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Dangerous dog

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MBT2301

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
To all those walking from Triacastela to Sarria. Beware of dangerous dog that bit me quite badly this morning.
The location was about 20mins after leaving Triacastela, you walk down a hill into a very small hamlet of about 2 or 3 house plus some farm buildings. There is a vending machine in one of the houses. As I walked across a bridge over a small stream there was a very large herding dog lying in the road. I glanced at it..nothing more..and it went for me and gave me a nasty bite on my arm. Have just finished at Sarria hospital getting a tetanus injection. If you see this dog..stay well clear of it.
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Again, soon as possible!
I hope you are ok. Please report it so it might not happen to someone else. I have been attacked a few times and literally fought the dogs off with my staff, though not on the Camino Frances (Via Podiensis and Camino San Salvador). I am really wary nowadays.

Don't let it spoil your camino, Ultreia!
Davey
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I'm so sorry this happened to you!
I'm scared to death of any barking dog after being attacked by a pit bull as a young woman.
I was bitten in the upper arm by a Rotwellier ten years ago; large unleashed dogs have scared me ever since.
 

Jean Ti

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances,Via de la Plata

Trying to do one camino every year
I wonder if carrying a pepper spray can is permitted in Spain?
 

malingerer

Active Member
No. Not anywhere in Europe that I know of. A big stick is legal though. So is an axe, but I find it a bit heavy! :cool:
Perhaps a few cries of "Odin" whilst waving the big axe might drop a hint to the doggie? :) Seriously tho, its no joke when it happens and I normally give such critters as wide a berth as possible whilst looking out for large rocks with which to give them a very severe headache if they get too near. I have never tried fazers yet but am always contemplating the issue. Walk soft and stay safe.

Buen camino

The Malingerer.
 

Jean Ti

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances,Via de la Plata

Trying to do one camino every year
It seems to be legal in Screenshot_2019-10-05-15-43-25.png Spain
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I am a true dog loving person but walking the first day out of Oloron-Ste. Marie on the way to Somport I encountered 3 Alasatians who were protecting a flock of sheep. The sheep were behind a barb wired fence but the dogs were sitting outside of the fence along the old railroad track. They went on high alert as I approached and attacked me from all sides. If I had not had my poles I still wonder how I would have survived. I had to bloody one of them which diverted their attention enough to give me a chance to escape. I was shaking like a leaf for hours after the encounter.
 

jsalt

Jill
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, Soulac, Norte, Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés
To all those walking from Triacastela to Sarria. Beware of dangerous dog that bit me quite badly this morning.
Oh, this is so so sad to hear this. Galicia is particularly bad with big loose dogs. It was in Triacastela that I shared a table at breakfast with a peregrina who was waiting for a taxi. She said she just couldn’t cope anymore walking alone with all the BIG dogs at every farm and village she walked through. To add insult to injury another pilgrim said to her that if she didn’t like dogs she shouldn’t be walking the camino. What??
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Oh, this is so so sad to hear this. Galicia is particularly bad with big loose dogs. It was in Triacastela that I shared a table at breakfast with a peregrina who was waiting for a taxi. She said she just couldn’t cope anymore walking alone with all the BIG dogs at every farm and village she walked through. To add insult to injury another pilgrim said to her that if she didn’t like dogs she shouldn’t be walking the camino. What??
It's not a matter of "not" liking dogs, it's a matter of wanting to feel safe while walking. I've been scared of dogs a couple of times too, on the camino, but thankfully they never came after me!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Cam Frances SJPDP to Santiago ('17): Finisterre ('17); Muxia ('17): Camino Portuguese ('19)
I carry a whistle ...one used by the U. S. Coast Guard. It can be heard for a mile in undulating waves and stormy weather. I used it three times on the Portuguese Camino. While nary a single person was around (or made their presence known) it did deter the advancing, encircling dogs. The biggest offender was a mastif sized dog about 3-4km south of Ansiao. His side kick, what appeared to be a yellow lab, seemed indifferent.

It’s unsettling. Even a cadre of three to four small ankle biters worry me.

I share your angst when seeing an untethered dog, am grateful for the ones that are, and hope to heck their rope isn’t fraying nor their fence too low or unweildly!
 

Walton

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Sjpp to Sdc. 2018 Lisbon to Sdc to Finisterre. Next up hopefully VDP or Del Norte.
I wonder if dog attacks should be reported? To whom? The Guardia perhaps?
 

ranthr

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
Brought this dazzer with me on the Invierno last year, got it from US after reading a lot about dangerous dogs in the forum. No scary dogs turned up, so I still do not know whether it would be useful or not. Have anybody seen the effect of using such?
Sorry about your trouble MBT2301!
 

Attachments

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature
I carried one when walking through Serbia, Bulgaria etc. Not sure whether it helped but it definitely gave me courage when walking on my own. Threatening with my walking poles seemed to work better 😉
 
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Camino(s) past & future
This will be my husband and my first Camino at age 68!
To all those walking from Triacastela to Sarria. Beware of dangerous dog that bit me quite badly this morning.
The location was about 20mins after leaving Triacastela, you walk down a hill into a very small hamlet of about 2 or 3 house plus some farm buildings. There is a vending machine in one of the houses. As I walked across a bridge over a small stream there was a very large herding dog lying in the road. I glanced at it..nothing more..and it went for me and gave me a nasty bite on my arm. Have just finished at Sarria hospital getting a tetanus injection. If you see this dog..stay well clear of it.
thanks for the warning we’ll be there in a few days. I’ll be stick ready. Whack!!!
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
No scary dogs turned up,
No elephants either, I'll bet, so it works for them too. Bears? Snakes? Tigers?

A dog attack is no laughing matter, I agree. Still, they are quite rare, far rarer than Shirley MacLaine imagined, and she has a vivid imagination.

Local authorities want to control dangerous dogs, so report attacks to the police. Your hospitalero, or health clinic, can help you report. Rabies is seeing an increase in Spain, so there is danger in bites.

Wishing the OP a speedy recovery.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Encountered a Rotweiller type dog whilst on the Portugues. He was literally lying across the walking path as though he owned it and thinking "none shall pass" lol. I thought I would skirt around him without eye contact and all would be well, nonetheless I held both trekking poles in my strong hand, ready to use. My plan did not work and as soon as I reached a certain distance he jumped up, growling and barking and went for my lower legs/calves. One two-handed hard whack to the top of his shoulders and head along with some swear words questioning his bloodline was enough for him. He had an instant "oh no" look on his dog face and ran off. Mind you I love dogs, but I do not care if I injured him.
Another time I saw two large dogs on the path of the Frances in an isolated area. They looked like they were going to be trouble so I picked up some large rocks and went no closer to them and began throwing some sidearm fastballs their way. A couple of glancing shots and near misses and they ran away. The rocks remove any advantage they have of up close aggression as their teeth are their only device. Again, I do not mind if one of my rocks caused them pain or even minor injury.
Working/country dogs respect rocks and staffs/poles/sticks. They have been smacked by them their entire life and know the pain compliance. Do not be afraid to use whatever force you have available to prevent a dog attack.
 

Glenshiro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - León, Camino Frances (2012 - 2019)
Another vote for carrying a trekking pole - on the via Podiensis every farm has a dog whose job it is to warn you off in French. This isn't a problem as they are chained up - until you get into the Basque country where they roam free. I've lost count of the number of times I've walked backwards for about 100 metres down a country road, followed by a dog telling me loudly what it's going to do to me if I don't clear off. At least, I think that's what they were saying, but I don't speak Dog French, so that's just a guess. They could have been giving me advice about accommodation in the next town, or asking if I liked Johnny Hallyday, but I doubt it.
However, I escaped unscathed simply by pointing the business end of my trekking pole at them until they got bored (dogs have a very short attention span) and turned back.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Another vote for carrying a trekking pole - on the via Podiensis every farm has a dog whose job it is to warn you off in French. This isn't a problem as they are chained up - until you get into the Basque country where they roam free. I've lost count of the number of times I've walked backwards for about 100 metres down a country road, followed by a dog telling me loudly what it's going to do to me if I don't clear off. At least, I think that's what they were saying, but I don't speak Dog French, so that's just a guess. They could have been giving me advice about accommodation in the next town, or asking if I liked Johnny Hallyday, but I doubt it.
However, I escaped unscathed simply by pointing the business end of my trekking pole at them until they got bored (dogs have a very short attention span) and turned back.
Johnny Hallyday was usually at the second bar, the dogs instinctively know that. RIP my dear friend.
Eddie Barclay, Johnny Haliday, Freddie Meyer, Brigitte Bardot - Voom Voom Club, St. Tropez (19...jpg A photo of Johnny with Brigitte Bardot and some friends of mine from late in the 1960's
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
Working/country dogs respect rocks and staffs/poles/sticks. They have been smacked by them their entire life and know the pain compliance. Do not be afraid to use whatever force you have available to prevent a dog attack.
Agreed. I had some unpleasant incidents with both individual and packs of aggressive dogs on the Sanabres this year. I followed some advice I had previously read on a thread here, to pick up a rock and ostentatiously threaten to throw it. It worked, but it takes a strong nerve, particularly if a dozen of them are coming at you. I do not think it is guaranteed to be always successful either. In particular, I do not believe it would deter a couple of the fortunately restrained german shepherds I have encountered.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Agreed. I had some unpleasant incidents with both individual and packs of aggressive dogs on the Sanabres this year. I followed some advice I had previously read on a thread here, to pick up a rock and ostentatiously threaten to throw it. It worked, but it takes a strong nerve, particularly if a dozen of them are coming at you. I do not think it is guaranteed to be always successful either. In particular, I do not believe it would deter a couple of the fortunately restrained german shepherds I have encountered.
True, an actual trained working guard dog would not let a rock thrown his way stop his attack or you better put a big rock in his face at high velocity, but fortunately would be highly doubtful one would encounter such a valuable, expensive dog running vagabond on the Camino. Same goes for the huge mastiff sheep guard dogs. Simply to valuable to be running amok. Those ruffian dogs I encountered were no doubt owned by someone, but semi feral in nature. Perhaps their working days were over and they're let loose to pasture.
I have a friend who owns two mastiffs. Not for work but for pets. Quite friendly, but one quickly becomes aware of their strength and power when playing with them. They drag me around like a rag and I am a pretty big guy. I have no idea how I would deal with a rogue one on the Camino path.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
The only really scary dog I've encountered was on the Invierno - a German Shepard being walked near Santalla del Bierzo. The guy on the other end of the leash warned me, but he hardly needed to: the snarling/lunging dog spoke volumes. I have no fear of dogs, but that was a very strange encounter because the guy was no prince charming, either.

What happened to @biarritzdon is fortunately not something to worry about on the Camino Francés. But it's wise anywhere to give dogs guarding stock a wider berth than you might think is necessary. They have a job and will do it.

For loose guard dogs, rocks are useful, and sticks. Any dog worth his or her kibble can tell if you are nervous, and it makes any encounter worse, so camoflage your fear with a confident stance and firm deep voice. Do not run. And if you have a squirt-top water bottle, the surprise effect is wonderful: a face-full of water can work wonders.
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
True, an actual trained working guard dog would not let a rock thrown his way stop his attack or you better put a big rock in his face at high velocity, but fortunately would be highly doubtful one would encounter such a valuable, expensive dog running vagabond on the Camino. Same goes for the huge mastiff sheep guard dogs. Simply to valuable to be running amok. Those ruffian dogs I encountered were no doubt owned by someone, but semi feral in nature. Perhaps their working days were over and they're let loose to pasture.
I have a friend who owns two mastiffs. Not for work but for pets. Quite friendly, but one quickly becomes aware of their strength and power when playing with them. They drag me around like a rag and I am a pretty big guy. I have no idea how I would deal with a rogue one on the Camino path.
The dozen or so I mentioned were actually huge sheep dogs! Mastiffs, I guess, and untethered. Guarding a small pen of doleful sheep located about 60 metres from the path. I had got lost, and they were not expecting pedestrians, to say the least. I had to walk past the damn things 4 times, and after the first encounter I took a large detour around them in through a neighbouring ploughed paddock. The craziest thing about it (other than me preparing to meet my doom) was that the first time, as they eventually backed-off, I could see in the distance behind them a fox slinking up on the far side of the sheep pen, hoping to snaffle a meal. The dogs were having such a whale of a time putting the wind up me that they had neglected the sheep they were supposed to protect.
 

Wovoka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April, 2015
I agree with the earlier poster about the effectiveness of a rock on a dog. Here in the States, even if there was not a stone within reach, i would stoop while continuing to make eye contact (DO NOT LOOK AWAY because dogs take this as a sign of submission) and appear as if I were picking up a rock. This works for me every time.
 
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Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Any time a dog bite is treated at a health center, a report is sent to Guardia Civil, or whichever police force covers the area. The police take these things very seriously... one of our dogs bit my husband one day when he was breaking up a dog-fight. The Guardia were at our house that same evening, warning us the dog cannot be off the lead outside the house and if another bite was blamed on that dog we would be fined heavily -- even if the victim was one of us!
 

Campo

The best things in life aren't things
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte, Camino Francés, Camino to Nidaros, Camino Primitivo, BF Westweg, West Highland Way
Hi all– thought I'd share some of this info I've found. This pertains more to the Francés – but there's a great sign outside of Arzúa detailing what you should do if you encounter a road animal ( at least in Galicia). First, I am so sorry that this happened and hope you get better soon. I've walked the Camino seven times and have always encountered loose dogs of some kind, although never that grave of a situation. Encounters like these are less and less common on the busy Francés, especially in summer high season though. So, what to do if you encounter roaming dogs, a dog starts to follow you, its lost, or you suspect maltreatment/ animal abuse?

UPDATE: As @Pelegrin mentions below, 092 is only opened in large municipalities, so if that local police number is not accessible and theres a problem, use 112 to contact them.

If roaming loose AND/OR you think it might be lost:
Call Local police: 092, or APACA: 881.973.068– this is the Association for the Protection of Road Animals. Many times I've experienced this, and although I think its cute that they follow me, I often think about the fact that they could be or are lost.

If a dog is injured, proceed as if it was a human: Call Emergency: 112, provide it with shade and shelter, water if deemed necessary, but never move it. Also call APACA: 881.973.068.

If you suspect maltreatment or abuse of a dog along the Camino: Call SEPRONA: 062 (This is a unit of the Guardia Civil for Nature Protection Services) and deal with the locals in the case of animal abuse.

As always, watch for your safety first– but please also help our four legged friends when possible and don't only treat them as a threat. I lead a group of students along the Camino every year and always go over scenarios regarding dogs, horses, cattle, etc along the way, as I know that it could one day be useful. Last year on the Pradela route out of Villafranca, we encountered three large mastiffs on the path. The dogs pulled a Gandalf and said "you shall NOT pass". A few of our students that were ahead didn't listen to their behavior and trekked forward, trying to pass them (regardless of my instructions!! :rolleyes: )– almost getting bit or worse, mauled (dogs were working together, and they were huge). The rest of us turned around, backed up, and got the attention of the locals. This time, the super nice hospitaleros at the albergue in Pradela helped out. The gentleman mentioned that they are just curious working dogs from the farm above and only come down to the path in the mornings. He grabbed his large herding stick and escorted all of us out of Pradela till we were way past them. So... ask the locals. They know the dogs and the dogs know them back. A few other pointers from experience:

1. Always take off sunglasses when passing a dog. They are looking for your eyes/gaze and if they can't see them, they might feel threatened.
2. Try not to stare them down or look at them in the eye, but keep them at safe distance, wider berth and sight in your periphery.
3. Have trekking poles in the case that they do get uncomfortably close, or worse, lunge.

4. Reach out to the locals. Most of the time these are working dogs and may not be in the right place.
5. Refrain from petting dogs. On several occasions, students decided to treat working dogs like they would their pets back home and ended up at the clinic with flea bites all over. Thankfully that was the extent of the situation.

Be safe y'all! and Buen Camino!

IMG_5278.JPG
 
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newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
I seldom have to throw a rock---just pretending to pick one up sends most dogs away.

My wife can make most ferocious guard dogs roll over for a belly rub.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
If roaming loose AND/OR you think it might be lost: Call Local police: 092, or APACA: 881.973.068– this is the Association for the Protection of Road Animals. Many times I've experienced this, and although I think its cute that they follow me, I often think about the fact that they could be or are lost.

If a dog is injured, proceed as if it was a human: Call Emergency: 112, provide it with shade and shelter, water if deemed necessary, but never move it. Also call APACA: 881.973.068.

If you suspect maltreatment or abuse of a dog along the Camino: Call SEPRONA: 062 (This is a unit of the Guardia Civil for Nature Protection Services) and deal with the locals in the case of animal abuse.

View attachment 65736
092 is only open in big cities for access to local police.
In small and mediun municipalities they have normal numbers (9 figures) different for each police. So, in case of problem dial 112.
 

MaShaMe

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Way (2019)
To all those walking from Triacastela to Sarria. Beware of dangerous dog that bit me quite badly this morning.
The location was about 20mins after leaving Triacastela, you walk down a hill into a very small hamlet of about 2 or 3 house plus some farm buildings. There is a vending machine in one of the houses. As I walked across a bridge over a small stream there was a very large herding dog lying in the road. I glanced at it..nothing more..and it went for me and gave me a nasty bite on my arm. Have just finished at Sarria hospital getting a tetanus injection. If you see this dog..stay well clear of it.
This is awful to hear! I was attacked by a large dog in the Portugues Way, walking between Ponte de Lima and Rubiaes. It was before the hill climb at a road underpass. I was lucky it did not break skin as it tore holes in my pant leg and sock, taking me down. I was alone and had no stick. 😫
 

Theo59

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2022
To all those walking from Triacastela to Sarria. Beware of dangerous dog that bit me quite badly this morning.
The location was about 20mins after leaving Triacastela, you walk down a hill into a very small hamlet of about 2 or 3 house plus some farm buildings. There is a vending machine in one of the houses. As I walked across a bridge over a small stream there was a very large herding dog lying in the road. I glanced at it..nothing more..and it went for me and gave me a nasty bite on my arm. Have just finished at Sarria hospital getting a tetanus injection. If you see this dog..stay well clear of it.
I am very sorry about it. I wish you a quick recovery.
My rules :
1) Never eye contact. Dogs think of it as an agressive attidute
2) never run unless you are sure you can escape. Running wakes up hunting insticts to them and they bite not to protect property, but to kill as hunters
3) do not show fear, if possible
4) Do not get close. Choose other road far away of them .
5) If they are more then one, alarm must sound in your heads. Groups of dogs mean serious danger.
6) a wooden stick can help but not in all cases. Dog that guard a flock, group of dogs, very big dogs may not stop the attack because of a stick
7) Best defence: to not be there=avoid them=change road
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
This is awful to hear! I was attacked by a large dog in the Portugues Way, walking between Ponte de Lima and Rubiaes. It was before the hill climb at a road underpass. I was lucky it did not break skin as it tore holes in my pant leg and sock, taking me down. I was alone and had no stick. 😫
Interesting....that is the one that attacked me and I hit with my trekking poles as I mentioned in my earlier comment on this thread. A Rottweiler type of dog. That is exactly where I had my encounter and I recall another dog nearby inside a fenced area which was also barking.
I hit it as hard as I could with both poles held together and I hit it on the top of the head and shoulders. It let out a yelp and ran off when I did that. I hope I caused it enough pain so that it did not attack anyone else.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
Spain

In Spain, pepper spray is approved by the Ministry of Health and Consumption for sale to anyone over 18, if it is:

  • at a concentration no greater than 5%
  • in canisters containing not more than 22 grams

Legal use is technically confined to self defence against large wild animals, such as wild boar in rural areas.
 

Jean Ti

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Norte, Primitivo, Frances,Via de la Plata

Trying to do one camino every year
I was wondering the same thing
I purchase a can for trekking in Canada for bears and I would not hesitate to do it for dogs in Spain.

In some part of Spain the dogs are so bigs and ferocious they can kill a wolfe. So for your protection and peace of mind just do it!
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I have trained in the use of pepper spray and have used it on people but not animals. It doesn't always work on people and may not always work on animals. Mind you, it is good stuff when it does work but there's always a possibility of overspray being blown back to you and getting in your eyes. That's no fun. Part of our training was getting a full spray to the eyes. Trust me, you do not want that. The spray comes in many brands, percentages, stream or spray. The ones carried for defense against bears and other large animals are large canisters and not something you will want to walk with on the Camino, and not legal.
I personally would not carry pepper spray on the Camino but I do understand the concerns about vicious dogs. Perhaps any forum members who have carried pepper spray on the Camino can relate their experience doing so and give experienced advice.
 

clare kelly

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho portugues
Via de la Plata
I bought a small canister of pepper spray ( I think it had 3-5 sprays in it) at an army disposal type store in Salamanca. I never needed to use it but it gave me great security. Untethered dogs are my greatest and only fear on any Camino
 
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