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Do you drop any personal restrictions on Camino?

David

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
First one in 2005 from Moissac, France.
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
 
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Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Interesting question @David. Not an easy one to answer for me. I’ve lived my entire life with a philosophy close to: “I’ll do what I want to do when I want to do it”. Like you I buy locally produced food, in season, and adapt my diet to what is available: what I’ve grown, shot, foraged or found. I’ll admit I buy wine from all over the world but mostly from Europe (including England- praise be).

In Spain, and on Camino, I’m always grateful for what I’m given though I’ll choose a supermarket frozen vegetable paella over a menu purgatorio whenever I can. Off that 1km wide linear city that is the Camino Frances most of the food served in the places that I like to eat encompasses my food preferences anyway. And I’ll always choose the lentils over the lomo. Factory farmed meat? Been disgust (pardon) here before.

Coffee? I don’t drink a lot of coffee at home either but in Spain that cafe solo is essential to stop the burn 🔥 of the breakfast Orujo.

Perhaps I never really separate “here” and “Camino”. As dear Janis Joplin ever so nearly put it: “ it’s all the same {%^^{}^ Way, man”. 😉😉
 
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So, basically, are we “different” on the camino?

Yes, I am, big time.

At home I spend all day every day on my computer (very intensive genealogical research) and I get very frustrated when the internet or power goes off for hours at a time (disadvantages of where I live), and yet, on the camino I do not miss my computer at all.

I don’t even think about it.

I tend to embrace the camino as a whole, where I am, what I’m doing, eat what’s going, chat with whoever is there – and if there’s no-one there then I’ll read a book on the kindle on my phone.

I seem to live a different life on the camino.

So which one is the real me? 🤔
 
To go with that: In my normal life, I don't talk to strangers.
Really? Really, how does that go? I’ve had conversations with several total strangers today and yet all I did was go for a ten mile walk in rural Sussex. I’ve discussed the weather (England: it’s even more exciting than our politics and much more common ground); I’ve discussed the proliferation of Muntjac deer; the tragedy of neglect of rural churches and, the impact of easily installed electric pizza ovens on the menu in rural pubs. I discovered that one random acquaintance used to poach the same rivers I did and that we both packed it in about the same time when the agricultural runoff into our river systems meant that there weren’t any gravel beds left for the Sewin to spawn on. We both needed a pint to mourn that passing. Luckily the Royal Oak was open.

If you, and @K_Lynn this isn’t aimed at you ‘cos I’m guessing you’re saying you’ll chat to strangers on Camino (perhaps we could have a chat sometime) but, in normal life, if you don’t talk to strangers you will never find new friends. And, hey, you don’t have to sleep with them …
 
idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.
I didn't know you cared so much about my personal moral and ethical choices! Nor did I understand that the mere fact of doing the Camino gave some form of permission to relax any of these.

While my lack of adherence to the first three or four of the ten commandments might appall dedicated Christians, I tend not to be a scoff law when I am travelling. If anything, I am more likely to want to comply with national, state and local laws than when I am at home. The difficulty, when one is in a foreign country, is knowing exactly what those laws are and how they are applied,

Fortunately, I am not vegan nor vegetarian based on ethical considerations about the use of animals and animal products for food, but I imagine this would be a particular dilemma for those that are. For me, food might involve personal choices, but I don't see my choices of food and liquid refreshments to consume as matters of great significance. Certainly I would be less rigorous in selecting food items based on calorific value, or fat and sugar content. But I don't see this as a matter of not observing some personal lifestyle or ethical restrictions, and I wonder why that would be of any interest to you.

The final area, one already raised, is how I might relate to other pilgrims on the road or in albergues, etc. While I walk alone most of the time, I always exchange greetings with fellow pilgrims, and might chat with some for a short while. In albergues I will introduce myself to my neighbours, fellow pilgrims in the common areas, etc. That said, I am reluctant to break into and join a group that has already formed into a 'camino family'. For me, couples require particular care, as it is not always clear whether these are in permanent relationships outside the camino, or are walking together as chance companions. The fact that, in general, we are in a shared endeavour on the Camino does go some way to lower the social barriers that might exist in our non-camino lives to engaging with others.

Is there anything else? Perhaps there are other things I might do differently, but I cannot think of any that I think walking the camino itself gives some permission for that.
 
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Really? Really, how does that go? I’ve had conversations with several total strangers today and yet all I did was go for a ten mile walk in rural Sussex. I’ve discussed the weather (England: it’s even more exciting than our politics and much more common ground); I’ve discussed the proliferation of Muntjac deer; the tragedy of neglect of rural churches and, the impact of easily installed electric pizza ovens on the menu in rural pubs. I discovered that one random acquaintance used to poach the same rivers I did and that we both packed it in about the same time when the agricultural runoff into our river systems meant that there weren’t any gravel beds left for the Sewin to spawn on. We both needed a pint to mourn that passing. Luckily the Royal Oak was open.

If you, and @K_Lynn this isn’t aimed at you ‘cos I’m guessing you’re saying you’ll chat to strangers on Camino (perhaps we could have a chat sometime) but, in normal life, if you don’t talk to strangers you will never find new friends. And, hey, you don’t have to sleep with them …
I rarely see anyone when out walking my dog, admittedly they are very short but frequent walks as she is very old. I live in a bizarre world where most people do not walk. My arduous, completely hill free 1km walk to the grocery store will usually be entirely vacant of other people until I get near the store.

I did have two conversations with strangers last week! One with a gentleman that lives 4 houses down. It was our first conversation in the 10 years I have lived here, we have nodded and said hello as we pass, but this time he stopped to talk about my dog - her age, blah blah, the dogs he had etc. It was nice, I should have asked his name lol. A day later a random woman I have never seen before stopped to ask about my dog as well lol. Apparently she has watched me walk the dog several times a day for the last 7 years. The dog's name is Isa (after the Futhark rune for ice) and she will be 15 in September, she's a black lab great Pyrenees goof that is not nearly as large as I had hoped she would be.

So I will talk to strangers. I make idle chitchat when in a store and occasionally will insert myself into random conversations because I have no shame. lol And as we can see here. I will chat via the internets with random strangers.

I would love a conversation with you. Your posts are always full of humour and information.
 
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
At home, I avoid sugar. I expect that will be impractical to maintain on the Camino. From what I've read, it sounds like a lot of the food I'll be eating will be prepared by others, with no way to know all the ingredients.
 
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Chips aka crisps. Ate them almost everyday (tomato flavor yum). They were my electrolytes 😆 no restrictions whatsoever lol. Counting the sleeps to when I can do it again as it is a BIG restriction at home. Other than that, same person whose values and ethics were to respect the country I had the privilege of walking across it’s entire length.
 
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Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.
Well, I won't talk about the restrictions that are endemic to any Camino.

But I found, after I pushed past my old three month psychological barrier of previous Caminos in 2022, and settled into a different and more "permanent" Camino routine, that walking the Camino in that frame of mind was more like my normal daily routine at home, just on the move and living out of my backpack instead of in my place. Smartphone instead of computer, sleeping in Albergues or outdoors instead of in my own bed, but fundamentally not much difference.

Just some tiny detail drinks I generally avoid -- I will occasionally drink a Coke on the Camino, which I almost never do at home ; and like some others have mentioned, I also drink a LOT more coffee on Camino, and that's irrelevant as to whether it's Spanish, Portuguese, French, or Italian. Also, it's more often café con leche, café au lait, cappuccino or other milk coffee than espresso or other black coffee than at home.

It's hard to think of anything else -- as to food, I learned to my disadvantage that I need to maintain my food restrictions on Camino, my 2021 stage was ended from my not having done so and eaten too much of what I generally shouldn't.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaust energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
Whilst at home, I tend not to walk in to town with my underwear hanging on the outside of my bag.
Tried it once . . . People can be so unkind . . . . . .
A positive was getting some great recommendations for therapists in the local area 🤣
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.
Very similar, although as @Tincatinker I'll avoid cheap meats where possible.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Nope, what you see on Camino is how I am at home as far as I can.
Since my first Camino I realised I had to try and be more tolerant of others and their ways and have taken that on board and brought that home with me

Upon my return I have found myself trying hard to stop saying Buen Camino to everybody I encounter ( much like Mick Dundee saying G'Day to everybody in the movie Crocodile Dundee )
 
I don't drink wine at all at home, but on the Camino, it's daily. There's something to be said about local wines that are not loaded with preservatives.
I generally do not eat carbs at home ( and was told once by a medical professional that I am gluten intolerant ) but the camino is a carb walk...the breads, rice dishes, etc...it didn't kill me.
I don't haul vitamins and supplements with me while walking, no difference at all in how I felt. Resumed once I returned home.
I find kindness in strangers much more out on the camino than here at home. Very much enjoy engaging with others from all walks of life and far away places. It's what keeps me coming back.
I've enjoyed this thread...interesting how we give ourselves permission to be a bit different on the camino.
 
Whilst at home, I tend not to walk in to town with my underwear hanging on the outside of my bag.
Tried it once . . . People can be so unkind . . . . . .
A positive was getting some great recommendations for therapists in the local area 🤣
I tried a trekking umbrella on a camino and wound up not using it much. But in my sole local, pre-camino training with it on a hot, sunny day, the first person I met, a cyclist, rode by and shouted, "Hello there, Mary Poppins!" I probably should have waited to unveil such a fashion statement until the Camino.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

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Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
I rarely drink fizzy soft drinks at home. On my first Camino I discovered Schweppes Limón and that became my afternoon post-walk post-shower go to drink. I struggle to maintain my weight when on the Camino so happy to eat way more fried food than I would consider at home. Otherwise keep to old habits
 
Hi, one afternoon, I found myself hanging some pilgrim ladies underwears to dry, which I never do at home. That's a funny memory because in the context of pilgrims sharing a washing machine in an alberge, it was perfectly normal !
 
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.
This is forward looking for me, as my first Camino will be next May-June. I don't eat octopus at home: they're just so smart. I expect to set that aside on the Camino. Other than that, I am Looking Forward to finding out what changes for me, immersing myself in the experience and culture.

This has been a delightful thread.
 
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Yes! I usually eat low carb, but I’m eating bread. I usually don’t drink but I’m having wine. I usually don’t have caffeine last 12 but I’m drink espresso and Coke Zero, no wonder I’m not sleeping well LOL.

I’m just trying to live with the flow of things. I usually ask a server for “what’s traditional” and am striving for an authentic experience, I’m trying NOT to make this trip like my life at home, I’m striving for the opposite.

I’m also trying to speak as much Spanish as possible. I mean DUH, but honestly I’m so uncomfortable with it, I’m really coming out of my shell in that regard.
 
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
I don’t worry about soft beds, eat what I need and never overeat on the Camino. At home now I’m less picky about my bed. I still overeat though. Got to sort that out…
 
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
Intermittent Fasting and low carb diet Lol. Impossible for me to do it here!
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I rarely see anyone when out walking my dog, admittedly they are very short but frequent walks as she is very old. I live in a bizarre world where most people do not walk. My arduous, completely hill free 1km walk to the grocery store will usually be entirely vacant of other people until I get near the store.

I did have two conversations with strangers last week! One with a gentleman that lives 4 houses down. It was our first conversation in the 10 years I have lived here, we have nodded and said hello as we pass, but this time he stopped to talk about my dog - her age, blah blah, the dogs he had etc. It was nice, I should have asked his name lol. A day later a random woman I have never seen before stopped to ask about my dog as well lol. Apparently she has watched me walk the dog several times a day for the last 7 years. The dog's name is Isa (after the Futhark rune for ice) and she will be 15 in September, she's a black lab great Pyrenees goof that is not nearly as large as I had hoped she would be.

So I will talk to strangers. I make idle chitchat when in a store and occasionally will insert myself into random conversations because I have no shame. lol And as we can see here. I will chat via the internets with random strangers.

I would love a conversation with you. Your posts are always full of humour and information.
Well, you live in a town where the streets are extra wide because of your Winter snows... (I was thinking of moving there, and it was an interesting place to visit!) I think that the amount of pavement is an impediment to chatting or being casually "neighborly" with anyone not on your side of the street?
 
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
I generally eat everything I want, drink all I want, stop wherever, etc, but I have learned that eating a menu del dia at lunchtime and drinking the whole bottle of wine has deleterious effects on walking the remaining 20 km that day, so I have restricted that a bit😀
 
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Well, you live in a town where the streets are extra wide because of your Winter snows... (I was thinking of moving there, and it was an interesting place to visit!) I think that the amount of pavement is an impediment to chatting or being casually "neighborly" with anyone not on your side of the street?
I promise our streets are not extra wide. There are some that are, buy many in neighbourhoods tend to about 2 lanes wide, but people park on the street. Parking on the street means streets never get plowed properly (and where it is plowed it is merely pushed towards the curb) and over time each lane becomes a meter narrower. I've watched firetrucks sit and wait, sirens blaring because a car is driving towards them and the street is effectively one lane in winter. It's madness.

I moved here for love (my partner was transferred), not for the climate, the lack of sidewalks or the dismal transit system. :D Had I visited prior I might have decided single life was better.
 
I’m just trying to live with the flow of things. I usually ask a server for “what’s traditional” and am striving for an authentic experience, I’m trying NOT to make this trip like my life at home, I’m striving for the opposite.

We should set up a monolith at Roncesvalles with this carved into it in a multitude of languages!!
It is Exactly that!! 👍
 
I pretty much break every restriction I have in place ..My daily life is quite restrictive in that clients are expecting fast & accurate opinions on their property purchases .. i plan my meals for my family I have a set get up and go to bed routine . I walk around the same lake everyday...all very routine ..not complaining but just love the randomness of the Camino. I love that I have no idea of where I am going , where I am staying , who I am going to meet and how far will I go . Food couldnt careless as long as I can have a G & T then all is good
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
At home I am usually “dry” during the week. On the Camino I drink wine ever day. Spanish wine for every day drinking seems to lighter on alcohol than Australian wine.
Also for me wine is part of the Camino “spirit”.
 
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
Coffee for me is a must, in Spain as well as in Sweden or any other place on earth.
That aside, I try to stick to local products which is not too difficult on the Camino.
Not fanatically though...
 
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Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

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To go with that: In my normal life, I don't talk to strangers.

This.

I have a restricted diet when on Camino. Last year all I bought/ate was Chorizo, Cheese, a bag of Rocket or Lambs Lettuce every day and yoghurt drinks. Soft drinks were water, aquarius or sugar free monster. I also had spaghetti and oxo in my pack for cooking (via a gas stove) when needed. So all in all, my diet was more restrictive than when at home. I still drank alcohol though. ;)

Everything else is how it is for everyone. Body clock moves to going to bed by 10, getting up at 6, walking for 8-10 hours a day, eating when I want and everything else. The upside is it's generally warm.
 
We try to make healthy food choices on the camino and at home and try to be respectful of people and our environment. Circumstances, may not always be optimal, but no real significant changes.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I generally only drink coffee on the Camino. My eating schedule on the Camino is very different from regular life. To @dougfitz's point, I don't consider either of these really relaxing my ethical standards.
 
I hardly ever drink Coca-Cola anymore, but at the end of long Camino stage it is always so refreshing to have one. Also, those chips (crisps) with the “sabor jamon” …. I don’t have those at home either!7410C0E1-1100-47FF-BD02-862EAC9FAF0F.jpeg
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
I typically eat low carb at home...but on the Camino??? Bread, Bread, Bread. lol
 
Sadly, the local Portuguese bakery down here on the French Riviera, which still has very excellent Portuguese pastries, has switched from Delta coffee to an Italian brand.

It's smoother, but that's not what you want in a Portuguese coffee ; and it's not Italian either, because they make it in a Portuguese style. For proper Italian, there is a MUCH better place a couple of hundred metres downhill.

Disappointing !!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I’m just trying to live with the flow of things. I usually ask a server for “what’s traditional” and am striving for an authentic experience, I’m trying NOT to make this trip like my life at home, I’m striving for the opposite.
I read a blog post years ago complaining about things that Spain does differently than America—written by someone living in Barcelona. Felt like commenting “There’s no place like home, so if that’s what you want, stay there!"

My biggest differences: in Spain, I consume far more wine and far more olive oil than elsewhere. Also, here I walk on sidewalks next to busy streets. Or along the nearby railroad tracks.
 
Hi .. idly thinking and was wondering what sort of restrictions (personal lifestyle/ethics choices) you may drop when on Camino.

Par ex: I rarely ever drink coffee - too much caffeine for me .. a few times on Camino I have been completely caffeine free but I found this year that I seem to have relaxed in a number of areas and really enjoyed coffee - that strong Spanish coffee! - whenever I wanted and somehow it didn't seem to be a negative for me ...

For me food is an obvious one. In the UK I only buy UK produce (apart from olive oil, pasta, and wine - and that is all close France or Spain); no exotics flown from far overseas, no veg or fruit out of season, all my meat home grown, high welfare, and mainly outdoor reared; eggs, milk, organic, etc - on Camino? I happily eat what I get given, no questions asked, no guilt, no thought about it.

My home body clock goes out the window, obvious really, and I just fit in to exhaustion, energy, sleeping, not sleeping, eating, not eating as it all manifests each day and night and, again, never think about it. On Camino for me it just is.

So was wondering how it is for others ....
I eat and drink whatever comes to me on the Camino. And that’s fine :)
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
I don’t generally listen to audiobooks at home, but completed 20 books on my 30 day Camino Francis trek.

Found it nearly impossible to stay vegan in Spain, so my diet was vegetarian on the Camino.. but even that was challenge.

I’ve never thought it possible for me to walk the length of a marathon, but I’ve done it twice on the Camino.. never since.

Never thought I’d ever sleep on a three-tier bunk bed with strangers, but got stuck doing it on the Camino Primitivo.

On all my treks, I’ve found more *patience* than I generally have during my days at home. I like that aspect of THE WAY. :)
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.

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