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Luggage Transfer Correos

Do THEY speak English ? Clues ? ?

gschmidl

sator arepo tenet opera rotas
Camino(s) past & future
Kumano Kodo (11/2018), Camino Sanabres (4/2019)
what they do when presented with a piece of cake on a plate and a set of knife and fork. 😎
This is getting further and further off-topic but now I'm intrigued. What other options are there besides spiking the cutlery into the ground and mashing the cake into the other's face, plate and all?
 

Antonius Vaessen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2016 VdlPlata - Sanabres
2016.Primitivo
2017 Salvador
2018 Norte (to Sobrado)
2019 Norte again
(Antonious I am listening what you are saying are you?
The one monolingual was ok the other one not, that happened to be the non English speaker.)
In areas where you don't learn English let's say Russian first in school or like our man from Canada here no other language English is not the common language not on the Camino and please I hope I don't break youalls heart in the rest of the world.
It's nice to find a common language -
a true communicator in my opinion does what needs be but doesn't impose. It's like a looking class if you carry expectations like here of some one else doing what you do you may see one point clear but the rest is blocked. My feelings to this everybody should speek Greek or at least Latin.
I don't think you did understand my meaning, it was not that the English speaking was ok and the German woman was not. I was talking about the "strangeness" of my feelings, why did I feel some irritation towards the monolingual german speaker and not towards the monolingual English speaker.
 

Harington

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
Probably not :cool: It often seems that expressing any criticism of the Brierley guides is the last great taboo in Camino circles. It always generates more heat than light. For a lot of reasons - some of which are fairly specific to my own background - I dislike Brierley's guides. If you would like to test the character limit of the forum's private conversations or chat on Facebook I will be happy to explain my opinions at ridiculous length privately.... 😉
Up to you! Though I would be interested. I never used a Brierley.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I am a Retired Monolingual North American.
When I'm walking the Camino.... I often wonder.... Do they speak English?

I am look for help in how to find (or elicit) clues.

Two things I already do....

I don't say “Buen Camino” I say “Hello, Buen Camino”
My hope is to let people know I am an English speaking Pilgrim.

I look for others with the John Brierley Guide Book.
I assume it is only in English and therefore they must speak English.


Any more ideas ?
It doesn't take long for people hearing me speak French, Spanish or Portuguese to offer English if they've got it, unfortunately. :) The Canadian Company of Pilgrims badge on my backpack is, I expect, a clue.

But you can always ask. Probably a more reliable system than looking at guide books.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I used to feel this way - as if I were lazy by speaking my mother tongue. However, now I think that there needs to be an international language and that English is a good one to take that role. It is a very flexible language, it grew from the common people, has no academic academy in control, is very forgiving of mistakes, and it will continue to adapt.
I certainly recognize my privilege as a native English speaker.

In addition to the benefits you describe, English is also fundamentally, a creole language, born out of the pidgin of the clash between Old English and Norman French in the 11th century. As is often the case with pidgin languages, that simplified the language enormously. English fundamentally lost its case system (only vestiges of which remain in the pronouns) and grammatical gender. The verb conjugations were simplified to the point that we only have one form for the past and one for the future, and two for the present, rather than six each. I could go on. These changes make it much easier to learn English at a basic level.

Sure, it is also a language which follows other languages into dark alleys and robs them of vocabulary, yanking it away so hard that bits of grammar remain attached. That's why it is so inconsistent - in spelling, in plurals and other things. And also why it has such an extensive vocabulary, rich in synonyms. These make it difficult to learn English at a very advanced level. But you don't need an advanced level to communicate.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I hate misquotes:

“The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary.”

They have a way with words, those Canadians, don't they?
 

CAJohn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept/Oct 2019
I speak several languages. It is my hobby. I decided to put little flag pins on my backpack, like you might see on a website (click here for English...). I figured it would let people know that I speak English, Spanish, French and German. I did not get an Italian pin, because my Italian is so poor (at least speaking). Hopefully, it will encourage someone who is shy to say hello.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
Loving this conversation! And noticing that it is all in English. ;) As we converse about which language to speak, etcetcetc.
One thought that comes up for me, not directly related to verbal communication, is that I, and it seems many others, become uncomfortable when in unfamiliar situations. It's about language, but also there are unwritten/spoken ground rules in all our cultures that give us usually unconscious comfort. Preparing for a visit to Brazil, I learned that some of our American hand gestures have very different meaning there... :oops:
I love to travel and/but always have twinges coming into an unfamiliar place. Then things begin to clear....
Thanks to all of your for your comments and especially expressing those uncomfortable/embarrassing things.
 

SSojourn

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Plan walk solo in April. SJP to St. James, Santiago
It's true, like . . . . Kiosk

"Words like ‘kiosk’: that’s a Viking word and it came from when they would rape and pillage. Because they would rape and pillage and awful and blood everywhere and limbs hacked and money stolen, and then they’d say, ‘If you have enjoyed today’s experience, you can get some souvenirs in the kiosk down on the beach."
Eddie Izzard
Wow, that is disgusting. " Can you give me a hand"?
 

SSojourn

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Plan walk solo in April. SJP to St. James, Santiago
I am a Retired Monolingual North American.
When I'm walking the Camino.... I often wonder.... Do they speak English?

I am look for help in how to find (or elicit) clues.

Two things I already do....

I don't say “Buen Camino” I say “Hello, Buen Camino”
My hope is to let people know I am an English speaking Pilgrim.

I look for others with the John Brierley Guide Book.
I assume it is only in English and therefore they must speak English.


Any more ideas ?
Today I used Google translator local Huerta hombre. What a kick. He never did that 😂 before. Ended up walking me " companion" to the way, so I could find an open Albergue in Villava as his town municipal Alb. had been closed for sometime. Villava Alb. Rocks, families, mixed roommates, hot ( did I say HOT?) shower...a little piece of heaven. I am sitting with an Italian couple, we are sharing a table, communication...Spanish
 

stinmd

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - May 2015; Camino del Norte/Primitivo - July/August 2016; Camino Portugues - Sept 2017
I have been studying conversational Spanish for a couple of years now. I can read and speak okay, but the bigger challenge is in listening comprehension. For this, I find a Youtube channel called "Espanol con Juan" very helpful. Thought I'd just pass this along :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo
I am a Retired Monolingual North American.
When I'm walking the Camino.... I often wonder.... Do they speak English?

I am look for help in how to find (or elicit) clues.

Two things I already do....

I don't say “Buen Camino” I say “Hello, Buen Camino”
My hope is to let people know I am an English speaking Pilgrim.

I look for others with the John Brierley Guide Book.
I assume it is only in English and therefore they must speak English.


Any more ideas ?
Do what a lot of Brits do. Talk VERY LOUDLY and VERY S L O W L Y and a person of any nationality will be able to understand you!
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
I am a Retired Monolingual North American.
When I'm walking the Camino.... I often wonder.... Do they speak English?

I am look for help in how to find (or elicit) clues.

Two things I already do....

I don't say “Buen Camino” I say “Hello, Buen Camino”
My hope is to let people know I am an English speaking Pilgrim.

I look for others with the John Brierley Guide Book.
I assume it is only in English and therefore they must speak English.


Any more ideas ?
Monolingual? That sounds like an awful affliction! I am so sorry. On the other hand, ‘retired’ Monlingual sounds hopeful. Perhaps yo are retiring from your Monolingual community into a ‘polyglot’ one? In which case congratulations! 😃
 

Deputy Dan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Logrono to Burgos in week of October (2017); Camino Frances in 2019 or 2020
I always try to learn a few basic terms (hello, WC, beer, wine) wherever I go. On my short Camino I had several Spanish speakers in my group and got by with my usual minimum. But my plan to go back on my own - plus recent trips to Central America - prompted me to get a bit more serious about Spanish. Our state university system offers free tuition to those of us over 62 so I enrolled and am just finishing my second semester of Spanish. Bonus - I can now choose between the student and the senior discounts, though I haven't yet found anyplace that will double up and accept both at the same time! I'm not particularly proficient, but much more confident and better able call ahead to reserve a bunk or to order food with my beverage of choice.
 

Djimbo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Leon to Santiago in Sept.- Oct. (2016)
Antonious I am listening what you are saying are you?
The one monolingual was ok the other one not, that happened to be the non English speaker.
In areas where you don't learn English let's say Russian first in school or like our man from Canada here no other language English is not the common language not on the Camino and please I hope I don't break youalls heart in the rest of the world.
It's nice to find a common language -
a true communicator in my opinion does what needs be but doesn't impose. It's like a looking class if you carry expectations like here of some one else doing what you do you may see one point clear but the rest is blocked. My feelings to this everybody should speek Greek or at least Latin.
There are still Esperanto clubs all over the world...perhaps guidebooks in Klingon might soften those monolingual barriers!
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
I speak several languages. It is my hobby. I decided to put little flag pins on my backpack, like you might see on a website (click here for English...). I figured it would let people know that I speak English, Spanish, French and German. I did not get an Italian pin, because my Italian is so poor (at least speaking). Hopefully, it will encourage someone who is shy to say hello.
I saw a sales person with a name tag ™I speak English. ™An other one had one with Arabic I asume Hindi English and I thought what is he doing here..?
So you can say Hi am Bob I speak Southern.
 

Kos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
non yet
Look for pilgrims with heavy walking boots - they are likely to speak English.

People with yellow guidebooks and "Deuter"-backpacks usually come from Germany, but most of them have learnt English at School.
Deuter backpacks are really nice but hard to get here. The yellow book is the "Schmitke"?
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Hi Bradypus I think it so cut that you have half colonels while across the oceans they have full birds. Always learning here.
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Deuter backpacks are really nice but hard to get here. The yellow book is the "Schmitke"?
Lol. Yellow Joss but called Gelbe and red one Rother.
Plus oldish people like me may have learned Russian. So no win there.
 

Kos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
non yet
I would agree that Montrealers are generally bilingual, but I have spent too long in Rimouski and Chicoutimi among francophone monoglots to say that of Québécois in general. As one drilled through years of Latin, I always regret that it has lost its status as the international language. Habeasne wifi?
WIFI necesse est. Cachinnosus
 

SeattleJen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
First time pilgrim and walking solo. Leaving SJDP around April 5, 2018.
I'm somewhat fluent in French, yet when I am in France, locals immediately identify me as American just from my pronunciation. I only knew a few words in Spanish when I started the camino (I knew quite a bit of Spanish by the time I reached Santiago). When I started, I definitely knew "gracias" and "holla" and used them every time I could -- after all, I believe the kindest sign of respect is to try to speak the language of the locals through whose homeland you are walking. Funny thing is just saying those two words -- nothing else -- and everyone was guessing me to be American. I was at about the halfway point before another American (who was fluent in Spanish) pointed out that the way I said "gracias" and "holla" was very US West Coast, so I clearly was from CA/OR/WA. OH!

My advice: try to learn at least a few words before you leave, and pick up as much as you can on the camino. Not only is it a sign of respect (us Americans are somewhat famous for expecting everyone else to cater to our language limitations), but it exercises your brain and you will have another thing to be proud of. Not only did you achieve the physical feat of walking the camino, you also return home with a little bit of an expanded tongue (and world view?). Buen camino!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/?/Invierno ('19)
Unicuique suum...omne bonum!
(Hey, this is sooooo cool. Who needs English? We have Latin!)
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
WOW!!! Post #101 -

A possibly different perspective? When travelling, I do not give communication a moment's concern. I know we will figure out what needs to be done. Why? When I meet a stranger on the street, on my way somewhere, I have a map and roughly know where I am going but need a bit of help. A smattering of the indigenous language can help but is rarely necessary.

Having said that, I have found that if, say in Spain, if you start by saying something in Spanish, no matter how badly, the effort is incredibly appreciated and the conversation changes from stressed and maybe forced to a calm, happy conversation, maybe some espanol, un poco de ingles. But again, we are both happy when we say, "Adios." 😎
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Hi Bradypus I think it so cut that you have half colonels while across the oceans they have full birds. Always learning here.
Just in case you might use the phrase in the wrong time and place perhaps I should explain that "half colonel" is not an official term :) An informal and perhaps slightly rude way soldiers sometimes refer to a Lieutenant Colonel - the normal rank for the commanding officer of a regiment or battalion in the British Army.
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
I thought so much. You wouldn't address a full bird as such.
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Unicuique suum...omne bonum!
(Hey, this is sooooo cool. Who needs English? We have Latin!)
Yes please lets polish up our kitchen latin. Lingua latina tibi nonnumquam est.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo
Don't forget nobody outside of Île-de-France speaks proper French ;) we can but try to emulate them!
In fact the clearest French I've ever come across was from francophone West Africans - I think the tendency to a deeper voice helps too.
I worked with a French Canadian from Montreal. He visited Paris whereupon the locals asked him to speak English as they had difficulty in understanding his French!
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Not as bad as when I got complemented on my excelent command of the language... it was my mother tongue.. left me without words.. then all I could say... really?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Caastellano was no problem, they see you are foreigner already from afar anyway.
Yes but I encountered many coming toward me, probably on their way to work, that seemed to me to glare rather than smile when I gave them a greeting in castellano (and I always tried to use the word castellano in Spain rather than the Latin American espanol that I learned in school). And definitely Peg and I looked like foreigners.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
An interesting thread..........

However my take on languages is this.

If you are travelling to a country that speaks a language other than yours for an extended period, learn some of the language. It's rude and arrogant not to. We native English speakers are particularly bad at it.
The speak louder and slower brigade ;)

If I'm in a country for a few days I'll at least learn how to say Hello, Goodbye, thank you and a few other simple terms. The locals appreciate it.

I recall working on my first client assignment in Thailand many years ago.
I thought it would be a nice gesture if I could ask the receptionist if the meeting room was available, in Thai.
It only took a couple of minutes to learn the phrase.

She beamed a huge smile when I asked and showed me into the meeting room and brought me a coffee :)

On Camino I learn a few set phrases. I don't always understand the answers, but at least I am making an effort and it always seemed to be appreciated.

It's not that hard to learn a couple of dozen essential words and half a dozen handy phrases.....;)

As for actively seeking out other English speakers? That seems a bit bizarre to me, sorry.
A bit like going to Paris or Rome and seeking out a McDonalds for lunch :rolleyes:

P.S. When I got really stuck a couple of times, I pulled out Google translate on my phone and spoke into it, playing back the translation and the other person gets the idea and speaks their reply into it. Usually causes a few smiles.
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
I carry a German guidebook, but not in my hand while walking. Most people don't, they have them in their pack or hip pack, so this isn't a good way to know if they speak English.
People can often tell from your accent when you say Buen Camino, what your native language might be. It doesn't sound the same when Germans say it or French, or Spanish.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way + voie de Tours + CF + Gulf of Biscay + English Channel)
What I hear along the Camino Frances, is pilgrims nattering all day long in a language in which they are confident. So either they seek each other out or they are naturally drawn to each other along linguistic competency lines. I don’t hear them exchange all day long the few words and phrases they may have taught themselves in Spanish.

I understand a lot of spoken Spanish and can read even more. My active Spanish is poor. In fact, I’ve been lazy with my learning and feel ashamed how atrocious my conversational skills are. Of course local people are gracious, often the elderly, and seem happy to listen and respond. But I’ve come to the conclusion that a few words and phrases are not enough. You need to know your verbs, how to decline them at least in the I and you/usted form and you need a past tense. Where I strongly believe any past tense will do. That’s what I did with French for years and years: passé composé and nothing else. 😃

The overwhelming majority of conversations I had with pilgrims along the Camino Frances was in English, French, German and Dutch, roughly in that order. Rarely in Spanish. Was/is it different for most of you if you are not a native Spanish speaker or competent in Spanish???

So I fully support the OP‘s quest to seek out English speakers. Perhaps that’s because I know more than a few words and phrases in a few (European) languages ....? 😉
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
What I hear along the Camino Frances, is pilgrims nattering all day long in a language in which they are confident. So either they seek each other out or they are naturally drawn to each other along linguistic competency lines. I don’t hear them exchange all day long the few words and phrases they may have taught themselves in Spanish.

I understand a lot of spoken Spanish and can read even more. My active Spanish is poor. In fact, I’ve been lazy with my learning and feel ashamed how atrocious my conversational skills are. Of course local people are gracious, often the elderly, and seem happy to listen and respond. But I’ve come to the conclusion that a few words and phrases are not enough. You need to know your verbs, how to decline them at least in the I and you/usted form and you need a past tense. Where I strongly believe any past tense will do. That’s what I did with French for years and years: passé composé and nothing else. 😃

The overwhelming majority of conversations I had with pilgrims along the Camino Frances was in English, French, German and Dutch, roughly in that order. Rarely in Spanish. Was/is it different for most of you if you are not a native Spanish speaker or competent in Spanish???

So I fully support the OP‘s quest to seek out English speakers. Perhaps that’s because I know more than a few words and phrases in a few (European) languages ....? 😉
That's very true. I cannot hold a conversation in Spanish. I have only learnt enough for 'survival'. And my comments regarding learning Spanish were purely aimed at 'getting by' rather than holding conversation.

In chatting with other Pilgrims we will tend to gravitate toward languages we know. And we often pick up on that by hearing others around us. But often memorable encounters are with those with whom we don't share a common language and we might end up using a third! Or bits of languages.

I suppose like many, given the choice I will gravitate towards conversations with fellow Pilgrims in my native language. English. Though they are often not native English speakers.

Often I'll strike up a conversation with someone who appears not to be a native English speaker just out of curiosity. The conversations might not be long and somewhat awkward, but still enjoyable. I can manage very simple and short conversations in German and French, and Thai, but I have yet to find any Thai Pilgrims other than those I brought with me :rolleyes:

But the cultural 'melting pot' is part of the joy of the Camino isn't it? :)
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/?/Invierno ('19)
sed ut primus inter pares fuerunt ... 😉
:cool:
Well, you win @chinacat . That exhausted my pitiful Latin.
So I cheated and ran it through Google translate...such a delicious paradox.

We can do that with almost any language. Sometimes the results are hilarious, but it basically works.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I am a Retired Monolingual North American.
When I'm walking the Camino.... I often wonder.... Do they speak English?

I am look for help in how to find (or elicit) clues.

Two things I already do....

I don't say “Buen Camino” I say “Hello, Buen Camino”
My hope is to let people know I am an English speaking Pilgrim.

I look for others with the John Brierley Guide Book.
I assume it is only in English and therefore they must speak English.


Any more ideas ?

For me, camino preparation includes walking distances ahead of time, making sure I have the right gear and proper fitting equipment and thatI have enough survival phrases written or some sort of translator to reach out, at least to the host country proprietors. When I am visiting their country, I have no expectations that others will speak English. This way,I take responsibility for getting what I need. IMO, (as a bilingual American) to begin a conversation by relating in Spanish or any FL ....”Please excuse me, but I do not speak Spanish/French..can you help me” ..is a good way to start communication. If the person does not speak your language take out your prepared card with phrases or a translator. This year I turned 70,and am working on portugese phrases for our next Camino. Ultreia is not just walking!
 

freespirit

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Lourdes v SJPDP - Santiago (June/July 2010) Camino Frances - SJPDP - Santiago (July/August 2015) Camino Frances - SJPDP - Santiago (June/July/August 2017)
I walked my first two caminos using a Spanish language guidebook. I have not used a printed guidebook since. And I would not be carrying Brierley's guide no matter what language it was translated into.
I have walked the camino frances twice and this year about to do my third and I only know a few words of Spanish, but have always got by also most of the people you come across speak a few words of English, so its give and take also you can always use hand signals and as for Brierleys guide that is up to the walker i found on my first two caminos that because there was plenty of yellow arrows and markers along the way i still missed seeing a lot so on my next trip in June have marked down the places i intend to visit this time round and you need a guide book to know whats what,to give you an idea of what i mean how many of camino walkers have seen or know of Our lady of the crag, a church (built into the side of the cliffs) and what lies within on the way out of Tosantos i passed it twice because i was day dreaming, and there are quite a few other places of interest on the camino that can be missed, also the guide is something to read.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
@VNwalking

:cool:
Well, you win @chinacat .
On the contrary .... your inspired post (quoted in my last) wins hands down! ⭐

:cool:
... Google translate ....
We can do that with almost any language. Sometimes the results are hilarious, but it basically works.
Try running @Delphinoula “Lingua latina tibi nonnumquam est.“ through Google translate ... 😉😄😂

On a more serious (?) note, Latin enabled me to understand/translate a lot of an academic paper, in Spanish, on the gospel of St. John, whereas I really struggle to ‘hear’ Spanish, let alone speak it ... 😕
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/?/Invierno ('19)
On the contrary .... your inspired post (quoted in my last) wins hands down! ⭐
De gustibus non disputandem est.....
And my gustibus is different from yours.;)🙃
Try running @Delphinoula “Lingua latina tibi nonnumquam est.“ through Google translate ... 😉😄😂
OMG...:eek:🤣🤣🤣
How'd they get that?
What is even more bizarre is if you then take what they give you, and hit the little arrows at the top to exchange Latin and English you get even other things....

But to get back to the OP's topic...Rob's idea to speak into Google Translate and play back the result is still not a bad one. And any mis-translation that results can be the cause of a good deal of inter-linguistic hilarity.
@Robo, have you gotten any strange or puzzled looks, doing this? (As in..."Huh??? Do you really man that?")
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
I hate misquotes:

“The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary.”

They have a way with words, those Canadians, don't they?
This has caused me to almost choke to death...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Not all North Americans are citizens of the US - the OP is from Canada 🇨🇦;)

(Mexico in in North America too 🇲🇽)
Well, thanks, Jeff. I am always careful about discriminating between USA and Canada, but I confess to a total ignorance of the fact that Mexico also belongs to North America. Not any more. Now I know....
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
... sed ut primus inter pares fuerunt ... 😉



🙃
Latin is a language as dead as dead can be it killed the ancient Romans and now it’s killing me. I had the false nerve to write that in my final Latin exam paper at the end of 3rd year secondary school. I really wanted to be excused, as the teacher was such a bully. He preferred the boys and the smart girls. I was called to the Principal. I used my only weapon. Tears. I was excused from further Latin classes... and then I learned some more. What a pity. I leave you with a lovely life lesson:
And then I learned some more...
Pat Ingoldsby

I used to believe
There were little men in the radio
There was nothing my father didn’t know
I must eat all my dinner to grow
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
A hand will grab me from under the bed
Fire engines are always red
I mustn’t sleep till my prayers are said
And then I learned some more

I used to believe I’m a boy so I mustn’t cry
Priests go to heaven when they die
My tongue turns black if I tell a lie
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
You milk a cow with a three-legged stool
Black babies are a penny each at school
I must not call my brother a fool
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
Cabbage and carrots will make me strong
Sermons on Sunday are much too long
Every other church is wrong
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
America is good and Russia is bad
I mustn’t cry when I’m feeling sad
Anyone who acts strange is mad
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
English people have got horns on their heads
Only married people sleep in double beds
Big boys smoke in the bicycle sheds
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
If I get my sums right all is well
If I kiss a girl I must kneel and tell
If I enjoy it I’ll go straight to hell
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
My father has got all the money he needs
In Africa you buy things with beads
Sex has got something to do with seeds
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
All poor people eat bread and lard
The teacher is allowed to hit me hard
I must be tough outside in the yard
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
All Gaul is divided into three
Everybody knows about sex but me
There are parts of my sister I mustn’t see
And then I learned some more

I used to believe
The same road waits for every man
A good job has got a pension plan
Money is the measure of who I am
Thank god I learned some more
 

Tandem Graham

Every new day an adventure
Camino(s) past & future
Bike: Mont St Michel to CF and part Norte (all 2017) Budapest to Vezelay (2018).
Walk: Le Puy (2018)
After starting with “Buen camino”, I usually ask, in English, “Where are you from?” This is a very neutral question and may lead to an English language back and forth.

In retirement I have put a lot of effort into improvement of my French. As a slow walker, when I am overtaken by people speaking French, I address them in their language.

Tom
I cycle tour in many European countries. French cycle tourists often fly their flag to signify their Frenchness (I presume because few others choose to speak their language). French is my only slightly competent second language, so I always make a point of talking to them, in their language. They are without exception delighted to chat in their mother tongue, even if they have to slow down (their pedalling and their jabbering!).
I have attended 4 terms of Spanish evening classes, but my ability is still poorer than kindergarten.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
De gustibus non disputandem est.....
And my gustibus is different from yours.;)🙃

OMG...:eek:🤣🤣🤣
How'd they get that?
What is even more bizarre is if you then take what they give you, and hit the little arrows at the top to exchange Latin and English you get even other things....
... fui ibi, done that, gonna put it all on a t-shirt 😉
(the full latin was somewhat lost in translation ... 🙃 )

But to get back to the OP's topic...Rob's idea to speak into Google Translate and play back the result is still not a bad one. And any mis-translation that results can be the cause of a good deal of inter-linguistic hilarity.
@Robo, have you gotten any strange or puzzled looks, doing this? (As in..."Huh??? Do you really man that?")

There’s an App that does it ‘directly’ .... I can’t remember the name at the moment .... ah, found it ... it’s called “Speak and Translate”. Free trial and then a monthly fee. Perhaps Rob’s way is better ... it’s certainly cheaper ... 🙂
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
Gotta love the Vikings and Eddie Izzard, but kiosk comes from a Middle Persian word for a garden pavilion:

I think it was the Paris Metro that took some inspiration from the architecture of the east and applied the name "kiosk" to booths where you can buy tickets, snacks, and souvenirs.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I was going to apologize for my off-topic comment, but there doesn’t seem to be a topic anymore! In any event, I am enjoying all of these posts very much. (Have to confess from my moderator vantage point, that I am very pleasantly surprised to see that though we may have gone way off topic, we have stayed very rigidly on the path of politeness and respect!).

I do speak Spanish and some Portuguese, so on the Camino I don’t have many problems understanding people. In Germany it is another story. Years ago, when my husband and I were in Germany, he had spent some time brushing up on his decades-old German language study. On our first morning in Berlin, we could not find the breakfast room. My husband carefully put together what he thought was a proper German question, only to hear in response (in German) — I’m sorry I don’t speak English, do you speak German? At that point I decided that life really was too short for me to learn German, and I am sorry if that qualifies me as a language imperialist. :)

Buen camino to all, Laurie
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
But to get back to the OP's topic...Rob's idea to speak into Google Translate and play back the result is still not a bad one. And any mis-translation that results can be the cause of a good deal of inter-linguistic hilarity.
@Robo, have you gotten any strange or puzzled looks, doing this? (As in..."Huh??? Do you really man that?")
A few times and we had lots of fun with it, particularly with one the physios we visited! Couldn't stop laughing!
 
Last edited:

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/?/Invierno ('19)
At that point I decided that life really was too short for me to learn German, and I am sorry if that qualifies me as a language imperialist. :)
No, Laurie, it means that you are simply a realist.:cool:
Couldn't stop laughing!
Do you have any idea what Google was saying you were saying?
"My knee has a jet engine,"...that kind of ridiculous gibberish? Or was it just funny syntax and word choice?
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Gotta love the Vikings and Eddie Izzard, but kiosk comes from a Middle Persian word for a garden pavilion:

I think it was the Paris Metro that took some inspiration from the architecture of the east and applied the name "kiosk" to booths where you can buy tickets, snacks, and souvenirs.
Another myth debunked! Damn you Google search engine!
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
No, Laurie, it means that you are simply a realist.:cool:
Do you have any idea what Google was saying you were saying?
"My knee has a jet engine,"...that kind of ridiculous gibberish? Or was it just funny syntax and word choice?
No not really any idea. We had a bad connection and were only get partial translations.
But we had a lot of fun!
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
Another myth debunked! Damn you Google search engine!
I know ... Chats at the pub aren't as entertaining now that everyone has Google on their phone to verify facts.
But, believe it or not, I knew the etymology of kiosk without reference to Google.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I know ... Chats at the pub aren't as entertaining now that everyone has Google on their phone to verify facts.
But, believe it or not, I knew the etymology of kiosk without reference to Google.
Restores my faith in humankind - triumph over the machines!;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Burgos-SdC (May-June 2016); CF, SJPDP-SdC (April-June 2018); Norte (June-July 2019)
I have been studying conversational Spanish for a couple of years now. I can read and speak okay, but the bigger challenge is in listening comprehension. For this, I find a Youtube channel called "Espanol con Juan" very helpful. Thought I'd just pass this along :)
@stinmd many thanks for the Youtube suggestion. I like Juan’s teaching method — lots of repetition, clear explanations, and he’s quite an amusing character. And great practice for that Castilian accent. I’ve got a few weeks to brush up and Juan can help!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I never used a Brierley.
I own one, but can't say that I've used it. :)
I speak several languages. It is my hobby. I decided to put little flag pins on my backpack, like you might see on a website (click here for English...). I figured it would let people know that I speak English, Spanish, French and German.
As a native English speaker that has been trying for years to become conversant in Spanish I officially hate you. 😂😂😂
When I started, I definitely knew "gracias" and "holla"
Hmmm, not sure what holla (pronounced o-ya) is. :)
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/?/Invierno ('19)
As a native English speaker that has been trying for years to become conversant in Spanish I officially hate you. 😂😂😂
I have to admit to just a smidgin of envy, too. But I'm used to it. I spend a lot of time with someone who is seriously multilingual...and I am never in this life going to be that.
 

Lel

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2006)
Camino Portuguese (2017)
I am a Retired Monolingual North American.
When I'm walking the Camino.... I often wonder.... Do they speak English?

I am look for help in how to find (or elicit) clues.

Two things I already do....

I don't say “Buen Camino” I say “Hello, Buen Camino”
My hope is to let people know I am an English speaking Pilgrim.

I look for others with the John Brierley Guide Book.
I assume it is only in English and therefore they must speak English.


Any more ideas ?
You could try saying - do you speak English? L
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
PixieAuror Miscellaneous Camino Frances topics 5
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