• This section is a collection of FAQs on the Camino. No new questions can be posted here, but questions that are asked often will be move here by a moderator.
  • Missing the daily forum e-mail? Subscribe again.
  • Order your 2019 Camino Guide now.
    (6 2019 guides now shipping)
A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement


2019 Camino Guides

Do albergues refuse the pilgrims who don't carry their packs

#1
I have read in some blogs that entry to some albergues might be refused if they don't carry their bags and use a "vehicle support service" such as a taxi to bring backsacks. My girlfriends and I are going to do the Camino next spring for a friend's 50th birthday and we are split about how to go -- backpacks or no backpacks -- although we want to stay in the albergues.

I would like to travel light (this is not my first canoe trip) and not overpack the backpack, carry our own backpacks and just stay in the albergues. I have some experience backpacking in the Costa Rican rainforest (Osa Peninsula) and we carried everything we needed for 3 days and managed just fine.

Is there a list of albergues that will or won't accept pilgrims who use vehicle support?

Thanks,

I hope the answer is that we must carry our packs and not be reliant on taxis.;)
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#2
Hi Anna,

I never saw a pilgrim turned away for not having a pack...the key to entrance being your pilgrim passport. A municipal albergue may require a sello from the previous night's stay to gain entrance though private albergues (Red Albergue members come to mind) seem to want a full house regardless of how you arrive.

Buen "walking with my pack" Camino

Arn
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#3
You might find the albergue accepts you, but the inhabitants don't! Sounds like you can carry it just fine, and that would make life much simpler.

Incidentally, I know quite a few people in your age group,(I'm one of them) who would much rather spend their budget on staying somewhere other than the albergues, even if it required carrying their own packs. If you have the money for taxis and bag shuttles you might think about whether that would be better spent on private bathrooms and quiet nights.

Others, of all ages, consider the albergues, the international comeraderie in them, to be the highlight of the trip. If you fall into that group, go for the albergues, but I think you'll mingle much more easily if you are carrying your own pack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#4
newfydog said:
You might find the albergue accepts you, but the inhabitants don't!
I was never of a mind NOT to talk to someone on the camino on the basis of whether or not they carried their big pack.That said, I didn't think I had much in common with those who had their pack sent ahead.

I certainly wouldn't have sought them out of an evening, which is rather ironic, given that I am about to embark on the second Camino Salvado, where everyone's big packs will be sent ahead.



Regards
 
#5
I only know of one the Rufugio Gaucelmo in Rabanal run by the Confraternity of Saint James,they don't allow packs to be dropped off or picked up,they have a huge garden but also don't allow the use of mobile phones,but they do do English afternoon tea's and is a great place to stay.
I only sent my pack ahead once and still feel the shame :oops:
Ian
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#7
You are right Ian, to say that the Refugio Guacelmo doesn't accept pilgrims who have had their pack transported for them. Actually these packs are delivered to another Albergue in Rabanal where the Pilgrim's have to go and collect - and I guess, usually stay there. Regarding the use of mobile phones in the field on the property, I wasn't aware of this rule and I was hospitalero there for 18 days! Yes, they do serve you a nice English cup of tea and biscuits!
That said, there can be many reasons why a pilgrim might send his pack ahead by a transport system: an on-going physical disability, injury while on the Camino, feeling ill that day, age, pregnancy (yes, there are some pregnant women walking the Camino), plus of course, the ones who simply want to make the Camino an easy hike! Most of the reasons are difficult to understand when a pilgrim having already walked hundreds of kms, carrying his burden on his back, is overtook by a couple or more walkers rapidly striding out, eager to reach their destination of the day asap! It's difficult to judge.
Then there are the group who arrive by bus, get dropped off a couple of kms before the village, take up their pack, walk into the village, have a refreshment and then give up their pack to be delivered further ahead. I have witnessed this once in Hornillos.
Personally, like you Ian, I would feel guilty to send my pack ahead - unless for some serious phhysical disability. I consider that my pack is part of me and part of MY camino. Anne
 
#8
On the subject of the need to carry your own pack.
from maricristina
I am aware that I am asking for a shower of "holier than thou" comments from those who disagree however I am old enough to think my opinion is valid. (Anyway who is NOT holier than me? Answers on a postage stamp please.)
When working as hospitaliera in Miraz (a CSJ refuge) I require three things; the pilgrim should have walked, cycled or ridden, have a pilgrim passport and be carrying their own pack. (O.K. maybe the horse or bike carried it!) In such refuges, provided by charities, the workers are there at their own expense to assist pilgrims and for this they ask for a donation. When I do this I regard it as "putting something back" because I received such charity and am grateful for having been so blessed. Sometimes of course there are special circumstances!!
Refuges which require payment may make their own rules. It does not follow that I am deciding who is a "real pilgrim", whatever that is, because I do not know who is and who isn't.
P.S. Like annakappa the alleged rule banning mobiles is news to me but one cannot get a signal in Miraz!
 
#9
Hello Maricristina,

Did you actually turn people away who did not carry their packs? I agree with you that the pack should be carried, but we are going to have a mixed group with some carrying (ME!) and some not.

It's too easy for the tour groups and such to take over and sanitize the whole experience.

Anna K
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
#10
Going back to the original question in the subject line:

What the albergue considers as "it's" rules are those we must honor if we wish to stay there. Therefore, postings which discuss specifics on albergues and their rules should be researched before one begins trekking along the Way.

What we decide is the proper weight for our pack is our personal decision, be it as little as a plastic bag holding a tooth brush and our pilgrim's passport, or a mountaineering pack with everything we think we might need.

As many veteran and new Forum members will find...while it's our Camino...only the Camino knows what that will entail.

Buen "now where did I put that cast iron skillet" Camino
Arn
 

CaminoGen

CF May-June 2011; Oloron to Fisterra Sept-Oct 2013
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances-SJPP. Santiago (2011); Oloron to Fisterra (Sept 5-Oct 23 2013)
#11
They don't (I haven't seen anyone turned away even when the albergue had a rule about it) but they should at least check them in after pilgrims who have walked with their pack. People not carrying pack usually arrive sooner than the people carrying packs whatever level of fitness.
 

Alan Pearce

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aragones 2008, del Norte 2009, VdlP 2011, Ingles 2014, Camino de Madri 2015, Frances 2017
#12
I stayed in 2008 in a little 18 bed albergue in the centre of Burgos, with the ceiling of a church being the floor of the albergue. The only reason we were able to stay there was because the large group that had arrived before us admitted to the hospitalero that they had bussed the 80 km from their previous nights albergue on to Burgos. He refused them admittance and let our group in instead.. There is a tale of the same hospitalero, who refused to accept luggage sent forward in a taxi by a group of German women, and when the women arrived, they were faced with the daunting task of trying to find the taxi and retreive their belongings.

Alan

Be brave. Life is joyous.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#13
One day, while I was on duty, a young girl arrived, checked in and then told me that her friend would be coming along later. She had his Pilgrim's credential. Some time later, the young man arrived, dressed in a smart shirt, clean trousers and mocassins on his feet! The girl then gave him his brand new credential and then it turned out that they even wanted a separate room! (we didn't have any), but by that time, maybe a bit late, I had "smelt a rat"!!! Anyway I told him that I couldn't accept him as he "wasn't a real bona-fide Pilgrim"! At that point, they went off to find alternative accommodation and when the girl came back to retreive her things, she told me in no uncertain terms that she was very offended that I had described her friend as not a real Pilgrim! Judge for yourself. Note: the albergue in question worked on a donation system and that night we had full house. Anne
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#15
I am a hospitalera too, and the quick answer to your question is: It depends.
Is the albergue really busy? Is the pack being sent ahead because someone is unwell or handicapped? What is the weather like?

If the place is only half-full, the rules are more flexible. If it´s a packed house and there are lots of sick and afflicted people coming in, the people carrying their own bags will go in first. It´s only fair. Usually when the taxi or bag-delivery guy arrives with a bunch of packs I put them to one side. They do not get any priority if a line forms outside -- unless the albergue is private and you have a reservation, sending your bag ahead does not guarantee you a bed, or a reserved spot in the line!

Some places I have served, like Miraz and Rabanal, have no written rules about carrying your own pack, but will refuse groups of more than 5 or 6 people.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
#16
Several topics have touched on the edge of the reason why those who carry packs may not be well disposed to non-carriers.

When the albergues are full it is galling beyond belief to arrive at a refugio and find that those who did not carry their pack have arrived ahead of you becaus without weight they have been able to walk much faster.

Those who travel by bus also are getting the advantage of staying in the municipal or church albergue ahead of those who walked with a pack. As these are often cheaper than private albergues then the backpacker is not only scratching around for a bed, they are paying more for it as well.

I have no problem with the injured, the handicapped and the plain worn out having their bags moved on, but some of the people I have met do not fall into that group.

In 2004 I arrived at Mansilla del Mulas to see people in the courtyard who had "jumped" by transport sitting enjoying the sun while I was turned away. As far as I was aware they were not injured and they had carried their packs on earlier stages. I met this with a shrug but a Canadian perigrina who arrived at the same time as me went ballistic. We had to share a room over a cafe at twice the price of the albergue. If I had been solo it would have been four times the albergue fee.

The volunteer warden said, "We are not the police." And I understood the dilema they were in.

anna, at the age of 52 I carried my backpack the 170km of the Camino Inglés + Muxia with a blocked artery, which I didn't know about. So no excuses, eh. :wink:

Unless you are injured, elderly or handicapped I would say to you, carry your backback; don't despise those whom you meet who don't, but remember that when you have dark thoughts about them taking "your bed" that in the end you have been true to yourself.

I "heard" your final line. Buen Camino.
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(10,11,17), Vasco(12), Salvador(13), Primitivo(13), Norte(14), Madrid (16), Mozarabe (18)
#17
AnnaCamino:

I have walked and carried my pack every step of The Way. That said, I feel no ill will towards others who may have sent their pack ahead or traveled by other means for a day or two. They are doing the Camino their way and should be considered, imo, like any other Peregrino to a bed. Most of the people I saw/met along the way who sent their pack ahead walked with day packs. They were usually much slower than others and could not manage the entire weight and walk.

I do not believe Albergues in the old days prioritized or discriminated between Pilgrims who came on horseback/mule or had a horse/mule drawn cart to carry their belongings versus those who walked. On the other hand, I would not be against prioritization rules as long as they were published or known versus Hospitalero's subjectively making that decision.

Bottom line here is everything I have said is my opinion. You have asked a question to drive a decision between you and your friends. I go back to my original post advice here. This is your Camino and you should do it your way.

Ultreya,
Joe
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(10,11,17), Vasco(12), Salvador(13), Primitivo(13), Norte(14), Madrid (16), Mozarabe (18)
#19
I agree "entitled" is the wrong word and have edited my comment.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#20
I agree it is "your" Camino and you have the right to have your bags carried for you, knowing that you may be turned away because of it.

I also feel that a private albergue has the right to serve pilgrims who have walked and carried their packs FIRST. If, after those weary pilgrims have been given beds, there are beds left, then the bicigrinos and taxigrinos and busigrinos should be served. But that's my personal feeling.

If an albergue refuses you because you taxi in or bus in or have your pack carried, then "your" Camino means finding alternative lodging. :lol:
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#21
Anniesantiago said:
If, after those weary pilgrims have been given beds, there are beds left, then the bicigrinos and taxigrinos and busigrinos should be served. But that's my personal feeling.
:

Do you have a hierachy of worthiness? Apparently a person on a bike is lower than a walker. Do they rank above a busigrino? Are private taxigrinos the least holy of all pilgrims?
 
#22
I think that this makes the most sense (Let the walkers who carry their packs bed down first) but it is up to the hospitaleros. I know that the hospitaleros do get training.

It would be a shame if tour companies take over and push the walkers --peregrinos --who carry their packs out of the way.

Buen camino to all!

Anna
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#23
newfydog said:
Do you have a hierachy of worthiness? Apparently a person on a bike is lower than a walker. Do they rank above a busigrino? Are private taxigrinos the least holy of all pilgrims?
Nope, I said nothing about worthiness or holiness.
I spoke of "weariness."
And perhaps for me, it's more of a matter of "fairness."

That's all.
There's nothing more to it than that. :)
 
#24
I, personally, don't think anyone should be discriminated against for "not carrying a backpack". I think everyone does the Camino "their own way" - the best way they can. In my opinion, as long as they walk, bike, ride a horse or even use a pogo stick .... they are all pilgrims. Clothing should not matter either. I've seen people wearing ALL KINDS of things on the Camino - some nice, neat and clean looking -- others filthy. If there is real proof that the people are not abiding by the "essence of the Camino" and are "cheating" then that's another story. I don't carry a backpack (my poor hubby is stuck carrying everything) because I can't. I have Fibromyalgia and can't carry any weight over two lbs. or so. I look healthy. Anyone looking at me would ask - why is she so lazy that she makes him carry it all? Just like my case, I am sure there are many, many more. So, I say live and let live... we all need to be tolerant and non-judgmental. Again, if someone steps off the bus in front of the albergue in a business suit -- then there's room to make a judgment. I don't mean to put anyone down here, just to bring up the fact that there are many reasons people don't carry packs and we need to withhold from making quick judgments.
 
#25
I have read quite a few books written by former pilgrims where judgment is cast on people who decide not to carry their full backpack. I personally think that no one should be judged for the way they choose to do their own pilgrimage.
Originally, in medieval days, pilgrims carried a scrip, which was a small leather satchel symbolising the poverty of the pilgrim, and it was certainly not something that weighed them down at all. They carried very little with them and most of them wouldn't have a change of clothes, toiletries etc, let alone a sleeping bag, ground sheet etc. The large backpacks that are used today are certainly not in keeping with the traditional pilgrimage.
Pilgrimages are done for many different reasons, such as seeking a cure for an illness, looking for personal peace and solace, as an act of thanksgiving or atonement, etc. What each person gains from their journey depends very much on their own personality and circumstances.
For me personally any pilgrimage I do is for religious reasons and I find it much easier to pray and meditate daily without the constant battle of carrying a backpack. It is a time for me to be close to nature and close to God and if that means sending on my backpack, and just using a daypack, then so be it.
Why, when a pilgrimage is such a personal journey, would it matter to anyone how other people are choosing to do their pilgrimage, unless it impacts on you directly. Is criticising other people really what the spirit of being a pilgrim is all about?
 
#26
Thank you Colleen for your thoughtful response. Likewise for me, pilgrimage is an intensely personal and spiritual experience and I don't pay much attention to the ways in which fellow pilgrims choose to go along the way. In the albergues, I try to fit in, be as unobtrusive as possible, clean up after myself, put away some dishes or perform some other kitchen chores, and engage in conversation if opportunity to do so arises.

I came back from another wonderful pilgrimage a couple of months ago. I did encounter a few people (very few) who seemed to think we should all subscribe to some unwritten code of pilgrim conduct and they seem a little judgmental to me. My experience is not their experience, is my response.

The fact is, the Camino has been in existence for more than 1000 years. In my view, it's an entirely organic phenomena, it moves and grows through time. There were no tour buses 500 years ago, and pilgrims weren't fitted with state-of-the-art shoes and equipment either. And the roads to Burgos and Leon did not take weary pilgrims through modern-day urban sprawl that is soulless and, frankly, ugly.

I've gone way off topic to the question, but the discussions about behaviour of pilgrims always seem to end this way. My apologies.

For the record, I carried my own pack all the way. But on a scorching Friday evening, having walked 30+ km, which included a harrowing walk into Burgos, I decided that would be my last walk into and out of a large city. I took the bus and used the time I saved to enjoy the gorgeous, inspiring walks in a natural environments - that is one of the main reasons for me to walk on the Camino.

Peace to all.
 
#27
please forgive me colleens and apilgrim if I put an opposing view just for the heck of it.
when I walked from SJPP the first time I walked every footstep,it was important to me,I didn't want to tell people I had walked 750km apart from when I caught a bus or missed out the meseta because it was a bit boring. I am wiser now and don't judge people less I be judged myself. I walk my own Camino and let others do the same,but it must be said that the people who have impressed me the most are those that walk through great pain, blisters,and baggage of all discriptions to reach Santiago,I'm not suggesting we go the whole hog,start wearing barbed wired bra's and whipping our backs as we walk,or walk barefoot or worse still crawl on our knees the whole way,but to my mind its not a place to pick and mix,surly it should be no different to walk through natural enviroments??? or modern urban sprawl.
I'm no Christian but when I walk it is with internal peace and nothing is soulless and frankly ugly or I may as well sit on a beach listen to the lapping waves and contemplate my navel.
Ian
 
#28
Having confessed in an earlier post that I took a bus twice, I will also add that if an albergue turns me away because of that, I would accept this and find another place to stay.

I don’t walk the Camino to impress anybody and I don’t measure my own experience by the number of km I walked or the number of blisters I had to nurse, as compared to others. I don’t regard the way I walk the Camino as “picking and choosing.” I am walking it the way I walk it.

Surely this particular question of Anna's is not the place to discuss philosophical differences on the manner in which we choose to go on pilgrimage.

All best, Anna, with your walk. Buen Camino.

Peace.
 
#29
I hear a great deal of judgements in these posts about what other pilgrims are or are not carrying. I hope to walk the Camino this year in two parts (spring and fall) because I can't deal with heat and crowds. I am going to be 65 in September and I am not in the best of physical shape. I am able to walk but see no need to carry everything on my back making it more likely that I will NOT suceed. I will not judge others who chose to do so. I will not be trying to get your place in the albergues so don't worry.

My travels since I was 16 have taken me all over the world and I have met all types of people and I try to encounter each one without prejudice and prejudgement. I hope this is what I will find on the Camino as I do it my way.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#30
There is no institutional hostility toward those who do not carry their backpacks. However, the municipal and parochial albergues have a policy that says only pilgrims who carry their backpacks are granted entry, and that includes bicycles that use a chase car. Private albergues do not have the rule in general, and accept all pilgrims and their backpacks that are sent ahead. It is said that the original policy was to preserve the beds for the weary pilgrim and discourage the weekend warrior out for a cheap bed. The same motivation is behind bicyclists being denied a bed before 6 p.m. with the added motive that a bicyclist can go another 5 km more easily than a walker when places fill up.

You will see pilgrims pick up their backpacks at the edge of town from vehicles to circumvent the rule. Pilgrims noting the practice have been known to inform the hospitalero! With the increase in private albergues in recent years, baggage services have become quite common.

It is not an issue of two classes of pilgrims, but a matter of trying to provide support for the ones who are working the hardest. It may not be a perfect system, but it has some logic behind it, and it has the full backing of pack-carrying pilgrims.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#31
falcon269 said:
You will see pilgrims pick up their backpacks at the edge of town from vehicles to circumvent the rule. .

That is perhaps the saddest thing I have ever read on this forum. If one can afford baggage transport, you ought to be able to pay for private accomodation (physical limitations aside), and not take advantage of charity.

Having done the Frances twice, I now travel the outer routes, but whenever I look at pictures I think it would be nice to go there again. Maybe in January :?
 
#32
From page 423 of the Authentic Pilgrim's™ Guide to the Camino:
You are not really going to carry your own gear are you?!!?! That is the purpose of serfs! But should you choose to leave them at home, the Authentic Pilgrim™ recommends that you at least have a pack mule. Not only will you appreciate not having to carry your hemp sack over the Pyrenees yourself, you you will also appreciate it when, after getting a hoof infection that goes systemic, your mule’s carcass provides plenty of meat for a feast at that night’s albergue stop.

Seriously.... I am getting so depressed by all of the people who continually pass judgement on how others travel the Camino.... Authentic? Authentic to when? 1100? 1750? 1966? Authentic to who? A 16th century nobleman who travels with retainers and servants? A 19th century nun who has taken vows of poverty? A 1940's Franco supporter who devoutly prays daily for the murder of all socialists?

We can only be authentic to ourselves, here and now. No one knows our inner motivations, our physical limitations, our intentions or our hope or dreams for the Camino. Those who live in glass houses....
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#34
Authentic? Authentic to when?
The question is not about authenticity in this topic; it is about who gets a bed at a refuge. "Authentic pilgrims" have received Compostelas in Villafranca del Bierzo, and Alto del Perdon has been considered a suitable place for forgiveness.

I don't think there is a lot of judgment going on, though there are strong opinions about who gets the bed, and that does have an element of how deserving a pilgrim is! But it still is not about authenticity.
 
#35
OK.... Not about authenticity. Lots of judgement, however, about the worthiness of people and their pilgrimage. Yes, I carry all of my own gear, even after two major knee surgeries. But it is about me and MY desires and MY vision of pilgrimage. It is not to impress or prove myself to others.

Although this forum has been invaluable for providing specific pieces of information about the Camino (for which I am very very thankful), so many of the topics degenerate into confrontations between different people's vision of what is a good, true, authentic, correct, real pilgrim/pilgrimage....
You might find the albergue accepts you, but the inhabitants don't!
Snorers must be silenced/you MUST wear earplugs! Cyclists are not real pilgrims! People who just walk the last 100km are lesser pilgrims!

And it seems that the majority of these strong assertions that one's personal perspective is correct and true come from those who most actively post on these boards. I am so happy that your experience on the Camino has played such a large and positive role in your life. However, no one person's experience of the Camino is the universal experience. Each of us walks our own path. I encourage people to let go of the judgmental attitude that so often emerges on these Boards. None of us is perfect. None of us is "pure." Judge not lest ye be judged.

That said, I shall no longer share my opinions here. I genuinely wish you all a Buen Camino – whatever that means to you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#36
I have been following this with what can only be now classed as morbid fascination. It is a great shame that what was a practical question where our collective experiences and approaches might have made a valuable contribution has descended to this frightful bickering amongst forum members.

Is it possible to stop this now? We should, and I hope we can.

Regards,
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#37
Well, I don't really see a lot of serious bickering between people on this thread.
I do see a lot of opinions, some differing, and one or two people who seem to be looking for a problem where really, there is not one.

I think it is normal not to agree on everything.
Some people think fresh air is good for you; others think it is bad for you.
Some sleep with the window open; others with it closed.
Some snore; others do not.
Some carry makeup and hair dryers; others go light and free
Some people wear boots; others sandals.
Some people eat meat; others are vegetarian
Some drink coffee; some drink tea
Some people lift weights; others do yoga.
Pilgrims come from every country in the world, I imagine, and that means a lot of cultural differences too, as well as religious differences.
Some are Christian; others are Jewish, Moslem, Buddhist, or Hindu or ??
Some people like organic food; others don't care
Some people take drugs to lose weight; others exercise and watch what they eat
The list just goes on and on and on...

We live in a wonderfully diverse world.
There's enough in the world for everyone to get what they want.

When it is a problem is when people start thinking EVERYONE should want or do what THEY want.

I once lived in a beautiful commune in Oregon. We were totally self-sufficient. We grew our own vegetables, raised sheep for wool, and chickens for eggs. We were all so happy there... except for one woman. She did not like "stepping in chicken poop" and so insisted our free-range chickens be cooped up. Then the sheep kept her awake at night, so she insisted we get rid of them. Then she didn't like seeing laundry hanging in the sun. Little by little that one single woman chipped away at our community until most people threw up their hands and left. Consensus was impossible. She had a different idea of what she wanted. Instead of that one person leaving, and letting the rest of us be happy... she insisted on having things her way and basically ruined it for the rest of us. That taught me a good lesson. If I don't like the rules where I am, I just move on...

Life's too short to bicker... especially about the Camino, I agree.

And when it comes to albergues and who is allowed to stay there, the owners of the albergue decide and I see nothing wrong with that. I would like to decide who stays in MY house, even if some people call that being judgmental.

We are ALL judgmental.
It's a fact of life.
We make judgments all day long.
And often, when I'm calling others unfairly judgmental, I've learned to look in the mirror to see the REAL judgmental person! :lol:
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
#39
Lydia Gillen said:
Thanks Annie for your wisdom
NOT SURE?

The nicest people one meets are non-judgemental, accept you for who you are,
they make you feel welcome & loved :)

my vicar 85 loves me ringing the bell in church; got to go past the bats to do it;
he says 'it's lovely cause it shows that we are open for business'
makes his day(& mine)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#40
Anniesantiago said:
Well, I don't really see a lot of serious bickering between people on this thread.
I might be wrong, but someone feeling they have to withdraw from commenting seems to me to be a significant level of tension:
DesertRain said:
That said, I shall no longer share my opinions here. I genuinely wish you all a Buen Camino – whatever that means to you.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#42
Much like Doug, and others, I've read this thread with an interest and with some growing sense of unease. As a yet to start I cannot comment on the realities of the way. They wait for me and I look forward to our meeting. But I have nurtured my Camino for some time now and soon it will begin.

The tension I sensevfrom comments here, but also comments and questions from loved ones friends and vague aquaintences, grows around the question - what is a pilgrim and what is the pilgrimage.

And then I found Lise T's contribution on another thread - see her entry under "why we walk the Camino" and weep as I did.

I don't have the technical ability to cut 'n' paste from one post to another so surf :cry:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Mar 2010, May/Jun 2016, Sep 2011, 2012, Apr 2014, St Olav's Way 2018
#43
On judgement

Some years ago, I had someone I thought of as a friend take umbrage when I challenged her on an interpretation of an event. I had asked if there was an alternative explanation of cause and effect that might equally well explain a set of circumstances in which she had cast someone in an unkind light.

After some thought about it, my response was that she had to decide whether she wanted our friendship based on me suspending disbelief, and uncritically believing everything she said, in which case I would refuse to contribute advice should she seek that. Alternatively, should she want my advice, she had to accept that I could not do that without testing both the veracity of what she thought of as fact, and her interpretation of that. We compromised, and worked out when I should just listen, and when to engage disbelief.

I see this forum full of similar circumstances. Tincatinker's reference to the thread at http://www.caminodesantiago.me/board/el-camino-frances/topic12881.html will take you to a string of powerful and compelling stories that have been shared to motivate and inspire us.

Other threads invite discussion, this one originally sought information, but at some stage seemed to become a platform for a broader discussion. I thought that was a great pity, and said so.

I agree with an Anniesantiago when she said:
Anniesantiago said:
We are ALL judgmental.
It's a fact of life.
We make judgments all day long.
And often, when I'm calling others unfairly judgmental, I've learned to look in the mirror to see the REAL judgmental person! :lol:
.
What I would add is that we are always entitled to withhold our judgement, and hold our views privately. More than once I have I recast and even abandoned a post when I have felt that I have not been 'without prejudice and prejudgement' (two virtues for the price of one there!!). As Anniesantiago says so well, there are times to look in the mirror, normally just before we hit the Submit button!

Regards,

ps - which I have just done, and still did.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#44
You're all being really judgemental of the judgemental! Stop before my head explodes!
 

fraluchi

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
One every year since 2007
#45
newfydog said:
You're all being really judgemental of the judgemental!
In fact, the original question was whether "albergues" refuse.....etc.
We couldn't possibly judge each and all albergues on the various ways to Santiago. Could we now?
The answer is quite simple: it's not the "albergue" which refuses, it's the operator/hospitalero/manager who decides whether or not, when and why a person without having carried his/her pack will (or can) be given a bed/colchoneta/litera/place-in-the-barn/tent-in-the-field.
So after all this judgmental stuff, the answer is really simple: "it depends" :lol:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#46
I agree, Doug, we could withhold our views.
Sometimes that is appropriate in life, especially when our viewpoint might harm another.
"Do I look fat in this dress?"

However, this is a forum and here is the definition of that word:

fo·rum/ˈfôrəm/
Noun: A meeting or medium where ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged.

Which is exactly what has been done here.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
#47
Last year at Carrion I was given the last available bed in the municipal albergue. Just after I arrived and had booked in, two pilgrims arrived who had sent their backpacks by luggage transport from their last albergue, and they were under the mistaken impression that this guaranteed beds for them. But no problem as there were vacancies at other albergues in the town. For those pilgrims who think they can reserve beds this way, they are very mistaken.
These two pilgrims that I met at Carrion had in one case injured his back, and his wife had very bad tendonitis, so they had very good reasons to forward their backpacks, and indeed are to be commended for continuing their pilgrimage.
Please stop being judgemental everyone. The Camino is not a competition and that attitude should be left at home with all the rest of our baggage and does not belong on the Camino. David
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#48
I was starting in Pamplona off-season, so I went to Jesus y Maria with my credential. The hospitalero gave me a five minute speech on why I was not eligible to stay there. He then took my money, and I joined the twenty other pilgrims in selecting among the hundred beds. There are rules, and they may bend to economic necessity. I have no doubt that in June, I would have been sent to Paderborn or a hostal!

In Burgos at the Albergue Divina Pastora after dark in the pouring rain, we climbed the darkened steps to the dormitory. No one was at the desk, so we selected beds and showered. The hospitalero then appeared and checked us in. He had finished massaging a comely girl over in the corner, and had time for other, less pleasant, duties. He said we were not eligible to stay because, though we had walked to Burgos the previous day and immediately taken a bus to Santo Domingo de Silos, having just arrived this day by return bus, we were not eligible because we had not walked in that day! It was off-season, so he took our money, and went back to his girl.

Rules are rules, but flexibly applied. In the high season, do not be surprised if you are turned away if you don't carry your pack (does not always apply to all private albergues).
 

CaminoGen

CF May-June 2011; Oloron to Fisterra Sept-Oct 2013
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances-SJPP. Santiago (2011); Oloron to Fisterra (Sept 5-Oct 23 2013)
#49
falcon269 said:
It is not an issue of two classes of pilgrims, but a matter of trying to provide support for the ones who are working the hardest. It may not be a perfect system, but it has some logic behind it, and it has the full backing of pack-carrying pilgrims.
Totally agree. I took the bus twice because of injury and time constraint but when I did, I let the walking pilgrims go first and then asked for a bed. The thought of someone being turned away because of a lack of room would have made me sick.

I have fibromyalgia too and I carried my kit... when I saw a group of French pilgrims where one of the men drove the car with the bags and "reserved" places in line for his friends, it made me mad and I made sure they knew it.
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
#50
We attended the pilgrims mass in Triacastela near the end of our journey (in grateful thanks for having made it that far and seeking a little divine intercession to ensure we'd make it to the end)
The celebrant Fr Augusto Losada Lopez wasn't your regular country parish priest and nor indeed was the service he conducted. It was sunlit, inclusive, thought provoking and joyful. As 'penance' for any sins Fr Augusto instructed us to be kind to ourselves and to be joyous in our lives. But it was his final words at the end of the mass that came to mind when reading this thread he said "remember God doesn't count your steps nor Santiago weigh your pack- what they measure is your heart pilgrim, so look to your heart ....and take care of your feet!".
 
Last edited:
#51
nellpilgrim said:
... As 'penance' for any sins Fr Augusto instructed us to be kind to ourselves and to be joyous in our lives....... he said "remember God doesn't count your steps nor Santiago weigh your pack- what they measure is your heart pilgrim, so look to your heart ....and take care of your feet!".
Yes! Well said.
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
#53
Well if Camino accommodation were to be allocated on points earned by the distance covered carrying your pack then Lovingkindness would be entitled to a suite in a Parador every night not to mind a bunk in an albergue!
Nell
 

rubyslippers

Ruby Slippers
Camino(s) past & future
April-May (2008) September (2012)
#54
It's YOUR Camino. Do it your way - no apologies necessary. :) I must say that for me I want my stuff with me. Less is always more so do not overpack or you'll be constantly looking for the PO to send stuff home. You may change your mind about where you want to stop or where you want to end up on a certain day. One of the beauties of the Camino is that you get to take it at your own pace. It's a Process and why schedule it in any way. You get very attached to your pack and the feeling of it on your back. Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(09/05/2013)
#55
I think the more difficult path for me maybe will be the climbs SJPP-Roncesvalles, Astorga, Rabanal, Vega de-Calcare Alto de Poyo think I'll have to send my backpack in front. My cervical vertebrae is damage, even I must take a cervical collar to relieve . Reading the comments I feel very guilty and ashamed for having to do it if I need to do . :oops:

But , my point of view that judgments are not good too,we must let people do what they want and GOD or their own conscience will judge them.

If there is any better advice how to carry my packing without damage my cervical, I much appreciate

Buen camino
Fatima
 

colinPeter

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SDC (2009) Somport-Jaca, Burgos-SDC, Cee-Muxia (2012) Le Puy - Aumont-Aubrac (2014) SJPP-SDC (Oct 2015)
#56
Fatima1964 said:
Reading the comments I feel very guilty and ashamed for having to do it if I need to do it
Hola Fatima,
I think the Camino is about getting there the best way you can, if you use baggage transport, so what, it's your Camino. Do what you have to do and enjoy it.
Buen Camino.
Col
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#57
Yes, albergues do tend to refuse pilgrims who don't carry their packs, and in fact there are some hospitaleros who will phone on ahead down the Camino to warn the other albergues of pilgrims travelling with a support vehicle.

Though this is just a rule of thumb, not an absolute law -- if there is enough room for one and all, such pilgrims will not be turned away ; plus, hospitaleros will naturally be more than understanding of those with medical conditions preventing them from carrying their own packs, provided that these things are honestly and openly explained to them.

Those being targetted by these measures are the sort of "tourist-pilgrim" that has a support vehicle for pure reasons of convenience ; these are typically the same sorts of people that will travel parts of the Camino that they are unhappy with inside their vehicles, or who will do the ghastly boring suburban stage into Burgos by bus instead of hiking -- and who tend to try and grab all of the beds, so that those who have slogged through 20-40 KM of heat, sweat, and sometimes misery then end up with nowhere to rest because of the selfishness of these "tourist-pilgrims".

This is NOT a discriminatory measure targetted AGAINST these people, however, but rather a protective measure for the actual walking pilgrims. Again -- when and where there is room for all, there's not much problem.
 

rubyslippers

Ruby Slippers
Camino(s) past & future
April-May (2008) September (2012)
#58
Dear Fatima 1964 - I wanted to make another post as I did the Camino again in Sept. I have a slipped 4/5 vertebrae and I only got into the walk about 10 days and had to quit. Just carrying it around before I even started an incline cause me pain in my hip and leg. Don't be afraid to have someone take it on ahead for you. <3 Enjoy your walk
:D
 
Camino(s) past & future
(09/05/2013)
#59
rubyslippers said:
Dear Fatima 1964 - I wanted to make another post as I did the Camino again in Sept. I have a slipped 4/5 vertebrae and I only got into the walk about 10 days and had to quit. Just carrying it around before I even started an incline cause me pain in my hip and leg. Don't be afraid to have someone take it on ahead for you. <3 Enjoy your walk
:D
Oh Dear Rubyslippers. :( so sorry for you. I will definitely send my backpack ahead . Otherwise I will compromise my goal to reach Santiago and my health . Of course that I can not drive my destiny , but with the other fellows experience we can make things smoothly and possible.

Is in God Hands, but I need to make my part.

Thanks for your support .

ULTREYA!

Hugs.
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#60
Fatima-- it might help if you had a sentence or two in Spanish which refers to your condition. As well (and this is advice I hand out to everyone without asking), if you have a complex medical situation, it is often useful to have your doctor draw up a diagnostic note with the treatment described, and then have it put into Spanish by a medical translator. It is not cheap (usually $100-150), but I have had friends who were greatly aided by this-- when they fell ill, they just handed it to their Spanish nurse and doctor, and it saved them a great deal of trouble.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(09/05/2013)
#61
oursonpolaire said:
Fatima-- it might help if you had a sentence or two in Spanish which refers to your condition. As well (and this is advice I hand out to everyone without asking), if you have a complex medical situation, it is often useful to have your doctor draw up a diagnostic note with the treatment described, and then have it put into Spanish by a medical translator. It is not cheap (usually $100-150), but I have had friends who were greatly aided by this-- when they fell ill, they just handed it to their Spanish nurse and doctor, and it saved them a great deal of trouble.
Thanks oursonpolaire for your advice . yes I can speak Spanish , also my doctor already wrote my diagnostic etc. etc. As I am worry , not because of the my own problem. I lived with this almost 3 years. But as far I will put a lot of effort on my body, maybe I can have pain or worth injure. Must be prepare . from now on just in God hands.

Thanks a lot.

ULTREYA!
Fatima
 

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
#62
This is a strange thread.

Use a horse to carry your pack and it's okay.

Use a horseless carriage and you're in trouble.

Wouldn't it make sense to weigh every pack? Hand out the beds on the basis of the weight of the pack. No more sawing toothbrushes in half to save 7.3 grams.

Last week the elderly lady across the street was dragging a package to the shop. I picked it up and carried it for her. Certainly nobody would say it was harder for me then her.
 

Daxzentzu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
FRANCES (2018) in planning
#63
Wow!
I have read every word in this thread and now I understand.
I understand the ethos of the Camino - it is simply, make your own way, in your own way and it is not for any of us to judge each other.
We must leave that to a higher authority.
Thank you.
Dax
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013
Ingles 2014
Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017
Via Francegena 2018
#65
Wow, we all got there in the end with our good hearts!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
#66
  • I confirm that the albergue 'Gaucelmo' at Rabanal which is run by the CSJ in London does not accept pilgrims who have used 'assistance' to get to Rabanal. This is stated in writing on the front gate of the refugio. Two of us who arrived independently on 13 May this year were turned away as we had used Jacotrans luggage carriers, and our packs were not accepted but deposited at Pilars refugio in the village. The lady peregrine (in her 60's) had injured her knee and was virtually hobbling from albergue to albergue and struggling very hard to get to Santiago. I had walked part of the VDLP and then walked from Pamplona on the Frances, but due to extreme exhaustion had started using Jacotrans from Leon only. I was 81 years old. I had always carried my pack before on roughly 2000 kms of various Caminos, and stayed at Gaucelmo twice before and it is an excellent place to stay.
  • The hospitaleros explained to me that the reason for not accepting assisted peregrinos was because of political considerations in the village as Gaucelmo is donativo, and the other accommodation in the village resent this - understandably. I have also been told the Bishop in Astorga has requested the CSJ to enforce this rule, although I do not know whether this is correct.
  • I accept the situation without complaint but feel that hospitaleros at Gaucelmo should be able to use their discretion in certain situations.
  • Incidentally, the lady and myself stayed at Pilars refugio, and in the morning the lady manager took us in her car to Cruz de Ferro where she had arranged for a taxi to meet us and take us to Molinaseca (a true Christain act and in the spirit of the Camino), where I went straight to bed and slept for 16 hours straight. After that I walked to Santiago and then walked Camino Portuguese.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
#67
Sorry! I should have written 'lady peregrina', and not 'lady peregrin' - which is a bird.
 
M

MendiWalker

Guest
#68
There are many types of accommodation along the Camino from public albergues to luxury paradors . In most how you do your Camino doesn´t matter at all as long as you pay the price as they are private. The so called problem may happen when you try to use a public albergue where there are rules about who can stay there and who has preference .

In Galizia where the public albergues are run by the Galizian government the rules are very clear. Another thing is if the hospitalario decides to look the other way. The priority to stay in one is the following - 1. Physically challenged pilgrims.
2.Pilgrims travelling on foot.
3. Pilgrims travelling by horse.
4. Pilgrims travelling by bicycle.
5.People travelling with support vehicles.

I saw a group of 25 youngsters along with a priest who used a van which carried their backpack to the door of the public albergue in Redondela try to get in.
The hospitalera informed them of the rules and added that groups of this type had to wait until the end of the day to see if there was any free bunk. She suggested that they go to the sports center which was public. They went off to the public sports center.

Buen Camino!
 
#69
Anna, from reading the posts it would seem that some albergues don't allow the transportation of bags. How about a compromise with your friends, travel very light (bare essentials and no sleeping bag, etc.) and stay in private rooms, if there is a group of you, the price of a large room would not be much more than booking into a albergue and getting your backpack carried. Do the camino your way, no matter how it is done it is a great personal achievement.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#70
Jacotrans has a list of places that accept baggage, so it should have known better than to try to deliver to Gaucelmo. Choices are limited a bit when a baggage service is used, but at least two of the as many as five albergues in Rabanal accept bags, so finding a bed is no problem if you use a baggage service. Delight in the idea that beds were found even while pilgrims trudging along with packs were not finding completo signs everywhere from pilgrims using a baggage service! The balance was not disturbed...;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF15, CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF17, CP17, CdN, CM, CF18, LePuy19
#71
I ran into 2 interesting situations about baggage shipping and groups:
First instance was in Atapuerca at the albergue Peregrino which is private when an older gentleman arrived in the Jacotran mini bus with his bag and several other pilgrim's bags, he strutted up to the head of the queue that had formed in the courtyard waiting for the doors to open claiming he had first priority for a bed. Quite an argument ensured in Spanish and I have no idea what his claim was but there were some major hard feeling that night in the dorm. The fact that it had been nearly 30 degrees by noon that day didn't help mitigate the aggravation.
Second instance was in Triacastela at another private albergue, Hospital da Condesa, when several of us who had been walking on and off together for weeks arrived there around noon. Four of us gladly found beds while others decided to have lunch after walking on a nearly freezing, blustery, rainy "July" Galician day only to learn that a group of about 20 American students on a study holiday had booked nearly every bed in the albergue that night, some of them arrived with bags and some arrived in the chase van to avoid the weather.
None of this meant to be a gripe, it's just when you are walking the Camino you always have to be prepared for some upset to your best laid plans, good weather or bad!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2014)
#72
Hi,
I want to start my Camino on JUly or August, 2014
I'm 56 women with knee problem, I can't do the camino carrying my whole backpack, first: i walk slowly, i will be walking 15/20 KM per day.
so I will be the last one in get a bed and in July or August, there are so many people, (i can't do the camino in other dates) second: maybe I will finish my camino without getting to santiago, if I carry a big backpack, with all my stuff.
so, the question is: do I continuing to prepare my camino ? or cancel my wish to do it, because the other people who are carrying a backpack will seeing me like a cheater?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
#73
Hi,
I want to start my Camino on JUly or August, 2014
I'm 56 women with knee problem, I can't do the camino carrying my whole backpack, first: i walk slowly, i will be walking 15/20 KM per day.
so I will be the last one in get a bed and in July or August, there are so many people, (i can't do the camino in other dates) second: maybe I will finish my camino without getting to santiago, if I carry a big backpack, with all my stuff.
so, the question is: do I continuing to prepare my camino ? or cancel my wish to do it, because the other people who are carrying a backpack will seeing me like a cheater?
Welcome to the forum.

You will not be considered a cheater if you do not carry your pack. It is generally accepted that everyone does the camino whichever way he/she can manage; do not let anyone make you feel guilty, or inferior. By all means, go ahead and plan your camino.

For what it’s worth, I carried my pack for 2-1/2 weeks before I developed problems. Rather than put my Camino at risk, I had my pack transported the rest of the way.

Aside from the extra expense, you will have to know in advance which town you expect to get to at the end of each day so you can advise the transport company where to deliver your bag. Generally speaking, only the private albergues accept delivery of packs, but my understanding is that you don’t have to stay where your pack is delivered – personally, I never tried to stay elsewhere. The only time we had a problem was when, at the advice of the hospitalera, we sent our packs ahead to Guacelmo in Rabanal del Camino, only to learn later that not only does Gualcelmo not accept pilgrims who do not carry their packs (there’s a perfectly understandable explanation for this), but that our packs weren’t there! There was a bit of anxiety before we located our packs down the hill at a private albergue, which is where we ended up staying.

Aside from this thread, you may find some more help here http://www.caminodesantiago.me/comm...nge-to-our-upcoming-camino.20898/#post-164035

Happy planning, and Buen Camino.
 
Last edited:

fraluchi

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
One every year since 2007
#74
[...]it's just when you are walking the Camino you always have to be prepared for some upset to your best laid plans, good weather or bad!
Which is one of the reasons why one should budget for the chances of having to stay somewhere else instead of in a cheap (municipal, parroquial, etc.) albergue. If a private albergue cannot accept your reservation for a bed, ask for an address for a room or other accommodation in the (nearest) village or town. On the Camino Francés you rarely have to walk too far and find somewhere to stay at a reasanable cost. Couples have the advantage that a room is often not (much) more expensive than 2 beds in a private albergue. Of course one is missing the comradeship, as well as clothes washing facilities! But it shouldn't happen every day:eek:
 

Hollie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Will walk September 2015
#76
From page 423 of the Authentic Pilgrim's™ Guide to the Camino:
You are not really going to carry your own gear are you?!!?! That is the purpose of serfs! But should you choose to leave them at home, the Authentic Pilgrim™ recommends that you at least have a pack mule. Not only will you appreciate not having to carry your hemp sack over the Pyrenees yourself, you you will also appreciate it when, after getting a hoof infection that goes systemic, your mule’s carcass provides plenty of meat for a feast at that night’s albergue stop.

Seriously.... I am getting so depressed by all of the people who continually pass judgement on how others travel the Camino.... Authentic? Authentic to when? 1100? 1750? 1966? Authentic to who? A 16th century nobleman who travels with retainers and servants? A 19th century nun who has taken vows of poverty? A 1940's Franco supporter who devoutly prays daily for the murder of all socialists?

We can only be authentic to ourselves, here and now. No one knows our inner motivations, our physical limitations, our intentions or our hope or dreams for the Camino. Those who live in glass houses....
Amen!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#77
I did not read this entire thread, so I'm just offering my own answer.

Some will let you in with no problem if you use bag transport.
Others will refuse you.
Your best bet is to research which are which, imo, and don't hesitate to use bag transport if you need it!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#78
Hi Anna,

I never saw a pilgrim turned away for not having a pack...the key to entrance being your pilgrim passport. A municipal albergue may require a sello from the previous night's stay to gain entrance though private albergues (Red Albergue members come to mind) seem to want a full house regardless of how you arrive.

Buen "walking with my pack" Camino

Arn
My understanding is that Guacelmo in Rabanal, for one, will not let you stay if you use bag transport.
Is this no longer true?

Oh MY!
I just realized how OLD this thread is when I went back and started reading and ran into Methodist Pilgrim's post. I sure do miss him!
 

Ian Afloat

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF July 25th 2017 from SJPDP
#80
What is the distance qualification for a Compestella when travelling by canoe exactly?
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#81
What is the distance qualification for a Compestella when travelling by canoe exactly?
I'd guess that it would be considered as 200 KM, same as those travelling by bike, or horse, or with a donkey etc
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#82
Gosh this is an old thread. I am almost scared to resurrect it! In its day it was burning hot!
Wonder if any of those original people got turned away for bag transport, or bumped by outrageous touregrino rudeness...
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#83
Gosh this is an old thread. I am almost scared to resurrect it! In its day it was burning hot!
Wonder if any of those original people got turned away for bag transport, or bumped by outrageous touregrino rudeness...
Things have changed since the thread was made ...

There are now very few albergues that refuse to accommodate the JacoTrans etc ...
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#85
Just the British at Rabanal! When we Brexit they may have to ;)
No not just them, there are still some albergues, usually donativo, that refuse reservations, refuse JacoTrans, and only accept pilgrims in the old-fashioned way.

But yes, they're a dying breed in face of the rampant commercialisation -- in 2005 I saw that JacoTrans seemed to be accepted in about half of the places ; in 2014, it was over 90%.

But there is still a network of refugios that cater preferentially to those that carry, and I don't think this will ever completely vanish.
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#86
@JabbaPapa I actually think the flexible (day to day bookable) bag transport services are a good thing, if it stops people using full-on guided tours, jumping on and off buses, or illicitly meeting support vehicles. Having to lie and pretend is certainly not in the spirit of the camino. Much better to get a bag transported, walk by yourself as far as you can, and be honest about it. In the end, it's the person who is supposed to do the camino, not the bag.
 

SabineP

Camino is about empathy. Not about entitlement.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#89
please forgive me colleens and apilgrim if I put an opposing view just for the heck of it.
when I walked from SJPP the first time I walked every footstep,it was important to me,I didn't want to tell people I had walked 750km apart from when I caught a bus or missed out the meseta because it was a bit boring. I am wiser now and don't judge people less I be judged myself. I walk my own Camino and let others do the same,but it must be said that the people who have impressed me the most are those that walk through great pain, blisters,and baggage of all discriptions to reach Santiago,I'm not suggesting we go the whole hog,start wearing barbed wired bra's and whipping our backs as we walk,or walk barefoot or worse still crawl on our knees the whole way,but to my mind its not a place to pick and mix,surly it should be no different to walk through natural enviroments??? or modern urban sprawl.
I'm no Christian but when I walk it is with internal peace and nothing is soulless and frankly ugly or I may as well sit on a beach listen to the lapping waves and contemplate my navel.
Ian
Stumbled upon this old thread and read these wise words from Sagalouts. Espeically the last sentence in his post.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017
#90
I do not recall any Albergue turning someone away who forwarded their pack. Everyone should walk the Camino in a manner they are comfortable. There is no right or wrong way. It is your Camino.

Ultreya,
Joe
I agree, you can't judge what is being carried on the Camino by someone carrying a backpack.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#91
Yes, albergues do tend to refuse pilgrims who don't carry their packs, and in fact there are some hospitaleros who will phone on ahead down the Camino to warn the other albergues of pilgrims travelling with a support vehicle.
hmmmm, given that this topic has resurfaced : --- with rare exceptions, the above notion exceeded its "sell-by date" about 5-7 years ago.

As things stand now, with very few exceptions of some albergues who continue to privilege some genuinely poor pilgrims, albergues will tend to refuse pilgrims who have no cash as well as those arriving after all beds have already been filled.

Whether you carry your pack or not has become the sole concern of a bare handful of places along the length of the Camino at the very least from Arles and Le Puy onward, though the Piémont Way still has its diehards in this philosophy.

BUT -- if you wish to do a very long Camino outside of the beaten path, which might involve some weeks of walking alone, then the above advice remains completely valid ; also to a certain degree (I **think**) on the Vézelay and Paris/Tours routes
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#92
An interesting thread that got me thinking.... ;);)

Is carrying all our gear in a backpack a modern concept?

If we are to differentiate pilgrims carrying back packs from 'day packs' what is the volume that is deemed to be more acceptable?

Many of the local pilgrims seem to carry little more than a 5 Litre bag or nothing at all. Did they not get the memo! :eek::eek:

During our current Camino we have booked private rooms in Albergues a couple of times. On arrival the reception areas were cluttered with bags of all types with jaco trans and correos tags :oops::oops:

This Pilgrim lark seems to be going to the dogs!! :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Tongue firmly in cheek......

rather than carrying bags or not, what gets me hot under the collar is the boogie boxes and radios! Have they never heard of ear phones????

Just out of curiosity....
Do any of these Pilgrims carrying little more than a shopping bag turn up at Albergues?
 
#93
I'm off to the Del Norte this Wednesday. Starting in Santander ,so i guess I have (de-officialized) myself for not having started in Irun. I will however, as i did on the Frances carry my own gear. Not that it is a form of self flagellation to do so, but the weight keeps me mindful of my camino motto "no quiero ser mas grande que mis pies o mi sombra". I had to get over those who could carry and did not, having pejoratively nicknamed them kiloleros(two pounds). All said and done, forbearance in place my favorite image was the two walkers with paper Gucci shopping bags. I did not know that my eyes could roll that far back in my head. Buen Camino a todos visto en Santander on the 21 Aug
 
#94
Thanks Mike I love the image I now have of the Gucci pilgrims! ( still laughing!)
I know things have changed on the Caminos ( when we walked the C del Norte...way back ? 2002? .......we met no other pilgrims until we got the C F) but I cling to the ?outdated? idea of a walking pilgrim carrying that they need. I worked for many years as a volunteer in a refuge where it was a requirement except for those with “problems”. Now there are many private places which accept those who use transport and that is fine by me but it is a different thing.
Yes there are always those who cannot do it the old way but the experience is different. Now ( in old age) I would still carry my pack but use the many hotels/hostales available.
Buen camino on the Norte!
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017
#95
I never encountered this, but heard that some albergues wouldn't accept bag transfer. Maybe they weren't manned in the daytime. I can't imagine making assumptions about people based on whether or not they carried a backpack. Most of us carry more stuff in them than many pilgrims would have owned in previous times. I have had to send my bag ahead due to problems at times with lymphatic circulation following cancer treatment. Backpacks are so much better these days, but the extra weight can put extra stress on joints and feet and can sometimes make the difference between staying on the camino or not. I'm so grateful I could carry on with the help of bag transport. I would imagine that we can't really judge what pilgrims are carrying by the size of their backpacks. The most difficult burdens are perhaps in the hearts and minds.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#96
I can't imagine making assumptions about people based on whether or not they carried a backpack. Most of us carry more stuff in them than many pilgrims would have owned in previous times. I have had to send my bag ahead due to problems at times with lymphatic circulation following cancer treatment.
I would imagine that we can't really judge what pilgrims are carrying by the size of their backpacks. The most difficult burdens are perhaps in the hearts and minds.
Very true.
And (as I understand it) albergues that refuse to accept people who are transferring luggage are doing so not out of judgement but rather so that those who are carrying their packs will not lose the bed race to tourigrinos who are walking faster without weight on their backs. If you were to state your situation to a hospitalera/o in that circumstance, I am guessing they would at least listen. I am also guessing hospis can easily tell the difference between a tourigrino and a peregrino - regardless of whether they transfer their bags, or not
.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJpdP to Santiago ( Sept-Oct 2018)
#97
Turigrino? Busigrino? Bicigrino? Are we not all pilgrims, and all journeying our own way? I agree with Gilmore Girl. For me that way will start with pack support for the first few days because I and my arthritic feet and dodgy ankles and cancer surgery scars want to one day reach Santiago. I will see how I am going as I make my way. I feel happy with this decision.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#98
Turigrino? Busigrino? Bicigrino? Are we not all pilgrims, and all journeying our own way?
Please relax, @longwayhome - you're absolutely not the kind of person I meant.;)
I do not want to start the tired debate about who is a real pilgrim because it's endless.
But just to say that there is nothing more dispiriting if you've lugged your pack 25-30 kms to find the albergue completo, full of party-goers who are carrying virtually nothing and taxi-ing to 5kms out of town. These are the kind of people I mean.
(And I have a dodgy ankle and those cancer surgery scars too, so I do understand what you're dealing with...)
 

Via2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
Hi,

I think it is quite ok, if the public or donativo albergues refuse pilgrims with back-pack transport. This is by no means disqualifying them as pilgrims. But: If you can afford extra 4 or 5 Euros a day to have your back-pack sent you should also be able to pay another 4 or 5 Euros for private albergues (they are normally 10-12 Euro a night instead of 5-6 in a public albergue). I think it is a question of fairness.

I would also distingish between those who use back-pack-transport for medical reasons and could not walk the camino without this help and those who use back-pack-transport for their personal commoditiy (they neither want to restrict themselves, neither want to bear the consequences of being unable to restrict themselves to the basics).

BC
Alexandra
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
Ymanning Frequently Asked Questions 5

OLDER threads on this topic



A few items available from the Camino Forum Store



Pilgrims here right now

Advertisement
Booking.com

Latest posts

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 8 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 33 4.5%
  • April

    Votes: 108 14.7%
  • May

    Votes: 179 24.4%
  • June

    Votes: 53 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 15 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 11 1.5%
  • September

    Votes: 219 29.8%
  • October

    Votes: 89 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.5%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top