A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Don't forget Masks, Hand Sanitizer, Sleeping Bag, Sleeping Pad and Contactless Credit/Debit Card..

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Last edited:

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I'm not understanding why a sleeping pad would be necessary. If albergues have to operate at less than capacity doesn't mean that they will have more than enough beds??
The lowered capacity is to keep social distancing. Some albergues will also be closed for the rest of the year, some permanently. Some might close unexpectedly.

But I'm pretty sure there will be less pilgrims. But, unforseen events. It is just my sugestion.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
There is a set of proposed albergue protocols linked on this thread. They include a suggestion that pilgrims carry their own sleeping bag in one place, and in another that disposable bedding will be provided. I am sure that this will lead to another round of debate. As someone who has always carried a sleeping bag and liner, I don't see it making any difference personally. But clearly those who have been reluctant in the past to consider carrying bedding will seek further guidance on this.

Perhaps the absolute minimum is going to be a full length hooded liner, sometimes now marketed as a 'traveller liner'. It provides a cover from head to toe. Past forum discussion around this suggests that many walking in the warmer months will find this sufficient, even if blankets are no longer being provided.

Whether or not to take a sleeping mat seems to really be a personal choice. Unsurprisingly, it isn't part of the published albergue protocol, which assumes that there will be a bed available. There has been some useful recent discussion about camping, where clearly one would consider taking a mattress of some sort. Personally, I would be looking for other options, either walking on or looking locally for other accommodation, if an albergue where full. At my age, cowboy camping is something I am prepared to concede should be consigned to romanticised memories of my youth.
 
Last edited:

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
There is a set of proposed albergue protocols linked on this thread. They include a suggestion that pilgrims carry their own sleeping bag in one place, and in another that disposable bedding will be provided. I am sure that this will lead to another round of debate. As someone who has always carried a sleeping bag and liner, I don't see it making any difference personally. But clearly those who have been reluctant in the past to consider carrying bedding will seek further guidance on this.

Perhaps the absolute minimum is going to be a full length hooded liner, sometimes now marketed as a 'traveller liner'. It provides a cover from head to toe. Past forum discussion around this suggests that many walking in the warmer months will find this sufficient, even if blankets are no longer being provided.

Whether or not to take a sleeping mat seems to really be a personal choice. Unsurprisingly, it isn't part of the published albergue protocol, which assumes that there will be a bed available. There has been some useful recent discussion about camping, where clearly one would consider taking a mattress of some sort. Personally, I would be looking for other options, either walking on or looking locally for other accommodation, if an albergue where full. A my age, cowboy camping is something I am prepared to concede should be consigned to romanticised memories of my youth.

Well you're a grown-up guy and you can make your own decisions.

The only real rules are made by the Spanish government. The proposals usually come from different associations. I made a few proposals myself. Albergues will be run according to the protocol of the association they belong to. And private independent ones according to the rules of the Spanish government.

The only rule you have to follow is wearing a mask. Getting a sleeping bag is something I will recommend. No albergues will have blankets unless they want to break the law. Some albergues with cotton sheets will have disposable sheets in the future. And then some private albergues, hotels etc. will have proper beddings.

But unless you are sleeping at those all the way, I will recommend bringing a sleeping bag because, there will be no blankets. In the mountains and on the meseta it can be 35C during the day and 10C during the night in high summer. So, nighttime will feel freezing. You will not be provided with blankets, windows are more likely to be open because most people would want to avoid still and stale air. And then ...you might even decide in the middle of the night it might be better to sleep outside if people are sick, if you get sick. If an albergue is closed because the owner is sick, if Spain, Portugal or France closes down over night again. You might want to bring a sleeping bag ...and a sleeping pad.

But go ahead and make your own grown up decision and see if you can find the answer in one of the albergue associations proposed protocols. I can tell you, you cannot. But it is still up to you to decide what you bring. I made my suggestion.
 

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
There is a set of proposed albergue protocols linked on this thread. They include a suggestion that pilgrims carry their own sleeping bag in one place, and in another that disposable bedding will be provided. I am sure that this will lead to another round of debate. As someone who has always carried a sleeping bag and liner, I don't see it making any difference personally. But clearly those who have been reluctant in the past to consider carrying bedding will seek further guidance on this.

Perhaps the absolute minimum is going to be a full length hooded liner, sometimes now marketed as a 'traveller liner'. It provides a cover from head to toe. Past forum discussion around this suggests that many walking in the warmer months will find this sufficient, even if blankets are no longer being provided.

Whether or not to take a sleeping mat seems to really be a personal choice. Unsurprisingly, it isn't part of the published albergue protocol, which assumes that there will be a bed available. There has been some useful recent discussion about camping, where clearly one would consider taking a mattress of some sort. Personally, I would be looking for other options, either walking on or looking locally for other accommodation, if an albergue where full. A my age, cowboy camping is something I am prepared to concede should be consigned to romanticised memories of my youth.

Do some lateral thinking ole buddy! I use an ultra lightweight inflatable mat EXPED) which weighs next to nothing! It doesn't need a pump thanks to that wonderful invention the Snozzle bag :) I don't use Albergues so its a room or nothing with the nothing being Church doorways etc. Hence the mat! It used to come in very handy for airport floors as well! As to age and cowboy camping, at 82 I am no cowboy and my romance with the Camino started when I was 65, so there!

Yours aye,

The Malingerer.

:) :) :)
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Do some lateral thinking ole buddy!
If you want to go cowboy camping in church doorways, that is a personal choice, hardly lateral thinking. I didn't deny it was an option, just expressed a preference not to do it. Perhaps it isn't age related, but still my preference!

ps I do have the EXPED Synmat UL 7 M for camping trips. It weighs about 475 gm. I don't have their pump sack, but it looks like another 60 gm - all up about 535 gm. That's pretty heavy for 'next to nothing'!
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Do some lateral thinking ole buddy! I use an ultra lightweight inflatable mat EXPED) which weighs next to nothing! It doesn't need a pump thanks to that wonderful invention the Snozzle bag :) I don't use Albergues so its a room or nothing with the nothing being Church doorways etc. Hence the mat! It used to come in very handy for airport floors as well! As to age and cowboy camping, at 82 I am no cowboy and my romance with the Camino started when I was 65, so there!

Yours aye,

The Malingerer.

:) :) :)

Steady now - all Doug was doing was expressing his personal opinion .. wasn't telling anyone else what to do.
Doug has trekked and Camino'd all over the world for decades, including leading groups out into the wild - surely he is entitled to his opinion? (and comfort)
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Thank you so much for this!
How about pillows? I think I read somewhere that pillows will not be provided either... do you know if this is true?
Yes, different places go by different protocols. Based on associations and regions.

I have a stuff sack and some clothes I can put in it if needed. But I am always trying to have as little weight as possible. Some people might want a real pillow. I have even seen that before all of this.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Great idea to make the new list of things we will need.

I would add disposable gloves - hhmm, and possibly a larger rucksack? ;)

View attachment 77032

Haha ...yeah ...I'm always trying to get a smaller backpack, so.

Well my experience with gloves is they are more trouble than anything else. I think they are more useful if you want to avoid getting hand sanitizer on your hands and are willing to deal with the extra trouble. So, you are just disinfecting the gloves instead of your hands. But you would have to disinfect your hands when you take your gloves off anyway, so.

But this is all personal preferences.

In Spain though, all supermarkets have disposable gloves (or plastic bags) to put on your hands and hand sanitizer at the entrance. Most people just have a mask with them, and everything else is provided. But for hiking I would have my own hand sanitizer as well (and gloves if that is you preference).
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
If you want to go cowboy camping in church doorways
I use an ultra lightweight inflatable mat EXPED
@dougfitz it's not really about planning for cowboy camping (even though I love that), it's more about being prepared for the unforeseen. Like a scout.

@malingerer I'm going way smaller than an inflatable mat. It is more like an ultra-light or emergency mat I use. One of those used for mountain trail running. They are less than half they weight and will not puncture. You can see them here: https://camino.ninja/packlist#sleepingpad
If I planned to sleep on it the entire way I would bring yours. The lightest (and cheapest) foam mats from Decathlon will do as well, I think.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
@dougfitz it's not really about planning for cowboy camping (even though I love that), it's more about being prepared for the unforeseen. Like a scout.
I don't agree with this, and the reasons are simple.

To deal with the second statement, that this is preparing for the unforeseen. The circumstances where there is no albergue accommodation are entirely foreseeable, and to some extent the camino won't change in any fundamental way on this score because of COVID 19 restrictions. I have walked the Camino Frances twice, and both times there were full albergues. Perhaps the proposed restrictions will make that more likely, but even if it does, it is not new. I would contend that one needs a strategy for these circumstances, just as one always has. Part of that might be finding a quite place like a railway station, church porch or the like. I have never had to do that. So far when an albergue bed hasn't been available, I have:
  • checked the next albergue in the town - it helps to start looking at the first albergue one comes to in a town for that to work,
  • checked into a local hostel, or even a hotel,
  • rung forward to check that there is still an albergue bed in the next town and walked on,
  • walked on just the same without checking, and
  • found accommodation off the camino route and arranged a vehicle transfer there and back the next day.
Will this 'escalation pathway' strategy continue to work if there are greater restrictions. Clearly I cannot tell that it will always be successful - only time will tell. Clearly taking a sleeping mat as well can be part of that pattern if you would rather avoid some of the more expensive elements of the approach that I have outlined.

This leads back to your first point, I don't think that it means you are intending to cowboy camp for the whole of the Camino, but clearly by taking a sleep pad or inflatable mattress, you have a plan to use that should the circumstances warrant doing so. After all, if you weren't planning to cowboy camp in those circumstances, why would you carry the mat? Makes no sense to me.

I am not challenging your or anyone else's choice to carry a mat. What I am suggesting is that I see it as just one element of the escalation pathway when one is faced with a full albergue. It should also be clear from my comments that I don't see this as anything new. It happened to me regularly enough in 2010 and somewhat less frequently in 2016 on the Camino Frances. There is every prospect that it will happen again with or without CDOVID 19 related restrictions. Perhaps more frequently with them, and perhaps on other routes where it will be more problematic, and each of us will need to work out how we want to deal with that.
 
Last edited:

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
Great idea to make the new list of things we will need.

I would add disposable gloves - hhmm, and possibly a larger rucksack? ;)

View attachment 77032
I have just retired from the medical profession remember it is recommended to wash or sanitize after each glove use. We make and bottle our own hand sanitizer which is accessible on the outside of our ruck sacks.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I don't agree with this, and the reasons are simple.

To deal with the second statement, that this is preparing for the unforeseen. The circumstance where there is no albergue accommodation are entirely foreseeable, and to some extent the camino won't change in any fundamental way on this score because of COVID 19 restrictions. I have walked the Camino Frances twice, and both times there were full albergues. Perhaps the proposed restrictions will make that more likely, but even if it does, it is not new. I would contend that one needs a strategy for these circumstances, just as one always has. Part of that might be finding a quite place like a railway station, church porch or the like. I have never had to do that. So far when an albergue bed hasn't been available, I have:
  • checked the next albergue in the town - it helps to start looking at the first albergue one comes to in a town for that to work,
  • checked into a local hostel, or even a hotel,
  • rung forward to check that there is still an albergue bed in the next town and walked on,
  • walked on just on just the same without checking, and
  • found accommodation off the camino route and arranged a vehicle transfer there and back the next day.
Will this 'escalation pathway' strategy continue to work if there are greater restrictions. Clearly I cannot tell that it will always be successful - only time will tell. Clearly taking a sleeping mat as well can be part of that pattern if you would rather avoid some of the more expensive elements of the approach that I have outlined.

This leads back to your first point, I don't think that it means you are intending to cowboy camp for the whole of the Camino, but clearly by taking a sleep pad or inflatable mattress, you have a plan to use that should the circumstances warrant doing so. After all, if you weren't planning to cowboy camp in those circumstances, why would you carry the mat? Makes no sense to me.

I am not challenging your or anyone else's choice to carry a mat. What I am suggesting is that I see it as just one element of the escalation pathway when one is faced with a full albergue. It should also be clear from my comments that I don't see this as anything new. It happened to me regularly enough in 2010 and somewhat less frequently in 2016 on the Camino Frances. There is every prospect that it will happen again with or without CDOVID 19 related restrictions. Perhaps more frequently with them, and perhaps on other routes where it will be more problematic, and each of us will need to work out how we want to deal with that.
I walked 30+ Caminos over the last 15 years, but last year in Easter there where 20 or so pilgrims not being able to find accommodation within 30 km from Logroño. All albergues and everything on Booking.com was full. They were sleeping on the street. I have seen it a few times before but not as bad and always in areas with less accommodation options.

But with COVID-19 things can become more complicated. You can have a reservation being canceled same day because a place shuts down. Or as it just happened here in Santiago some months ago, overnight, all accommodation options where shut down and military where set in to clear the streets. Next day, no pilgrims, no homeless people, no romas begging ...just military patrolling the streets.

But feel free to leave your sleeping pad at home.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
But feel free to leave your sleeping pad at home.
[/QUOTE]

Um, is it necessary to be so, um, astringent? You may not intend so but you sound like you think your thought is the only one true proper way to do $ACTIVITY. (Insert activity of choice here.) Perhaps you don't intend to sound like that.

Sleeping pads, which you seem firmly in favor of, are not absolutely necessary...though as we get older the idea of sleeping on a floor with the bag sounds less comfortable. Still, the pad is not absolutely necessary and some people will prefer to have different strategies.

For myself, if it becomes possible to walk before next year, I intend to try hard to avoid staying in the group accommodations. Not only does it seem to me like common sense, it probably helps out the local economy a bit more. And I intend to carry my little mask in my pocket until I reach town and assess what the local choice is for that...possibly people will be wearing them inside shops and suchlike. Possibly also in churches during Mass.

But it is only June and too soon to tell "si Dios quiere, y no hay inundacion." (My attempt to translate "God willing, and the creek don't rise.")

Buen camino to all
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
And I intend to carry my little mask in my pocket until I reach town and assess what the local choice is for that...possibly people will be wearing them inside shops and suchlike. Possibly also in churches during Mass.
Masks are currently mandatory in places suchlike in Spain.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Um, is it necessary to be so, um, astringent? You may not intend so but you sound like you think your thought is the only one true proper way to do $ACTIVITY. (Insert activity of choice here.) Perhaps you don't intend to sound like that.

Sleeping pads, which you seem firmly in favor of, are not absolutely necessary...though as we get older the idea of sleeping on a floor with the bag sounds less comfortable. Still, the pad is not absolutely necessary and some people will prefer to have different strategies.

For myself, if it becomes possible to walk before next year, I intend to try hard to avoid staying in the group accommodations. Not only does it seem to me like common sense, it probably helps out the local economy a bit more. And I intend to carry my little mask in my pocket until I reach town and assess what the local choice is for that...possibly people will be wearing them inside shops and suchlike. Possibly also in churches during Mass.

But it is only June and too soon to tell "si Dios quiere, y no hay inundacion." (My attempt to translate "God willing, and the creek don't rise.")

Buen camino to all
@Texas Walker I'm not trying to say my strategy is righter than anyone else’s, actually, for me, it is not about strategy. It is about giving a good advice, and as such making people aware of the situation so they can make their own decision.

I think your strategy is good as far as choosing hotels all the way and making reservations in advance will heighten your chances of getting a place every night compared to not having reservations at all. You might even have less chance of exposure, who knows really. And supporting locals is a good thing to do.

But if there will be a second wave of outbreak and Spain will use the same strategy as they just did with the current outbreak, all hotels and all public transport will be shut down overnight.

So, even though I'm with you on your strategy, I would still bring a sleeping pad.

And on a side note; personally, I prefer albergues. I walked a Camino in January and one in March this year and did not see any sick people on either the French or the Portuguese Caminos. It seems like the outbreaks where mostly in bigger cities with airports and some cases where locals traveled and came back and spread the virus in their community.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
MODERATOR'S NOTE

For many years Moderators noted that for most of March through to October members posts covered topics of planning, walking or recovering from a camino. Members were friendly, supportive and sympathetic. November through February without those comforting distractions things on the forum got a little more fractious as Members squabbled over back-pack weights, the correct way to order a coffee and the true meaning of meaning. We used to call that period "Fighting Season".

I for one would be a happier Moderator if Members chose not to extend Fighting Season to the whole year even though they cannot make more than the vaguest of plans, have little prospect of walking and have nothing to recover from more than some vigorous typing.

Buen (future) camino all.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
MODERATOR'S NOTE

For many years Moderators noted that for most of March through to October members posts covered topics of planning, walking or recovering from a camino. Members were friendly, supportive and sympathetic. November through February without those comforting distractions things on the forum got a little more fractious as Members squabbled over back-pack weights, the correct way to order a coffee and the true meaning of meaning. We used to call that period "Fighting Season".

I for one would be a happier Moderator if Members chose not to extend Fighting Season to the whole year even though they cannot make more than the vaguest of plans, have little prospect of walking and have nothing to recover from more than some vigorous typing.

Buen (future) camino all.
Well said @Tincatinker 👍
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
MODERATOR'S NOTE

For many years Moderators noted that for most of March through to October members posts covered topics of planning, walking or recovering from a camino. Members were friendly, supportive and sympathetic. November through February without those comforting distractions things on the forum got a little more fractious as Members squabbled over back-pack weights, the correct way to order a coffee and the true meaning of meaning. We used to call that period "Fighting Season".

I for one would be a happier Moderator if Members chose not to extend Fighting Season to the whole year even though they cannot make more than the vaguest of plans, have little prospect of walking and have nothing to recover from more than some vigorous typing.

Buen (future) camino all.
Actually that is the reason I don't post in here a lot. Trying to make something useful and valuable to the Camino and getting shut down is quite discouraging.

FYI: And I'm not trying to start an argument about weather I'm making something useful and valuable to the Camino or not.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I for one would be a happier Moderator if Members chose not to extend Fighting Season to the whole year
I try to remind myself, especially when I am feeling murderous, that, this is not Fighting Season but pandemic season.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
But unless you are sleeping at those all the way, I will recommend bringing a sleeping bag because, there will be no blankets. In the mountains and on the meseta it can be 35C during the day and 10C during the night in high summer. So, nighttime will feel freezing.
LOL! It always makes me chuckle when I see people post that they think 10C (50F) is freezing. Sorry, couldn’t help myself. For us thats shorts and t-shirt weather.
Stay happy fellow pilgrims. There’s enough stress and anger going around without arguing over packing a sleeping pad. To each their own.

Peace
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
A credit card is the lightest weight survival kit you can carry and will get you out of almost any unexpected situation, especially accommodation ones. Newspaper and cardboard for those who don't have a card.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
LOL! It always makes me chuckle when I see people post that they think 10C (50F) is freezing. Sorry, couldn’t help myself. For us thats shorts and t-shirt weather.
Stay happy fellow pilgrims. There’s enough stress and anger going around without arguing over packing a sleeping pad. To each their own.

Peace
Nobody said 10c is freezing. Somebody said a 25c temperature difference between day and night FEELS freezing. And at 10c people would most likely prefer a sleeping bag anyway.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
A credit card is the lightest weight survival kit you can carry and will get you out of almost any unexpected situation, especially accommodation ones. Newspaper and cardboard for those who don't have a card.
Except during lockdowns like this where all hotels and public transport is being shut down over night. Your credit card becomes worthless.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Except during lockdowns like this where all hotels and public transport is being shut down over night. Your credit card becomes worthless.
I may certainly be incorrect, but I believe that even when Spain enforced a lockdown, they didn't require foreigners who happened to be in the country to sleep outside. I think arrangements were made for them. If you have different information, I'm certainly open to hearing it. It wouldn't be the first time I've been wrong about something.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
I always use cash when I can but during the lockdown nobody would take it so I ended up using my credit/debit card all the time, I would assume other countries were the same. I still have neary the same amount of cash in my wallet as I had 3 months ago. :)
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I always use cash when I can but during the lockdown nobody would take it so I ended up using my credit/debit card all the time, I would assume other countries were the same. I still have neary the same amount of cash in my wallet as I had 3 months ago. :)
At home I always use my credit card, because I can use the points that I earn for my flights to Spain!
 

Don Camillo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17,
Ruta de la Lana 09/18
Final charge at that Land Rover. If you going to carry a sleeping bag why on earth would you not carry a roll mat, cut down or otherwise. A very light weight insurance policy.
Don
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
A credit card is the lightest weight survival kit you can carry and will get you out of almost any unexpected situation, especially accommodation ones. Newspaper and cardboard for those who don't have a card.
Apart from the Iberian peninsula where cash is king! Though it may have to change with Covid19.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Apart from the Iberian peninsula where cash is king! Though it may have to change with Covid19.
I always had the impression that the reason "cash is king" is because of the extra expenses of the infrastructure and security issues that inevitably come up with credit card acceptance. The really small businesses just didn't have the wherewithal to get into the credit card zone, so to speak. We only used the card at major places like Compostela or Madrid--and only when staying in something that was larger and more set up for that.
 

Dromengro

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
Apart from the Iberian peninsula where cash is king! Though it may have to change with Covid19.
When I said Credit card I meant extra money in the bank to cover the unexpected, whether you carry that in Credit/debit card, travelers cheques, cash or gold. Personally I always make sure I always have at least one usually more, alternative ways of paying for anything.

Except during lockdowns like this where all hotels and public transport is being shut down over night. Your credit card becomes worthless.
Even in those extreme circumstances, (although highly unlikely that nothing at all would be available), ATMs/banks or shops would still be available where you could use your card to get cash, which would open doors, although probably in such extremes, payment would often be refused by friendly locals.
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
I always had the impression that the reason "cash is king" is because of the extra expenses of the infrastructure and security issues that inevitably come up with credit card acceptance. The really small businesses just didn't have the wherewithal to get into the credit card zone, so to speak. We only used the card at major places like Compostela or Madrid--and only when staying in something that was larger and more set up for that.
I was only cought out once,the Camino likes to go through the "old town" ,and I'd been to the Correos in Sarria to post excess luggage in my rucksack,and forgot I needed cash,anyway I was saved by my Camino angel,I spent the night with a 79 year old American lady,!
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
I always had the impression that the reason "cash is king" is because of the extra expenses of the infrastructure and security issues that inevitably come up with credit card acceptance. The really small businesses just didn't have the wherewithal to get into the credit card zone, so to speak. We only used the card at major places like Compostela or Madrid--and only when staying in something that was larger and more set up for that.
You get used to using cash very quickly,and then back to cards just as quickly after a few days!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Final charge at that Land Rover. If you going to carry a sleeping bag why on earth would you not carry a roll mat, cut down or otherwise. A very light weight insurance policy.
Don
Simply because one doesn't need to pack one's fears, and never has. The fear-mongering, doom-saying and gas-lighting now evident in this tread is rather alarming. Yes, some of these extreme events might occur, but let me ask how likely do you think they are, and whether carrying the extra weight of a sleeping mat is the best treatment strategy? For some it might be, others might have the financial resources to pursue different strategies that don't add excessively to their pack weight.
 
Last edited:

David with new Kit!

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF September (2019) SJPP to Logrono
CF May/June (2020) Logrono to ? (Delayed).
Last year I mostly stayed in Pensiones and private Albergues and all accepted my credit card. Any property smaller always required cash. (As did most small shops and stores)

On a ‘normal’ holiday I plan 80/20 in favour of credit card but last year on the CF I planned for a 50/50 mix of credit card Vs cash and for me that worked well.

As @Dromengro mentions, ATMs would normally still be available, at least in the short term

I think the expression is plan for the worst and hope for the best
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
At home I always use my credit card, because I can use the points that I earn for my flights to Spain!
My wife and I look at this as a form of travel savings. We find it a very effective way to make provision for our future trips. We review the arrangements every year, and we continue to think we are getting good value from the them even when all the various costs are considered.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
My wife and I look at this as a form of travel savings. We find it a very effective way to make provision for our future trips. We review the arrangements every year, and we continue to think we are getting good value from the them even when all the various costs are considered.
The card I use doesn't have a fee, and I pay the balance each month before any interest accrues, so there is no extra cost.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I may certainly be incorrect, but I believe that even when Spain enforced a lockdown, they didn't require foreigners who happened to be in the country to sleep outside. I think arrangements were made for them. If you have different information, I'm certainly open to hearing it. It wouldn't be the first time I've been wrong about something.
No arrangements were made as such. The decision to close the country down where made over night. All hotels and albergues where closed overnight, and all reservations where cancelled. People "sheltered in place" where possible but not something organized by the government. It was random but most pilgrims where sheltered within a week or two. A few continued walking all through the lockdown. And some just sheltered with locals. The lockdown is still here actually.


Most of the pilgrims where able to get home before the airports shut down. Some were not.

You were only allowed to go out to go to the nearest supermarket or the pharmacy, and police, military and Guardia Civil would check you.

There is still no trains and busses in Spain. And I still think the airports in Galicia is closed.

Only two of those I met so far seemed really traumatized. And they were both sheltered in Santiago. None of them would talk about what happened and both of them literally ran away when I asked them. Both europeans.

The other pilgrims I have met looked fine. And yesterday I even saw the first touregrinos in Santiago.

I still think Spain did a really good job handelling all this. And I think they will handle it even better if needed again. A really good routine for everything seems to work well everywhere.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I always use cash when I can but during the lockdown nobody would take it so I ended up using my credit/debit card all the time, I would assume other countries were the same. I still have neary the same amount of cash in my wallet as I had 3 months ago. :)
A contactless credit/debit card should actually be on the recommended list as well. It has become the preferred method of payment in Spain. Cash is still accepted though. But a lot of albergues who previously didn’t have that option, have it now and they will prefer not having to deal with cash. I will still bring some cash though.
 

Don Camillo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 04-16
Norte/Primitivo 09-16
VdlP/ Sanabres 02/3-17
Levante 09/17,
Ruta de la Lana 09/18
I went on my first camino in 2016. I carried a sleeping bag, roll mat and bivvy bag. You will note this was way before Covid 19. So far from "carrying my fears" or being "fear mongering" or "doom saying" it was and is simply a way of avoiding pre- planned stages, crowded or closed albergues and providing a freedom of the road that I believe the Camino is partly all about. Also this obsession with weight is silly. You carry what you feel you need for safety, comfort and necessity. The weight of my pack has always been easily manageable, I have always been able to put in long days if I felt like it and I have never worried about where I was going to sleep. Fine if people do not want the added "weight" of a roll mat or sleeping bag - no one is forced to carry them. How on earth is any of that related to fear mongering or doom saying. Strange world.
Don.
Lock down in UK 4th July partially ends - Cotswold Way (100 miles) here I come, sleeping bag, roll mat and bivvy included.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I went on my first camino in 2016. I carried a sleeping bag, roll mat and bivvy bag. You will note this was way before Covid 19. So far from "carrying my fears" or being "fear mongering" or "doom saying" it was and is simply a way of avoiding pre- planned stages, crowded or closed albergues and providing a freedom of the road that I believe the Camino is partly all about. Also this obsession with weight is silly. You carry what you feel you need for safety, comfort and necessity. The weight of my pack has always been easily manageable, I have always been able to put in long days if I felt like it and I have never worried about where I was going to sleep. Fine if people do not want the added "weight" of a roll mat or sleeping bag - no one is forced to carry them. How on earth is any of that related to fear mongering or doom saying. Strange world.
Don.
Lock down in UK 4th July partially ends - Cotswold Way (100 miles) here I come, sleeping bag, roll mat and bivvy included.
I completely agree on you perspective. A sleeping pad gives you freedom. Freedom to start late without having a reservation, to make a long picnic without having a plan or reservation.

And if you prefer to go without reservation, Easter is just o e of the clever times to have sleeping pad with you. Or when more albergues are closed and potentially facing another lockdown. And maybe even for holy year it will be a good idea too.

I'm not scared or stressed about getting a place to sleep, and would prefer to plan my way out of it.

I do like to travel light though :cool:
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
I went on my first camino in 2016. I carried a sleeping bag, roll mat and bivvy bag. You will note this was way before Covid 19. So far from "carrying my fears" or being "fear mongering" or "doom saying" it was and is simply a way of avoiding pre- planned stages, crowded or closed albergues and providing a freedom of the road that I believe the Camino is partly all about. Also this obsession with weight is silly. You carry what you feel you need for safety, comfort and necessity. The weight of my pack has always been easily manageable, I have always been able to put in long days if I felt like it and I have never worried about where I was going to sleep. Fine if people do not want the added "weight" of a roll mat or sleeping bag - no one is forced to carry them. How on earth is any of that related to fear mongering or doom saying. Strange world.
Don.
Lock down in UK 4th July partially ends - Cotswold Way (100 miles) here I come, sleeping bag, roll mat and bivvy included.
Hi Don,I'm guessing the Cotswold Way is mostly off road,I didn't think weight would be an issue,but we're not designed to pound pavements for any length of time,
My next Camino will be on a push bike,so weight shouldn't be an issue,
Enjoy the Cotswold Way,in Scotland we can't go more than five miles from home,
But on the plus side all the Covid numbers are coming down.
Bill
 

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
The most abandoned piece of kit I saw in 2012/13 was the sleeping mat/pad, they were left in albergues by the score and more disturbing, along the trail.
I bet they were the cheap foam ones which many people feel obliged to carry! My exped inflatable weighs 400g and is in its pouch and stowed away in my mochilla. The snozzle bag doubles up as a dry-bag. I doubt very much you will find those discarded! I find the cheap disposable ponchos to be as big a menace. Like you say it is disturbing and does the pilgrim image no good at all.

The malingerer.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I bet they were the cheap foam ones which many people feel obliged to carry! My exped inflatable weighs 400g and is in its pouch and stowed away in my mochilla. The snozzle bag doubles up as a dry-bag. I doubt very much you will find those discarded! I find the cheap disposable ponchos to be as big a menace. Like you say it is disturbing and does the pilgrim image no good at all.

The malingerer.
I walked 30+ caminos and have never seen sleeping pads left along the trail. The only gear I can think of I have seen left on the trail is shoes.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I think that you need to walk at least 45 Caminos before starting to see sleeping pads. You are getting closer...
Yeah ...I'm getting there. But maybe I should stop before that? Sounds terrible ...
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
30+? And the only discard you’ve seen is shoes? I’d love a list. The Ditch Pigs would know where their service was redundant.
Some clothes ...not that much. Plenty of litter.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I haven't seen sleeping pads discarded along the trail, but they get discarded somewhere, based on the number of pilgrims that I've seen start the Camino with one, but finish without a sleeping pad.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I haven't seen sleeping pads discarded along the trail, but they get discarded somewhere, based on the number of pilgrims that I've seen start the Camino with one, but finish without a sleeping pad.
I have seen some left at albergues. And people send a lot of stuff to Santiago or even home.

But I think the trick is to buy stuff you really like. I think I had the same super light foam mat with me on half of my Caminos. Didn’t use it much. But nice in airports, for nightwalks, when you arrive at the Camino after midnight. For peace of mind if you like to walk without a plan and reservation.

I think when people buy the 5€ Decathlon ones, they are more likely to throw them out, but that might be a generalization.
 

An Tincéir

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2009) Norte (2016) Norte/Primitivo (2018)
@Texas Walker I'm not trying to say my strategy is righter than anyone else’s, actually, for me, it is not about strategy. It is about giving a good advice, and as such making people aware of the situation so they can make their own decision.

I think your strategy is good as far as choosing hotels all the way and making reservations in advance will heighten your chances of getting a place every night compared to not having reservations at all. You might even have less chance of exposure, who knows really. And supporting locals is a good thing to do.

But if there will be a second wave of outbreak and Spain will use the same strategy as they just did with the current outbreak, all hotels and all public transport will be shut down overnight.

So, even though I'm with you on your strategy, I would still bring a sleeping pad.

And on a side note; personally, I prefer albergues. I walked a Camino in January and one in March this year and did not see any sick people on either the French or the Portuguese Caminos. It seems like the outbreaks where mostly in bigger cities with airports and some cases where locals traveled and came back and spread the virus in their community.
Hi Ninja, no one is denying your right to bring what ever you like on your Camino so why be so strident in defending your opinion against others’ opinions that are equally valid. Peace!
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
Nobody said 10c is freezing. Somebody said a 25c temperature difference between day and night FEELS freezing. And at 10c people would most likely prefer a sleeping bag anyway.
For me, 70 F is about perfect. Lived in the West Indies for awhile and found it just right. Now in the PNW. Seldom gets WAY low, but often chillier than I like.
 

jsalt

Jill
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
I made a few additions to my Packing List and thought it might be helpful for anyone planing on walking the camino now

  • Masks
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Sleeping Bag
  • Sleeping Pad
  • Contactless Credit/Debit Card
The few times that I have not had a bed for the night, and had to sleep on the hard ground, has not been worth carrying a sleeping mat for.

With a few items of clothing underneath to protect against the cold, a sleeping bag (which I always carry), and a poncho or rain jacket on top, I survived the nights.

But not worth carrying a mat every day for.
 

Creativeguy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP France to Santiago 2020
MODERATOR'S NOTE

For many years Moderators noted that for most of March through to October members posts covered topics of planning, walking or recovering from a camino. Members were friendly, supportive and sympathetic. November through February without those comforting distractions things on the forum got a little more fractious as Members squabbled over back-pack weights, the correct way to order a coffee and the true meaning of meaning. We used to call that period "Fighting Season".

I for one would be a happier Moderator if Members chose not to extend Fighting Season to the whole year even though they cannot make more than the vaguest of plans, have little prospect of walking and have nothing to recover from more than some vigorous typing.

Buen (future) camino all.
Thank you! I don’t believe there is one correct way to walk the Camino. Patience, flow, adapt,respect the journey and each other, walk in peace. Ahhhhhh!
 

PaulB Hayward

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finish the other half.......as soon as I think my iffy knee will be able.....I hope :)
Do some lateral thinking ole buddy! I use an ultra lightweight inflatable mat EXPED) which weighs next to nothing! It doesn't need a pump thanks to that wonderful invention the Snozzle bag :) I don't use Albergues so its a room or nothing with the nothing being Church doorways etc. Hence the mat! It used to come in very handy for airport floors as well! As to age and cowboy camping, at 82 I am no cowboy and my romance with the Camino started when I was 65, so there!

Yours aye,

The Malingerer.

:) :) :)
I like this ...............I think this way too; and, it's always nice come accross another 'mature' walker, that shares my values...
 

ctay122

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020 Camino Frances
This might sound like a stupid question, but will one be required to wear a mask at night while sleeping in the albergues or is social distance enough? Is a mask necessary when inside any building, public or private right now?
 
Last edited:

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
This might sound like a stupid question, but will one be required to wear a mask at night while sleeping in the albergues or is social distance enough? Is a mask necessary when inside any building, public or private right now?
Well ...the crazy thing is ...some albergues have interpreted the rules like that. But the real rule is, you have to wear a mask inside when you cannot keep a 2-meter distance. And also, for check-in. So, you are not supposed to sleep with a mask on. Some albergues might tell you to, but they are not right. Just like bars and restaurants are open for dining inside with a 2-meter social distance to other tables.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Well ...the crazy thing is ...some albergues have interpreted the rules like that. But the real rule is, you have to wear a mask inside when you cannot keep a 2-meter distance. And also, for check-in. So, you are not supposed to sleep with a mask on. Some albergues might tell you to, but they are not right. Just like bars and restaurants are open for dining inside with a 2-meter social distance to other tables.
I don't know how you can draw your conclusion! It obviously depends on whether or not you CAN keep that required distance. Sometime you can't, in which case you would need to wear the mask whether you are sleeping or awake. Furthermore, if the albergue decides that you must, by their rules, then you must!
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Hi Ninja, no one is denying your right to bring what ever you like on your Camino so why be so strident in defending your opinion against others’ opinions that are equally valid. Peace!
People are definitely allowed to have their own opinions. And people are definitely allowed to pick whatever they put in their backpacks.

But, I am allowed to have my opinion as well. And as I started the thread here, I would say some people have a problem with that. That is fine. And I am fine with that.

But, when it looks more like trolling or intentional manipulation without any value except spoiling a topic in here, I might not be as overbearing. So, if people are referring to non-specified proposals as an argument against what I am saying and if they say they have a better strategy without being specific about what that strategy is ...it looks more like being clever in a destructive narcissistic way. Or let’s say people, or even moderators, would argue sleeping pads are left all over the trails as an argument not to bring them, and everyone who walked the Camino know that is not true ...it becomes stinky. And I do not value their opinion as much as others, sorry.

If people say they do not want the extra weight and just want to sleep on whatever is in their backpack, if needed ...it's cool. Or if people want a really heavy sleeping pad because they want to sleep comfortable if needed. It's fine. Or if they do not want to bring a sleeping pad for whatever reason ...it's cool with me.

And then there is the element of a new situation. Spain just had a State of Alert. Military and Police where sent in to enforce orders by the government shutting down bars, restaurants, hotels, hostels, albergues etc. Airports and public transport got shut down. And all that might happen again. And I recommend bringing a sleeping pad. Nothing in this topic has changed my mind about that being a good recommendation.
 
Last edited:

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I don't know how you can draw your conclusion! It obviously depends on whether or not you CAN keep that required distance. Sometime you can't, if which case you would need to wear the mask whether you are sleeping or awake. Furthermore, if the albergue decides that you must, by their rules, then you must!
Albergues are not allowed to run at full capacity, or at least they have to make sure social distancing is enforced in dormitories by physically not having as many beds available. But, yes, you have to follow the rules of the albergue. But if they tell you to sleep with your mask on you might want to use your sleeping pad outside instead.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
And then there is the element of a new situation. Spain just had a State of Alert. Military and Police where sent in to enforce orders by the government shutting down bars, restaurants, hotels, hostels, albergues etc. Airports and public transport got shut down. And all that might happen again.
Which is why I'm in no hurry to spend my time and money planning a Camino in these uncertain times, no matter how much I am craving it.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
@camino.ninja - how the thread varies in a post, this is normal .. once you start a post you no longer 'own' it, it isn't yours and it will go where it will .. an open forum .. and, like conversations round the dining table at a great supper, the conversation goes off at tangents and then comes back again ... some you will like and some you will not, and, true, nonsense things will be said ...

- yours is a great opening post, one to make people think about what extras they would take now the world has changed . and people are bound to add items to your list - you adding a sleeping mat to your list is a good one and I agree .. but someone disagreeing with that? - this is normal stuff .... so all is well ..

... though, generally there appears to be some change in tone on the forum at the moment .. a little sniping here and there, attacks on others because they have a different point of view ... a bit unpleasant ... what is this? cabin fever from lockdown? letting out stress from the plague situation at home? who knows, it will pass.

re sleeping mats left on the Camino - well, I have been going to do first aid for some thirteen years now and have never seen one dumped outdoors, though I have seen many left in refugios, all the cheap foam roll mats ...
 

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
Someone once said bad decissions makes great adventures.
have made a host of very bad decisions in my life! I only discovered they were great adventures AFTER I had recovered from them! :) I sometimes think my decision making is on the same level as my planning i.e. great at the time but wonderful for throwing out the window once you get started! :)

The Malingerer.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
have made a host of very bad decisions in my life! I only discovered they were great adventures AFTER I had recovered from them! :) I sometimes think my decision making is on the same level as my planning i.e. great at the time but wonderful for throwing out the window once you get started! :)

The Malingerer.
A young guy asked me some years ago how to prevent getting old. And without thinking about it I just answerd: "Do not learn from your mistakes". I sure thought a lot about it afterwards, and I think it might helps me keep younger at mind. So you might got something valuable right there.
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
A young guy asked me some years ago how to prevent getting old. And without thinking about it I just answerd: "Do not learn from your mistakes". I sure thought a lot about it afterwards, and I think it might helps me keep younger at mind. So you might got something valuable right there.
I think that was part of a famous quote,I'm sure someone on here,will keep me right!
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I think that was part of a famous quote,I'm sure someone on here,will keep me right!
Would not be surpriced. Or at least it should be.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
  • Contactless Credit/Debit Card
I don’t think it takes much in the way of reading the tea leaves to predict that the former mantra of “cash is king” on the camino will be a thing of the past. This will have the unintended benefit of regularizing more transactions in which proprietors were able to avoid declaration of income with a cash transaction.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I don’t think it takes much in the way of reading the tea leaves to predict that the former mantra of “cash is king” on the camino will be a thing of the past. This will have the unintended benefit of regularizing more transactions in which proprietors were able to avoid declaration of income with a cash transaction.
Yeah ...before the whole corona thing, paying with card for something less than 5 euros was almost impossible even though they had the machine. Now they prefer Contactless for a 1 euro coffee. If I was working at a bar or albergues I would prefer Contactless as well. No need to risk getting sick for that.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I'm not sure how this would work at donativo albergues. Maybe boil the coins and put any bills into a bag or box to dry out for a few days? I don't believe that paper can retain the SARS-CoV-2 virus for very long: plastic bills are another issue.
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
I'm not sure how this would work at donativo albergues. Maybe boil the coins and put any bills into a bag or box to dry out for a few days? I don't believe that paper can retain the SARS-CoV-2 virus for very long: plastic bills are another issue.
Quarantine the coins for 72 hours,or have honesty boxes,like the ones in the Norwegian huts!
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I'm not sure how this would work at donativo albergues. Maybe boil the coins and put any bills into a bag or box to dry out for a few days? I don't believe that paper can retain the SARS-CoV-2 virus for very long: plastic bills are another issue.
The coins can just be handwashed or disinfected with hand sanitizer. But the paper bills are cannot be washed really. Any ideas?

But coins would be something like having a clean bag and a bag for receiving change. It is difficult.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Quarantine the coins for 72 hours,or have honesty boxes,like the ones in the Norwegian huts!
How about a QR code to a PayPal donation link? It would require them to be registered as a non-profit organisation.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
What are honesty boxes?
The box, available in many Donativos, Hurtas, Mountain Huts & Bothies, where honest users can leave their honest contribution to the cost of maintaining the facility. Or, like my local Apiarist's Honesty Box where anyone who wants a jar of his Honey is expected to leave their cash, or like the box my neighbour puts out to collect donations to charity in exchange for the plants he grows and nurtures.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
The coins can just be handwashed or disinfected with hand sanitizer. But the paper bills are cannot be washed really. Any ideas?
Euro notes are machine washable. You may want to watch this video Euro Banknotes - Made to last by the European Central Bank. ☺

However, the easiest thing to do is washing your hands properly for at least 20 seconds after handling money. There is no legal requirement to disinfect money as far as I can tell.
 
Last edited:

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
I don’t think it takes much in the way of reading the tea leaves to predict that the former mantra of “cash is king” on the camino will be a thing of the past. This will have the unintended benefit of regularizing more transactions in which proprietors were able to avoid declaration of income with a cash transaction.
So that's what moderators do with their time off! Read the tea leaves! it was a well known art in my family but I didn't know it was still practised! :) Can you get them on the Camino? looks like I will have to carry my stove after all, just to boil the tea! Just think, I could charge for readings and have extra crusts to scoff! :) :)

Looks like there are a few dark arts practised on the camino which are now coming to light! :)

Yours aye,

The Malingerer.
 

malingerer

samarkand
Camino(s) past & future
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
The Runes say nothing ever changes. The Entrails suggest decay. The Geese have flown over the water. The Sphinx recommends delay. “There’s no future” sang Sid, and the things that he did made him right in his way on that day 😉
What's this? another wordsmith loose on ye forum? I shall burn incense and chant incantations immediately!

:)

The Malingerer.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
Not sure if this has been raised elsewhere but putting it up for information
View attachment 77826
It's not a Camino de Santiago route. And I haven't heard of temperature measuring and gloves being required on any Camino de Santiago route. This might be more confusing than helpful.
 

peregrino_tom

Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
For my sins, I've just read all of this thread.
I'm wondering about pillows. If I was running an albergue I think I'd withdraw them from circulation along with the blankets etc.
A couple of years ago I got tempted to buy the Sea to Summit premium Aeros blow-up pillow. It seemed like a bit of an unnecessarily expensive luxury at the time, but it's been truly excellent for me. It's 79g / 2.5 ounces that I don't ever resent carrying.
 

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 55 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 197 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 325 24.8%
  • June

    Votes: 95 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 379 28.9%
  • October

    Votes: 158 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock