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Did ANYBODY take crappy equipment

+@^^

Active Member
#1
it seems we all speak about how great MY backpack / MY shoes / MY sleeping bag etc was....
very seldom do we admit to bad equipment or making bad equipment choices
.
so heres your chance......
 

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M

mikevasey

Guest
#2
When i walked my first camino last year,nearly all my clothes were cotton -t-shirts, underwear. There was a lot of chaffing going on.I know better now but at the time i wasnt interested in technical clothing.

On my 2nd camino i took a self powered headlight, I had to use it one evening while we were walking. No matter how much powering up you did, it would die as soon as you stopped. it was supposed to keep its power for at least a minute.

mike
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#3
I took some really awful soap, actually. In an effort to save weight by taking dry soap rather than the liquid stuff, I took the little "soap leaves" that come in packets of 50: worthless. It took at least 3 leaves to generate any lather at all, 5 leaves for a shower. I would have been much better off with one of the little hotel-sized soap bars (I did pick some of these up along the way).

I also took along a write-in-the-rain pen; this worked very well but it had a heavy steel casing. An inexpensive plastic ballpoint pen would have been much better.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#4
There are a lot of crappy bikes out there. I fix a bike every day or so.

My favorite was a bike some Canadian had with cheap spokes which were breaking. I fixed some for him at the place we stayed.

A year later, we met some Canadians who knew those people. One had, in fact, borrowed the same bike. "Did you get a better rear wheel?" I asked. "No, the spokes keep breaking! How did you know?"

Some friend.
 

dutchpilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, 2005, 2008, 2012
#5
Does Seam-Seal count as well?
I was told that it would make the seams of my backpack waterproof.
It didn't. Nothing makes the seams of your backpack waterproof.
Only a rain-cover or a poncho does the job properly.

Ultreya,
Carli Di Bortolo.
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Jul-Aug 05, Frances, Jul-Aug 06, Portugues, Oct 2010
#6
On my first Camino I took along a pedometer that had come as a free gift with a breakfast cereal. At the end of my second day, upon arrival at the albergue in Astorga, I threw it against the wall in a rage when, after a day of battling all the weather the Paramo had to throw at me, and with bleeding blisters, it tried to tell me that I'd only walked 3.5km.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
#7
On my first Camino I took three pairs of walking socks.

I only used 2 pairs for days on end. Wash the ones I was wearing, put on yesterdays washed socks and so on.

Then on the 9th day I had to put on the fresh socks as the other two were still wet.

They did not pass away the moisture. I got a bad blister and in walking to keep the pain down I developed tendonitus. I ended up in casualty in León.

I now test every new pair of socks out on a full days walk before packing them for Spain.

I threw one away and used the other when giving talks about the Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#8
I would rather think of what changes would I make next time. Some of the changes might be because some things might not have been a good choice, or perhaps, might not have been very good equipment for the purpose.

Pack - used a Macpac travel hybrid. It was very robust, with both front panel access as well as top and bottom compartment. It was really good for the couple of weeks in hostels etc in Europe post my Camino in 2010. But for the Camino, it was too heavy. Plan to use either a Kathmandu (65li) or Deuter (55li) on St Olavs Way next year.

Clothing - packed three trousers, shirts as well as two sets of thermals and an extra t-shirt and a pair of shorts. Sent a pair of trousers, shirt and one complete set of thermals to a friend in the UK along with some other stuff at Los Arcos. Clothing then was:

  • Inner layer - thermal long sleeve top, polyprop short sleeve top, quick dry t-shirt, 3x briefs, four x trekking socks, two x liner socks
  • middle layer - two long sleeve shirts - one mainly day use, one for evening, two trousers - similar pattern
  • outer layer - microfleece top, rain jacket, gaiters, rainpants, beanie, waterproof hat, fingerless gloves, glove liners and waterproof gloves

I will need to rethink the issue of thermals for my next trip, as well as what I need for any post walk activities while I am in the UK / Europe.

Trekking poles - started with a pair of Macpac sprung poles. Carbide tip broke on day one and was not carrying a spare. Spring on one pole gave out on way into Ponferrada, and I bought a cheap replacement pair of poles in Villafranca. These lasted about a week, and I replaced them with a pair of Altus poles in Melide. Don't know yet what I will use next time.

Torches - packed a 2xAA maglite as well as a small headtorch and a little Kathmandu red light that I attach to my pack. The big maglite was put in the post. I will be looking at a replacement for the headtorch, only because there are some brighter ones around today to replace my 2004 model.

Plate, cup, knife, fork and spoon - kept the cup, but the remainder were put in the post. Just not necessary for the Camino. Looks like they will be needed for St Olavs Way.

Guidebook, phrasebook - I started with two guidebooks, both a French and Spanish phrasebook and a Spanish dictionary. Kept one guidebook (Brierley) and the Lonely Planet Spanish phrasebook.

First Aid Kit - didn't change this, but major demand was on blister patches, but would be reluctanct to not have analgesics, re-hydration powders and some other bits and pieces which didn't get used. Don't quite know what the right balance between weight and insurance might be. I think I could reduce the weight somewhat, but the problem with getting old is that one needs to take one's regular medications as well as feel safe.

DougF
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
#9
Doug, I am planning a VERY long walk in 2015 (providing I don't need a hip replacement!!!!!), part of which includes the St Olav's Way there and back. For this trip (I am aiming to do around 7-8,000kms over a 12 month period and end up in SDC - I will get a WBA pack from One Planet. I cannot sing the praises of One Planet harnesses too much. In my opinion, and I realise there are many opinions out there, the One Planet harness is superior to any thing that I have used before. I have used an Aarn (wonderful pack) and a Macpac to name a few, but the heavy One Planet travel pack that I carried on my first camino was so easy to carry because of the superior harness. The WBA (weighs .....all!) is a heavy pack, compared to others, but is strong and simple and most importantly comes with their wonderful harness system. They now make it with two pockets on the waist band to easily access water bottles. Bushwalkers I know swear by the harness on these packs. I think from memory you are in Canberra - One Planet is an Australian made pack and I think is based in Melbourne.

You might like to look at Pacer Poles too. They are avaiable with (I think) free post from their website in England. Backpacking light in Melbourne used to sell them but I don't think they do anymore as it is easier to just buy them direct.

I use the tiny little Petzl light that only weighs 27grams. So far I have used it on 2 (long) Caminos and have not yet replaced the battery. I also use the red Kathmandu light - particularly when not wanting to disturb people in the albergues either in the morning or during the night.

Cheers, Janet
 

Beverley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2009, Camino Portuguese 2010, Del Norte 2011, Pamplona to Burgos and Santiago to Finnesterra 2012
#10
YES! On my first Camino my back pack was c--- :!: I didn't know enough about shopping for one and I let the sales people talk me into one that didn't fit. I had to use bungie cords attached to the back at the neck, bring them over my shoulders and attach them to a spot lower donw on the front strap so that the bad stayed high enough on my back to be comfortable. It was a pain. One suggestion for small items is try to get a light with a neck string or of course one that goes on your head. Same goes for your Swiss Army knife (or whatever brand you take) Lihgts and knives are left behind almost every day unintentially of course because they are not attached to the body and we can be forgetful creatures where there is a trail to walk 8)
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
#12
I took lots of crappy items, too many Kg :( I spent many $ on postage and also donated much at various alburgue along the way, things like heavy guide books, solar battery charger, gas cooker etc.

But the best thing I took was my crocs! ! They weighed almost nothing, were heaven to wear after a days walking, could wear in the shower, my feet got lots of air:) and I could hang them outside my pack for easy access when I arrived at the hostel off with boots on with crocs!!! Best little luxury on my camino

Frank :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
#13
On my first camino, I carried a summerdress all the way to Santiago, but when I got there, the weather was rainy and too cold (in june) for wearing a dress
Sympathies. In june 1998 I arrived in Santiago dressed for a winter's day here in England.

Before I started my dream was to arrive at the Cathedral in T shirt and shorts.

I didn't know that then that there are lies, damn lies, and My Fair Lady. The rain in Spain falls in Galicia.

We are both now much wiser. :roll:
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#14
methodist.pilgrim.98 said:
I didn't know that then that there are lies, damn lies, and My Fair Lady. The rain in Spain falls in Galicia.
:lol: This has made me chortle over this side of the world. i think it is hands down one of the funniest things I have read on the forum. :lol:
Thanks.
Margaret

PS By the way, I arrived in Santiago at the beginning of July 2008- not long after you. It still wasn't too warm, though I made sure I had my photo taken in front of the Cathedral in a t-shirt.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
#15
Margaret,

Thank you.

I don't want to be accused of getting off topic, but it was while watching My Fair Lady on DVD that I remembered my experiences of walking the blistering hot meseta and arriving in Santiago and realized that I'd been lied to. :shock:

Still, the rain in Spain falls mainly on Galicia doesn't have quite the same zip about it, does it?

philip
 

andy.d

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Levante 2009
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2011
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2014
Pilgrims Way Winchester - Canterbury
Camino Ingles (Ferrol) 2015
Cistercian Way (Wales) 2016
#16
Walking through the utter flatness of La Mancha, being able to see at least four different rainstorms falling on different places at once (including the one that was heading quickly towards me) and seeing what looked very like a tornado in the distance (not coming near me)

Andy
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#17
dougfitz said:
I would rather think of what changes would I make next time. .........

I will need to rethink the issue of thermals for my next trip, as well as what I need for any post walk activities while I am in the UK / Europe. ...........

DougF
We avoided the usual Merino wool type of thermals and use Trekmate Vapourtec longjohns - 120gms. They also do long sleeved T shirts - 120gms. Great as they are quick drying, can double up as nightwear and are not expensive.

Only bad thing we took was a fold up shopping bag. It was badly stitched and needed knots in the handles to carry it without it hitting the ground or coming apart.
Tia Valeria
 
#18
I am King of crappy equipment.
1. Heavy Rucksack 65L(over 2kg)
2. Small Acer netbook and charger(1.5kg)
3. 4 cotton tee shirts ( took 2 days to dry)
4. 4 pairs of Walking socks that also took too long to dry
5. Headset for Skyping
6. Bladder and water bottles (bladder weighed over 2kg when full plus another 1 kg for water bottle
7.Tweight carried 12kg minimum before water and food which for a 70 year old was too much. :roll:
I woner why I had to be airlifted hom with a hernieated disk and ended up having an operation on my spine?
see my blog
http://www.caminodonalcorcoran.blogspot .com
and learn.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
#19
I brought a pair of chintzy gaiters that I got rid of quite quickly. My boots were also too heavy, and I ended up replacing them with a light Spanish pair in Logrono. I had a non-breathable rain jacket that I left in SJPP because it was like a portable sauna. And my neck wallet ended up being a sweat-soaked pain in the...well, you get the idea.

I also had way too much stuff at the beginning of my trek - not necessarily crappy equipment, but things I didn't need (including a pair of travel jeans, a bivvy sack, and a shoulder/chest bag). I ended up either shipping these items to Santiago, leaving them at an albergue for someone else, or discarding them. :arrow:
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#20
I'm with you on the 'too much stuff' thing vinotinto. But you learned from your mistake, took breath and carried on. I remembered your account and was inspired by it when I found that I too had started with too much stuff...
Margaret
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#21
Maybe it is because I tend to do my pilgriming in Spring, or maybe because I tend to look in those "lost and found" boxes, but one of the things that seems abandoned most is bad gaiters. If you are traveling in muddy or snowy weather, they are great.. when they work. But a crappy pair is a headache and a burden.

If you are doing gaiters, invest in a good pair. And if you decide against carrying ANYthing crap any more, PLEASE thow it away in a proper waste bin. There are plenty enough "scenic" pairs of bottomed-out boots and busted bladders already draped along the Camino.

You carried it all the way here. You can carry it to the next bin.
We don´t need to see your waste, thanks.
Reb.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#22
jl said:
snip
I will get a WBA pack from One Planet.

snip
You might like to look at Pacer Poles too.
Visited Snowgum here in Canberra today. They carry One Planet, but didn't have the WBA.

Also looked up the Pace Poles website, but for the moment will stay with either my Leki Enzian (unsprung) or Komperdell Basics AS.

Thanks for the suggestions.

Doug
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo (April/May) 2009: Norte/Primitivo (parts) (April/May) 2010: Inglés (May) 2011: Primitivo (April/May) 2012: Norte / Camino de La Reina (April/May) 2013: Camino del Mar / Inglés (May/June) 2015
#23
vinotinto said:
I also had way too much stuff at the beginning of my trek :
Found a way to get my pack weight down to reasonable level - 250 gr!! :lol:

The link is here - http://songs-with-music.freeservers.com/woad.html

Sorry - I have to let off steam sometimes, otherwise I would go bananas struggling with a packing list.

Blessings on your laughter
Tio Tel
 
#24
dougfitz said:
Torches - packed a 2xAA maglite as well as a small headtorch and a little Kathmandu red light that I attach to my pack. The big maglite was put in the post. I will be looking at a replacement for the headtorch, only because there are some brighter ones around today to replace my 2004 model.

Yes, i definitely agree: three torches are a minimum :))
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
#25
+@^^ said:
it seems we all speak about how great MY backpack / MY shoes / MY sleeping bag etc was....
very seldom do we admit to bad equipment or making bad equipment choices
.
so heres your chance......
...& after 3 months what was on you list sir :?:

Pegs or saftey pins, we did use the but we could have :D
I probably shouldn't have taken my 15yr old jacket, but I liked it & still do! its very light lets rain in & out :lol:
 

Chacharm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Frances (2012) Vie Del Norte (2015) Via Frances (2016) Le Puy (2017)
#27
My raincoat was crappy. It was a H2No thing that MANY people also had on. I chose a neon orange color because I was concerned about being seen in grey light. I was seen all right - every day for three straight weeks. I hate that jacket so much! It had other problems too. No breast pocket. Your pack belt will close on any hip pockets so that they're inaccessible. Make sure you have a jacket with pockets you can get to.
My pack was also way too large. I just couldn't bring myself to go all the way to Spain for two months and not take ANYTHING. It goes against every over-packing tendency I have...and I paid a price for it. I threw away my pillow the first night. My 40$ tech pillow. It wasn't heavy but it took up too much room.
I never used my head lamp that cost 80$ and I never used my cup or my spork.
I thought leggings were going to be so perfect but they don't work for walking in the rain and they were pretty heavy.
 

rubyslippers

Ruby Slippers
Camino(s) past & future
April-May (2008) September (2012)
#28
Chacharm said:
My raincoat was crappy. It was a H2No thing that MANY people also had on. I chose a neon orange color because I was concerned about being seen in grey light. I was seen all right - every day for three straight weeks. I hate that jacket so much! It had other problems too. No breast pocket. Your pack belt will close on any hip pockets so that they're inaccessible. Make sure you have a jacket with pockets you can get to.
My pack was also way too large. I just couldn't bring myself to go all the way to Spain for two months and not take ANYTHING. It goes against every over-packing tendency I have...and I paid a price for it. I threw away my pillow the first night. My 40$ tech pillow. It wasn't heavy but it took up too much room.
I never used my head lamp that cost 80$ and I never used my cup or my spork.
I thought leggings were going to be so perfect but they don't work for walking in the rain and they were pretty heavy.
I'm sorry you struggled a little, but I think that a yoga pant is perfect if it is synthetic and light. They don't ride up or cause chafing from the seams. In the heat I would think a bike short would be best. I saw one lady from Europe who hikes ALL THE TIME and she had two items for the lower part of her body. A stretch pant and a stretch short. They washed and dripped dry while I was still struggling to get my zip off pant/short items put back together. Also the waist band of anything that zips is a pain to deal with. Also I sent back my headlamp and then stayed in an albergue that had NO electricity and needed it. Also needed it for the morning I hiked to see the sun come up with all the wonderful Germans who started early. I didn't want to have to hold a flashlight in my hand always either. thanks for your post. I am going this time in September. Last time it was Spring.
 

rubyslippers

Ruby Slippers
Camino(s) past & future
April-May (2008) September (2012)
#29
I'm sitting (literally) at home laughing my head off at all of the postings! Thanks you everyone. I'm hoping that my back (in healing mode) lets me do the Camino in Sept.

I too had some crappy stuff packed! Since I'm a flight attendant and travel on a stand by basis I had to be dressed in a First Class style to go to spain and come back home! This is a problem as I didn't Need ANY of those items for the Camino, but couldn't send it home.

THIS year I'm making sure that I have some "Travel Wear" in Black. Probably tunic pants and top which scrunch up and are light weight. I'm also taking Crocks this year for the same reason mentioned above. Light weight-OK in the wet and can wear socks with them if you have some blisters to heal and keep clean.

Also someone mentioned a shopping bag that fell apart. On a previous Camino, I traveled briefly with a girl from Barcelona. She carried a fold up (stuffable) back pack. Everywhere we went she would pull it out and used it for groceries and her valuables and still had her hands free! It was made of nylon so it's very strong and light weight. I've gotten myself one now and it clips onto the back pack. Mine was from Eastern Mountain Sports, but REI has them too.

I also made the mistake of taking soap. Never again. Use the same soap for washing body, hair and clothes. Everything in the stores along the way come in huge bottles though so I found myself buying Tide or something and then leaving it at the Albergue if it was more than I could take with me. I'm taking a small container and will buy soap when I get there.

I had a crappy rain coat that didn't breath and had no breast pocket. Need to pick up a better one. Any suggestions will be appreciated.
 

pwestcot

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
#30
@DougF,
your packing included "four x trekking socks, two x liner socks".
Why 4 heavy socks and 2 thin ones?
I am interested in your reasoning/experience - my first thought would have been to pack the opposite combination.
Regards, Peter
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
#31
I took a pair of waterproof overpants, they kept all the rain out, and all the perspiration/condensation in, end result when I took off the overpants my hiking trousers were wetter than ever, Crappy equipment for sure, next Camino poncho and gaiters:)
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#33
yeah my body :roll: :wink:
Then why did you follow the Appalachian Trail through-hikers on the Dragonte path???

:D :D

You are still my hero for doing it...

Happy New Year.
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
#34
falcon269 said:
yeah my body :roll: :wink:
Then why did you follow the Appalachian Trail through-hikers on the Dragonte path???

:D :D

You are still my hero for doing it...

Happy New Year.
& you're my hero for being knowledgeable ("falcon269") Tom,
& because I wanted too & it was old Camino & that doesn't exist anywhere else :D.

Happy New Year :lol: 2013
David
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#35
I took a crappy rain jacket that cost me £10 at a discount store. No 'The North Face' trendy jackets for me. It did the job when Galicia delivered a 4 day monsoon in October though, so I'm laughing. :lol: Buen Camino!
 

Cejanus

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJDP - Santiago April "2013"; European Peace Walk"2015"; VIa de la Plata "2016"
#37
I read somewhere that it was a requirement to wear a high visibility vest when walking on a road in Spain. It was my last purchase before I left and it was the first thing I ditched on day two.
 

reg2450

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March 2013
#38
My daughter's Kathmandu Nowaki Women's Backpack. Crap. I thought it was just her, as I would carry it on front of me on days she just wasn't up to it, but when I carried it on my back I understood her discomfort. My pack was fantastic (Votai) and I will marry it when that sort of thing is legal, but hers was a shocker. We bought a local Deuter backpack for her along the way (YOU CAN BUY EVERYTHING OVER THERE CHEAPER THAN IN AUSTRALIA), and she hopped and danced and skipped all the way to Santiago with exactly the same stuff in it - just a much better designed bag.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (15 April 2013)
Camino Portuguese (1 May 2014)
Camino Mozárabe from Málaga (8 April 2015)
Camino del Norte & Camino Ingles (April 2016)
#39
I read somewhere that it was a requirement to wear a high visibility vest when walking on a road in Spain. It was my last purchase before I left and it was the first thing I ditched on day two.
Yes, I did exactly the same. I bought an extra large vest and cut into four pices so that my daughter and I could share it using safety pins. It got dumped halfway through day two!
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Dieppe, FR Bici CF.
2014 Ruta Vasco/CF/Primativo
#41
Does Seam-Seal count as well?
I was told that it would make the seams of my backpack waterproof.
It didn't. Nothing makes the seams of your backpack waterproof.
Only a rain-cover or a poncho does the job properly.

Ultreya,
Carli Di Bortolo.
Seam seal is for the seams on things like tents. It works really well for that because the fabric used in making most tents nowadays is water proof. Packs are not made of waterproof material. It would be a crooked manufacturer indeed who tried to tell you otherwise.
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
#42
Good reaction on a 3 year old post :D

Cheers? ;)
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
#43
In my first Camino I checked and re-checked carefully all my equipment, but I never examined my old sleeping bag, a veteran of many expeditions. Almost as an afterthought, some hours before leaving to the airport, I tried it and well, it had a zipper malfunction. So, I run to the nearer supermarket and bought another, the kind that schoolboys bring to summer camps. It was large, shapeless, but actually served me well. Only crappy thing: everybody looked at my backpack and immediately told me "you are carrying too much":rolleyes:
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Dieppe, FR Bici CF.
2014 Ruta Vasco/CF/Primativo
#44
Really the best way to waterproof a pack is to waterproof the stuff INSIDE the pack. Put the stuff you want to keep dry into a heavy weight trash bag, squeeze the air out and twist it closed. Put that inside the pack. I wouldn't trust a pack cover to some of the weather I've encountered. I've done all kinds of dumb stuff over the years. One of my first jobs as a guide had us using a construction pack. That's a pack made from a heavy weight poncho, 20 feet of parachute cord and detachable ALICE (that's US military for All purpose Lightweight Carrying Equipment) straps. We rolled our minimalist crap into the sleeping bag and then rolled that into the poncho (doubled as a shelter) tying it up nice and neat. I used a fanny pack to help hold it up off my shoulders. I carried 30 pounds in one of those. I tried finding an image to post but can't so use your imagination.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#46
My daughter's Kathmandu Nowaki Women's Backpack. Crap. I thought it was just her, as I would carry it on front of me on days she just wasn't up to it, but when I carried it on my back I understood her discomfort. My pack was fantastic (Votai) and I will marry it when that sort of thing is legal, but hers was a shocker. We bought a local Deuter backpack for her along the way (YOU CAN BUY EVERYTHING OVER THERE CHEAPER THAN IN AUSTRALIA), and she hopped and danced and skipped all the way to Santiago with exactly the same stuff in it - just a much better designed bag.
Here here, I agree. Good gear in Pamplona, Burgos and Leon.

Here's my list, not "crap" gear, but just a mistake, taken on our first Camino.

My husband's Kathmandu pack and my Paddy Pallin pack. I posted mine on from Leon and bought a lightweight local pack for peanuts. Both the original packs have been in a wardrobe since. Both still look pretty much as new. Anyone want them?

Boots. His were Goretex lined from Kathmandu. Mine were top of the line Scarpa, fitted by an "expert". Indestructible. I hated mine with a passion that makes the Middle East conflict look friendly. It slowly dawned on my husband that his were actually the cause of his blisters. Both now in landfill.

Full-on -7 degree sleeping bags. Way overkill.

Heavy 3 layer Goretex jackets. My husband likes his for skiing, and during torrential downpours to unclog the storm water drain.
 

rubyslippers

Ruby Slippers
Camino(s) past & future
April-May (2008) September (2012)
#47
Here here, I agree. Good gear in Pamplona, Burgos and Leon.

Here's my list, not "crap" gear, but just a mistake, taken on our first Camino.

My husband's Kathmandu pack and my Paddy Pallin pack. I posted mine on from Leon and bought a lightweight local pack for peanuts. Both the original packs have been in a wardrobe since. Both still look pretty much as new. Anyone want them?

Boots. His were Goretex lined from Kathmandu. Mine were top of the line Scarpa, fitted by an "expert". Indestructible. I hated mine with a passion that makes the Middle East conflict look friendly. It slowly dawned on my husband that his were actually the cause of his blisters. Both now in landfill.

Full-on -7 degree sleeping bags. Way overkill.

Heavy 3 layer Goretex jackets. My husband likes his for skiing, and during torrential downpours to unclog the storm water drain.
I agree with the comments on the "Gortex" as they chew feet up. Never needed a sleeping bag as I hiked in May and used a silk liner like they sell in the SkyMall magazine. Got it in Large. It covered the mattress and the pillow. A space blanket to add if it was a cold building. Less is more, less is more, less is more. Clips for your bag and clothes pins for your laundry are a must and don't take up much room.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (15 April 2013)
Camino Portuguese (1 May 2014)
Camino Mozárabe from Málaga (8 April 2015)
Camino del Norte & Camino Ingles (April 2016)
#48
I took a mifi gadget that I had checked was functioning at home with my spanish sim. Arrived in Lisbon and purchased a Portuguese sim and set it up to work fine, but the minute I left Lisbon it never worked again - even when I crossed the border into Spain and put in my spanish card again - zilch! Luckily it is tiny and weighs practically nothing.

Oh, and a very cheap wind-up torch. I had to wind it like a demented woman for ages in order to get a nano-second of light. Luckily my phone supplied all the light I needed.

And of course the eye liner and lippy that also accompanied me on my camino Frances last year, and never got used then either. But a girl just has to be prepared!
 
Camino(s) past & future
June (2015) & June/July (2018)
#49
it seems we all speak about how great MY backpack / MY shoes / MY sleeping bag etc was....
very seldom do we admit to bad equipment or making bad equipment choices
.
so heres your chance......
Yes, I used some thick wool socks during June. Don't ask. Got blister from hot and wet feet on day two or three and had them still when I walked into Santiago. Other pilgrims, by about day 25 would try to casually snap photos of my feet in the alburge while I had them propped up and airing. I have scars on my feet from the blisters.

Bought some replacement walking sandals, which were awesome, about on day 10. Can't be certain but about 100 miles from Santiago I got a new pain. Turns out it was a broken foot, possibly brought on by the sandals during to the lack of support.
 

Kiwi-d

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sep/Oct 2014
#52
1. An expensive torch that promptly fell to bits. Luckily I also had a $2 key-ring torch from a China shop, which projected a far better light than my American walking companion's very expensive headlamp.
2. Knickers. As I lost weight they crept up to places I don't want to remember! I ended up buying a couple of pairs of mens' underwear that were perfect as they had longer legs.
3. Thick merino socks which I promptly gave away as my feet sweated so much. Perfect if you wanted blisters! Luckily I also had a couple of pairs of Nike Dri-Fit socks that were excellent.
4. A pile of junk that I couldn't bear to part with, "just in case". Of course it all ended up getting mailed ahead.
 

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