A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Camino Forum Store

Advertisement

drain plug, guidebooks, soap, ear plug and knife...

#1
Hiya!

These are my last minute minutia...

1. Is a universal plug needed?? (I belive i've heard yes and no)
2. Is a simple knife enough to suffice? I'd rather a lightweight real-ish knife than cut cheese or salami or bread with a 1-inch swiss army blade.
3. Is a watch a good idea, if for no other idea for a morning alarm?
4. I'm no beauty queen but the thought of using bar soap on my face for a month kinda makes me cringe. Ladies...? (or men) thoughts?
5. I'd like to take the brierly guide but i don't know if its worth the weight?
6. Is there ice at the refugios or bars to ice achy body parts?
7. I'll be starting in france and want to post things ahead to myself in spain for during/after the camino. Is this a bad idea? I wonder about a greater chance of being lost/not arriving?

Many thanks in advance. You each are an important part of a wonderful community.

Buena.
 

Advertisment

A

Anonymous

Guest
#2
My humble suggestions:

1. Negative
2. None
3. Watch is crucial
4. Gel
5. If u read Spanish, I'd recommend: "El Pais/Aguilar"
6. In most of them
7. Good :idea: to send ur things on ahead to Santiago. After weeks of using the same clothes over and over, changing into clean, "regular person," clothes, will be a heck of a luxury :!:

I wonder about a greater chance of being lost/not arriving?

You may get lost. But u will arrive.

Best,

xm 8)
 
#3
Thanks XM!

You may get lost. But u will arrive.

I meant my stuff not me...heheh. Thanks for the vote of confidence!
Clearly I don't know how to use quotes.

Followup questions...
What is the washing situation? (since you don't use a sink plug)
And no knife? You just bite on into your bread loaf and cheese? :)

Leo espanol pero prefiero ingles porque es mi idoma primero....
 

marktqm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2006)
#4
Buena,

You can wash your clothes without a sink plug. It's a matter of technique. First you wet all the items under the tap, remove all the mud, then add your detergent and create lather (you don't need standing water for that). Then rinse. There are 'lavaderos' in most albergues. In some, you may be forced to use the in-house laundry machine (will cost you a few euros) or the bathroom sink, but be considerate of the people waiting in line.

Mark
 

Advertisment

Camino(s) past & future
Frances from SJPdP 2007, TBD 2017
#6
Face soap

Personally I hate to be without my precious nuetragena facial soap bar. I decided it's no big deal to cut off a small peice of it and stick it in the bag with my shampoo bar (which will suffice for washing the rest of me). That's my solution.
Lauren
 
#8
1. Is a universal plug needed?? (I belive i've heard yes and no)
Your profile says you're from the US of A. To repeat myself:

US have 110/120 Volt AC at 60 Hertz, Europe has 220/230 Volt AC at 50 Hertz, so make sure you have a charger (or device in case you plug it straight in) that can handle both. Some do: "input 100/240V, 50/60Hz", some don't - so check, before the thingy goes up in smoke....

You will need an adapter additionally. Adapters only make sure you can plug in the damn thing - they will NOT transform AC from 110 to 220.

That - right voltage and an adapter - applies to all electric devices from the US: charger of all kinds (video, digicam), cellphone, iPod, laptop, electric razor, GPS, electric bedbug killer, dishwasher - whatever your heart desires to schlepp along the Camino...

The so called "euro plug" looks like that:



The european standard plug with protective earth conductor looks like that:




Re "bar soap on the face": mate, I've been using bar soap on all of my body - head to toe - for the last 30 years. I'm still beautiful. Well. See yourself:

AFTER SOAP:



BEFORE SOAP:

 

WolverineDG

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#10
To dry clothes more quickly, roll them up in a towel, then step or sit on the towel several times. Unroll, flip towel over, roll up again, then repeat process. The clothes will still be damp, so you need to hang them up. Voila, dry clothes in the morning.

dg
 
#12
Folks - there are so many things running on electric power, i.e. digicams (yep, I'll bring one for my Camino), video cameras (no), ipods or mp3 players (yes, got one - can't live without my music), electric shaver (no), electric toothbrush (sic! - but no), laptop (oh my Gawd...), handhelds or palms (some like it - I dont), GPS (hölp...), these things to make womens hair curly (my wife always insists, me: thank you - no, what hair?) and so on. When you're from Europe - no prob, plugs fit. When you're from the US of A - big prob: plugs won't fit, different current.

I used to run tours allover NZ professionally and still run a forum about NZ - you wouldn't believe what nonsense people carry around. On the Caminos they would have to schlepp it from A to B on their backs. But in a trunk, taken care for by the backup guide in the van? Via the US and therefore 2 x 23 Kilo plus cabine luggage full of junk? As I said: unbelievable...
 

Whalleyranger

Moderator
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Jul-Aug 05, Frances, Jul-Aug 06, Portugues, Oct 2010
#14
Pilgrims have been walking without watches or other timepieces for hundreds of years. You'll get by without one. Eat when you're hungry and sleep when you're tired.

Of course, if you're walking in the summer, it's easy to tell when it's 5am because that's when the plastic bags start rustling.
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPDP - Santiago); Via Podensis (Le Puy en Velay - SJPDP); Via Francigena (Canterbury - Rome); Via Portugues (Tui - Santiago); Via Francigena del Sud (Rome - Bari).
To Do Via Egnatia (Durres - Thessaloniki); INT & Jerusalem Trail (Tel Aviv - Jerusalem)
#15
Soap, cleansers

There was an article (in New Scientist I think) that studied washing with no soap at all, just water. After a few days the skin chemistry adjusts to the new regime and there is no antisocial smell - nor does your body become a seething cesspit of germs.

What about germs from trips to the toilet, I hear you ask? An excellent question indeed!

To which I reply: How many of us scrub up to remove germs like those TV doctors after our toilet stops - which is the only guaranteed way to dislodge bacteria. In fact, how many of us always use soap on such occasions? Hmmm??

I now mount my soapbox (laughter) and declare to one and all that society (at least in Australia, where I live) has become far too obsessive about cleanliness to the degree that there are supermarket shelves full of personal and household cleaners to rid us of the very last microbe - even those that may actually be doing some good by challenging our immune systems.

BobM
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#16
I hear u BobM...ah, but a hot, soapy, shower, just after waking up, is simply celestial! Best, xm
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002-2004-2006-2008-2011-2015
Cycled from Scotland,walked Francias, walked V.D.L.P, winter on Francais, stroll on Englaise
#17
washing

Hi
If you must wash, put your clothes on the floor as you shower then rinse after. (tongue in cheek re must wash)
Dael
 

WolverineDG

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#18
I forgot to add the following to my towel-drying suggestion:

First, wring as much water out of your clothes as possible. THEN roll them up in a towel. And don't just step on the towel; stand on it, shifting your weight from foot to foot. This gets much more water out of your clothes than just wringing & they should be dry by morning (if not sooner). That way, you only have your towel flapping from your backpack the next day & not your (ahem) delicates. :shock:

Buen Camino, y'all! :arrow:
dg
 

Whalleyranger

Moderator
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Jul-Aug 05, Frances, Jul-Aug 06, Portugues, Oct 2010
#21
Not all albergues and refugios have washing lines. Or if there are, there aren't enough clothes pegs to go round. A couple of safety pins will do the job just as well, they weigh nothing and you can use them to pin damp socks to your backpack the following day.

If you get a bottom bunk you can also hang wet socks underneath the mattress above.
 

WolverineDG

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#22
xm, even if there is a place to dry clothes, by taking out as much water as possible, you lessen the time the clothes need to be on the line or in the dryer, leaving more space for the next person. :)

dg
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#24
Not all albergues ...have washing lines. Or if there are, there aren't enough clothes pegs to go round.
True, but there are alternatives, such as: walls, empty chair/tables, stone floors away from people, stones, roofs...

Best,

xm 8)
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPDP - Santiago); Via Podensis (Le Puy en Velay - SJPDP); Via Francigena (Canterbury - Rome); Via Portugues (Tui - Santiago); Via Francigena del Sud (Rome - Bari).
To Do Via Egnatia (Durres - Thessaloniki); INT & Jerusalem Trail (Tel Aviv - Jerusalem)
#25
Using a towel to wring out clothes

WolverineDG said:
To dry clothes more quickly, roll them up in a towel, then step or sit on the towel several times. Unroll, flip towel over, roll up again, then repeat process. The clothes will still be damp, so you need to hang them up. Voila, dry clothes in the morning.dg
I wrap say a washed shirt or sox strethched out in the towel, roll it up into a sausage then keep twisting the towel hard. You can generate a surprising amount of force this way once you have optimised the twisting technique. Works best for one article at a time.

Cleanliness in next to Godliness!

Bob M
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPDP - Santiago); Via Podensis (Le Puy en Velay - SJPDP); Via Francigena (Canterbury - Rome); Via Portugues (Tui - Santiago); Via Francigena del Sud (Rome - Bari).
To Do Via Egnatia (Durres - Thessaloniki); INT & Jerusalem Trail (Tel Aviv - Jerusalem)
#26
Shower Bliss

xm said:
I hear u BobM...ah, but a hot, soapy, shower, just after waking up, is simply celestial! Best, xm
xm makes an excellent point that I had overlooked. Showering (and even modest pampering after doffing the hairshirt and sackcloth) is about more than just cleanliness.

A great shower (with soap) after a hard day does wonders for the spirits, creates enthusiasm and aids recovery. I do it myself.

Howie in another post makes an extravagant claim for beautification which also cannot be overlooked (despite insufficient pictorial evidence!) :D

"Please God, make me pure - but not yet" - St Augustine
 
#27
Looking your best

Probably a silly question, but ...
Do refuges have any facility for ironing the odd shirt? After weeks in and out of a rucksack, I feel even the best drip-dry shirt is going to have more wrinkles than the average elephant.
And even we elderly chaps like to look our best!
 
#28
.....shirt is going to have more wrinkles than the average elephant.

Try rolling your clothes instead of folding. Doesnt stop wrinkles but removes that pressed flat look.

regards
michael
Your friends will know you better in the first minute you meet than your acquaintances will know you in a thousand years.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#30
Hi bibtracker, no such thing as a silly question, if u have one it reflects that others do, as well. I haven't see any ironing facilities in the albergues that I've been to. You'll find as u walk that looks even for us elderly gents do not count at all :!: Best, xm
 

marktqm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2006)
#31
bibtracker,

A lot of pilgrims wear polyester shirts, sometimes called technical shirts. Among other benefits such as wicking away sweat and drying faster, they don't need to be ironed. No need for a lint remover either!

Mark
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#33
I do hereby confess to this egregious forum that I was guilty of "looking good" prior to my first Camino. In less than a week, though, when no one looked/cared (too tired), I gave it up and got into wearing wrinkled clothing, big time. Best, xm 8)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#34
ah, but a hot, soapy, shower, just after waking up, is simply celestial!
Add on: aah, but a cold, soapy, shower, upon arriving at an albergue after hours of walking, sweating, being tired, etc., makes me feel like singing: " heaven, am in heaven... (more so than) dancing cheek to cheek (people still do that :?: Fred...Ginger...where r u :?: ) Well, there's always...am singing in the shower, just singing in the shower...:lol: Best, xm
 
#35
great pictures HOWIE!

you continue to suprass me with your tecnical know-how. quotations, a personal logo AND pictures within your post. my oh my you put this 27 year old to shame...lol.

i neglected the word 'sink' in regards to a universal sink plug, but your answer got me thinking. how hard would it be to get the right european version charger for my digital camera? a lithium batter is pretty basic, and europeans probably have the same model cameras, or at the very least they're using the same battereies. if you get the right one, that will definitely lighten the load- less heavy techy stuff to carry around since you wouldn't need an adapter AND converter AND charger. perhaps ebay, or in a shop in europe?
 

WolverineDG

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#36
buena, I am taking my digital camera & extra batteries. I did have the rechargeable kind, but after a while, they stop holding a charge. Yes, you can get batteries in Europe for your camera, so leave all that other stuff at home. :)

dg
 
#37
So my deep thoughts about "plugs" (in general) where not in vain. I felt pretty much ashamed after I realized my silly mistake, I can tell you. Took quite a few bottles of NZ Pinot noir to get over it...

buena! said:
... ebay, or in a shop in europe? ...
Yes. Your problem is the difference in voltage. European chargers of course are ok for 220/230 Volt - plus having the right plug (and the correct output current as well - correct charger for your particular gadget presumed). Depends where you arrive - go for an electronics shop and ask. Ebay needs a postal address - that might be a problem.

Re uploading pics: it's easy. If you see (anywhere, try image search with Google) a pic you like: right click it for "properties", copy the address (with the http:// in front, important), paste that in your post, highlight the whole caboodle and mark it as IMG (right above where you write your post). Hey presto, here you are...

(Sorry Ivar, forum administrators doen't like that, I know, I am one myself...)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#38
Thanks for that bit of info, dg. I have FINALLY jumped from the 19th to the 21st century and bought my first digital camera ever, yesterday :!: Yes yes, I've been using the old fashioned, politically incorrect, kind, forever. A nine year old kid is showing me how to use it :!: This one has a video/mike, and dunno what else (what do I want to use that for?). I've already learned the basics. No more trips to Wlagreen's to have film developed:!: I have a "memory card" for 300 pics, u think that may be enough? It's actually being fun learning how to use it. One fear less. Best, xm 8)
 

WolverineDG

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#39
You might want to get one more, at least a 1gig, which holds tons of pics (at least according to what the package on the 1 gig I bought at Target said).

While I miss my trusty Canon (RIP :cry: :cry: :cry: ; met its doom in Egypt), I love being able to see the pic I just took & delete it if it's not good, instead of waiting until I get home & pay to develop it. ;)

Batteries definitely weigh less than film & take up much less room, too. The ones I like are the Energizer Lithium; expensive, but they do last a long time.

Welcome to the Space Age!
dg
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#40
Welcome to the Space Age!
Thank u, peregrina :lol: :!:

You might want to get one more, at least a 1gig, which holds tons of pics

OK ok , go easy on me. What's 1 gig? Is that like more pic capacity? Already got space for 300, u think I need more?

...I love being able to see the pic I just took & delete it if it's not good, instead of waiting until I get home & pay to develop it.

Yesssssss :!: One of the things I like about this one is I'll be able to take b/w pics, which I like a lot.

The one I got is a "Cannon Power Shot SD 1000 Digital ELPH," small and light. What do u think of it? It was on sale at Bestbuy...

Best,

xm 8)
 

WolverineDG

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#41
I've long heard good things about the ELPH line of cameras. Does it have an optical zoom or digital zoom? Because you really want the optical zoom. I have a Kodak 5 megapixel, bought last year & probably obsolete the second I took it out of the box. :lol:

Your memory card should say what size it is. Take a gander at it; it won't bite/byte. ;) The one currently in my camera is a 128MB, which holds about 100 pics. It sounds like your card is a 512MB, the next size up. A 1 gig holds tons more, so I'm taking that & my 128MB so I can snap away & not worry about having to delete something to make room for another pic. :)

dg
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#42
It's got a a 3X (whatever that means) optical zoom which I still don't know how to use, will get there, am sure. Well, this one has probably become obsolete the moment I opened up the box, too... I bought a memory card which I can't remember what size it was but holds 300 picts and 5" video time. So it does sound that ur recommending taking more memory for more pics?
 

WolverineDG

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#43
Yes, because what are you going to do if you're snapping away & hear the ominous "ding" that indicates your card is out of memory? :shock:

dg
 

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
Donating Member
#44
Congrats with your new camera!

Once you have taken your photos, have a look at this program to organize your photos on your computer. It also makes it easy to uplaod these photos to web albums so others (we all?) can see them.

All free.

http://picasa.google.com/index.html

Un saludo,
Ivar
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#45
Howie said:
Your problem is the difference in voltage. European chargers of course are ok for 220/230 Volt - plus having the right plug (and the correct output current as well - correct charger for your particular gadget presumed).
OK this all confuses me muchly but Howie, since you are from my side of the world, you are the right person to ask.
When I came home last year I bought a new digital camera in Singapore. It had two plugs in it, one presumably for Singapore, and the other one perhaps for somewhere in Europe, not here anyhow. Plus a simple charger.So I had to get a plug converter for here, but had no voltage problems.

Now, when I go to Europe I am sure I will get the plug thing sorted sooner or later. But does our NZ voltage go OK over there? Sorry to sound so ditsy about this.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#46
I hear what ur saying, dg, but THREE HUNDRED PICS :!: :!: :!: :!: I've never reached the two hundred mark :!: Nonetheless, my friends agree with u so I may have to give in to peer pressure and get it. Best, xm
 
#48
Hi all !!

About use of watch : Yes I know that a part of the camino is turning your back to the time-pressure we have at home. BUT, as one who managed to get lost in a discussion at a dinner table and got back to a locked door at the refugio, a watch would have been a good thing.....

:D

Liv
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
#49
For me, taking a watch during my Caminos is essential. I like to be aware of the time I leave an albergue, how many hours I walk, when I arrive at the next albergue, and much more. Though I do like to break as many connections as poss. with my "cotidian home reality," being aware of "watch" time poses no problem. Come to think of it, I've been using the same, simple, relatively inexpensive, watch (Timex EXPEDITION), during my last Caminos and I feel "he" is one of my inanimate Jacobean friends, along with my pole, shoes, and backpack. I use it exclsively for the Roads. Best, xm
 
#50
Howie your post was great! Even though technically you answered a different question, I still needed your answer. You should feel good about that, not embarassed!

For anyone still looking for a camera, I have a Pentax optio Wpi and it's 100% water and sand proof. you can actually take it underwater. it works- ive done it! now i just have to get the euro charger instead of the US one. small lightweight, and doesn't require a waterproof bag.

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_rev ... iowpi.html
 

WolverineDG

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#51
That's what my cousin said on our trip to London a couple of years ago. We had to stop several times so she could burn a few CDs/DVDs (?), reformat & continue on. She ended up with over 500 pics!! :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:

My father was a Scoutmaster, so I follow the Boy Scout motto: "Be prepared."

dg
 
#52
KiwiNomad - Sorry for confusing you, my fellow kiwi, but buena! hails from the US of A and they definitely have a different voltage over there (and, btw, different freuency too). So that post was directed to buena!.

KiwiNomad06 said:
... Now, when I go to Europe I am sure I will get the plug thing sorted sooner or later. But does our NZ voltage go OK over there? ...
The voltage is the same (220/230 Volt, 50 Hertz) - so all your gadgets will work ok. Only thing you need is an adapter plug (NZ -> EU) - easily available in most NZ outdoor shops, most likely even at the NZ airport.
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
#53
Howie said:
The voltage is the same (220/230 Volt, 50 Hertz) - so all your gadgets will work ok. Only thing you need is an adapter plug (NZ -> EU) - easily available in most NZ outdoor shops, most likely even at the NZ airport.
Thanks Howie.... glad to hear that. Since I bought my camera in Singapore it never had an NZ plug, and I had to buy a converter here. But one of the two it came with may be a Euro type plug. I will find out in due course.
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
Camino Chris Equipment Questions 19
EmoJohnson Equipment Questions 25
A Equipment Questions 7
Orafo Equipment Questions 28
T Equipment Questions 2

OLDER threads on this topic



Advertisement

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 7 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 3 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 24 4.5%
  • April

    Votes: 84 15.8%
  • May

    Votes: 141 26.5%
  • June

    Votes: 43 8.1%
  • July

    Votes: 12 2.3%
  • August

    Votes: 9 1.7%
  • September

    Votes: 143 26.8%
  • October

    Votes: 58 10.9%
  • November

    Votes: 6 1.1%
  • December

    Votes: 3 0.6%
Top