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Does anyone wear gloves for sweaty hands on hiking poles?

0 Euro Camino Bank Note

CatPhillips

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016, Norte 2017, Primitivo 2017, Norte 2019, Primitivo 2019.
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?
 

malingerer

Active Member
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?
I too have sweaty hands and pacer poles! Being old and arthritic I find I have to keep my hands protected. Particularly on cold mornings. My glove of choice has also been cyclists fingerless mitts with leather palms. My main problem is losing them! I too have often wondered if I was the only person with this problem. A trawl around charity shops is always handy for a supply of cheapies and failing that just cut the fingers off whatever gloves are to hand. Not very elegant but needs must :) Good luck anyway!

Yours aye,

The Malingerer.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Don't forget what Heather advises about how to hold PPs:

Forget about the pole, just be aware of the hands/forearms moving up-and-down at your side (not out in front) left hand goes up passed your hip when the right leg moves forward etc. Feel the upward and forward thrust each time your hand pushes downwards and backwards - don’t grip the handle, push against it.


If you grip hard it’s the equivalent of lacing-up your boots too tight - which disrupts the flow of movement over the joints so they can’t function as they should. As the body pivots over the shaft tip, loading is being controlled and directed through the hand/handle’s contours as a dynamic action. Relax the fingers - just pressure between thumb and index finger is usually all that is needed to retain the pole. Gripping the handle tightly wastes energy, and can cause sweat (as can suncream / insect repellent on the hands). plus jamming the sides of the fingers together skin-to-skin can also cause sweat. By allowing air to circulate as the hand/palm peels away from the handle at the end of each stride, allows the skin to 'breathe' (see hand images on the Product page/What is a Pacerpole).


Before I got my PPs I had cork handled Lekis - don't remember them getting sweaty.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
I wear lightweight gloves but not because of sweaty hands.

To stop sunburn.........
They also avoid any chafing of the hands in the web between thumb and forefinger. (never had it)
Though as advised above, the handles are not 'gripped' at all.
It's a very light touch, with the downward pressure being applied through the straps only.
 

Theresa Brandon

Artist, photographer, dreamer
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (2018)
I made sleeves for my Pacer pole handles. I used the ankle cuffs from worn out wool socks and kept them in place with a rubber band on each one. They provided a bit of padding, too.
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF x 3
A different approach one could try is to go to a tennis equipment store and buy racket grip tape/wraps. They come in many varieties but perhaps a shammy style wrap would be the most absorbent and 'grippy' and come in many different colours. For PP's I suppose you would need to use a light 2-sided tape due to the irregular grips but then at least they would stay perfectly fixed in place?

1566839413266.png
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, Madrid (2019) Portuges (2020)
A different approach one could try is to go to a tennis equipment store and buy racket grip tape/wraps. They come in many varieties but perhaps a shammy style wrap would be the most absorbent and 'grippy' and come in many different colours. For PP's I suppose you would need to use a light 2-sided tape due to the irregular grips but then at least they would stay perfectly fixed in place?

View attachment 63968

What a great idea. I already have strips of reflective tape on my poles (for early starts and road walking) and a wrap of gaffer tape, but some chamois-type tape on the handles would be luxury.

To the OP - I hope you find a solution. Don’t give up on the pacer-poles.
 

CatPhillips

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016, Norte 2017, Primitivo 2017, Norte 2019, Primitivo 2019.
These are all great ideas. I love the idea of putting something on the handles, I hadn't thought of that! Thanks to everyone! And I don't think I'll ever give up on my pacer poles. Love them!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - Sarria to Santiago (2018)
Frances - Burgos to Santiago (2019)
Cycling gloves are great and some have gel padding if desired. Also, as others have stated, don't grip poles too tightly. Be sure to use the wrist straps as that if placed correctly, you can let the pole somewhat "swing" without much grip and thereby increase air circulation to hands.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
My Lekis are still going strong, after 30+ years ... but my touch on the handles is very light ... mainly for ‘guidance’.
I took an old pair of very thin riding gloves, with thin patches on the palm (for reins), but only used them when needed in inclement weather.
 

Micah26

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France's (2018)
Catphillipes,

I worried about this cause I have neuropathy and have to grip my poles... I bought weight lifting gloves in sports section Walmart $10. They are fingerless and padded. For me they did the trick! I tried baseball batting gloves but preferred the fingerless and padding. Try a couple options... I’m sure you will find something that works best for you! Bien Camino!
 

Walkerooni

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
An alternative is to buy actual trekking poles. Held properly, by putting your hand up through the loop from the bottom, and then dropping your hand to the handle, letting the strap take all weight, allows you to barely grip the pole. No gloves required. And way more stable for ups, downs, and flats.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I too have sweaty hands and pacer poles! Being old and arthritic I find I have to keep my hands protected. Particularly on cold mornings. My glove of choice has also been cyclists fingerless mitts with leather palms. My main problem is losing them! I too have often wondered if I was the only person with this problem. A trawl around charity shops is always handy for a supply of cheapies and failing that just cut the fingers off whatever gloves are to hand. Not very elegant but needs must :) Good luck anyway!

Yours aye,

The Malingerer.
If you haven't forgot them in that chino store after purchase you're OK :D
 

CatPhillips

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016, Norte 2017, Primitivo 2017, Norte 2019, Primitivo 2019.
Thanks everyone. For what it's worth, I don't think I do grip my poles too tightly. It's just that they're all plastic and it's hot outside. Ya gotta touch the plastic at some point. ;) But thanks for the suggestions.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
An alternative is to buy actual trekking poles. Held properly, by putting your hand up through the loop from the bottom, and then dropping your hand to the handle, letting the strap take all weight, allows you to barely grip the pole. No gloves required. And way more stable for ups, downs, and flats.
Why do you think that Pacer Poles aren't actual trekking poles??

A different approach one could try is to go to a tennis equipment store and buy racket grip tape/wraps.
I'm not sure how well this would work. The unique thing about Pacer Poles is their ergonomic grip, which isn't cylindrical.
pacerpole grip.jpg
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Just back from a 5k hike through the woods and decided to try gripping the PPs and, what do you know, they do get sticky!
Then went back to my normal hold and, something I'd never noticed before, I found that I hold them between thumb and first finger as recommended plus my fourth finger. Fingers two and ring barely touch the handle at their tips. No idea why I do this but it does mean the air gets between palm and handle.
I'll try with fingerless cycling mitts next walk.
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF x 3
The unique thing about Pacer Poles is their ergonomic grip, which isn't cylindrical.
Understood, @trecile, that’s why I would suggest laying the 2-sided tape over the entire surface and then laying the wrap on the tape with a slight overlap still. Because the pressure is still primarily downward, I hope it would hold well in place. I guess trying this at home before leaving would be a good idea to see if it holds well ;)
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?
I sweat profusely and I wear these fingerless sun-protective gloves. They have suede on the areas of the palms that contact hiking poles. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00V5RXW1G/?tag=casaivar02-20
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
I have found the optimum solution (for me) is to wear a pair of finger-less (no fingertips), microfiber, FISHING GLOVES. You can find them online.

The best have grippy dots on the palms to aid on gripping fishing (and hiking) poles when your hands are sweaty. The fabric has built in sun resistance, usually like SPF 50. So that saves putting slimy sun block on.

I wear mine in all weather; sun, rain or snow. In the evening, I rinse them in a sink and they dry out very rapidly.

Be sure to get a light color, to attenuate the effect of the hot Spanish sun. I prefer tan or light grey. Avoid dark colors.

In six Caminos, I have used two pair of gloves. The first thing to give out is usually a seam. But, if you are handy with a needle and thread, this is easily remedied.

Hope this helps.
 

Chris Gi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago. 2020 May or end of September.
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?
Lightweight workout gloves work really well for this. Amazon has many choices and are not too expensive. They also add support to my wrists over a period of time.
 

Denise McKay

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
16th September 2017
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?
Hi. When I had my Pacer Poles I had the same problem so I used fingerless bike gloves. I loved those poles but hated the handles so I gave up and bought different poles with non plastic handles.
 

alhartman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hope so!
Just older Leki, but I use the lightweight silk or poly inner-glove full fingered. Enough to absorb sweat or stop the sun, or take out the morning chill.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Just to clarify, before I settled on using microfiber fishing gloves with my hiking sticks, I first tried bicycling gloves, weight lifting gloves and golf gloves. It was an expensive process.

Basically, anything with full fingers was too hot. Also, anything with padding (usually in the palm) was too hot, and, perhaps more importantly, the padding reduced critical feedback feeling from the poles. This could cause traction and balance problems, at least for me.

The microfiber gloves provide good grip while allowing full tactile feedback. That they also protect my hands and wrists from skin melanoma is a bonus.

Hope this helps.
 

K Turner

One step at a time
Camino(s) past & future
14 August 2019 (SJPdP 16 August)
Occasionally I tie my shemagh around a pole handle. It helps keep my hand in a more neutral position so I have less pain by the end of the day.
 

Zordmot

First timer Spring 2019
Camino(s) past & future
April-May 2019
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?

I use one pole with a cork handle. I wear a cycling glove (thin, light, wicks sweat, has a little padding right where the hand touches the pole) on my right hand mainly to prevent blisters and a sore hand.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I don't like gloves in general and never wear them while on the Camino or while using trekking poles. I don't grip the handles really, and my hands rest on the straps. Besides, what gripping of straps and handles I do toughens up the skin of my meat hooks. Beneficial.
 

SeattleJen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
First time pilgrim and walking solo. Leaving SJDP around April 5, 2018.
I brought a pair of gloves and very thin glove liners when the extended forecast from SJPDP to Pamplona was for snow (instead I got a nice sunburn and ran out of water on the Valcarlos route-- joke was on me). I eventually ditched the gloves to save space/weight in the pack since they were never needed, but I started wearing the glove LINERS every day by about day three. I found I could not walk without them for no matter what the conditions, they were needed: blister prevention, chafing, sun protection, or to protect from windburn/chapping. They were so light that I rarely if ever worked up on sweat on my hands. I cut a little hole into the thumb and pointer finger of the right hand so I could use my phone. I'm remembering the liners being super cheap -- under $5? Good luck!
 

SeattleJen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
First time pilgrim and walking solo. Leaving SJDP around April 5, 2018.
Stretch-poly sounds about right. They were super light and stretchy but had a very tight knit.
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2018}
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?
Used cycling gloves first camino, after that, plain old hands. However, I use poles from the German discount store, Lidl. Lightweight and with cork handles that dont have the same problem with causing sweaty hands
 

ween

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugués (2020)
I didn't understand the problems with sweaty hands until I looked up Pacerpoles and saw they're meant to be gripped.

I use old-school straight poles and run my hand up through the straps (like Walkerooni and RJM) just like I'm cross-country skiing (I actually use my adjustable length Leki ski poles for hiking). Since the poles spend most of the time dangling from the straps, my hands don't get too sweaty. I don't wear gloves unless it's cold.

 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I didn't understand the problems with sweaty hands until I looked up Pacerpoles and saw they're meant to be gripped.

I use old-school straight poles and run my hand up through the straps (like Walkerooni and RJM) just like I'm cross-country skiing (I actually use my adjustable length Leki ski poles for hiking). Since the poles spend most of the time dangling from the straps, my hands don't get too sweaty. I don't wear gloves unless it's cold.

Please read my posting #7 above - a direct cut and paste from PPs website (except my underlining). PacerPoles are meant not to be gripped.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Please read my posting #7 above - a direct cut and paste from PPs website (except my underlining). PacerPoles are meant not to be gripped.
No modern trekking pole needs to be gripped. Indeed, if you have to grip the pole to use it, you are doing something wrong. My observation is that the single most common fault is not having the straps on conventional poles the correct way around. I have two further observations about that.

First, there are some who claim that wearing the straps correctly is more dangerous than not wearing the straps at all. Their 'evidence', if they suggest there is any, is anecdotal, and they have never been able to point to anything like reported walking related accident or injury statistics that bear out their assertions. At that point, I take the view that their objections are matters of personal preference, not rational objective decision making, and leave them to it.

Others haven't been instructed about fitting the strap when they purchased their poles, or the importance of this wasn't emphasised and the information has got lost in the maze of other things people have had to think about as they prepared for their walk. It could be for any number of reasons.

Second, the one and perhaps only demonstrable difference between conventional poles and pacer poles is that it is almost impossible to hold pacer poles incorrectly. So from the outset, new users get the benefits of holding them as they are meant to be held for effective use. The same cannot be said for conventional poles, where some care is needed to learn how to fit, adjust and wear the strap to use the poles effectively.

This is clearly a significant advantage. There have been many posts on various threads over the years lamenting that there are so many pilgrims not getting the benefit of using conventional poles. Pacer poles are one way, but not the only way, to address this.

Ps, before any relatively new PP aficionados get tempted to rehearse their 'many' benefits, this is a well worn but not recent discussion. I suggest you will find most of the benefits claimed for PP are shared with conventional poles, ie they are not unique to PP.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
it is almost impossible to hold pacer poles incorrectly. So from the outset, new users get the benefits of holding them as they are meant to be held for effective use
That's why I bought them. I needed idiot proof poles. 😂
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I use hiker gloves when it's cold, but I wouldn't wear them against sweat ; possibly because it's less of a problem with the wooden hiking staff that I use than with plastic pole handles -- the only time I would wear one glove in non-cold conditions is if I get little blisters on my staff hand.
 
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Marcus-UK

Old Git
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (2016) Camino Portuguese (2017) Considering Invierno 2019
I use fingerlesscycling gloves with my walking poles. However this is more to reduce abrasion from the strap on my wrist/hand.
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
Don't forget what Heather advises about how to hold PPs:

Forget about the pole, just be aware of the hands/forearms moving up-and-down at your side (not out in front) left hand goes up passed your hip when the right leg moves forward etc. Feel the upward and forward thrust each time your hand pushes downwards and backwards - don’t grip the handle, push against it.


If you grip hard it’s the equivalent of lacing-up your boots too tight - which disrupts the flow of movement over the joints so they can’t function as they should. As the body pivots over the shaft tip, loading is being controlled and directed through the hand/handle’s contours as a dynamic action. Relax the fingers - just pressure between thumb and index finger is usually all that is needed to retain the pole. Gripping the handle tightly wastes energy, and can cause sweat (as can suncream / insect repellent on the hands). plus jamming the sides of the fingers together skin-to-skin can also cause sweat. By allowing air to circulate as the hand/palm peels away from the handle at the end of each stride, allows the skin to 'breathe' (see hand images on the Product page/What is a Pacerpole).


Before I got my PPs I had cork handled Lekis - don't remember them getting sweaty.
With the forefinger/thumb technique I tend to get blisters on them even if I'm not gripping or holding on tightly.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I wear lightweight, leather palmed, fingerless gloves. Not so much because of sweaty hands, but because they prevent blistering and increase the grip. Kinda like these:

My first camino,I got a couple of blisters...even with cork-handles on my poles. Now I wear light silk gloves most days...works for me.
 

Hiking Gauguin

Morris Jensen
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Portuguese [2013] - Camino de Santiago [2014]
Camino Frances Spring 2015. April 2017.
Cat, I wore thin white gloves on both my summer Camino and they work very well.
Not only do they assist in gripping the poles, as they can be rinsed at almost every water source and dry in minutes, they also make a great face wipe, spec cleaners. I already had a pair of white cotton military ones, later I bought two pairs from an online art supplier, pastel artists use them. Hope this helps.

 

Chizuru

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
I use leather palmed cyclists gloves when I use my poles to prevent sweaty slippage and friction with the grips and straps and also to keep the sun off my hands. When it gets cold, I switch to possum/merino blend gloves. When it rains and is cold I slip a large pair of rubber washing up gloves over my possum/merino gloves which gives me great grip on wet poles and keeps my hands nice and warm and dry. They look pretty daggy but it works well.
 

JLuis

Member

FedericoCarlos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2014)
Cycling gloves are great and some have gel padding if desired. Also, as others have stated, don't grip poles too tightly. Be sure to use the wrist straps as that if placed correctly, you can let the pole somewhat "swing" without much grip and thereby increase air circulation to hands.
 

FedericoCarlos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2014)
I had trigger fingers after first 800 km hike (Camino). Next time around wore bike gloves with padding - no issues that walk ( nearly 800 km again).
 

NavyBlue

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy and Camino Frances. Via Francigena. Tro-Breiz in progress.
Hi,

As many contributors, I rely on the strap, pushing it downwards with my wrist, just "pinching" slightly the pole for guiding it.

For some "out of the box" thinking and the fun of it: there are other concepts, such as this one (in French, sorry for that).
No strap (you can add one, although the designer argues against it), very long foam grip, single segment, surprisingly light when you hold them. Looks counter-intuitive... But I met a mountain guide who loved his ones for summer hiking and recommended them to anybody intrigued by their looks.
 

Jim Stinson

ibrew4u
Camino(s) past & future
5/2015 CF
4/2017 CF
5/2019 CF fr Astorga
Buff makes some nice lightweight gloves that I've used on the Camino and year round at home. Both for hiking and for fishing.
Good UV protection, rubberized grip, wicking, and quick drying.
Definitely go for light colors to avoid absorbing the heat of the sun.
Keep in mind, though, those electronic capable finger tips, aren't so much. So if you go for your phone frequently (mapping and photos), they can be a bit of a pain.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2017
Camino Frances Sept 2020
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?
I have pacer poles and worried about the sun on my hands so wore these: https://www.coolibar.com/unisex-fingerless-sun-gloves-upf-50.html?93=79&179=174&CAWELAID=120015460000144397&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI5f-WsPy15AIVAtlkCh2JyA-BEAQYAyABEgKwyvD_BwE

It is not just pacer poles. Your hands simply sweat depending on temperature, but more importantly, it is protection from the sun you need when hiking 6-8 hours a day.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
I haven't seen anyone else discuss this issue so I wonder if I'm the only one! I use Pacer Poles (which I LOVE) with plastic handles (which I don't love as much) so my hands get sweaty most days. On my first Camino, I ended up wrapping a handkerchief around my hands. Not a great solution. On my second Camino I wore some old fingerless biking gloves and that worked pretty well but they were worn out at the end. So on my third camino I wore fingerless yoga gloves which are ok, too. But for my fourth camino, I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for the perfect glove. I never saw anyone else wearing gloves at all. And only saw one other person using Pacer Poles. So is it just the Pacer Poles or do I just have really sweaty hands. (I don't, actually.) How come no one else talks about this?
YES!
I've done three Caminos with my Pacer Poles, using gloves. I never saw anybody else with them and, without them, I too find the Pacer Poles sweaty. So it's nice to meet you!

I used gloves that were made to protect from the sun, by a company called Outdoor Research. They had fingerless ones too, but I found they bunched around my fingers and weren't as comfortable. On my longest camino, the wrist part started to unravel, so I got a sewing kit and fixed it. Walked another camino with those and then bought another pair.

Glove-sister, Jill
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
What a great idea. I already have strips of reflective tape on my poles (for early starts and road walking) and a wrap of gaffer tape, but some chamois-type tape on the handles would be luxury.

To the OP - I hope you find a solution. Don’t give up on the pacer-poles.
Reflective tape on the poles and chamois-type tape on the grips; both brilliant ideas.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
No modern trekking pole needs to be gripped. Indeed, if you have to grip the pole to use it, you are doing something wrong. My observation is that the single most common fault is not having the straps on conventional poles the correct way around. I have two further observations about that.

First, there are some who claim that wearing the straps correctly is more dangerous than not wearing the straps at all. Their 'evidence', if they suggest there is any, is anecdotal, and they have never been able to point to anything like reported walking related accident or injury statistics that bear out their assertions. At that point, I take the view that their objections are matters of personal preference, not rational objective decision making, and leave them to it.

Others haven't been instructed about fitting the strap when they purchased their poles, or the importance of this wasn't emphasised and the information has got lost in the maze of other things people have had to think about as they prepared for their walk. It could be for any number of reasons.

Second, the one and perhaps only demonstrable difference between conventional poles and pacer poles is that it is almost impossible to hold pacer poles incorrectly. So from the outset, new users get the benefits of holding them as they are meant to be held for effective use. The same cannot be said for conventional poles, where some care is needed to learn how to fit, adjust and wear the strap to use the poles effectively.

This is clearly a significant advantage. There have been many posts on various threads over the years lamenting that there are so many pilgrims not getting the benefit of using conventional poles. Pacer poles are one way, but not the only way, to address this.

Ps, before any relatively new PP aficionados get tempted to rehearse their 'many' benefits, this is a well worn but not recent discussion. I suggest you will find most of the benefits claimed for PP are shared with conventional poles, ie they are not unique to PP.
Have you tried the Pacer Poles, Doug?
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Have you tried the Pacer Poles, Doug?
Yes. I borrowed a pair for a short try out on the CF in 2016 while I was the hospitalero at San Anton.

I wonder how may pacer pole users have taken the time to learn to use conventional poles. I know that there are a couple that have, but I am not sure that it would be that many.
 

Sheesh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2009, 2013);
? (2020)
I took conventional poles in 2009 and they were invaluable. However, in 2013 I took the plunge and ordered Pacer poles and found them to be much easier on my deteriorating thumb and wrist joints (in fact I do prefer them to conventional poles). But palm moisture (on both types, but more so with the Pacers) and the sun on the backs of my exposed hands was problematic. The next time I am Camino-bound fingerless gloves will certainly be in my kit. So I have been watching this thread with great interest and thank you all who have made thoughtful or experiential suggestions.

I add another brand of glove into the mix (no endorsement implied, I've simply seen them on-line):
Though not in pink, that is just what came up with the link.
 
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Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
Doug said
“First, there are some who claim that wearing the straps correctly is more dangerous than not wearing the straps at all. Their 'evidence', if they suggest there is any, is anecdotal, and they have never been able to point to anything like reported walking related accident or injury statistics that bear out their assertions. At that point, I take the view that their objections are matters of personal preference, not rational objective decision making, and leave them to it.”

I do not recall such a discussion but I would caution those using straps to be careful on terrain that is less stable....downhills, rocky areas where poles can get stuck in crevices, narrow paths-especially near cliffs, and wet or muddy terrain where poles can slip or get stuck in mud.


My and others experiences are important information. I do believe that there are sufficient reports to suggest caution with regards to the use of straps.

I read this on another blog and I thought it was worth posting. The responder. Rick, is commenting on the use of Hiking pole straps.

“I used to always use them, and even fell with them on a couple of times – breaking a pole as a result one time. Then I started finding out about just how many dislocated shoulders, etc. have been caused by that. So now I don’t use them, even though I think they make the poles easier to use. “


Here is another hiker reporting what happened to him .while hiking. Alansloman.blogspot.com

1567632101740.jpeg


...” after the climb up Dearg Allt and with Kinbreack within eyeshot, disaster struck! One leg slid about four feet down the slithery oozing hillside while one trekking pole planted itself firmly in the one solid bit of land in the whole of Scotland. With my arm caught in the wrist loop, the rest of me plummeted ground-wards, twisting under the weight of my pack. Explosions seemed to go off in my arm on the way down until I ended up face down in the bog. I lay there for a moment checking myself over. Mike unfastened my pack and I sat there, my mind totally numb as my arm screamed at me. I had no idea what I had done but I could not move it. After a while I limped into Kinbreack, one of my titanium poles completely buckled.”

Here is another report

I am one who has been injured by using straps. A couple Winters ago I was coming down the Owlshead Brutus bushwack. I lost traction on a steep section, and fell forward. My hiking pole/basket snagged a tree. The strap kept my hand attached to the pole. My arm snapped back as I fell forward, and ripped my bicep tendon.
So, no more straps on the downhills…..

My personal recommendation is not to keep your wrists in the poles when you are on uneven terrain, on narrow paths or near crevices where the poles can get caught. A few specific places, I would caution others about using the straps would be coming down to Roncevalles on the steep path, coming down from Alto del Perdon and coming from El Acebo to Molinesca. Also use caution when on any rocky path...going uphill where the poles can get caught in the rocks...
 
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JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
I never used conventional poles before getting my PacerPoles (other than while skiing). I have read reviews by very experienced, high level mountaineers singing the praises of PacerPoles over traditional ones. However, if conventional poles work as well for you, go for it, because they are narrower and, if they break down small enough, you can put them in your pack to carry on the airplane.
 

sailorf21

Walker
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-Oct 2019; Leon to Fisterra
Just throwing it out there about Pacer Poles... I have used trekking poles for over four decades, from the Highlands of Scotland (oh I love the Leki poles I bought there in '96) to the mountains of Colombia to trekking in the Himalayas - and all over the Canadian Rockies. I have used poles in Nordic and telemark skiing; so using poles to 'propel' me is not unusual either. I also have the Outdoor Recreation Degree to show how serious I am.
So about a year ago I got the Pacer Poles, but I did not use them. I started training for my Camino in February. I got out my nice carbon fiber cork grip favorite poles when I started training. I love them, I save them for hikes where I have to have a great poles. So - my wife used her Pacer poles for training while I continued to use what I knew well and had used poles (no carbon fiber back then) just like them since the late 70's.
A couple weeks into training and my wife was raving about the Pacer Poles. I tried then and literally hated them the first mile. But I continued to use them and after the first week I fell in love with them. The style of using the Pacer Pole is much more akin to Nordic ski pole use. They are used differently, they never really get in front of you. I notice that they allow me to apply more power than I could with poles/straps. I also use a loose grip on them and let the platform of the grip take the pressure. Lastly, the thing that really sold me is that my back and my right knee started feeling better - better than they had in years.
Now after 100's of miles (probably 1500 miles combined), they are all I use. Are they for everyone? Well, gear is individual... but the Pacer Pole compared to my best and huge (perhaps 20?) collection of Black Diamond and Leki poles is like comparing the most modern thermarest to a beach air mattress or an untra light backpack to the 1970's magnesium frame backpack that hangs in my garage.
I am not a gear 'raver' - I consider myself a gear consumer - but, the Pacer Poles are something I cannot do without now. They will be on my Camino. If I landed and the PP's don't make it there, I would buy another set to have shipped to me en-route.
 

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