion de los Condes - Terradillos de los Templarios
Albergue Los Templarios
27.2km

Day 21 - Terradillos de los Templarios - Bercianos del Real Camino
Albergue Parroquial Casa Rectoral
23.9km

Day 22 - Bercianos del Real Camino - Mansilla de las Mulas
Albergue Municipal Amigos del Peregrino
27.1km

Day 23 - Mansilla de las Mulas - Leon
Globetrotter Hostel
19.1km

Day 24 - Leon
Rest Day
-

Day 25 - Leon - San Martín del Camino
Albergue de San Martin del Camino
25.6km

Day 26 - San Martín del Camino - Astorga
Albergue de Peregrinos Siervas de María (or San Javier Albergue)
24.4km

Day 27 - Astorga – Foncebadón
Albergue Monte Irago
26.5km

Day 28 - Foncebadón - Ponferrada
Albergue Guiana
28km

Day 29 - Ponferrada - Villafranca del Bierzo
Albergue de la Piedra (or Albergue Leo)
23.2km

Day 30 - Villafranca del Bierzo - La Faba
Albergue para Peregrinos La Faba
24.1km

Day 31 - La Faba - Triacastela
Albergue A Horta de Abel
26.3km

Day 32 - Triacastela - Sarria (or +4km to Barbadelo)
Albergue Obradoiro

25.5km

Day 33 - Sarria - Portomarín
de Peregrinos Ferramenteiro (or Albergue A Fontana De Luxo)
23.2km

Day 34 - Portomarín - Palas De Rei
Albergue San Marcos (or Albergue A Casina di Marcello)
25.5km

Day 35 - Palas De Rei - Ribadiso da Baixo
Albergue Los Caminantes
26.3km

Day 36 - Ribadiso da Baixo - Lavacolla
Albergue Lavacolla
32km

Day 37 - Lavacolla - Santiago de Compostela
The Last Stamp (or Roots & Boots)
10.4km
I started a reply and I am not sure where it went. Anyway at risk of duplicating here goes. I did the Camino Francés last September. For purposes of planning I used www.godesalco.com. You can chart/customize your very own plan. However the best advice is to just go with the flow. Go your own pace . You will know how far to walk at any stage. Listen to your body. It will tell you. Many stages I did a town or two, maybe even three more than original planned just because I felt at the time that i could and because I still had time for that day. The Camino is an experience like no other. Beautiful people, libro y scenery. And dont forget to glance back occasionally early mornings or you may miss some spectacular sunrises. Buen Camino.
 
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E V Waight

It's the journey, not the destination.
Past OR future Camino
September (2017)
Possible September (2018)
Holy Year (2021) (all three Gladys, John and I)
And do remember as you may have read before, that it's not the destinatión but the journey. You will make many friends. Most will assist you where needed. You in turn will help others. The Camino does provi de. You will learn the minimalist way of life. It's the little things in life that count; one step at a time.
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
Orisson first day is ok. Espinal second day? Make sure you start early. The climb continues for another 8 km uphill, them 7 km across the mountains and 3 or 4 km downhill. When you arrive at Loepeder, overlooking Roncesvalles, take the RIGHT path. DO NOT follow the arrow to the left or the descent will be harsh and slow, draining of energy as you go. As much as the uphill will burn the calf muscles, the downhill will do crazy stuff to the shinsplints.

The bonus is that if it feels best to stop at Roncesvalles, it is right there. Alternately, as Burgete is only down the road, if there is energy left, it could be within reach with Espinal beyond that, about 45 min past Burgete. This could move up a Pamplona arrival by a day, or, push on past Pamplona, depending on your deciding factors. Many give the city a pass as it is quite early in the experience for so many people, especially for those seeking solitude.

Having said all that, there is only one real authority as to how long a daily walk will be, how far, etc, and that will be your own bodies, or, in reality, the endurance of the weakest in the group, whatever group that may be. You have a planned group but eventually, even that will meld into a much larger daily walking group.The first long day on the schedule is walking into Logrono, at 28.6 km. After the Pyrenees, that will be your first real day of distance and the one to keep an eye on everyone, make sure they are doing ok.

Finally, the Camino does provide, but only if it is allowed to do so. Some have trouble letting down their inhibitions about this. People learn lessons on the Camino, as it is also a teacher. We can provide indicators, where best to learn the lessons but ultimately, we must all learn from our own path and experiences, at our own pace.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Orisson first day is ok. Espinal second day? Make sure you start early. The climb continues for another 8 km uphill, them 7 km across the mountains and 3 or 4 km downhill. When you arrive at Loepeder, overlooking Roncesvalles, take the RIGHT path. DO NOT follow the arrow to the left or the descent will be harsh and slow, draining of energy as you go. As much as the uphill will burn the calf muscles, the downhill will do crazy stuff to the shinsplints.

The bonus is that if it feels best to stop at Roncesvalles, it is right there. Alternately, as Espinal is only down the road, if there is energy left, Burgete is not far beyond that. This could move up a Pamplona arrival by a day, or, push on past Pamplona, depending on your deciding factors. Many give the city a pass as it is quite early in the experience for so many people, especially for those seeking solitude.

Having said all that, there is only one real authority as to how long a daily walk will be, how far, etc, and that will be your own bodies, or, in reality, the endurance of the weakest in the group, whatever group that may be. You have a planned group but eventually, even that will meld into a much larger daily walking group.The first long day on the schedule is walking into Logrono, at 28.6 km. After the Pyrenees, that will be your first real day of distance and the one to keep an eye on everyone, make sure they are doing ok.

Finally, the Camino does provide, but only if it is allowed to do so. Some have trouble letting down their inhibitions about this. People learn lessons on the Camino, as it is also a teacher. We can provide indicators, where best to learn the lessons but ultimately, we must all learn from our own path and experiencesurgu, at our own pace.
Burguete is before Espinal
 
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Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Past OR future Camino
Camino Infinito
Good information, thanks everyone for providing your two euros to this conversation. On this new and improved forum I like the new feature of "Similar Threads" [at the bottom of this conversation], with a LOT of good information we can use. Planning, Planning, Planning, that's one of the fun parts of walking the camino. Continue planning, continue dreaming, y que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
 
Two pilgrims walking...your plan might be working.
Three pilgrims walking...your plan starts to break down.
Four pilgrims walking...tempers tick upward
Four pilgrims trekking to meet up...likely a non event!
Why my pessimism you might ask!
One day it’s the weather. The next day an ankle twist. Another day some tension for a distance you have missed. The next day no reservation. Your boots have walked away. Do you stay when your friend is hurting, or meet up along the Way.
My suggestion and I’ve been there... start together and plan to reach SDC in a three day window. Meet new friends, be open to detours and once home share the wonderful Caminos you experienced together and apart.
Buen Camino
Arn
 

PastorCat

Member
Past OR future Camino
May-June 2013
I’m going to disagree with many of my fellow pilgrims here about planning. I planned carefully. Took time to research and rank albergues months before I reached SJPP. Reserved a bed few days ahead, every day. I never stressed about finding a good place to stay and knowing a bit about the accommodatins ahead led to many new friendships. I only once landed in a regrettable hostel. I even kept abreast of the weather with a reliable mobile app and almost entirely stayed out of the rain...though I did contract pneumonia during my one long “rain-walk.” I think planning improved my Camino experience. And I was able to help others with the knowledge I’d gained through research. Be assured, pilgrims of old were well informed about communities and accommodations. Eschewing plans and maps is a modern idea rooted to postmodern angst and a desire to live simpler lives. That’s an understandable reaction to the data deluge we all face nowadays. But i see little value in superficially hobbling yourself. The key is balance. “Plan ahead” and “go with the flow,” need not be mutually exclusive. Plans change. That’s okay. But the knowledge you gain by planning ahead stays with and informs you as plans evolve. Stopping short or walking further is best determined in the moment. But knowing what’s in front of you adds wisdom to whatever you decide.

About distance and sightseeing, even though I am at the gym 15-20hrs a week, I limited my daily hike to about 24k. I’m 5’4” and my short stride keeps me slow and steady on a hike. 24k can take 6hrs if you’re walking and talking with slow moving neighbors. I’m too slow to sightsee frankly. I did see some short folks move fast by power-walking...but man that seemed silly on a 750k hike. When you arrive at the end of the trail-day, there’s still a shower to take, clothes to wash, feet to massage, the need for a meal and an hour or so to rest. Fitting sights into that schedule is difficult. And for me, they seemed a distraction to a genuine pilgrimage experience. Of course, not everyone walks as a spiritual pilgrim. But if that’s what you have in mind, I’d be wary of spending much time seeking landmarks to see. The magic of the Camino is in the people you meet and the opportunity to be a physical embodiment of kindness, selflessness, strength and forgiveness.
 
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caminka

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
see signature
probably the only place that it's highly recommended to make a reservation is orisson, as they have a limited number of beds and are very popular.

After León take the variant through Villar de Mazarife to Astorga. The camino principal, according to those who took it, has more road walking.

I disagree. the official camino is beside the main road, but almost all on tracks (apart from crossing the towns, of course).
part of the the villar route has been paved over some years back, so there is certainly more tarmac. but the scenery is nicer.
 

mousehog

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2018)
Australian Pilgrims might take a few more days to get their “Camino Legs”. I take a week or so to recover from jet lag. I crossed the Pyrenees on my second day in France.

I am on Stage 9 today. I am 59 years, carrying 8 kg. Meant to be 7, but used older heavier weight thermals, shoes and a couple of books. I will release some of the weight as the weather warms up.

I now have my Camino Thighs. Feet and knees still somewhere over Beijing.
 
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Glamgrrl

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Travel318
I found 25km to be a good range for planning purposes. 30km is a truly long day. You have a couple 32km days. Maybe rebalance to reduce some of those distances as you get going.
 
Past OR future Camino
1340
Hi Elisha,
One note: I think that albergue in Ribadiso that you have in your plan, Los Caminantes, may have changed ownership. I believe it’s now
called Albergue Milpas.
I could be mistaken about this, but it might be worth a check.
Best wishes,
Paul
 

Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
I know of two places in Ages that have repeatedly had bed bugs. One place has been infested...several times. I would not recommend that town as a stopping point as places are limited.:)
 

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