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Detailed planning thread for the Camino Olvidado

peregrina2000

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Day 16. La Magdalena to Pandorado (20 km)

(For anyone who notices that the last stage I posted was numbered 14bis, this stage gets the number 16 because the mountain alternative through Vegacervera took three days from Boñar to La Magdalena, while the “bis” route took only two).

For those who want longer stages, the most obvious stop would be Vegarienza, which is about 28 km from La Magdalena, and which has a wonderful albergue above the medical office, and a very nice road-side restaurant. But I’ll stick with Pandorado as the end point.

This is another one of those idyllic off-road stages, not much in the way of dramatic scenery but very pleasant. Pine forests and oak forests. Some of the camino goes along the Transhumancia, the official “livestock path” for farmers to take their flocks down to Extremadura during winter months. Though the animals are now transported by motorized vehicles, I remember being in Madrid in the 70s when the streets were closed off for one day. Some animals paraded on through the center of the city, to the delight of many and the displeasure of some. (Sort of the same reaction you get when cities are closed for marathons or cycling races).

I don’t remember any open bars or other services aside from those at the beginning in La Magdalena, and a café in Riello, about 17.5 km further along.

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Ender actually lists Riello as the “end of stage” but I don’t see any accommodation there. The casa rural I have contacted has advised me it’s a whole house rental with a minimum of two days. But there is a nice bar there, with an outdoor café. This was another one of those places where the local residents were eager to talk to me about the camino, their pueblo, and their hopes for a better future. Carrying on from Riello to Pandorado is another 2.5 km and involves an ascent, but it isn’t dramatic.

Resthy’s place in Pandorado is a small complex. It has a bar/mesón, restaurant, and tourist apartments (with washing machines!). They are very familiar with peregrinos. Ender’s guide doesn’t list it, and that may be because they have been a bit uncooperative with accommodating pilgrims. When I stayed there in 2014, there were no others spending the night in their nice tourist apartments, and the price for me was a whopping 60€. The owner told me the price was the same for 1, 2, 3, or 4, and I was free to invite in some others. o_O He and his wife were very nice, they just were not there to help pilgrims out. At that time, they also had a kind of taxi service. If the next day you walked to Fasgar or to any place before that, they would come pick you up and bring you back to Resthy’s. Cost was in the 20s€ I believe. But of course you would have to pay another fee to get taken the next day back to your starting point. That would make for 160€ for two nights plus taxi, not to mention food. That is no longer necessary, as there are places to stay now, but back in the day they had a kind of monopoly going on.

There is also a Gran Hotel Pandorado across the street from Resthy’s, so maybe that has made him offer more competitive prices. The hotel was not open when I walked through in 2019, and it doesn’t seem to have a website. Booking says it is not taking reservations.

All in all, I think this is a very manageable and enjoyable 20 km day.
 
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AJGuillaume

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Ender actually lists Riello as the “end of stage” but I don’t see any accommodation there. The casa rural I have contacted has advised me it’s a whole house rental with a minimum of two days.
I am assuming you refer to the Casa Rural La Alberiza. The caminoolvidado.com website also lists a Casa Rural La Panera del Conde, which has 4 beds:
4 plazas - 22,5€ / persona y noche
I couldn't see if there was a minimum number of nights requirement.

All in all, I think this is a very manageable and enjoyable 20 km day.
I think slow walkers would be ok with this. :) It would be a long but enjoyable day ;)
 

alansykes

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Ender actually lists Riello as the “end of stage”
It's perhaps worth mentioning that the tienda in Riello is the last one before Iguëña, 46km further on, and other food options are scarce. Especially if the lovely restaurant in Vegarienza (the oldest in León province) closes, and if you hit Fasgar when Aires de Fasgar is closed (which it is roughly 300 days a year).
 

peregrina2000

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Day 17. Pandorado to Fasgar (26 km)

If you have slept in Pandorado, your choices are either Vegarienza (8) or Fasgar at 26. There is just nothing in between Vegarienza and Fasgar. The road up to Fasgar through the valley has lots of tiny little villages, all looking like great vacation spots, but no accommodations that I can find!

Leaving Pandorado, there is an initial descent along an untraveled road to the pretty town of Omañuela and its river. From there it is really a pretty walk, a very gradual ascent, lots of river walking. There is nothing in the spectacular range, but there are ancient bridges, a few bits of Roman Road, a couple of tiny towns. Not much in the way of places to eat or drink, unless you are walking when the pueblos have “reopened” for summer, so bring what you need. Even in summer, the bars are unlikely to open in morning or early afternoon. It is almost totally off-road, so the feet enjoy the surface and the mind enjoys the quiet.

About 8 km after Pandorado, you come to the tiny hamlet of Vegarienza. Estela is a woman who grew up in the village, worked in Madrid, then retired and came home to take care of her ailing brother. Her house is two doors down from the medical center, and she noticed that it had a top floor that was not being used. With the help of other Olvidado supporters, she was able to get the top floor converted into a very nice albergue. She has the keys, will check you in, and is a gem. Her love is directed at her village, not at the Camino, and she fervently hopes the albergue will help bring back some life.

If you like longer stages, La Magdalena to Vegarienza is about 30. I stayed here in 2019 and it was really very nice. The little restaurant on the road was open for lunch, so I had my main meal here. It was pretty astonishing to see an elderly woman and her daughter (and by elderly I mean over 90!) doing all the cooking, serving, and cleaning. The set-up gave you a front row seat to the action, because the kitchen is in the middle of the restaurant. The mother told me they had been trying to retire for years now, but can’t bring themselves to shut the place and leave the village and the surrounding area with nothing. Googlemaps tells me Restaurante Maxi is currently open for takeout, a good sign for post-pandemic walkers!

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But back to the route to Fasgar. Shortly after leaving Vegarienza, you take a left turn off the LE-493. You are now on a small road that ends in Fasgar. The camino is mainly off road, but the road is never far away. It goes through several small villages, all along the river. Just so pretty. I had a cow encounter or two, and those who are leery could just stay on the road, because it is very very untraveled. The only advice I would definitely give is to make sure to take the camino path from Vegapujín into Fasgar, it is lovely and no cows!

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On my first Olvidado, Rosi opened her home to me, thanks to Adolfo (from Nava de Ordunte). Rosi had recently moved back to her pueblo from Oviedo, where she was on the hamster wheel of living pay check to pay check with a young child and high child care costs. When I first met her, she was running the “social center” (municipally owned bar). But basically they were living “off the grid” — with their own garden plots, a few animals (with an annual pig slaughter), wood stove. At that time the year round population was about 8, and it was the 3rd birthday of Rosi’s daughter, which I was privileged to celebrate with them in the bar.

Fasgar, at the end of the road, is a beautiful little mountain village, which fills up in the summer. Winters are hard, no more than 10 full time residents, and Rosi told me of many weeks with no outside contact. During her first winter back, she counted the days with snow and then got discouraged and stopped counting. It must be beautiful, but almost inaccessible.

Fast forward a few years, there is now an albergue in the old school, a slightly fancy restaurant, and a Casa Rural, all run by Rosi. I would highly recommend a stop here, no matter where you stay the night before. The restaurant seemed wildly successful the last time I was there. In fact, checking today on their website, I see that the weekend is completely booked for the restaurant, and this is a Tuesday during a pandemic!

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If 26 km is too much for you, the only obvious options I see are to either take Resthy up on his taxi offer for part of the way, or break the stage up into 8 (to Vegarienza) and 18 (to Fasgar).

It is a lovely stage, ending in a really pretty little town with a river running through it. It is literally at the end of the road.
 
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It is almost totally off-road, so the feet enjoy the surface and the mind enjoys the quiet.
Ahhhhhh.

La Magdalena to Vegarienza is about 30. I
Nice. But that means missing out on staying in Fasgar, and it sounds really nice. Oh, wait, no. It'd mean 30 (LM-V) then 18 (V-F), right Laurie?

Fast forward a few years, there is now an albergue in the old school, a slightly fancy restaurant, and a Casa Rural, all run by Rosi.
Wow, she is a force of nature! Brava!

Both Fasgar and Vegarienza sound like nice stops, and when I look at OSMsnd, I see what you mean by little hamlets - there's a regular string of them after Pandorado: Guisatecha, El Castillo, Vegarienza, Cirujales, Villaverde de Omana, Marzan, Riero, Barrio de la Puente, Torrecillo, Posada de Omana, and Vegapujin. Some with iglesia, some without.

But I do see a place labeled 'Puzaraca' between Riero and Barrio de la Puente, with no village, just a church. Google Earth to the rescue - it's the Ermita Santa Ana (screenshot from streetview):
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peregrina2000

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😁 Nice. But that means missing out on staying in Fasgar, and it sounds really nice. Oh, wait, no. It'd mean 30 (LM-V) then 18 (V-F), right Laurie?
Yes, that’s right. Vegarienza to Fasgar is a nice day. Rosi told me that with the albergue in Vegarienza now open, many walk on to Igüeña from there, just passing through Fasgar. I actually did that the last time I walked the Olvidado, Vegarienza to Igüeña is about a 35 km stage, and it is a very doable one for those who like long distances. But with a two and a half hour stop in Fasgar, it was quite a long day. And Fasgar is a really nice little place so I would never recommend that anyone do what I did. 😁 Rosi was going to be busy all afternoon and evening with the restaurant, so I decided to carry on after a long coffee and chat, with a visit to the restaurant, the casa rural, and the albergue.

I remember that in 2019 when I was in Fasgar, Rosi told me there had already been about 35 people in the albergue in the month of June. My camera tells me I was in Fasgar on the 22nd of June, so that suggests some real growth. Hopefully the momentum will resume when people are back on the camino.
 

peregrina2000

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Wow, she is a force of nature! Brava!
Did I neglect to mention that she was/is also the mayor (not mayor actually, because Fasgar is part of another municipality but she is the administrative officer of the town, concejala I think it’s called). And also that the region has designated her the official bus driver for the children up and down the road to get to school. It comes with its own little car and means she has to drive twice a day out and back to Murías de Paredes (I think), which is about 30 km each way, but it was the only way to make sure her child got to school. I don’t think there are more than one or two other children in all of those towns, if that many.

AND that they grow almost all of their own produce, raise a pig for slaughter each year, and cultivate a plot of “fancy” potatoes, with their own special ”denominación de origen”. These agricultural undertakings may have fallen by the wayside now that the albergue/school/restaurant came on the scene, but when I was there the first time, I got a long guided tour to all of the operation, including the building where the meat was cured, the various plots, etc. It was quite the impressive set-up for a “city girl” like me.
 

AJGuillaume

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If you have slept in Pandorado, your choices are either Vegarienza (8) or Fasgar at 26. There is just nothing in between Vegarienza and Fasgar.
Looking at the profile of this stage, I have a feeling someone is going to ask me to stop in Vegarienza...

About 8 km after Pandorado, you come to the tiny hamlet of Vegarienza. Estela is a woman who grew up in the village, worked in Madrid, then retired and came home to take care of her ailing brother. Her house is two doors down from the medical center, and she noticed that it had a top floor that was not being used. With the help of other Olvidado supporters, she was able to get the top floor converted into a very nice albergue. She has the keys, will check you in, and is a gem. Her love is directed at her village, not at the Camino, and she fervently hopes the albergue will help bring back some life.
And we would be quite happy to contribute to the local economy by staying in Estela's albergue.

Fast forward a few years, there is now an albergue in the old school, a slightly fancy restaurant, and a Casa Rural, all run by Rosi. I would highly recommend a stop here, no matter where you stay the night before.
Amazing! We are looking forward to meeting Rosi! We're definitely stopping in Fasgar and staying with her.

If 26 km is too much for you, the only obvious options I see are to either take Resthy up on his taxi offer for part of the way, or break the stage up into 8 (to Vegarienza) and 18 (to Fasgar).
Two good options, and I think we slow walkers will prefer the second one.
 

peregrina2000

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Day 18. Fasgar to Igüeña (18 km)

On my first Olvidado in 2014, this stage was heralded as the “etapa reina” (jewel in the crown more or less) of the Olvidado. It is beautiful, no doubt about it, but it now has some stiff competition from the Boñar-Vegarienza-La Magdalena variant. But if the weather is good, you are in for some exhilaration.

You ascend on a dirt road from Fasgar, then go down and cross the Campo de Santiago, where Santiago appeared in 981 to help defeat the Moors. I wrote a short synopsis of the story for Ender’s guide and won’t repeat it here, but the bottom line is that thanks to Santiago’s intervention, about 70,000 Moors lost their lives on this battlefield.


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From the ermita at the bottom commemorating the battle, you continue on a beautiful trail along the river. There is uneven footing in places, but the wooden bridges back and forth over the river have been rebuilt since the first time I walked on very precarious wooden structures.
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The camino emerges a total of 12 kms later from Fasgar in the town of Colinas del Campo de Martín Moro Toledano (the leader of the Moors in the famous battle). This is the town with the longest name in all of Spain, and it is another beautiful mountain village, just beautiful. Only a bar or two, seasonal hours, so don’t count on much. The first time I walked through nothing was open, but the second time was a Saturday and I was able to enjoy a nice cold drink in a very lively mesón with terrace.

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The fun fact is that the walk from Fasgar to Colinas del Campo is 12 km on foot. Driving a car turns it into a 79 km ordeal.

From Fasgar, the rest of the way into Igüeña is along the river, usually off road and very pleasant. All shaded! Igüeña has a modern albergue run by the bar/restaurante that is adjacent, and the owners will cook you up a plato combinado at any reasonable hour.

The mural at the entrance to town makes a big impact and reminds you that you are still in the part of Spain that is struggling to find life after mining.

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If 18 km is too short for you, here are a couple of other ways to break it up.
Vegarienza to Igüeña is about 35 or 36. But you would not get a stop in Fasgar, which is surely a pity. Beyond Igüeña, Quintana de los Fuseros and Labaniego have options, but I’ll save that for the next post.
 

AJGuillaume

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On my first Olvidado in 2014, this stage was heralded as the “etapa reina” (jewel in the crown more or less) of the Olvidado.
Beautiful! We're looking forward to experiencing this one day. And a bonus for the slow walkers: it's not too long ☺️

The fun fact is that the walk from Fasgar to Colinas del Campo is 12 km on foot. Driving a car turns it into a 79 km ordeal.
Note to slow walkers: don't even consider the taxi option 😂:cool:

If 18 km is too short for you, here are a couple of other ways to break it up.
Not too short. As Goldilocks said: just right 😄
 
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Colinas del Campo de Martín Moro Toledano
It must be something in the water around there, because on OSMand, right after the Ermita there's a locality called "Cáscaro de la Vallina Escura o del Pallón"
😂
20210522_202609.jpg
I did a search but came up with nothing.

The fun fact is that the walk from Fasgar to Colinas del Campo is 12 km on foot. Driving a car turns it into a 79 km ordeal.
We knew walking is better.
And in this case only about three times slower.
🙃
 

peregrina2000

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I just heard from Rosi that she thinks the albergue will be open soon. I know that’s not solid, but it is hopeful.

And in case anyone is interested, here is an interview with Rosi. I had it in my whatsapp chat history, she sent it when it was filmed. I think the Castellano is pretty understandable. Best line for me, when the interviewer was saying wow, you are a perfect example of how to return back to the pueblo to live, look at all you do.... She says “te haces a todo y si no sabes, aprendes.” You have to do everything and if you don’t know how, you learn. 👍
 

AJGuillaume

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Best line for me, when the interviewer was saying wow, you are a perfect example of how to return back to the pueblo to live, look at all you do.... She says “te haces a todo y si no sabes, aprendes.” You have to do everything and if you don’t know how, you learn. 👍
Inspirational! The world needs more people like Rosi!
Thank you for sharing the interview, @peregrina2000
 

peregrina2000

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Day 19. Igüeña to Labaniego (19 km)

The mountain walking is now officially over, but I remember some nice walking tracks through logging forests and just generally pleasant terrain. Nice views, nice paths. The hills of the Bierzo are on your left and there are vineyards and other agricultural production.

About 7 kms beyond Igüeña is the small town of Quintana Fuseros. On my first Olvidado, I arrived too early from Fasgar to stop in Igüeña and decided to keep on walking. When I got to Quintana and went into the bar, the bar owner made a phone call and the mayor came down to meet me. After welcoming me to town and buying me a drink, he proceeded to call the owner of the casa rural. She had a neighbor open the house and left me the run of the place. She asked me to leave 20€ on the table. It’s not much of a town to look at, but the people are wonderful. The home was clean, modern, hot showers and good kitchen. But bring food because there’s nothing in town.

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After Quintana Fuseros, as you are ascending to a forest, you’ll see a broken crucifix. The Cruz Cercenada represents the cross that was broken by Almanzor’s sword during a 10th century battle in the area. I think the idea is to turn it into something similar the Cruz de Fierro but I didn’t see any evidence of that.
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Another 12 kms and you are at Labaniego. I have never stayed here, but Ender’s guide indicates there is “acogida de peregrinos.” This term means that you will find a place to sleep but no guarantees about bed or showers or hot water. Labaniego also has several casas rurales, and a couple are offered on booking.com. It’s a small place, several nicely restored homes, but no services of any kind that I can see on google. So I would be sure to bring food.
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If you can walk 5 more kms, there is a small Hostal/Bar in Losada. On my last walk through, it was a terribly rainy day. I very much enjoyed a long stop and two hot cafés con leche. Wonderful people. You can tell a lot about a person’s character by her reaction to the entrance of a dripping wet pilgrim. Total hospitality, no worries about the puddles!

@Undermanager stayed in Losada and reported back:
I paid €15 for a bed in a twin room above the very welcoming Bar Losada on Calle La Era (tel: 680350708). You can’t miss it as it is the last building on the road out of town. The bar seems to be the community hub and forms part of the sports and swimming complex.
 

AJGuillaume

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Day 19. Igüeña to Labaniego (19 km)
That would be a manageable stage for slow walkers.

Labaniego also has several casas rurales
The only unknown would be if these casas rurales are available on other than "casa completa" basis. I guess a phone call might yield a room.

In Labaniego, I assume the acogida de peregrinos would not have cooking facilities, so what ever food we bring should be edible raw and cold?

If you can walk 5 more kms, there is a small Hostal/Bar in Losada. On my last walk through, it was a terribly rainy day. I very much enjoyed a long stop and two hot cafés con leche. Wonderful people. You can tell a lot about a person’s character by her reaction to the entrance of a dripping wet pilgrim. Total hospitality, no worries about the puddles!
The caminoolvidado.com website lists two casas rurales in Arlanza, 1.8 km from Labaniego, La Magia y El Encanto, both managed by the same owner. La Magia is for a couple.

If we don't find a room in Arlanza or Labaniego, an extra 5 km is our only option, I think. I'll carry her bag...
 
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peregrina2000

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Losada to Ponferrada would be quite a reasonable 25.6km day for any of us intending to continue on the Invierno. And it sounds a very welcoming place!
And just to make you eager to come read the next installments, there is a romanesque detour from Congosto to get your juices going!

In Labaniego, I assume the acogida de peregrinos would not have cooking facilities, so what ever food we bring should be edible raw and cold?
I found a little more information — Clemente is the guy in charge, and there are no showers. So surely there are no cooking facilities. Several days ago, I sent whatsApps to the CRs, but have heard nothing at all.
 

peregrina2000

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Day 20. Labaniego to Congosto (18.5 km).

I think we’re losing steam, but I am nothing if not persistent. So I promise I will get you to Ponferrada!

I remember this day as having lots of beautiful views over the Bierzo region to my left. At some point the terrain changes to vineyards, but before that it is green and even lush. My memory is not exactly tracked with these stages, because these are not the stages I walked. These last few days into Ponferrada are very pleasant, because you are now firmly implanted in the Bierzo, which IMO is a gorgeous part of the country.

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Such a contrast between houses, some beautifully preserved, apparently on their last legs.
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In Cobrana, about 13 km beyond Labaniego, I slept in La Vieja Fragua. It’s a tiny house with a loft, and the owner rents to peregrinos. The bar owners are in charge, since the owner lives out of town, but a WhatsApp is easy to set things up. Gelines in the bar prepared me a “lunch” that was too much food for lunch AND dinner. She delivered it to the house after I was showered and dry. It had been one of those almost all-day rains. I can’t remember what it was, but I do remember some excellent cheese, bread and sausage on the side. In the afternoon, the rain let up, and I enjoyed some good time with locals who are, as seems to be generally the case along the route, hoping very much that the Camino Olvidado becomes more popular.

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From Cobrana to Congosto is forest with beautiful chestnut groves. Before you get to Congosto, there is an ascent to the Sanctuary of the Virgen de la Peña. As a dutiful peregrina, I walked up, but it was thick pea soup fog and there were no views to be had. But the views would be over the Bárcena Reservoir, and frankly, I have come to the conclusion that I just don’t much like reservoirs. Cañaveral, Arija, Aguilar de Campoó, and now Bárcena. All of the reservoirs I have walked by strike me as slightly depressing for some reason.

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I have only slept in Congosto once, and it was on my first Olvidado when I once again was saved by the kindness of others. I called several casas rurales, and the owner of the Casa Rural Álvaro de Mendaña moved mountains to get her house opened for me. She was leaving town at noon be in Ponferrada for an appointment, but she prevailed upon her brother to open up the house when I called upon arrival. On the table were a bowl of cherries and some home made cakes. And the brother told me his sister had said to just leave whatever I thought was an appropriate amount. Highly recommended, though I would recommend giving her a heads up more than a few hours in advance like I did!

86E6BF8F-965A-4A6F-A05A-5F6091ECAFA5.jpeg 85171827-6960-47B8-985F-A39F6A4FF562.jpeg F950503E-9CA3-451C-BD31-74A81CE5E624.jpeg

The house is right across the street from a restaurant, where I was overjoyed to find a cheap menú del día at 5€ because I had almost totally run out of cash. Pola de Gordón (day 15) was the last ATM I had seen. Hopefully others can chime in with information about ATMs I might have missed. Luckily, the next day was Ponferrada, but I was close to penniless by that time.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Penniless, but with cherries!
Not a bad way to be.
And to be in the Bierzo in cherry season is the best thing in the world.

the owner of the Casa Rural Álvaro de Mendaña moved mountains to get her house opened for me.
All these little towns seem particularly hospitable, so I hope once we can all walk that this route begins to bring in some sustenance to the people along the way.

All of the reservoirs I have walked by strike me as slightly depressing for some reason.
That's because they've drowned the natural landscapes, not to mention human history. I don't like the feeling around them either - I find them depressing.

Pola de Gordón (day 15) was the last ATM I had seen.
Oh! That was a while ago.
Thanks for the heads-up.

Distances aside, heading to Ponferrada and given a choice between sleeping in either Cobrana or Congosto, which would you choose?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Distances aside, heading to Ponferrada and given a choice between sleeping in either Cobrana or Congosto, which would you choose?

For those who want to focus on albergues, I forgot to add that the albergue in Congosto, according to Ender, is poised to open. So that would tip the scale for some.

Google maps already shows the albergue, with a picture. It looks like it’s in the middle of nowhere, but actually it’s only about 300 m from where I stayed, which was central. Odd choice of building design!

7A294EE7-CF51-4F49-BD0C-09547FF827A9.png

As far as the difference between Congosto and Cobrana, hard choice. Cobrana is much smaller, a hamlet really, with just one little bar. Congosto is a proper town with some services (though no ATM!). The accommodations are both extremely comfortable. I think I was in Cobrana on a weekend, but I imagine that during the week it would be very quiet. Which may be what you’re looking for, but if you hope to find pople to chat with or little strolls to take, Congosto is probably the better choice.
 
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peregrina2000

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Penniless, but with cherries!
Not a bad way to be.
And to be in the Bierzo in cherry season is the best thing in the world.

D7EFF187-FEF9-48BE-821A-1E4FDCB0A5BA.jpeg

Even the trees alongside the road and not in any huerta are overloaded. So many different varieties, too — all the way from dark red, to yellow. It is heaven. And of course when you add in the fact that the chestnut trees are in bloom with that pungent smell and their majestic trunks and successive re-births out of dead hollowed out vestiges, it just doesn’t get much better!
 

AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Past OR future Camino
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Day 20. Labaniego to Congosto (18.5 km)
Another manageable stage for slow walkers.

I think we’re losing steam, but I am nothing if not persistent. So I promise I will get you to Ponferrada!
We're still walking, @peregrina2000 , even if we're slow! ☺️ And we'll walk with you all the way to Ponferrada!

In Cobrana, about 13 km beyond Labaniego, I slept in La Vieja Fragua. It’s a tiny house with a loft, and the owner rents to peregrinos. The bar owners are in charge, since the owner lives out of town, but a WhatsApp is easy to set things up.
This is an option for this stage, and we slow walkers don't mind a short stage ;)
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
View attachment 101036

Even the trees alongside the road and not in any huerta are overloaded. So many different varieties, too — all the way from dark red, to yellow. It is heaven. And of course when you add in the fact that the chestnut trees are in bloom with that pungent smell and their majestic trunks and successive re-births out of dead hollowed out vestiges, it just doesn’t get much better!
Wow. I had imagined these last stages to be a denoument of sorts, but clearly not! I will plan to arrive there in June.

El Sardón has a place for two, but it is a two night minimum.
CR Dora has closed permanently.

El Sardón suggested that for a one night stay, pilgrims should contact Diego. 655 25 50 14
Well, so much for that idea.
Laurie, what do you think about Quintana Fuseros-Losada-Ponferrada?

And I am not forgetting this ;) :
And just to make you eager to come read the next installments, there is a romanesque detour from Congosto to get your juices going!
That might change the idea....
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Day 21. Congosto to Ponferrada (16-19 km)

I am just planning on taking us from Congosto into Ponferrada, unless anyone thinks they would be interested in the Cabanas Raras route, which joins up with the Francés in Cacabelos. I know I’ve said this a million times, but if you are going to continue from here to Santiago, I think heading to Ponferrada and then walking the Invierno to Santiago is a terrific choice! With apologies to the dilligent Olvidado organization.

The official Camino Olvidado does not go down to Ponferrada, but rather continues for two more days to Cabañas Raras (20 km) and then onto the Francés at Cacabelos, with a stage ending in Villafranca del Bierzo (16 km from Cabañas). I have gone into Ponferrada both times, in order to get on the Invierno, which is a combination of caminos made in heaven. If you are going to continue on the Francés, though, Cabañas Raras is very eager to have pilgrims, and there is an “acogida” in town.

There are at least 2 ways to get from Congosto to Ponferrada. One is along the reservoir and across the dam. The spot where you leave the Olvidado to go into Ponferrada is obvious, but someone has tried mightily to erase the arrows showing the split. I would have a GPS just to make sure get on the right path, and there are many wikiloc tracks.

In 2014 I followed the arrows and it turned out to be a slightly convoluted loop. You walk alongside the reservoir, and cross over to the other side at the dam. It keeps you on the route to Cabañas Raras for a lot of the way, and then a cut south down to Ponferrada.
F29E7DCC-B117-4FAB-8E7B-A49164CEA8B7.jpeg 0BBE3EE8-9AF7-4545-8A40-90BB35521E6D.jpeg


In 2019 I thought I was heading to the romanesque church I describe below, but got turned around and wound up in a pine forest. Luckily I came across a European Diabetic biking group, and they helped me get back on track. (And I ran into them the next day in Las Médulas!). The pine forest is a nice option for going into Ponferrada, but I’m afraid I can’t reconstruct it since I was lost.

314D4B6C-99B4-45F3-9A58-3F1789772C33.jpeg 12C1D606-23FB-442D-8601-C6DF9E332FB7.jpeg

On both occasions I joined the Francés at Columbrianos and then walked “backwards” to Ponferrada.
740BD028-73ED-4798-BEFC-A9B61AB41C6B.jpeg 0AF4BB2E-253B-4483-AB91-BD1F78128370.jpeg

A second way into Ponferrada was brought to my attention after my last Olvidado. It is based on the idea that you want to go straight from Congosto to Ponferrada, rather than walk along the Olvidado route leaving Congosto and then detour. So this route leaves the Olvidado directly in Congosto. And it is a few km shorter.

This route will not take you to Santo Tomás de las Ollas, with its 10C Mozárabe church, unless you detour off the wikiloc tracks, near where the wikiloc map says “Urbanización Patricia.”

Alansykes was able to visit and enjoyed it immensely. He forged his own route, staying part of the way on the Olvidado and then turning off. Here’s what he reported:

Assuming you're planning on taking the Invierno into Compostela, I'd recommend leaving the Olvidado near the Bárcena reservoir and going straight into Ponferrada, rather than following the official route on to Villafranca del Bierzo. As well as saving a day or so, the main advantage is that you get to pass the glorious (possibly partly pre-)Romanesque/mozárabe church of Santo Tomás de las Ollas, with its amazing horseshoe arches and breathtaking almost circular simple apse.

I was sitting sadly outside thinking I would never see the interior when Manuela, a relatively elderly lady living in one of the houses on the square in front of the church came out with the key and let me in and gave me a lot of information about this fascinating site, including that it's just possible that it's of Visigothic origin. If Manuela isn't about, she told me that the local bar will let people know where she is, or find a key somewhere else (they're clearly justly proud if this hidden gem in the area). And then only a km or so into the centre of Ponferrada. "Vaut le detour", as the Michelin guides used to say.


The official Ponferrada website says to call the tourist office to see about getting someone to open it up. 987.42.42.36 Open every day except Monday.

So there you have it, the Olvidado from Bilbao to Ponferrada!

94869045-DE27-427C-BD27-221AACF7CCF3.jpeg
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
What do you think about Quintana Fuseros-Losada-Ponferrada?
VN, I think is fine but a bit lopsided, unless I’m messing up the distances. It looks like:

Quintana Fuseros - Losada, about 12 and Losada -Ponferrada about 32.

If you are going to visit the church, with the time that will take from walking, it might be better to have the lopside in the other direction. Quintana Fuseros to Congosto (29) and then the 16 or so into Ponferrada.
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
based on the idea that you want to go straight from Congosto to Ponferrada, rather than walk along the Olvidado route leaving Congosto and then detour. So this route leaves the Olvidado directly in Congosto
I stayed the night at Losada (very nice; the barman made me a delicious plate of roast peppers from his allotment, and put a slug of cognác in a glass of hot milk and honey to cure my streaming cold) and then followed the Olvidado all the way to the dam over the Sil, then turn left [EDIT: before the dam] then a couple of km down the Sil and an easy short detour to Santo Tomás de las Ollas. Lovely church, and nearby a fantastic mirador looking down to the Templar castle and Ponferrada, and out over the wide Bierzo and the encircling mountains. Then walk back to the Sil and only a couple of km to the centre of town.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
the barman made me a delicious plate of roast peppers from his allotment
That does it. This is where I'm going to stop. lopsided or not (mind you, perhaps he would make said peppers earlier in the day, too, allowing me to continue to Congosto.

Unless I'm completely decrepit by the time I can get to Spain again, the 29K from Quintana Fuseros to Congosto is quite doable. Thanks for the feedback, Laurie. What you say makes sense.

easy short detour to Santo Tomás de las Ollas. Lovely church, and nearby a fantastic mirador looking down to the Templar castle and Ponferrada, and out over the wide Bierzo and the encircling mountains.
This is coming in another post, right, Laurie?~
If you are going to visit the church,

I am restraining myself in not jumping ahead. Pass the pimentos, por favor....
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I am still interested in the Olvidado, but have been very busy planning my Levante for this fall: two years worth of camino, since last year was impossible. I might consider walking the Olvidado next spring, which would be my first spring camino. I shall have to try to read through all of it, before I gets edited and abbreviated.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
This is coming in another post, right, Laurie?~
Stop the presses. This is getting conusing. I’m sorry. I have edited my earlier post.

To clarify, I have talked about 3 ways to get to Ponferrada from Congosto. Only one of them takes you to the church.

1. Stay on the Olvidado, over the dam, to the place where the Olvidado turns right to go to Cabañas Raras. Arrows have been crossed out, but the spot is pretty clear. Those are my wikiloc tracks, posted above. Nowhere near the church.

2. The detour from Congosto that I posted in #325 leaves the Olvidado in Congosto, takes the Ruta de los Canteros, passes through San Miguel de las Dueñas but does not go through Santo Tomás de las Ollas on its way into Ponferrada. That is this trail. From what I can tell, it would be easy to swing over to Santo Tomás de las Ollas from this trail — at about the point where the wikiloc map says “Urbanización Patricia.”

3. Alan’s suggestion involves staying on the Olvidado past the dam on the Bárcena Reservoir, then leaving the Olvidado and heading for Santo Tomás and then Ponferrada. On google maps, it looks like he went on Calle Dinamarca rather than cross over the dam, then Calle Biobra, and then into Santo Tomás de las Ollas. That is what I tried to do in 2019 but got lost. 😁

If this doesn’t make sense, let me know.

. I shall have to try to read through all of it, before I gets edited and abbreviated.
Don’t worry, I’m losing steam and am not planning on editing this any times soon. So you will have no choice but to wade through the minutia, @Albertagirl. ;)

 
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Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
If this doesn’t make sense, let me know.
It makes total sense, especially with your second post. When I wrote that question I was mystified because I somehow missed your previous post. All is now clear. And I'm going, cherries in hand!

If Manuela isn't about, she told me that the local bar will let people know where she is, or find a key somewhere else (they're clearly justly proud if this hidden gem in the area)
As they should be. Wow. What a way to cap off a remarkable journey.




I’m losing steam
I'm not surprised.
Wow. We got here. I'll miss these posts, and salute our valiant leader...beautiful job, Laurie, and thank you for your tireless work of answering questions, phoning people on the ground, and generally keeping us going.

Thanks to everyone else who's walked this way for sharing your photos, stories, and tips. It'll be a joy some day to get there in person! But now I know where I'm going.
 
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AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Past OR future Camino
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Day 21. Congosto to Ponferrada (16-19 km)
We finish this amazing Camino with a stage that is kind to slow walkers! ☺️

I am just planning on taking us from Congosto into Ponferrada, unless anyone thinks they would be interested in the Cabanas Raras route, which joins up with the Francés in Cacabelos. I know I’ve said this a million times, but if you are going to continue from here to Santiago, I think heading to Ponferrada and then walking the Invierno to Santiago is a terrific choice!
A terrific choice, indeed, and one that we will make, when we eventually escape Australia to walk.
Just for the record, and should there be any slow walkers interested in going on to Villafranca del Bierzo, this is how I would have planned the stages:
Congosto to Cubillos del Sil, 13.5 km (just in case the acogida in Cabañas Raras is not available)
Cubillos del Sil to Cacabelos, 14.1 km
Cacabelos to Villafranca del Bierzo, 16.1 km.
Yes, short stages, just right for slow walkers...

This route will not take you to Santo Tomás de las Ollas, with its 10C Mozárabe church, unless you detour off the wikiloc tracks, near where the wikiloc map says “Urbanización Patricia.”
We'll detour anywhere just for a 10th century Mozárabe church! But I think we don't need to detour.

3. Alan’s suggestion involves staying on the Olvidado past the dam on the Bárcena Reservoir, then leaving the Olvidado and heading for Santo Tomás and then Ponferrada. On google maps, it looks like he went on Calle Dinamarca rather than cross over the dam, then Calle Biobra, and then into Santo Tomás de las Ollas. That is what I tried to do in 2019 but got lost. 😁
So would it be something like this:

I obviously haven't walked that trail, but it is interesting what a GPX editor can do ;)

I’m losing steam
You have done very well, @peregrina2000 ! It's not easy to lead a virtual Camino, and I am very grateful for all the effort you put in sharing your memories and your knowledge of such a beautiful Camino. Thank you also for your suggestions for the slow walkers!

If Manuela isn't about, she told me that the local bar will let people know where she is, or find a key somewhere else (they're clearly justly proud if this hidden gem in the area).
As they should be. Wow. What a way to cap off a remarkable journey.
Hear, hear! A wonderful way of capping off a remarkable journey!

Thanks to everyone else who's walked this way for sharing your photos, stories, and tips. It'll be a joy some day to get there in person! But now I know where I'm going.
I'll join my thanks to all the peregrin@s who shared their knowledge on the Olvidado. And I agree: now we know where we're going!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
So would it be something like this:
I obviously haven't walked that trail, but it is interesting what a GPX editor can do ;)

I should be able to do that, but I can’t. But I’ve got it on google maps, I think, and it is different from what you figured out. I’m not saying that your way won’t work, but this is what I think Alan did. Alan said he stayed on the camino till the dam. And the road to the dam is slightly before point A on my google maps. See what you think.

And p.s. I had to edit some of my edited comments, because they were garbled (and I edited your quoting of them, too, AJ, so things are in better shape). Also, VN, one of your links was broken so I added a different arquivoltas link and it worked fine. Onca again, I was so near yet so far from a real jewel!
 

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AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Past OR future Camino
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
I think, and it is different from what you figured out. I’m not saying that your way won’t work, but this is what I think Alan did. Alan said he stayed on the camino till the dam. And the road to the dam is slightly before point A on my google maps.
I only guessed where @alansykes might have walked, so my tracks most probably aren't where he walked. He did mention the Sil:
then a couple of km down the Sil
hence my staying closer to the river. Looking at the map, I followed trails, rather than roads.

AJ, if you are so inclined, I think that at the end of the thread, it would be great if you could post your proposed short stages in one message.
With a particular slow walker in mind, one that I love dearly, here are the short stages that I have planned for when we will walk the Olvidado. Where there are variants on the Camino, I have included them too. Note that this assumes that there is accommodation where we stop, so obviously if there isn't, for example if casas rurales want 2 nights, then we would change our plans. The usual contingency plans apply, such as getting a ride with a taxi when necessary.

Bilbao to Güeñes, 25.3 km (possibly taking the train to shorten this stage)
Güeñes to Balmaseda, 12 km
Balmaseda to Villasana de Mena, 15.5 km
Villasana de Mena to Villasante, 21 km
Villasante to Espinosa de los Monteros, 7.1 km
Espinosa de los Monteros to Quintanilla del Rebollar, 8.9 km
Quintanilla del Rebollar to Pedrosa de Valdeporres, 15.2 km
Pedrosa de Valdeporres to Cilleruelo de Bezana, 15.6 km
Cilleruelo de Bezana to Llano, 14.6 km
Llano to Reinosa, 19.3 km (this is off Camino, a suggestion from @peregrina2000 )
Reinosa to Olea, 15.8 km
Olea to Nestar, 17.4 km
Nestar to Aguilar de Campoo, 6.9 km
Aguilar de Campoo to Salinas de Pisuerga, 17 km
Salinas de Pisuerga to Cervera de Pisuerga, 11.7 km
Cervera de Pisuerga to Tarilonte 20.2 km

Option 1:
Tarilonte to Guardo, 19.1 km
Guardo to Puente Almuhey, 16.7 km
Option 2:
Tarilonte to Villanueva de Arriba, 11.8 km
Villanueva de Arriba to Velilla del Río Carrión, 12.1 km
Velilla del Río Carrión to Morgovejo, 19.2 km (hoping we can stay at the casa rural)
Morgovejo to Puente Almuhey, 7.7 km

Puente Almuhey to Cistierna, 21.2 km

Option 1:
Cistierna to La Ercina, 11.1 km (via Yugueros)
La Ercina to Boñar, 16.6 km
Option 2:
Cistierna to La Ercina, 13.8 km (via La Serna)
La Ercina to Boñar, 16.6 km

Option 1:
Boñar to Robles de la Valcueva, 19.6 km
Robles de la Valcueva to La Robla, 14 km
La Robla to La Magdalena, 16 km
Option 2:
Boñar to Valdepiélago, 9 km
Valdepiélago to Vegacervera, 18.3 km
Vegacervera to Buiza, 16.1 km
Buiza to Piedrasecha, 20.5 km (to check out the muñecos de piedra ;) )
Piedrasecha to La Magdalena, 7.1 km

La Magdelana to Pandorado, 20 km
Pandorado to Vegarienza, 8.2 km
Vegarienza to Fasgar, 17.9 km
Fasgar to Igüeña, 18.5 km

Option 1:
Igüeña to Labaniego, 18.7 km
Labaniego to Congosto, 18.5 km
Option 2:
Igüeña to Arlanza, 20.5 km
Arlanza to Congosto, 16.7 km
Option 3:
Igüeña to Losada, 23.8 km (will my darling walk those extra km for a delicious plate of roast peppers? ;))
Losada to Congosto, 13.4 km

Congosto to Ponferrada, 14 to 19 km, depending on where you walk

So there you have it, the Olvidado from Bilbao to Ponferrada!
Thank you once again, @peregrina2000 !

¡Buen Camino!
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I only guessed where @alansykes might have walked, so my tracks most probably aren't where he walked. He did mention the Sil ... hence my staying closer to the river. Looking at the map, I followed trails, rather than roads.

Trails rather than roads! Always a much better option. I have now put your track on my wikiloc app for my next Olvidado.

Your list is spectacular, AJ, what a great resource for others. I think you are now Camino- booked through 2026 or 2027, and I dearly hope some day we actually meet on the Camino!

This was fun, what I especially liked was seeing where the detours-in-waiting lie, so that the next time I won’t miss them!
 
Past OR future Camino
Have completed through Agosta
We didn't stay in Balmaseda, but I have heard good things about the Youth Hostel, which seems to be permanently open.
Thanks so much for all this great information. I am planning to start around July 1 2021 and wonder what you think lodging might be like. at least what how it was pre covid...did you have to reserve a night or two before? or just at arrival is fine? Thx
 

dick bird

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Thanks so much for all this great information. I am planning to start around July 1 2021 and wonder what you think lodging might be like. at least what how it was pre covid...did you have to reserve a night or two before? or just at arrival is fine? Thx
You could try reserving to be sure of a bed, but I don't think it will be essential. From memory, there are other places to stay in Balmaseda, it's a middling sized town with plenty of shops, bars etc and I am sure there will be at least one cheap hotel/pension. You should also check that the albergue (i.e. youth hostel, it is not just for camino walkers) is functioning and isn't temporarily closed or restricted numbers as a result of Covid.
 
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peregrina2000

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Thanks so much for all this great information. I am planning to start around July 1 2021 and wonder what you think lodging might be like. at least what how it was pre covid...did you have to reserve a night or two before? or just at arrival is fine? Thx
Here’s a late May update from Ender.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/current-status-on-the-olvidado-—-late-may-2021.70086/

He is on hiatus now and tied up with family things for a few months, but you might get some answers from others on the facebook page.


Good luck and let us know what you find out! Buen camino, Laurie
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Past OR future Camino
yes...
@peregrina2000 and all... Thank you so much for all of this amazing information... My husband retires next year and we are currently making plans to start walking out of Bilbao on the 24 May. We'll meander our way along and join up with the Inveirno to reach Santiago... Your plans and conversations have certainly inspired us ❤️
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
In Labaniego, I assume the acogida de peregrinos would not have cooking facilities, so what ever food we bring should be edible raw and cold?
I have seen that the Ecodomo in Labaniego is encouraging pilgrim business. Looks like a very nice (and quite unusual) option!

469D8B1E-569D-43ED-9263-30E47B0ECFF3.png

AJ, I think we’ve got a pretty good list of alternatives here. Add this to your list!
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Laurie,

The Guggenheim-Bilbao is still a great place to visit. See
https://www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/

And there are many useful tourist services at the Bilbao airport. See below
http://aena.mobi/m/en/bilbao-airport/bilbao.html

Buen camino.
Here is another reason as of July 11, 2021 to visit Bilbao and the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum
 
Last edited:

BombayBill

Still Learning
Past OR future Camino
2021
Trails rather than roads! Always a much better option. I have now put your track on my wikiloc app for my next Olvidado.

Your list is spectacular, AJ, what a great resource for others. I think you are now Camino- booked through 2026 or 2027, and I dearly hope some day we actually meet on the Camino!

This was fun, what I especially liked was seeing where the detours-in-waiting lie, so that the next time I won’t miss them!
Could you tell me the name of the track on Wikiloc? I find their search function difficult.
 
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AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Past OR future Camino
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Could you tell me the name of the track on Wikiloc? I find their search function difficult.
 

RobinK*

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Dear Laurie, and all others adding info to this thread,

I want to thank you so, so much for helping me plan my Camino!
Based on this thread I've made notes (11 pages!) that, together with Ender's guide, will for sure contribute to a wonderful pilgrimage.

This Sunday I will travel to Bilbao. The next day staying there to see the city highlights and then next morning I'll take the early bus to Santander and on to Aguilar de Campoo. From Aguilar my Camino Olvidado really starts. And then from Ponferrada and via the Invierno to Santiago. May Saint James be by my side :)

Best regards to all of you. And a Buen Camino if you're traveling soon.

Robin
 

RobinK*

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
O excuse me, just one (more) question: Are there enough of these little feuntes along the way?
I'm planning on two bottles of water (totall 2 liters) in my pack, which I would like to refill every now and then. It's going to be a warm August walk :)
 

Fred Gaudet

Member
Past OR future Camino
1341
Please post your experiences. I plan to start the Olvidado August 29 from Bilbao.

Have great caminos on your way to Santiago!!!
 

MikeJS

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Francis (2011), Norte (12), VdlP (16). Sureste/Invierno (17). Olvidado/San Salvador/Primitivo (19)
O excuse me, just one (more) question: Are there enough of these little feuntes along the way?
I'm planning on two bottles of water (totall 2 liters) in my pack, which I would like to refill every now and then. It's going to be a warm August walk :)
I did not notice any on my hike but nor was I looking for them. I normally carry 2 litres of water with me and make sure I have a very long drink before I start.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
This Sunday I will travel to Bilbao. The next day staying there to see the city highlights and then next morning I'll take the early bus to Santander and on to Aguilar de Campoo. From Aguilar my Camino Olvidado really starts.
Hi, @RobinK*

How exciting. I don’t know if you typically post “live,” but know that the forum Olvidado groupies would be delighted to read about your camino. It’s an actually spectacular route, especially the part from Aguilar, so you are in for some amazing days. Do you have a sense for what type of accommodation options are available these days? Buen camino, Laurie
 

RobinK*

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Thanks Laurie.

I'm in Bilbao right now. Will be wandering through town tomorrow. See some nice things and have good pintxos. Get me a stamp at the cathedral and relax.

Will let you guys and girls know how things will be along the way. I've got myself a tent also. So no worries about accommodations when not available, although I will use them if feasible.

Keep you posted!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I'm in Bilbao right now. Will be wandering through town tomorrow. See some nice things and have good pintxos.
Oh, what a wonderful memory, of walking through the old town near the cathedral and going into bars with the most amazingly beautiful and delicious pintxos. And then ”having” to do it all again when my walking partner showed up in the pensión and didn’t want to go out alone. So I sacrificed. :p
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Day 8. Aguilar de Campoó to Cervera de Pisuerga (29 km)
Noodling around looking at churches of interest around Aguilar de Campoo today, I found something I'd bookmarked but not read:

So then I got busy on OSMand.
Has anyone tried this (dark blue line) - going around the southern side of the reservoir instead of the regular way?
20210823_144136.jpg
It's only a tad longer (30km) and takes in two beauties:
Ermita de Santa Cecilia de Vallespinoso de Aguilar.
Ermita de Santa Eulalia de Barrio de Santa María.

[The track between the two is along the road only because I couldn't figure out how to change it to go off-asphalt, which would be very easy to do and a tad shorter.]

Thinking you might have the inside scoop, @Rebekah Scott ?
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Romanesque in Palencia is like this great big bag of balloons, just waiting for someone to open up so they float up into our consciousness. Those look very nice.

Both churches seem to be in a very beautiful setting, out in nowhere and probably never open. But I would go for it next time. Para variar, as they say in Spain.

In terms of what you would be missing, there are those anthromorphic tombs right after Corvío which are pretty impressive (but you would have seen some in Ojo Güareña earlier). The river walk from Salinas de Pisuerga is quite nice, but it looks like you would get the second half of that. And you would also join the river before the turnoff for the rock chapel of San Vicente, where there are more anthromorphic tombs!

Salinas is also a place with some services, so you’d miss the one place with bar/store, etc.

Two thumbs up is my rating.

And p.s. I have had some recent WhatsApps with Rosi and she says people are coming back to the Olvidado. Not huge numbers, but things are moving.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
In terms of what you would be missing, there are those anthromorphic tombs right after Corvío which are pretty impressive (but you would have seen some in Ojo Güareña earlier). The river walk from Salinas de Pisuerga is quite nice, but it looks like you would get the second half of that. And you would also join the river before the turnoff for the rock chapel of San Vicente, where there are more anthromorphic tombs!
So good to have a sense of this, Laurie, thanks!
When I do this I will be coming off the Viejo, which has oodles of both anthromorphic tombs and rock chapels, so I'll definitely go South!

I have had some recent WhatsApps with Rosi and she says people are coming back to the Olvidado
Ah, great.
 

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