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dry sacks/trash bag/ziplocks?

Eve Alexandra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first in March '17
#1
Is it a good idea to invest in dry sacs? Does the "line your pack with a trash bag" thing work well, given nice sturdy contractor bags are going to be waaaaaaay too big for a 35 L pack? What about freezer style (thicker) ziplocks instead of dry sacks?

Just looking at the mess on the floor of my kit and trying to figure out the simplest way to keep everything dry and easy to find. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#3
The garbage bag as a liner would work to keep the contents of your pack dry, but in serious rain your backpack (and everything in the external pouches) will get wet.

Personally, I like to organize my things carefully anyway, so I use several dry-bags of various sizes to do that. They also allow me to isolate my sleeping bag, etc., if I think I have been exposed to bedbugs. I also carry a large pack "liner" that my whole pack fits into, and always keep it in the bag, closed tightly, in the albergue to protect against bedbugs.

The simplicity and organization of my things is very important to me, so that I won't get overwhelmed by all the choices and decisions and rummaging around. I want only one combination/outfit that depends totally on the weather conditions - No style choices like "do I want a red shirt today, or a blue one?"

My dry bags are actually my main luxury item - they are certainly more expensive than alternatives, and the weight can get significant. Ziplock bags would be my alternative of choice.

Oh! Any bag you use to line your backpack needs to be bigger than the back pack, so that you can pack things in efficiently to fill all the crevices in the pack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May-June 2016)
#4
Is it a good idea to invest in dry sacs? Does the "line your pack with a trash bag" thing work well, given nice sturdy contractor bags are going to be waaaaaaay too big for a 35 L pack? What about freezer style (thicker) ziplocks instead of dry sacks?

Just looking at the mess on the floor of my kit and trying to figure out the simplest way to keep everything dry and easy to find. :)
I used both dry bags and freezer Ziplocs to keep items from getting wet from rain or other sources of water. While walking, I had my sleeping bag and clothes in two separate dry bags. I would also use the larger drybag to take my change of clothes and valuables into the shower with me, which would keep them dry. I used the freezer Ziplocs to store electronic components, guide books, and passport and other paperwork. I used the freezer Ziplocs as they were more durable to repeated openings.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#5
Is it a good idea to invest in dry sacs? Does the "line your pack with a trash bag" thing work well, given nice sturdy contractor bags are going to be waaaaaaay too big for a 35 L pack? ...
I use the trash bag approach since like, uh, ever. If the bag is too large, just cut it to size/cut a part of its top. I also use dry sacs/zip logs etc. inside the pack lined with a trash bag - but I am a bit of a burnt child when it comes to getting my Camino gear wet ;-) Buen Camino, SY
 
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whariwharangi

Guest
#6
Is it a good idea to invest in dry sacs? Does the "line your pack with a trash bag" thing work well, given nice sturdy contractor bags are going to be waaaaaaay too big for a 35 L pack? What about freezer style (thicker) ziplocks instead of dry sacks?

Just looking at the mess on the floor of my kit and trying to figure out the simplest way to keep everything dry and easy to find. :)

I like dry bags. I use them for hiking and sea kayaking. If you don't normally have a use for such an item I wouldn't buy one. If you do buy one the priority is keeping your sleeping bag dry. If you buy two bags, the second priority is keeping your clean clothes dry. I used a heavy duty garbage bag for years with good results and still line the dry bag used for the sleeping bag with one.

Laundry can go in shopping bags.

Documents and wallet should be in separate ziplocs. Nothing is more discouraging than trying to dry out passport and currency.

Ziploc for toilet paper roll. I also carry a ziploc marked 'toilet paper' which gets used to carry carefully folded and used tp to the next toilet. Its probably a good idea to mark it ... so you don't reuse it for carrying food items.

No need to line the pack. Most packs repel water and don't absorb much even if it gets dipped in a creek. Who cares if your toothbrush gets wet.

35l is probably too small to have internal frame and hip belt. Get a better pack that has these features.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#7
The garbage bag pack liner option worked for me in combination with some cuben fibre stuff sacks of various sizes. I only bothered with the garbage bag when rain was forecast because I made the mistake of taking a black one which made the inside of my pack so dark it was hard to find anything in it. Next time I was planning to take a white or green garbage bag but I like the idea of large zip lock bags.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF
#8
I agree with all above and would only add that as well as handy for organizing, small ditty bags (I like Sea-2-Summit SIL bags personally because they seem to make the least noise) because they have a draw string which is easy to hang in the shower with my toiletries and essentials like wallet, passport, etc. I use 3 ditty bags of different colours and sizes so I know exactly what is in each bag and don't need to hunt for things at the end of a long day.
 

fenix

Nevertheless, she persists
Camino(s) past & future
Several, since 1999
Upcoming: Almeria to Muxia, Summer 2017
#9
Is it a good idea to invest in dry sacs? Does the "line your pack with a trash bag" thing work well, given nice sturdy contractor bags are going to be waaaaaaay too big for a 35 L pack? What about freezer style (thicker) ziplocks instead of dry sacks?

Just looking at the mess on the floor of my kit and trying to figure out the simplest way to keep everything dry and easy to find. :)
I generally don't bother to line my pack, at least for a Camino type hike. I find that extra layer annoying to wrestle with. And it would also defeat the convenience of my new panel-loading camino pack.

I've never had an issue with water in my pack either. (Knock on wood, probaby jinxed myself now) I'm confident in my rain gear (Packa, fully deployed in heavy rain, or as just a pack cover + umbrella in light rain) so water doesn't run down my back.

I use a ziplock for my sleeping sack, just because it's light and convenient. And I keep my phone, camera, and ID/money (carried in front waistpack & security wallet) in ziplocks on wet days. That's mostly because I usually, except in the worst downpours or cold weather, leave my rain gear unzipped in front. I don't mind my body getting wet, as long as the pack stays dry.

No, I don't think you need to invest in drysacks for the camino.

Though..... you can multipurpose one 8-12 liter drysack as a laundry washbag (a la Scrubba, but lighter). I carry one for that purpose, but I just use it to hold (and keep separate) any dirty laundry until I wash it.
 

alipilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2005), Frances (2007), Madrid/Frances (2011), 1/2 VdP (2012),
#10
Instead of a garbage bag as a pack liner, many long-distance hikers use a trash compactor bag which is smaller but sturdy. Alternately, you can buy an ultra lightweight bag liner from a company like Zpacks http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/dry_bags.shtml. In reading many thru-hiker blogs, it appears that a pack liner is popular but when soaked, a backpack can absorb a lot of weight and become quite heavy so that's another reason to protect the pack from the outside. I personally don't like pack covers as I've always found water dribbles down between my back & pack, getting the pack wet and I hate soggy pack straps. I have always used an Altus poncho tho' this year I'm going to try wearing an XXL Frogg Toggs men's jacket which actually covers both me and my backpack!
 

fenix

Nevertheless, she persists
Camino(s) past & future
Several, since 1999
Upcoming: Almeria to Muxia, Summer 2017
#11
..... but when soaked, a backpack can absorb a lot of weight and become quite heavy so that's another reason to protect the pack from the outside. I personally don't like pack covers as I've always found water dribbles down between my back & pack, getting the pack wet and I hate soggy pack straps.
Same. I use a Packa for that reason. It can be just a packcover in light drizzle. But then the attached jacket portion can be untucked from the packcover and pulled forward when needed. Same idea as an Altus - protects the gap between the pack & your back - but the packcover can be more effectively used without the jacket when desired. (And huge pit zips make it cool like a poncho)

It was an investment, but I do a lot of hiking/backpacking and it's been worth it.

I haven't needed an interior pack liner, and ziplocks are mostly for convenient, lightweight organization.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#12
35l is probably too small to have internal frame and hip belt. Get a better pack that has these features.
I'm never sure what qualifies as an "internal frame." My Osprey Talon 33 in small size, holds only 31 L and I've found it to be an excellent choice. It doesn't have a frame such that the pack will stand upright by itself, but I can live with that. So I wouldn't assume that a 35 L pack isn't good enough.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
#13
I carried two 30-gallon heavy duty trash bags for my 48L pack. You know which days it will rain, so that morning before you head out, take everything out of your pack (including stuff in outside pockets), line the pack with the trash bag, and put the stuff in and cinch it up. For your pack maybe carry two 18 gallon bags and divide your stuff in the pack. That combined with your packs rain cover should keep everything dry.
Really no need to invest in expensive, water-proof bags. Why?
and the 30 gallon heavy-duty bags have a double duty purpose....field expedient poncho. Don't laugh. Wore them a few times at Mardi Gras parades when the weather turned. ;)
7f5c80cb-94cc-4f7b-a467-9b244726811d.jpg.w960.jpg
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
#14
I never line my pack, but I put everything in ziplock bags. I use the small size for underwear, etc. and a larger one for shirts, pants, etc. It keeps things clean and organized, and you can see what is in the bags. It works especially well on camino because I don't have a lot of items.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
#16
I brought a giant ziplock bag with a handle for carrying my stuff into the showers, toting my laundry, etc. The best thing about it was the price - only a dollar for two at the Dollar Tree store. Or one XXL for a buck.

And it never became necessary, but I could have fit most of the contents of my backpack into it if I had had to walk in really heavy rain.
tmp_8761-20170213_130034325960411.png

I also bought some small zippered mesh bags at the Dollar store that I used for clothes that didn't quite dry. I put the damp clothes in one and pinned it to my pack while I walked.
 
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whariwharangi

Guest
#18
I'm never sure what qualifies as an "internal frame." My Osprey Talon 33 in small size, holds only 31 L and I've found it to be an excellent choice. It doesn't have a frame such that the pack will stand upright by itself, but I can live with that. So I wouldn't assume that a 35 L pack isn't good enough.
Its an internal frame if the pack is designed to transfer load from the frame to the hip belt. I'm not well versed on the availability of 35l packs with a frame but I haven't seen one in passing, while looking at gear at the outdoor store, either.
 
C

Camino Chris

Guest
#21
Is it a good idea to invest in dry sacs? Does the "line your pack with a trash bag" thing work well, given nice sturdy contractor bags are going to be waaaaaaay too big for a 35 L pack? What about freezer style (thicker) ziplocks instead of dry sacks?

Just looking at the mess on the floor of my kit and trying to figure out the simplest way to keep everything dry and easy to find. :)
Hi Eve, I've used a wonderful kitchen trash compactor bag (not trash contractor bag...those things are enormous) lining my 25L pack on both Caminos and love it. I'm sure it must have been somewhat large, but it still fit nicely so thought nothing of its size. The excess at the top I just folded over on itself and used a chip clip to secure it. I will do it again this year and I never needed a rain cover for my pack, either. I also felt it was extra bedbug protection besides the spraying of my backpack, for it kept everything tight inside at night. I never left anything sitting out. They are amazingly strong. I had no worries of wet gear inside my pack and never invested in dry sacks. I use heavy duty 1 gallon ziplock bags for all other items, and a 2 gallon for my sleeping bag as it's so much easier than trying to stuff it in the little sack it came with. And I do have a small toiletry bag.
 

Eve Alexandra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first in March '17
#22
Well it sounds like a combination is the best way to go. I'm really liking the idea of one that can double in the shower for valuables and the clothes I'll be putting on afterwards. But probably not necessary for everything. I've got a pack cover. And a rain jacket. I will look at compactor bags the next time I'm at the store.

My Deuter ACT 35 has both a great internal frame and vents near the back and a great hip belt. When I researched packs, it was mostly those under 30 that didn't have internal frames...although one or two of the nicer 28 L ones still have a good frame, but not the ventilation on the back. REI was invaluable for the pack help. Would not have known what to look at without them.
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 05/17 brazo roto Portomarín
Francés 09/17, 09/18 SJPdP - Fisterra
Portuguese ~05/19
#23
Construction garbage bags work great and are inexpensive. I would leave them long enough to twist and fold over to seal out water. You can stuff the extra in the side of the pack somewhere where the compression will keep it closed. I would inspect them every once in a while to ensure that you have not inadvertently poked a hole in it.

I prefer lightweight silnylon dry bags for backpacking with a pack cover. The dry bags can be purchased in different colors to help with identification and organization. I am going to put a black construction garbage bag in the bottom of my pack as a backup and to eradicate the dreaded chinches if encountered.

I take a completely different approach when I have been canoeing in Quetico because of the possibility of capsizing. My Granite Gear Superior One packs are lined with a heavy duty clear poly pack liner from Duluth Pack. All soft gear (sleeping bag, clothes, etc.) are sealed in zip lock freezer bags (I do not not like the slide lock) and placed in a dry bag. All dry bags are then placed in the pack liner. The pack liner is rolled similar to the dry bag closure and stuffed in the front of the pack. I have a 10'-0" leash attached to the pack with a carabiner on the other end. I loop the leash around a canoe thwart and back onto itself. The leash will prevent the pack from floating away from the canoe, but give enough room to right the canoe. The pack can float for hours this way while keeping everything dry.
 
C

Camino Chris

Guest
#24
Instead of a garbage bag as a pack liner, many long-distance hikers use a trash compactor bag which is smaller but sturdy. Alternately, you can buy an ultra lightweight bag liner from a company like Zpacks http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/dry_bags.shtml. In reading many thru-hiker blogs, it appears that a pack liner is popular but when soaked, a backpack can absorb a lot of weight and become quite heavy so that's another reason to protect the pack from the outside. I personally don't like pack covers as I've always found water dribbles down between my back & pack, getting the pack wet and I hate soggy pack straps. I have always used an Altus poncho tho' this year I'm going to try wearing an XXL Frogg Toggs men's jacket which actually covers both me and my backpack!
That's a great idea getting a HUGE men's Frogg Togg jacket to be used like a short Altus.

And just clarify the bag liners. The best ones are white kitchen trash COMPACTOR bags, not plain white kitchen trash bags...there's a big difference between them!
 

Eve Alexandra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first in March '17
#25
Speaking of using what you have...years ago, when I used cloth diapers for my babies exclusively, I invested in 3 bags for storing the wet diapers in a diaper bag until I got home. No, they aren't gross. They've been through the wash many times and don't smell at all. They are about 12 x 13, and they are waterproof. I put one on my kitchen scale and it only weighs about 2 ounces.

I can shove my stuff sack that has both my Costco down quilt and my liner, into the fuzzibunz bag and still have room for another whole small bag of stuff.

....what does a standard dry sack weigh? Would you use what you have already?

This is what I own, just a much older version (which apparently weighs less than the new one)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FJG6HV6/?tag=camiforu-20
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
#26
Speaking of using what you have...years ago, when I used cloth diapers for my babies exclusively, I invested in 3 bags for storing the wet diapers in a diaper bag until I got home. No, they aren't gross. They've been through the wash many times and don't smell at all. They are about 12 x 13, and they are waterproof. I put one on my kitchen scale and it only weighs about 2 ounces.

I can shove my stuff sack that has both my Costco down quilt and my liner, into the fuzzibunz bag and still have room for another whole small bag of stuff.

....what does a standard dry sack weigh? Would you use what you have already?

This is what I own, just a much older version (which apparently weighs less than the new one)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FJG6HV6/?tag=camiforu-20
My 12 liter Osprey Dry Sack weighs 1.2 ounces.
 

fenix

Nevertheless, she persists
Camino(s) past & future
Several, since 1999
Upcoming: Almeria to Muxia, Summer 2017
#27
Speaking of using what you have...years ago, when I used cloth diapers for my babies exclusively, I invested in 3 bags for storing the wet diapers in a diaper bag until I got home. No, they aren't gross. They've been through the wash many times and don't smell at all. They are about 12 x 13, and they are waterproof. I put one on my kitchen scale and it only weighs about 2 ounces.

I can shove my stuff sack that has both my Costco down quilt and my liner, into the fuzzibunz bag and still have room for another whole small bag of stuff.

....what does a standard dry sack weigh? Would you use what you have already?

This is what I own, just a much older version (which apparently weighs less than the new one)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FJG6HV6/?tag=camiforu-20
I own an assortment, varying sizes & shapes, of sil-nylon organization bags and a couple of dry sacks.
They are all in the 1 oz - 3.5 oz range.

So yeah, what you've got is good!
 

fenix

Nevertheless, she persists
Camino(s) past & future
Several, since 1999
Upcoming: Almeria to Muxia, Summer 2017
#29
Hmmm...they may be too heavy, then. I suppose it depends on what the bag ends up weighing in the end.
2 oz. is just fine if .....
  • you find them helpful & convenient
  • they give you peace of mind
  • your overall bag weight is in your target
If you start obsessively shaving ounces (and fractions of ounces) as you get closer to your start date - we all do it :D - then just replace them with ziplocks.
 
C

Camino Chris

Guest
#30
Well it sounds like a combination is the best way to go. I'm really liking the idea of one that can double in the shower for valuables and the clothes I'll be putting on afterwards. But probably not necessary for everything. I've got a pack cover. And a rain jacket. I will look at compactor bags the next time I'm at the store.

My Deuter ACT 35 has both a great internal frame and vents near the back and a great hip belt. When I researched packs, it was mostly those under 30 that didn't have internal frames...although one or two of the nicer 28 L ones still have a good frame, but not the ventilation on the back. REI was invaluable for the pack help. Would not have known what to look at without them.
I will not be using the Osprey 25L pack this year as it was borrowed and just too small and the cramming I had to do...jeez! But it did have a full Airspeed trampoline back and internal frame. I am finally investing in a 36L for this year.
I brought a giant ziplock bag with a handle for carrying my stuff into the showers, toting my laundry, etc. The best thing about it was the price - only a dollar for two at the Dollar Tree store. Or one XXL for a buck.

And it never became necessary, but I could have fit most of the contents of my backpack into it if I had had to walk in really heavy rain.
View attachment 31841

I also bought some small zippered mesh bags at the Dollar store that I used for clothes that didn't quite dry. I put the damp clothes in one and pinned it to my pack while I walked.
I use the 1 and 2 gallon ziplock bags to hold most of my things, but on a whim I recently purchased two smallish 15"x18" zippered mesh laundry bags at Walmart for only $1.17 each. I couldnt resist at that price though I haven't checked them out yet to see if I like them enough to bring them.
 

Eve Alexandra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first in March '17
#32
They are NOT too heavy at all!
I actually got 1.65 oz on my kitchen scale...I rounded up in case the little bit hanging over the side wasn't showing up on the scale. lol

Organization is important to me. I can easily remember what is in which color bag. So if I don't use these, I'll likely buy something...which could get expensive. Or I could just use these and some freezer sized ziplocks. Which I am leaning toward at the moment. I guess I'll have to see closer to the end.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2020)
#33
Is it a good idea to invest in dry sacs? Does the "line your pack with a trash bag" thing work well, given nice sturdy contractor bags are going to be waaaaaaay too big for a 35 L pack? What about freezer style (thicker) ziplocks instead of dry sacks?

Just looking at the mess on the floor of my kit and trying to figure out the simplest way to keep everything dry and easy to find. :)
Others I walked with used the kitchen trash bag liner method. It worked well for them. I thought about a dry sack, but weight ruled it out. There was only one time when one of my stuff sacks got a little wet. It was no big deal. I used a rain cover in my pack. I haven't decided if I'd use the trash bag liner approach next time. Right now I'm leaning toward no, just for the hassle factor. It would prevent me from accessing anything from the side zipper. Plus, it would be noisier in the alburgue. Neiukd bring more zip locks next time. I didn't have enough of them.
 
C

Camino Chris

Guest
#34
Others I walked with used the kitchen trash bag liner method. It worked well for them. I thought about a dry sack, but weight ruled it out. There was only one time when one of my stuff sacks got a little wet. It was no big deal. I used a rain cover in my pack. I haven't decided if I'd use the trash bag liner approach next time. Right now I'm leaning toward no, just for the hassle factor. It would prevent me from accessing anything from the side zipper. Plus, it would be noisier in the alburgue. Neiukd bring more zip locks next time. I didn't have enough of them.
I love using a trash COMPACTOR bag to line my pack. They are extremely durable, still lightweight and do not make noise. I will be purchasing a new backpack this time and along with top loading I plan to have a zipper entry as well, which is a concern as it does prevent using the front load option. My plan is to only use the zipper to quickly access my jacket or put it away. It would not be in the compactor bag, but I don't think that as a big problem. At the albergues, I will just use the top opening.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#35
I used a pack cover to keep pack and its pockets dry in a shower of rain. Inside I used freezer bags for vulnerable items, the re-usable type which don't rustle. I packed and repacked my bag until I knew where everything fitted best and could find it easily. With a poncho rather than a rain jacket I had no problem with the pack or its straps getting wet in heavy rain. Your nappy(diaper) bags sound like a good idea for your clothes and bed roll etc.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Camino Frances SJPP / 2014 Camino Portugues / 2015 Camino Ingles / 2015 Hospitalero Training
2016 (fall) Camino Sanabre / Hospitalero?
#36
A lot to read as always. I use light weight drybags in different colors and sizes. They weigh very little don't make plastic bag noise. I don't bring a raincover for my pack, I eventually learn where everything is, If I need a" ship your bag day" I carry one with water, snack, and jacket. Trying to remember I believe this has been effective for 22 rain days on five Caminos.... Ultreya...... Willy/Utah?USA
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
#37
I used a pack cover to keep pack and its pockets dry in a shower of rain. Inside I used freezer bags for vulnerable items, the re-usable type which don't rustle. I packed and repacked my bag until I knew where everything fitted best and could find it easily. With a poncho rather than a rain jacket I had no problem with the pack or its straps getting wet in heavy rain. Your nappy(diaper) bags sound like a good idea for your clothes and bed roll etc.
Do you have a brand name for the non rustling reusable freezer bags?
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#38
Do you have a brand name for the non rustling reusable freezer bags?
Mine are from Tesco - the supermarkets own brand. They are very soft feeling but strong.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
#39
Use Altus rain cape. No need for bags inside pack to keep stuff dry. I carry a few varied sizes of zip locks for food and toiletries and dirty washing.
 

KariC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho portugûes (2016)
#40
I lined my pack with a plastic bag both for potential bedbug protection and for rain. DNK if the former worked - never any bedbugs anywhere I was - but never needed it for rain. It was noisy in the morning, tho - as much as I'd try not to make noise early in the morning, the plastic made noise - even if all I did was pick up my pack to carry it out of the dorm. I felt bad about that. I kept things that just couldn't get wet in ziplocks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May/June 2016
#41
Is it a good idea to invest in dry sacs? Does the "line your pack with a trash bag" thing work well, given nice sturdy contractor bags are going to be waaaaaaay too big for a 35 L pack? What about freezer style (thicker) ziplocks instead of dry sacks?

Just looking at the mess on the floor of my kit and trying to figure out the simplest way to keep everything dry and easy to find. :)
Ziplock bags are all I've used over many years of hiking/climbing/walking. Cheap, easy, see thru (or can be labeled) and can be purchased at most grocery shops.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo April/May 2016
Voie Littorale May 2020
#42
We used a lightweight dry sack to put our 35l packs into when we checked them and then used to line the interior of our packs. We also had numerous zip lock bags to keep our clothing etc within the packs. A little paranoid about keeping gear dry but never had an issue. A ziplock sandwich bag also served as my iPhone case on wet days.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Fall (2017)
#43
Hi Eve, my 1st Camino is in September. In my excitement I purchased pouches for everything, put all my things in them then into my pack. Put my pack on "OMG!" took pack off. Ended up with dry sack for shower (tolitries in zip, change of clothes and valuables) dry sack for clothes and sleep liner in zip. Odds & ends in another zip bag. Put pack back on, Amazing difference. Total bag weight I ditch was about 1/2 lbs! Im not a veteran by any means but when most zip loc bags weigh much less than an ounce..... ;) Buen Camino
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
#44
As many of you know, blankets and sheets sometimes come in clear heavy-duty rectangular plastic bags with a zipper 3/4 of the way around the top. I plan to try one of them to contain most of my clothing. On rainy days I'll place it in the pack zipper-down, for obvious reasons. My sleeping gear will be in a "tall kitchen can" bag, mostly because that's what I have always used.

For my other gear, things that need protection from moisture will be in ziplocks. The rest will be in a nylon pouch (e.g. toiletries/medicines kit), a lightweight nylon stuff-sack, or arranged in the pack's pockets.

I will also carry extra ziplocks. They're amazingly handy.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#45
In my excitement I purchased pouches for everything, put all my things in them then into my pack. Put my pack on "OMG!" took pack off.
I agree that one can get carried away with the fun of pouches and drybags :p. After 4 caminos, I have a very good idea of how I like to organize my things, but there is no point in carrying separate packing pouches/bags if you don't customize them for the way you work! If you are a dump-it-out-on-the-floor type of traveler :oops: (like some people I know and love) then you only need a plastic garbage bag liner against wet.

My loaded pack weighs 5.5 kg (excluding water). The backpack itself weighs almost 1 kg, and the 4 dry bags, 3 small packing pouches, and a few ziplock plastic bags account for at least 300 g more. (They are all very lightweight bags.) Some would say that is unnecessary, but I consider them to be well worth the weight.

I don't understand how people say that what they are looking for always seems to be at the bottom of the pack (except, of course, some poetic license). My sleeping bag is at the bottom, and my evening-only clothes are next. The rest is organized in easily recognized and accessible packages within reach from the top.

I admit to being a bit obsessive about my organization, but I enjoy it. :D
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#46
blankets and sheets sometimes come in clear heavy-duty rectangular plastic bags with a zipper 3/4 of the way around the top
I happen to have one of those at my side right now, trying to figure out a good use for it. I have just weighed it - 220 g, which I think is too much for this purpose. It is also rather stiff and bulky to fit nicely into my backpack, and finally, it is extremely noisy. Maybe some of them are more suitable, but not this one!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances , St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra May/ June 2017
Le Puy en Velay - Ales May 2018
#47
If you do use stuff sacks and compression bags or liners be careful of which colour you choose . No I'm not giving fashion advice here :).
I have a number of these bags in different colours for various purposes and would never trust my sleeping bag to anything else. Black is a commonly supplied colour and is popular because it doesn't show grime , the ones I instinctively reach for when packing are the yellow ones . The reason is simple , it is hard to see what's in the bottom of a black or dark coloured bag. Ferreting about trying to find something at the bottom of a liner is hard enough without having to resort to a torch in order to see as well . Objects inside a yellow liner stand out like traffic lights and make simple retrieval much less frustrating .
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
#48
I happen to have one of those at my side right now, trying to figure out a good use for it. I have just weighed it - 220 g, which I think is too much for this purpose. It is also rather stiff and bulky to fit nicely into my backpack, and finally, it is extremely noisy. Maybe some of them are more suitable, but not this one!
Yup, I know what you mean! The size & shape of the one I have seems ideal and, while somewhat stiff, it doesn't crackle-and-pop like others. And, if it doesn't work out, I have several different sizes of packing cubes (rectangular, zippered net bags) and what-have-you to choose from.

BTW, since you said yours weighs 220 grams, I'm wondering what a similarly-sized dry bag weighs.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#49
BTW, since you said yours weighs 220 grams, I'm wondering what a similarly-sized dry bag weighs.
Well, I happen to have that at my side, as well! And my scales. My biggest dry bag (about 1 m x .5 m) is the one I put my whole pack into at night in the albergue. It is fairly sturdy and weighs 140 g. Other bags about half that volume (say, 35 L) weigh 40-60 g. As I mentioned, I carry at least 300 g in bags!
 
#51
Yup, I know what you mean! The size & shape of the one I have seems ideal and, while somewhat stiff, it doesn't crackle-and-pop like others. And, if it doesn't work out, I have several different sizes of packing cubes (rectangular, zippered net bags) and what-have-you to choose from.

BTW, since you said yours weighs 220 grams, I'm wondering what a similarly-sized dry bag weighs.
 
#52
My kit is Cuben fibre packliner and packcover/poncho for my Zpacks ArcBlast pack and several sizes of their cuben fibre stuff sacks- they are very waterproof. I have ziplocs for toiletries,first aid kit (FAK)and suncream as you can find them at a glance. I keep the FAK and suncream in the hipbelt pockets.
I use my stuff sacks as a bit of a filing system to know where things are and keep constant what is in each one. Apologies if I am sucking eggs to some here.
I camp often and wondered where the time went between getting up in the mornings and starting walking. So I have this system to avoid OMFAT (old mans fa*ting about time). Firstly put any gear that you don't need the next morning into the pack the night before -avoids some bag rustling. When packing things away I try and touch things only once ; know the order you put stuff sacs in the pack- fill stuff sack in order and put in pack, then the next sack and so on.
 

craigmiller

Senior Walker
Camino(s) past & future
2012: Astorga to Palas de Rei
2013: SJPP to Burgos
2014: Burgos to Astorga/Palas to Santiago
2015: Camino Aragones
2016: Muxia/Finisterra
#53
Ziplock bag as bedbug barrier:
We travel with a large heavy-duty zip lock bag for each of our backpacks to prevent bedbug infestations in our gear. As soon as we arrive at an albergue we remove our sleeping gear (which is kept in a small ziplock) and put our packs inside the big ziplock bags. (I apologize if this suggestion has already appeared in this thread - I haven't read all the replies). regards.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
#54
Ziplock bag as bedbug barrier:
We travel with a large heavy-duty zip lock bag for each of our backpacks to prevent bedbug infestations in our gear. As soon as we arrive at an albergue we remove our sleeping gear (which is kept in a small ziplock) and put our packs inside the big ziplock bags. (I apologize if this suggestion has already appeared in this thread - I haven't read all the replies). regards.
The largest zip lock bag I have ever seen is a 2 gallon, which would never fit a backpack. I am curious where a huge one could be purchased as it sounds like a great idea for protection against bedbugs.
 

craigmiller

Senior Walker
Camino(s) past & future
2012: Astorga to Palas de Rei
2013: SJPP to Burgos
2014: Burgos to Astorga/Palas to Santiago
2015: Camino Aragones
2016: Muxia/Finisterra
#56
The largest zip lock bag I have ever seen is a 2 gallon, which would never fit a backpack. I am curious where a huge one could be purchased as it sounds like a great idea for protection against bedbugs.
XXL ziplock bags are sold for storing bulky items. We got ours at our local supermarket.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
#57
XXL ziplock bags are sold for storing bulky items. We got ours at our local supermarket.
Hmmm, I'll have to scout around at my local supermarket in the aisle where ziplock type bags are sold. I've never seen such a large one, but I'll take your word for it that they do exist!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#58
The largest zip lock bag I have ever seen is a 2 gallon, which would never fit a backpack. I am curious where a huge one could be purchased as it sounds like a great idea for protection against bedbugs.
I didn't try to find one huge ziplock to fit all my backpack contents but instead had several largish ziplocks, one for each change of clothing and another for my hoodie/fleece. That way, when I went to shower, I could take a ziplock with a set of clean clothing with me and be confident that (a) it was bedbug free and (b) it would stay dry while I was showering. After I changed, my dirty clothes went into the same ziplock until they were cleaned.

It being July/August, the hoodie/fleece rarely left its ziplock.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
#59
Hi David,
I already use the method you are referring to for many of my items. I was mainly interested in a ziplock big enough to cocoon my whole backpack as an added measure of bedbug protection.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#60
I didn't try to find one huge ziplock to fit all my backpack contents but instead had several largish ziplocks, one for each change of clothing and another for my hoodie/fleece. That way, when I went to shower, I could take a ziplock with a set of clean clothing with me and be confident that (a) it was bedbug free and (b) it would stay dry while I was showering. After I changed, my dirty clothes went into the same ziplock until they were cleaned.

It being July/August, the hoodie/fleece rarely left its ziplock.
I also used multiple ziplock bags. In the morning ( I always left in the LATE morning) I took inventory. I would examine each bag to see if it held all that it was supposed to and then I would check that I had all the bags. I didn't lose a thing.
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
#61
As a kindness to other pilgrims in the albergue, consider NOT using plastic bags for anything you bag up in the morning—especially if you are an early riser! Plastic bags in the early morning darkness, especially when accompanied by a headlight, are the most obnoxious sounding things!

That being said, I did line my Osprey pack with a white trash compactor bag. I just liked the confidence that if my pack fell in a puddle (don’t laugh—this has happened) that there was a measure of protection. I used a combination of lightweight silnylon stuff sacks and ziplocks. I also used an Altus poncho. It rained steadily the last three days into Santiago. Pack contents were relatively dry.
 

KariC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho portugûes (2016)
#62
I lined my pack with a garbage bag, in part for waterproofing, although that was redundant because I had a rain cover for it, but more to keep bed bugs out.
I don't know as I would repeat that, because turns out plastic is really noisy in the morning and it was hard to get out of the dorm without making noise.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo April/May 2016
Voie Littorale May 2020
#63
We used a lightweight dry sack to put our packs in while traveling to Spain (checked luggage) and then used same bag to line our pack in Spain. Also used ziplocks to sort clothes inside the pack.

Everything always dry and I suppose a defence against bed bugs.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#64
As a kindness to other pilgrims in the albergue, consider NOT using plastic bags for anything you bag up in the morning—especially if you are an early riser!
Personally, my experience with ziplock bags, plastic though they are, is that they were silent. Those plastic shopping bags, however, are a different story.
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
#65
There is no way ziplock bags are silent. If nothing else, the sound of them being opened and searched through! You may think they are silent until someone else rustles them in the dark.

For example, there were two wom3n who got up extra early (before dawn and before anyone else) and fiddled with those darn bags for 20 minutes waking everyone up with the noise and headlights. Then, after all that, turned on the lights, made themselves cups of tea and sat there wondering why people were glaring at them. Talking with them, they denied that their bags made any noise at all—at which almost everyone whooted. This same routine continued at each albergue. Unfortunately they seemed to be on the same walk/stop interval as we for a number of days-arriving late in the afternoon to the albergue so you were reluctant to pack up and leave. We walked a long day to get ahead of them
 
D

Deleted member 39850

Guest
#66
If you buy rubber tips for trekking poles, they come in a zippered sleeve similar to a ziplock, but much sturdier (and therefore quieter because they don't rumple). Save them and take them on Camino.
When I received my first passport in SJPDP they used the same zippable bag to give us our passports and elevation maps. If these are still being distributed, save them. They are perfect for: your phone and/or a tablet of the iPad *air* size, and for your passport, your citizenship documents, credit cards etc.
I have two of the dry sacks. One is for meds, and the other is for toiletries... the idea being that if anything ruptures and leaks, it is contained.
I am not worried about rain; I have a pack cover. If you do not have a pack cover, you can buy one for a matter of a few dollars. I went through terrific torrential rains and there was nary a drop on my pack.
For separating items -- well, that's easy: laundry goes in the bottom compartment. Clean stuff goes in the main compartment and my med bag is on the top.
And I carry a very small, very flat purse not much bigger than my phone to have access to documents and phone/camera right up front. Many of the fellas wear some sort of hip bag (otherwise known as a bum-bag or fanny-pack) for the same purpose.
Those zip bags for the trekking tips are amazing though.
And those with the need to dispose of toilet paper etc between villages: a zip-lock type of bag that you dump at the next WC is very considerate for all others on the trail, and for the general environment. No need to open that in the early morning at the albergue!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#67
There is no way ziplock bags are silent. If nothing else, the sound of them being opened and searched through! You may think they are silent until someone else rustles them in the dark.
I never opened them up or rustled through them in the morning. My habit was to sleep in the clothes I would walk in the next day, changing clothes after walk and a shower. My morning routine was to pick up my silk sleeping bag liner and stuff it into an outside pocket of my backpack, pick up my phone and put it into my pants pocket, grab my pack and head out of the room. Outside the room, I would stuff the sleeping bag liner into its sac (not plastic) and put that into the backpack. My son would watch my stuff while I headed into the bathroom and visa versa. Then on with the shoes and up with the poles and out we went. I don't think we made a lot of noise with the plastics.

I do still believe they make a lot less noise than the plastic shopping bags. Practically anything can make *some* noise if you are rustling through it, including fancy cloth dry sacs. Plastic shopping bags make a lot of noise if you barely touch them.
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
#68
I never opened them up or rustled through them in the morning. My habit was to sleep in the clothes I would walk in the next day, changing clothes after walk and a shower. My morning routine was to pick up my silk sleeping bag liner and stuff it into an outside pocket of my backpack, pick up my phone and put it into my pants pocket, grab my pack and head out of the room. Outside the room, I would stuff the sleeping bag liner into its sac (not plastic) and put that into the backpack. My son would watch my stuff while I headed into the bathroom and visa versa. Then on with the shoes and up with the poles and out we went. I don't think we made a lot of noise with the plastics.

I do still believe they make a lot less noise than the plastic shopping bags. Practically anything can make *some* noise if you are rustling through it, including fancy cloth dry sacs. Plastic shopping bags make a lot of noise if you barely touch them.
What I did too.
 

craigmiller

Senior Walker
Camino(s) past & future
2012: Astorga to Palas de Rei
2013: SJPP to Burgos
2014: Burgos to Astorga/Palas to Santiago
2015: Camino Aragones
2016: Muxia/Finisterra
#69
As a kindness to other pilgrims in the albergue, consider NOT using plastic bags for anything you bag up in the morning—especially if you are an early riser! Plastic bags in the early morning darkness, especially when accompanied by a headlight, are the most obnoxious sounding things!
Quite right ! (we never try to pack up in the dark - it is a good reason to sleep in).
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis " 2018"
#71
The garbage bag as a liner would work to keep the contents of your pack dry, but in serious rain your backpack (and everything in the external pouches) will get wet.

Personally, I like to organize my things carefully anyway, so I use several dry-bags of various sizes to do that. They also allow me to isolate my sleeping bag, etc., if I think I have been exposed to bedbugs. I also carry a large pack "liner" that my whole pack fits into, and always keep it in the bag, closed tightly, in the albergue to protect against bedbugs.

The simplicity and organization of my things is very important to me, so that I won't get overwhelmed by all the choices and decisions and rummaging around. I want only one combination/outfit that depends totally on the weather conditions - No style choices like "do I want a red shirt today, or a blue one?"

My dry bags are actually my main luxury item - they are certainly more expensive than alternatives, and the weight can get significant. Ziplock bags would be my alternative of choice.

Oh! Any bag you use to line your backpack needs to be bigger than the back pack, so that you can pack things in efficiently to fill all the crevices in the pack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis " 2018"
#72
Buy the zip up pack organizers ( with out the mesh top) in different sizes and colour maybe three . Underwear socks - shorts, tops, leggings- toiletries . Then you know where things are and only need take the pack out you need at the time . Put all the pack organizers including your sleeping bag and silk liner in a large dry pack which fits your back pack . This can be secured at the top. Overkill you might say !!!
. No !!!! bed bugs are a reality ...

Lift the mattress at each habitation and watch for a scuttle. No kidding !!!!

Also unless you have an Altus poncho the contents could get wet in the rain .
 

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