A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

Dealing with sweaty back from backpack

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#1
My Camino is getting closer -- 34 days -- and I am training more and more with my full pack. On warm, not hot days (68F-20C) my back sweats really uncomfortably from my backpack. Any suggestions on how to mitigate this? Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#2
I have read about low and no sweat walking techniques which generally involve moving much more slowly, avoiding the hottest parts of the day, etc to reduce water consumption. Where obtaining sufficient water is not an issue, most walkers I know accept this as a normal part of walking, and don't worry too much about it. If you are sweating to the point where it has soaked your clothes and sweat is running off your body and down your legs, you are probably trying too hard, and should slow down. There are also pack designs that promote air flow across the back, but if you already have your pack, that might not be all that useful to you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
#3
Personally, I won't hike in three-seasons with a backpack that sits against my back for precisely that reason. Except for winter, it is an absolute requirement for me to use an internal pack with tensioned "suspended mesh back panel" that sits against my back; the tension flexes the frame and opens up a gap of space between the mesh and the actual back of the pack. This dramatically reduces the sweat because there is constant airflow and opportunity for evaporation.

In the US, I see most selection in this with Osprey and Gregory, although Deuter, North Face, and REI's house brand also make versions with this.

A fallback position is an external frame pack, but these are progressively more difficult to find as internal frame packs dominate the market (at least in my part of the world).

Also, unless it's extreme, sometimes sweat happens and accepting is part of the reality of backpacking.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes please!
#4
I am one of those who can't quite do the fresh look when walking in the heat - I am a red faced, puffy, sweaty mess (but very happy!) and my back gets sweaty. It did with my Osprey Aura, with an air flow gap - though it felt amazing, my back was just as sweaty - and it does now with my Osprey Tempest, which sits closer to the back but has a ridged and mesh covered back panel. You have your pack already so re-investing in a different one is probably not what you want and it might not even help that much. You say your back sweats uncomfortably - could it be that your choice of top adds to the dicomfort? If you walk in synthetics, could you try wool or a silk mix or vice versa? I found getting sweaty in my clever sun protective shirt was a lot more uncomfortable than in my merino T-shirt. I take it you are not wearing cotton, which soaks up moisture and holds on to it. Going for a walk with a top in a different material might be worth a try and works out cheaper than getting a different pack.

(That said, you still have time to do so and get used to a new one before you go.)
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#5
@koilife, as a technical point, trampoline suspension packs (there are a variety of names given to this style of mesh frame) are external frame packs. They do not have the frame components on the inside of the pack - they are all outside.
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#6
I am one of those who can't quite do the fresh look when walking in the heat - I am a red faced, puffy, sweaty mess (but very happy!) and my back gets sweaty. It did with my Osprey Aura, with an air flow gap - though it felt amazing, my back was just as sweaty - and it does now with my Osprey Tempest, which sits closer to the back but has a ridged and mesh covered back panel. You have your pack already so re-investing in a different one is probably not what you want and it might not even help that much. You say your back sweats uncomfortably - could it be that your choice of top adds to the dicomfort? If you walk in synthetics, could you try wool or a silk mix or vice versa? I found getting sweaty in my clever sun protective shirt was a lot more uncomfortable than in my merino T-shirt. I take it you are not wearing cotton, which soaks up moisture and holds on to it. Going for a walk with a top in a different material might be worth a try and works out cheaper than getting a different pack.

(That said, you still have time to to so and get used to a new one if you decide to do so.)
Thanks!! No, I don't want to buy another pack. I do plan to wear a long sleeve sun protection shirt, I am very sun sensitive with skin cancer history. I think I will try wearing a light merino tank under my shirt and see if that helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#7
On warm, not hot days (68F-20C) my back sweats really uncomfortably from my backpack. Any suggestions on how to mitigate this?
You may want to experiment by taking an outdoor seat cushion with a hard plastic weave and attaching that to the back of the pack. That may give you the air flow you need and may be light enough and comfortable enough. It will be cheaper than a new pack and if it doesn't work at least you have a seat cushion.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#8
Koilife stated the "correct" answer above. Buy a rucksack with a trampoline frame. This is the suspended mesh panel that stands the rucksack away from your back to create an airspace for air to circulate between the rucksack proper and your back. The better brand packs usually feature some interpretation of this design.

If this is not an opinion, my best 'expedient' idea is to obtain a microfleece or microfiber, terry-cloth flocked towel. Get one with the thickest terry fleece flocking available. Try your local auto repair and supply store for a "detailing" towel. They usually come in small enough sizes to do this. it only needs to be about 12 inches wide by maybe 16 inches long to cover your back where contact is made. I believe a common size towel is 16 x 24 inches. If this is the case, fold the towel in half lengthwise to double the padding and wicking capability against your back.

Use medium to large, safety pins to attach the corners, top, and side edges of your towel to the back panel or should straps (where convenient) of your rucksack, where it contacts your back. Experiment to find the best attachment solution for your situation. The terry cloth towel will provide padding, wicking, and some ventilation. As a bonus, the microfiber / microfleece towel can be used for bathing on arrival. It can be easily washed, rinsed and dries fast.

I hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

Chacharm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Frances (2012) Vie Del Norte (2015) Via Frances (2016) Le Puy (2017)
#9
I spend more time cold than hot (and I live in TX) and decided last year that I didn't care that my pack really made back heat an issue. And it wasn't that big a deal for the 2-3 hours a day of training I was doing. But 8 hours a day means extreme back heat is a problem. Consider days spent walking uphill in rain. You have a raincoat on - or your normal gear and a poncho and the pack is generating heat and you pretty much want to throw yourself into oncoming traffic. I started sending my pack ahead on sunny days. So if the problem is your pack you might want to consider finding something that wicks away the heat and allows air to flow between the pack and your back.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
#11
You just gonna sweat (or as southern ladies say, "glow"). Nothing you can do about it. Comes with physical exertion, and walking 15-30 km a day, up and down hills wearing a backpack is definitely physical exertion.
Wear lightweight, tech type clothing designed to dry quickly and when you take a break, make sure to remove your pack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
#13
@koilife, as a technical point, trampoline suspension packs (there are a variety of names given to this style of mesh frame) are external frame packs. They do not have the frame components on the inside of the pack - they are all outside.
On all three of mine (Gregory, Osprey, Z-Pack), they're all slightly different, and almost a hybrid system. The stays are either on the inside like a normal internal frame pack or in enclosed ribs of pack fabric, and the mesh attaches to either an extrusion or to the rib.
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
#14
Pay attention to what you are wearing on the bottom half of your body. Make sure that your waistline is quick-dry, and if you need to, carry something to wipe sweat. As a person who works out hard and does perspire on the trail--I never got too uncomfortable with it.
Nothing worse than salty perspiration dripping down your crack. Not to be crude, but there--I said it. Also, you can get in trouble fast from sweat and friction.

I use a Deuter, which has the great mesh suspension frame holding the pack away from my back. Several people admired how far it held the pack off my back.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#15
There's no magic answer -I have a pack with a small gap between my back but also bring a change of shirt - the warmer it is, the quicker it will dry
I agree. Suggesting that there is one simple, 'correct' solution to a problem with as many dimensions as this doesn't appear particularly helpful to me. Clothing, pack type and load, and most of all, the rate of effort one is making all influence whether your body produces more sweat than can be evaporated in the prevailing ambient conditions. In the circumstances where @lmsundaze is less than a month away from leaving, one might infer that any major equipment and clothing decisions have already been made. While there might be some new, last minute, purchases that she is prepared to make, I expect good advice needs to be framed in the context that she is going with what she has already.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#16
On all three of mine (Gregory, Osprey, Z-Pack), they're all slightly different, and almost a hybrid system. The stays are either on the inside like a normal internal frame pack or in enclosed ribs of pack fabric, and the mesh attaches to either an extrusion or to the rib.
We are clearly going to differ on this. I would have considered all of the trampoline frame models from these makers as external frames. Attaching the bag to the frame with a strip of fabric, or in other designs, in pouches at the corners held under tension by the frame, does not seem to me to alter the fundamentals that the frame is outside the body of the pack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
The Camino Frances 2005
The Portugese Camino 2014
The Camino Ingles Easter 2015
The Camino Ingles April 2016
The Camino del Norte/The Primitivo 2016
#17
I like to walk a fast pace and I sweat! Especially from my head and it drips down to my shoulders and back. Often my hair is soaking wet when I have had a fast walk. The top of my back also generates a lot of sweat. I love walking fast and that is the price, I have to pay. I'm just happy I'm able to do it. I make sure I won't get cold by changing tops when I have breaks. Merino wool tops is great both Winter and Summer, keeps you dry and comfortable.
Enjoy your sweaty walking!
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#18
I talked to the manufacture of my pack. He said it is a minimalist pack and carries better hugging the back. His suggestion, if all else fails, was to use antiperspirant on my back. He said the antiperspirant works in ski boots. I do not plan to use antiperspirant, but sharing the suggestion. Also, thanks Doug Fitz for recognizing that buying new stuff really isn't an option at this point.
 

RumAndChupacabras

"Looking Forward To 6 Weeks in 2019"
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Aug 2019 Norte Apr. 2018: Oviedo, Santo Toribio, Covadonga, Garabandal May/Jun 2016: Portuguese
#19
...my back sweats really uncomfortably from my backpack. Any suggestions...
Hi! I have the same issue. I've found that items like cooling ties around my wrists (yes, wrists) seem to help cool me down overall. There's also the idea of an evaporative cooling towel attached to the back of the bra...this also helps cool me down. Then of course, there's always the option of considering an actual Cooling Vest or shirt. Just my 2 cents worth. ;)
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes please!
#23
I had a similar pack and used a back pad with holes in it to stop it from being just a piece of solid plastic at the back. My friend is using it now with a ridged Osprey Talon back pad inside, it works for her. The non-breathing back is the trade-off of a lightweight pack though. Let us know how it works with a merino top under the shirt, and if your pack is so light it might not be a bad idea to loosen the shoulder straps a tiny bit now and again to allow a little bit of extra air to circulate between stops.
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#24
Thanks Nidarosa -- I will try that -- appreciate the help. I am keeping my total weight under 10 pounds, so that will be a help.
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
#25
Thanks Nidarosa -- I will try that -- appreciate the help. I am keeping my total weight under 10 pounds, so that will be a help.
I am impressed with 10 lbs! I have Osprey Sirrus 36L - carry ~ 16 lbs, air suspension that works. But you have already stated not an option to buy new. But perhaps a merino wool base layer for $25? My new fav piece of gear.
Does 10lbs include water?
Buen Camino,
Janice
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#26
I am impressed with 10 lbs! I have Osprey Sirrus 36L - carry ~ 16 lbs, air suspension that works. But you have already stated not an option to buy new. But perhaps a merino wool base layer for $25? My new fav piece of gear.
Does 10lbs include water?
Buen Camino,
Janice
Yes, Janice, 10 pounds includes water and trekking poles and everything. It does not include what I am wearing. I'm not taking any extras.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
#29
We are clearly going to differ on this. I would have considered all of the trampoline frame models from these makers as external frames. Attaching the bag to the frame with a strip of fabric, or in other designs, in pouches at the corners held under tension by the frame, does not seem to me to alter the fundamentals that the frame is outside the body of the pack.
What I meant by "external frame" was something like this, where there is a full and stable exterior frame onto which is attached the bag itself. I grew up with these, and they do a reasonably good job with back ventilation. However, compared to an internal frame pack, they are prone to shifting, aren't nearly as comfortable, and they tend to be heavy unless they are (as in the case of this image) minimizing fabric by assuming one attaches to the outside frame with straps.



I've never seen a technical definition for external v. internal that would make a tensioned-mesh (trampoline) back qualify one way or the other, nor is it a distinction that probably matters, as long as one gets what works for them. Almost all of the tensioned-mesh packs are classified in sporting goods stores either in their own category or as a subclass of internal frame packs. Possibly that is just a US-ism though. Anyways, Cheers!
 
#30
I honestly hate sweaty back! I honestly hate where sweaty back sweat ends up. I carry tissue to....Well I hate sweaty back! But in the grand scheme of life and the incredible benefits a mind gains from walking.....Sweaty back is life. Ko
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#31
Because of back pain I cannot use backpacks that are far off the back, the extra traction on my back is a killer. Be sure to try a bag before buying it.
 
#32
Met a guy recently who was utilising female panty liners.
In case you are unaware, they are sticky one side, absorbent on the other.
He'd got his wife to buy him the thickest ones available.
Trial and error found the exact spot to position them.
One positioned around where the hip belt locks the pack on the hips. The other higher, where the top of the pack hits the back when cinched in by the load lifters.
Regards
Gerard
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#33
Met a guy recently who was utilising female panty liners.
In case you are unaware, they are sticky one side, absorbent on the other.
He'd got his wife to buy him the thickest ones available.
Trial and error found the exact spot to position them.
One positioned around where the hip belt locks the pack on the hips. The other higher, where the top of the pack hits the back when cinched in by the load lifters.
Regards
Gerard
Interesting idea! (I know what they are :) )
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#34
Another idea would be to buy a 'bum-bag' and put it on so that the bag section holds your pack off of your back. Trial and error would show how much or how little to fill it, but it would create an air gap. You might still have a small sweaty area but not so much as the full pack. The bonus with this is that you have a bag for your valuables for the shower etc.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
#35
:D
C'mon now, please tell me nobody on this forum has an aversion to perspiration while engaged in physical activity. C'mon now.
If you walk the CF during the summer, you are going to get sweaty and you are going to get some dirt and dust on your feet and legs. If it rains you are going to get wet and get mud on your boots or shoes. Ain't no big deal. As the non-empathetic military instructors I encountered as a younger man used to say, "suffer in silence". Ha ha.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#36
Get some medicated powder (I like Ammen's, or Gold Bond) and sprinkle some on in the morning before you pull on your clothes. You still will sweat, but it does make a big difference in how "fresh" you feel.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to SDC Sept 2012
Camino Frances Astorga to SDC Sept 2014
Camino Del Norte Irun to Santander Sept 2015
Caminho Portugese Barcelos to SDC Sept 2016
Camino Del Norte Santander to SDC (2017)
#37
I found a combination of under armour (sweat wicking base layer) , synthetic type sports shirts and a pack which allows air to flow .
 

RumAndChupacabras

"Looking Forward To 6 Weeks in 2019"
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Aug 2019 Norte Apr. 2018: Oviedo, Santo Toribio, Covadonga, Garabandal May/Jun 2016: Portuguese
#38
@Pablo Mac That's good to hear, because I just invested in a long sleeved (I dislike being slathered in sunscreen) Under Armour "Coolswitch" top. It's so light it almost feels like it was woven from paper. It's going for a loaded with backpack test hike this weekend.
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#39
Because of back pain I cannot use backpacks that are far off the back, the extra traction on my back is a killer. Be sure to try a bag before buying it.
Me too -- with this pack the sweat is uncomfortable but with my old Gregory I was having back pain. I just returned from today's walk, took Nidarosa's advice, wore merino wool shirt and made the straps real lose. My pack is light enough I can carry it that way. I didn't feel that bad, but of course soaking wet. Next time will try Gold Bond as Rebekah suggested. Thanks so much to everyone on this forum!
 

JAL

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2014
Le Puy-St. Jean 2015
Via Francigena 2016
Norte/Primitivo 2016
Via de la Plata 2017
#40
My Camino is getting closer -- 34 days -- and I am training more and more with my full pack. On warm, not hot days (68F-20C) my back sweats really uncomfortably from my backpack. Any suggestions on how to mitigate this? Thanks!
One thing I do that helps a lot is periodically let the pack straps slide back down my arms to create a large gap between the pack and my back, kind of "hinging" the pack back on the waist belt, thus letting the wind and sun dry off my sweaty back. I can do this without stopping and let the packstraps kind of hang on my elbows as I walk. Works and feels great, if it may look bit strange. I learned this backcountry skiing, where it is imperative to stay dry.
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
#41
Thanks!! No, I don't want to buy another pack. I do plan to wear a long sleeve sun protection shirt, I am very sun sensitive with skin cancer history. I think I will try wearing a light merino tank under my shirt and see if that helps.
I have to go with Doug on the exterior frame pack.

The only other option is to camino when the weather is colder.

Putting merino under a shirt will not aid.

Soldiers in the desert in WWII used to wear heavy coats to limit evaporation due to sweating ... this helped prevent dehydration.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
#42
I have to go with Doug on the exterior frame pack.

The only other option is to camino when the weather is colder.

Putting merino under a shirt will not aid.

Soldiers in the desert in WWII used to wear heavy coats to limit evaporation due to sweating ... this helped prevent dehydration.
Having spent some months in deserts as a soldier (Marine) I have never heard of wearing heavy coats in that extreme heat and sun. Sure, the sweat won't evaporate, but you will sweat more under the heavy coat. That would actually be an invitation to death. There is just no way we would have entertained that concept. If they did that in the 1940's it was based on a misconception.
The purpose of sweat is that the air passing over it on the skin causes a cooling of sorts.
 

jozero

Oh... That's what the shell is for...
Camino(s) past & future
CF January 2013
CF April 2016
CF January 2018
CP Coastal September 2018
#43
We are clearly going to differ on this. I would have considered all of the trampoline frame models from these makers as external frames. Attaching the bag to the frame with a strip of fabric, or in other designs, in pouches at the corners held under tension by the frame, does not seem to me to alter the fundamentals that the frame is outside the body of the pack.
Wouldn't this by your definition then mean that every pack is an external frame pack? The earlier internal frame packs had the larger aluminum bent frames inside the pack itself but just a pad and the thin material of the bag separating the back and pack. Now they have progressed and use lightweight wires, rods, leafs, stays, etc but fundamentally, they are still 'inside' the pack with only padding and a thin piece of material between the back and pack. My earliest external packs had the entire frame and harness outside and simply hung/attached the bag to that frame with nothing inside the pack. We dual-purposed those pack by removing the bag altogether and carried heavy items in the bush by tying them directly to the external frame.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C. Francés (2004-), C. Portugués, C. de Madrid, 1/2 V. Plata, 1/8 Levante, hospitalera Grado 2016.
#44
Can you do anything about sour sun-protection shirt? I've found that if I wear a very thin silk shirt, cut for a man (so lots of space around the shoulders and under the arms) most of the sweat wicks out into the shirt and evaporates. (And the shirt, when it dries, will have an interesting pattern of salt stripes).

The backpack will eventually wear a hole in the shirt, but then I just get a new second-hand men's silk shirt. There seem to be a lot of them that never got any use...
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
#45
Having spent some months in deserts as a soldier (Marine) I have never heard of wearing heavy coats in that extreme heat and sun. Sure, the sweat won't evaporate, but you will sweat more under the heavy coat. That would actually be an invitation to death. There is just no way we would have entertained that concept. If they did that in the 1940's it was based on a misconception.
The purpose of sweat is that the air passing over it on the skin causes a cooling of sorts.
The cooling occurs due to evaporation of moisture. More sweating would have to result, speeding the process of dehydration.

The coat trapped the moisture slowing the rate of evaporation. I would guess a large loose coat would aid in cooling convection under the coat. Think long loose clothing favored by Bedouin.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
#46
The cooling occurs due to evaporation of moisture. More sweating would have to result, speeding the process of dehydration.

The coat trapped the moisture slowing the rate of evaporation. I would guess a large loose coat would aid in cooling convection under the coat. Think long loose clothing favored by Bedouin.
Yes, desert cultures do wear thin, loose fitting clothing, but the clothes have no insulating properties at all (we all bought some to bring home as souvenirs). Designed to cover one from the sun's rays yet loose and breezy.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
#47
Can you do anything about sour sun-protection shirt?
All tech fabrics are going to "sour" over time, even with good washing machines and really hot water (both a luxury on the Camino). The only way that I've found to eliminate the sour, "funky" smell is an extended soak in an enzymatic cleaner from time to time, which can break down the proteins and bacteria that accumulate to produce the sour smell. In the US, we have Resolve / Spray and Wash, which does a really good job.
 

GreatDane

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF to Burgos Sept/Oct 2014, Burgos to Astorga April 2016, Astorga to SdC 2017
#48
...Also, thanks Doug Fitz for recognizing that buying new stuff really isn't an option at this point.
Did you happen to purchase your pack from REI? If so no problem returning it for a different model and manufacturer (and the end roof season clearance is going on now too I think)
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#49
@koilife, as a technical point, trampoline suspension packs (there are a variety of names given to this style of mesh frame) are external frame packs. They do not have the frame components on the inside of the pack - they are all outside.
Packs, such as those by Osprey, with ventilated back panels are internal frame packs... at least as defined by those who make the packs and those with a historical knowledge of the evolution of backpack designs. I suppose, using semantics, you can define them however you like. But, as an earlier poster showed, what most of us know as external frame packs are different in almost every way from what most of us are carrying now.
 
Last edited:
#50
You just gonna sweat (or as southern ladies say, "glow"). Nothing you can do about it. Comes with physical exertion, and walking 15-30 km a day, up and down hills wearing a backpack is definitely physical exertion.
Wear lightweight, tech type clothing designed to dry quickly and when you take a break, make sure to remove your pack.
Reminds me of what I was brought up with. "Horses sweat, men perspire and ladies glow"
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#51
Did you happen to purchase your pack from REI? If so no problem returning it for a different model and manufacturer (and the end roof season clearance is going on now too I think)
Thanks Great Dane, no REI where I live. I am going to "glow" with it;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#52
Packs, such as those by Osprey, with ventilated back panels are internal frame packs... at least as defined by those who make the packs and those with a historical knowledge of the evolution of backpack designs
I know Osprey use the term 'peripheral frame', and Deuter describe those packs that do have an internal frame as such, but I have never seen a trampoline suspension system referred to as an internal frame. I would be interested if you could refer me where you think they have. The distinction is one of design, not semantics!
 

jozero

Oh... That's what the shell is for...
Camino(s) past & future
CF January 2013
CF April 2016
CF January 2018
CP Coastal September 2018
#53
I know Osprey use the term 'peripheral frame', and Deuter describe those packs that do have an internal frame as such, but I have never seen a trampoline suspension system referred to as an internal frame. I would be interested if you could refer me where you think they have. The distinction is one of design, not semantics!
Hi Doug - are there a set of internationally recognized standards that state trampoline systems are external frames?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#54
Hi Doug - are there a set of internationally recognized standards that state trampoline systems are external frames?
Why? It really is about the common English language meanings of the words. I have four packs in various sizes with trampoline suspension systems, from Salewa, Deuter and North Face. I can tell you that all the frames are external to the bag itself - I can see the frames from outside the pack. I have both internally framed packs and an older external ladder frame pack as well. I consider it an internal frame if I have to open up the bag to get access to the frame. It isn't any more complicated than that - it is clearly inside the bag, ie internal, if I have to get at the frame from the inside of the bag.

Osprey describe its approach as a peripheral frame in the promotional literature I have read. That might be to avoid any negative associations there might still be with externally framed packs being old-fashioned and not suitable for certain types of outdoor activities.
 
Last edited:

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#55
I know Osprey use the term 'peripheral frame', and Deuter describe those packs that do have an internal frame as such, but I have never seen a trampoline suspension system referred to as an internal frame. I would be interested if you could refer me where you think they have. The distinction is one of design, not semantics!
When I say semantics, I mean that, when considering which pack works best for you, the name of the design isn't really relevant. It's kind of a geek distinction, I guess. "External frame" connotes the old Kelty or Trailwise packs, as a previous poster pictured. I wrote to my friend Mike, who is the founder/owner of Osprey packs to ask him. (He and I backpacked together when we were teenagers).
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
#56
When I say semantics, I mean that, when considering which pack works best for you, the name of the design isn't really relevant. It's kind of a geek distinction, I guess. "External frame" connotes the old Kelty or Trailwise packs, as a previous poster pictured. I wrote to my friend Mike, who is the founder/owner of Osprey packs to ask him. (He and I backpacked together when we were teenagers).
Thats cuz most people go with an internal frame. Its actually difficult to find a good exterior frame pack ... but they do exist.
 

jozero

Oh... That's what the shell is for...
Camino(s) past & future
CF January 2013
CF April 2016
CF January 2018
CP Coastal September 2018
#58
Why? It really is about the common English language meanings of the words. I have four packs in various sizes with trampoline suspension systems, from Salewa, Deuter and North Face. I can tell you that all the frames are external to the bag itself - I can see the frames from outside the pack. I have both internally framed packs and an older external ladder frame pack as well. I consider it an internal frame if I have to open up the bag to get access to the frame. It isn't any more complicated than that - it is clearly inside the bag, ie internal, if I have to get at the frame from the inside of the bag.

Osprey describe its approach as a peripheral frame in the promotional literature I have read. That might be to avoid any negative associations there might still be with externally framed packs being old-fashioned and not suitable for certain types of outdoor activities.
My 'why' is because I have a different point of view about this topic but am interested in learning more. In the past I have noticed when some Posters have a different point of view as another Poster they ask them if they have any official documentation that validates their stance and I think this is a smart approach as there certainly may be such documentation that exists. In this case I have looked at a variety of classification societies and patents but can find nothing conclusive either way so was simply curious to know if there was any such that you knew of that the would imply the designers and manufactures of these various packs were using improper terminology.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#59
@JillGat, thank you for making this effort. I will be interested in the response.
From Mike, who has designed all the Osprey packs: "The frames internal so I think they're internal frames, but whatever. I'd like to do an external frame for all those people who are afraid of "internal frames"."
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#60
My 'why' is because I have a different point of view about this topic but am interested in learning more. In the past I have noticed when some Posters have a different point of view as another Poster they ask them if they have any official documentation that validates their stance and I think this is a smart approach as there certainly may be such documentation that exists. In this case I have looked at a variety of classification societies and patents but can find nothing conclusive either way so was simply curious to know if there was any such that you knew of that the would imply the designers and manufactures of these various packs were using improper terminology.
I'm sorry that plain English doesn't work, but you might want to read the Wikipedia article at https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backpack#External_frame_packs. It's probably vague enough to satisfy both camps in this discussion. In the meantime I will continue to use the simple test that if I don't have to open the bag to see the frame, it's an external frame.
 

jozero

Oh... That's what the shell is for...
Camino(s) past & future
CF January 2013
CF April 2016
CF January 2018
CP Coastal September 2018
#61
I'm sorry that plain English doesn't work, but you might want to read the Wikipedia article at https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backpack#External_frame_packs. It's probably vague enough to satisfy both camps in this discussion. In the meantime I will continue to use the simple test that if I don't have to open the bag to see the frame, it's an external frame.
My language skills are just fine. I just have a different set of definitions. Anyway, moving on...
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#62

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
#65
Hi, @Imsundaze, I dont know if loosening the straps is helfping (either the shoulder straps, or the waistbelt), but thought this was an interesting idea that I was reading about. Take a piece of cardboard, or perhaps you have one of those plastic thingies that Eagle Creek uses in their packing cube system. Insert into back of pack. Undo waist belt and connect them to each other in the back of pack to to top of pack. My pack has a hand loop at the top. The idea is that the tension on the straps will buckle out and create a concave area on back of pack. Air will circulate and allow better evaporation of sweat. I don't know if your pack is light enough or how long you would be able to walk without waist strap, but it may be a solution for temporary relief while still being able to walk.

I had this idea as I recently purchased these Nite Eze Gear Ties for upcoming CP - see link

https://www.niteize.com/product/Gear-Tie-Loopables-12.asp

I purchased mine at Home Depot. My thought is, you could bend this into shape which would allow a space between your back and the back pack. These could be placed inside or outside pack. They are VERY light.

And lastly, cover your pack or the outside of your wool shirt with absorbent fabric such as this chamois cloth. I have several of these clothes - the ones I have say "Made in Germany" and I think these are better quality. I camp a lot, and can attest to the absorbency on those rainy, wet days. See link for cloth, but you should be able to find locally.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DP2A2SU/?tag=camiforu-20

Buen Camino,
Janice
 

RumAndChupacabras

"Looking Forward To 6 Weeks in 2019"
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Aug 2019 Norte Apr. 2018: Oviedo, Santo Toribio, Covadonga, Garabandal May/Jun 2016: Portuguese
#66
@lmsundaze 99 cent store applicator pads.jpg
I found something for me that has killed two birds with one stone...auto applicator pads (2 pack) at the 99 Cents Only Store. Not only are they lightweight, they're versatile! You can put one at each 'corner' of your backpack (with a pin or velcro or whatever) to help make the slightest air space without throwing off balance AND...you can use them for tender spots (I get these at waist, lower back or hip areas...just depends).
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#67
From Mike, who has designed all the Osprey packs: "The frames internal so I think they're internal frames, but whatever. I'd like to do an external frame for all those people who are afraid of "internal frames"."
I did a check of the local outdoor retailers today. There seem to be four design variants:

a. External frame - mesh panel attached to the bag at the top and frame at the bottom - Salewa, Deuter
b. External frame - mesh panel attached to the bag at top and bottom - Deuter, Osprey
c. Internal frame - mesh panel attached to the bag - Osprey
d. Rigid panel - mesh attached to the bag - Berghaus, North Face

While this was only a sample of what might be available, there was only one pack, an Osprey, that I would have classified as an internal frame. On all the other packs with a frame, it was accessible from outside the bag.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
'03CF, '08VdlP, '12Porto, '14VdlP via Port '15CPI ‘17Levante to Toledo
#68
Thanks!! No, I don't want to buy another pack. I do plan to wear a long sleeve sun protection shirt, I am very sun sensitive with skin cancer history. I think I will try wearing a light merino tank under my shirt and see if that helps.
Good idea @imsundaze I only wear merino next to my skin. I’ve done both hot and cool caminos and it’s great. A 150gm base layer (¾ sleeve) is fine in summer. You can get a size bigger than normal too for a bit more freedom against your body.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk the Camino in 2015.
#69
I swear by Merino wool as well. As much as I love my jeans and cotton t shirt at home, Cotton is definitely a no no while hiking & traveling. Merino is expensive, but so worth it. I've slowly built up a collection over the past year. To the original poster, I hope your Camino was Bueno! Sweaty back or not, hope you had fun.
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#70
Thanks Vagabond man. My camino was wonderful, I had a short sleeve merino shirt and a long sleeve one. Also a long sleeve button shirt for sun protection. That was all. I was fine. LOved my ULA Ohm2.0 backpack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Haven't walked the Camino yet. But I've hiked all over this beautiful planet and hope to walk the Camino in the near future.
#71
I'm late to this party. Glad you had a great Camino! Can't wait to do mine. I too love merino. Did you find you sweated less on your Camino than at home training? Just curious. I have an Osprey pack with a suspended mesh back panel, so that should help. Cheers!
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
#72
Lowe 'Airflow' packs are really good for allowing ventilation to the back in hot weather and as I'm an Autumn, Winter early Spring pilgrim also prevent 'wind spin' caused by the wind hitting your pack and buffeting you-this can be pretty extreme with a strong wind. The 'gap means the wind goes through and around the bulk of the pack reducing that buffeting effect.
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#73
I'm late to this party. Glad you had a great Camino! Can't wait to do mine. I too love merino. Did you find you sweated less on your Camino than at home training? Just curious. I have an Osprey pack with a suspended mesh back panel, so that should help. Cheers!
Thanks! Yes I had much less problem on the Camino than training, but I think because the weather was very cool in April and May when I walked. If I go again, it will be in the spring the next time too.
 

bunnymac

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012 SJPP-Logrono, 2013 Logrono-Burgos, 2014 Burgos-Leon
CF August/September 2016 SJPP- Santiago
#74
My Camino is getting closer -- 34 days -- and I am training more and more with my full pack. On warm, not hot days (68F-20C) my back sweats really uncomfortably from my backpack. Any suggestions on how to mitigate this? Thanks!
I use an Osprey Tempest 30 It has a mesh air pocket between your back and the pack to allow air to circulate. It works quite well. My daughter uses a Decathlon Forclaz 30 air which is similar (and about half the price!!!) However if you've already purchased a pack and cannot change it, I don't have any words of wisdom. Hope someone else can help. :)
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
camster Equipment Questions 12

OLDER threads on this topic




A few items available from the Camino Forum Store



Advertisement

Booking.com

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 35 4.4%
  • April

    Votes: 117 14.8%
  • May

    Votes: 192 24.3%
  • June

    Votes: 55 7.0%
  • July

    Votes: 15 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 12 1.5%
  • September

    Votes: 236 29.9%
  • October

    Votes: 96 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.6%
Top